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September 14, 2012

1111 S. Dee Road • Park Ridge, Illinois 60068

Vol. 49, No. 1

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PHOTO BY JOSIE FIORETTO

Pa See

Restoration

New chairs and a new look for iconic theater Page 4

London Calling

Behind the scenes with this summer’s Olympic stars Page 7

Fresh Start

Why freshmen should have the first day to themselves Page 12

Cracking Down

Girls’ XC earns their uniforms Pages 14-16


NEWS

| September 14, 2012

Youth Campus property still on the market Chris Brendza Staff Writer

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n Aug. 16, the Park Ridge Park District Board of Commissioners delayed the referendum for the proposal to buy the property of the Youth Campus in Park Ridge. The board had originally anticipated discussing the proposal at the meeting. However, no action was taken to place the referendum on the November ballot, instead delaying it to April 2013 at the earliest. This comes after the Youth Campus’ abrupt closing in the spring of this year, citing large financial losses as a main factor in the closing. The organization had tried to work out a financial plan with Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, but the board decided the accumulated financial losses were too high to overcome. Recently, a plan by the nonprofit’s leaders to convert the Campus into a

“foster-care village” was proposed, but fell through as the financial losses came to light. Over the summer, the Park Ridge Park District submitted proposals to convert the open area into a combination of park space and recreational areas. Park district Executive Director Gayle Mountcastle stated, “Our primary purpose for the property is to maintain open space.” She went on to list a few park amenities that are being considered for the area, including an athletic field, picnic shelter, outdoor performing arts pavilion, walking paths, and more. While initial ideas proposed for the purchase of the land included selling a portion of the area to a home developer, Mountcastle stated that the board decided, “…after review of the related purchase and development costs, and initial feedback from the residents, to inform the sellers that we are interested in purchasing the entire 11.35 acres.” Park Ridge Commissioners were recently presented with cost scenarios for the property, ranging from a low of $8.3 million to a high of $15 million, depending on the changes that would be made. Mountcastle

stated this as one reason why the referendum was postponed. A contract between Youth Campus and the Park District has not been put forth yet. “The Park District has not signed a contract with The Youth Campus for the purchase of the property, but is in final negotiations, and hopes to have a final contract soon,” said

Mountcastle. The historic Youth Campus has been a fixture in Park Ridge since its move from Evanston in 1908 with the goal of helping orphaned girls by providing them with a family-like experience. In the 1980s it was opened to boys, but recently, its population dwindled to only a few adolescent girls.

PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

Park District lobbying to buy the unoccupied area

CLOSED FOR BUSINESS

The Park Ridge Youth Campus has been closed since this spring. The Park Ridge Park District Board of Commissioners is planning to buy it in hopes of using the space for recreational purposes.

WiFi adjustments made at Maine South PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

New routers installed in classrooms to help fix weak Internet connection Jonathon Zamaites Staff Writer

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his past summer, District 207 made significant changes to the wireless connections at Maine South, and the technology staff continues to fine tune the system for better performance. Currently, the connection strength has been inconsistent, which has proved frustrating to students and teachers alike. However, according to Mr. John Animalu, the network manager, and Mr. David Kasprak, the network engineer for District

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ALL ACCESS The new low-density access points around the school will help to speed up wireless Internet around the school.

207, the inconsistency of the wireless network is not permanent. The system has already undergone several changes, with more to come. One of the changes made over the summer was fine-tuning the density, or the number of connections,

on the network. The density is now being lowered in order to boost the overall performance of the network. Along with the density reduction, a new configuration of access points and new device models are being used and tested. The new configura-

tion was tested at Maine West with successful results and will be coming to Maine South in the next few months. The exact date of the change over has not been announced yet. There are a few methods students can use to help speed up Internet access on mobile devices until the seamless connection between access points is fixed. Since Maine South’s wireless service is intended for educational purposes, music streaming services such as Pandora and Spotify, which put a strain on the network, should be avoided for the sake of connection speed. Having students avoid unnecessary internet usage and limiting access in the hallway will increase internet speeds in the classroom. Eventually, the system reconfiguration should provide classes with easier, more efficient access to the web.


September 14, 2012

| NEWS

Staff Writer

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PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

he Pickwick Theatre is currently undergoing a series of renovations to restore and modernize aspects of the historic Park Ridge landmark. The famous marquee is currently in the process of being repainted, while further changes have been made inside the building. The Pickwick Theatre marquee has been used as the backdrop in the opening sequence of the television show, “At the Movies,” hosted by film critics Gene Siskel and Robert Ebert of the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Sun-Times, respectively. It has also appeared in a 2010 Chevy television commercial and is the fictional dance studio in the Disney show “Shake It Up.” The sign has currently been stripped of its paint, and will soon be painted in new colors. According to co-owner Dave Loomos, they are “going to do it with colors that just go with the building, art deco colors that kind of pick up

ICONIC MARQUEE GETS REVAMPED

The most noticeable renovation done to the Pickwick was stripping the exterior sign. Plans for repainting have already been made.

PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

Natalie Kirchoff

the accents of the building.” They have been trying to find out what colors the marquee was originally painted, but have had little success, as all pictures they have procured thus far are blackand-white. The renovations in the theatre are all to enhance the quality of the moviegoers’ experience as well as modernize the technology used to show films. The inside of the Pickwick is undergoing a series of small-scale restorations, which includes new carpeting, wall coverings, and a new screen in the theaters. “The biggest thing is new seats.” said Loomos. After receiving requests from movie patrons, new seats have been put into all the theaters at the Pickwick. The new, larger seats are intended to enhance the viewer’s experience. The largest theatre within the Pickwick, Theatre One, still had the original seats in it until their replacement this summer. The seating renovations are still underway in Theatre One, which will seat slightly less people upon completion. The theatre, which had a maximum capacity of 1,400, will, according to Loomos, house approximately 950 after the seating renovations are completed.

NEW LUXURY AT THE PICKWICK One of the improvements to the Pickwick experience will be watching movies from brand-new, leather rocking seats.

The Pickwick is also modernizing its film technology. “With the new digital craze coming, 35 mm film is going to be obsolete soon, so if you don’t switch over to digital, you’ll be out of business,” said Loomos. A new digital projection screen will maintain the quality of film, even after a multitude of showings. The 35 mm print can wear over time, potentially distorting the images. With a new digital system, though, movie screenings will remain like new after much use. The Pickwick The atre is a prominent feature of Park Ridge, and the reactions of its residents to the renovations have been largely positive so far. Loomos explained that these renovations are part of a constant process to maintain the theatre. “The community’s been very good to us,” he said, “so we just thought this would be a great time to do it.” The Pickwick is a family-owned institution, and has been in the possession of the current family since 1967. For Loomos, it’s a mixture of business and the neighborhood. “We’re part of the community,” he said. “We figured that the theatre is the icon of the community.” The renovations at the Pickwick will modernize some aspects of the moviegoer’s experience, but they will

PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

Changes to both the exterior and interior help modernize the iconic building.

PHOTO COURTESY KEN KOVACIN

Pickwick undergoes renovations

maintain the overall character of this Park Ridge landmark. The Pickwick Theatre first opened in 1928, originally serving as both a movie theatre and a vaudeville stage. It is currently one of the oldest movie palaces in the Chicagoland area, and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. The theatre was modeled in the art deco style, an architectural fashion that flourished in the 1920s. The movie palace was intended to give its patrons an impression of the glamour of the silver screen. The development of movie palaces spiked in the late 1920s, when many of these large, extravagantly-decorated theatres began to appear around the country. The ornate ornamentation that characterizes these theatres is clearly evident in the Pickwick, which reflects Chicago art and architecture.

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NEWS

| September 14, 2012

A-wing bathrooms get facelift Energy-efficient utilities update the school’s busiest bathrooms

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In addition to these renovations, the administration plans on making a few more minor changes to the school. “Well right now we’re focusing on changing our current lights to LED lights,” said Mr. Kline. Now, where the auditorium used to run on 500 watts, it only runs on 28 watts. There’s also new furniture and LED lights in the Performing Arts Lobby.”

PHOTOS BY JESSICA GRONKE

changes and seem happy about the improvements. “These new bathrooms are exceptionally clean,” said junior Adam Szymanski. “The only thing they need are flatscreen TVs.” Mirrors in the bathrooms on the third floor Caryn Clark and Dora Bialy have yet to be installed; however, according to Staff Writer and News Editor Mr. Kline, they have already been measured and his past summer, the A-wing restrooms should be added in the near future. were renovated as part of a five-year plan to improve all of the bathrooms in the school. The renovations started with the Spec Gym lobby and Performing Arts wing bathrooms. “We’re trying to get the most commonly used bathrooms redone first,” said Mr. Rich Kline, one of the members of the maintenance staff. “With the six A-wing bathrooms being so populated, we decided it was best to redo them over the summer rather than during the school year.” According to Mr. Kline, the administration decided it was time to update the bathrooms, which had remained largely unchanged since the original construction of the building in 1964. The implementation of new walls, modern tiles, lighting fixtures, and plumbing cost about $25,000 per bathroom. Some of the updated features in the new bathrooms include more energy efficient technologies. The toilets and sinks now have automatic sensors, and are also low flow. In addition, LED lights were installed, and the lighting system was placed on an BEFORE The old stalls with peeling paint and occupancy sensor as well. manual toilet flushers had remained the same since the So far students have reacted positively to these construction of the building in 1964.

AFTER

Toilets with automatic sensors, new stalls, a new paint job, and modern tile are all new features that have been added to the A-wing bathrooms.

Teachers implement new grading practices News Editor

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any teachers have adapted their grading scales this year by placing greater value on summative assessments. This new style of grading makes 80% of the students’ grade based on summative material, and 20% on formative. Summative assessments would essentially be made up of tests, quizzes, projects, and essays. Anything considered a major assessment would fall under this category. On the other hand, formative assessments would include all homework or minor assignments that are practice for the eventual summative assessment. This grading practice has not, as of yet, been implemented schoolwide. If Maine South follows in the trend of other schools who have adopted this type of grading, the policy may eventually be instituted district-wide. For every individual course, the teachers that teach it decide whether they want to implement this technique, and, if they do, how much they want to weigh the summative category. Only the

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Foreign Language and Social Science departments have made the policy consistent across the whole department. In addition, the most commonly-used scale at the moment is 80/20; however, a few teachers have decided to weigh as much as 90% of the student’s grade on the summative category. District 207 is taking a careful look at grading policies. In August, nearly 100 teachers and administrators voluntarily took part in a workshop led by educational consultant, Rick Wormeli, which presented the idea of placing greater emphasis on that final assessment rather than giving students completion points along the way. This philosophy is said to better prepare students for the college and beyond where they won’t get rewarded for PHOTO BY DORA BIALY

Dora Bialy

completing work, but instead will be required to put forth a good final product. “Formative is synonymous with practice,” said Mr. Parrilli. “In a cross country meet, they don’t take your practice times all week long plus your race time on Saturday. It’s just your race time on Saturday. A student shouldn’t necessarily be assessed and scored on when they’re practicing on how to learn and use a skill. They should be assessed when they have been fully trained and practiced.” The policy is essentially a way for teachers to grade students more on their academic ability rather than on their diligence and willingness to do their homework.


September 14, 2012

| ENTERTAINMENT

Lollapalooza reflects changing musical interests Nicholas Arger & Soren Ramsey Staff Writer & Editor-in-chief

hotspot for Chicago music fans of all ages, Lollapalooza returned for another soldout year. Braving heat, rain and flooded fields, music fans swarmed Grant Park for three days of music. Though wildly different from its ‘90s origins, Lollapalooza continued as a musical Mecca for music lovers throughout the country. Day One: Music fans rallied to catch shows ranging from seasoned classics to fresh-sounding newcomers. Early performances by bands such as Yellow Ostrich and Black Angels gave people the chance to see new bands while waiting for their favorites to go on. Later in the day, alternative veterans The Shins and Passion Pit took to the stage. M83, riding the wave of their hit single “Midnight City,” put in a notable performance as well. Co-headlining was Black Sabbath, reuniting for the first time since 1999. The show was one of only three announced. Though drummer Bill Hall decided at the last minute to join the reunion, the band remained strong in a nostalgic trip through four decades of classics. Black Sabbath was not the only draw for rock fans. The Black Keys continued their tour, with a stop at the Red Bull Soundstage. Playing their fifth set at Lollapalooza, The Black Keys reminded everyone why their brand of exectrified Delta blues is so powerful. The culmination of tireless touring and six albums in nine years, this show proved that The Black Keys deserved to be playing stadium shows and festival stages. Day Two: The threat of heavy rains and thunderstorms did little to stop the 90,000 festivalgoers. In fact, the mud further excited the crowd. For the first time in Lollapalooza history, security had to evacuate the festival grounds because of a storm warning. Fans were herded into restaurants, bars, hotel lobbies and any other space available to shelter people from the lightning. Those who waited out the rain were treated to a full, if somewhat abbreviated, afternoon of music. Acts ranging from veterans Franz Ferdinand to folk soloist Tallest Man on Earth made the most of their shortened set. Saturday was incredible, especially for any fans of dubstep or electronic dance music, with Avicii headlining on the Bud Light Stage. An ever-growing Perry’s stage featured electronic powerhouses like Bassnecter and Nero. The presence of such electronic headliners goes to show how much the Perry’s Stage has become a fan favorite over the past four years. The stage was created by Lollapalooza founder Perry Farrell in 2008 to showcase the best of new electronic acts. Moved from a tent to its own stage, Perry’s was a haven for dancers and ravers. Featuring acts like Calvin Harris and Santigold, Perry’s was the place to be if you’re into computer music. For fans of more traditional rock, there was Red Hot Chili Peppers, who wowed the crowd

PHOTOS BY TATSUYA TAKIZAWA

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ROCKIN’ N’ ROLLIN’ 

Lead vocalist of Delta Spirit Matthew Vasquez performs on the second day of Lollapalooza. Chicago streets can’t handle the traffic as over 90,000 people a day visit Lollapalooza.

with funky bass lines and roaring ballads. Though critics have claimed that the exit of John Frusciante doomed the band, the Chili Peppers rocked the stage regardless. Day Three: Sunday proved that Lollapalooza’s promoters know how to save the best for last. Florence + the Machine graced the stages of “Good Morning America”, “Saturday Night Live,” and even the Grammy Awards, but this summer, Florence outdid herself with an energetic Grant Park performance. A London native, Flo drew heavily from her most recent album, “Ceremonials.” At the same time, Of Monsters and Men whipped their audience into a frenzy using the ultra-catchy hooks of their debut album. The crowd welcomed the Icelandic band with open arms, belting out the chorus to their radio hit, “Little Talks.” Also from Iceland, Sigur Ros blew away their crowd with intense, ethereal symphonies of guitar and strings. Singing mostly in their made-up language, “Hopelandic,” and using a bowed guitar for the entirety of the set distinguished Sigur Ros from the rest of the festival. Other acts on the day included folk quintet Trampled by Turtles, punk phenoms The Gaslight Anthem and Miike Snow. Closing out the night were headliners that couldn’t be more different. French electronica duo Justice, made up of Gaspard Augé and Xavier de Rosnay, Justice energized the festival, with a set of pump-up dance anthems and electronic beats.

At the same time, Childish Gambino, also known as Donald Glover from the hit NBC show, “Community,” was called upon by his loyal fans. A majority of Gambino’s followers were chanting his name when The Big Pink, the band performing before the rapper, were only halfway through their set-list. After the sun went down and The Big Pink left the venue, Childish Gambino opened with a freestyle intro to pump up the crowd. His most well known song, “Freaks and Geeks,” sent the crowd into a frenzy. As the last act of Lollapalooza 2012, Childish Gambino personified the wild weekend with his crazy and fantastic performance. Arguably the highlight of the night was Jack White. Drawing from 15 years of recordings over 4 groups, White flawlessly combined old favorites like “The Hardest Button to Button” and “Steady as She Goes” with new material off of White’s solo album, “Blunderbuss.” Jack White split the set in half, playing the first half of the show with an all-male backing band, and the second half with all women. Popular new songs like “Love Interruption” and “Love at 21” showed that, while the White Stripes are no more, Jack White has no intentions of fading away. Overall, the festival showed a changing music scene in Chicago. A growing interest in computerized music coincided with rootsy folk, pensive post-rock, and traditional punk.

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ENTERTAINMENT

| September 14, 2012

Yogli Mogli & Frosty Penguin hit Park Ridge Matt Weiss Staff Writer

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uring the hot and humid summer weeks, Yogli Mogli and Frosty Penguin, the newest restaurants to hit the streets of Park Ridge, were filled with eager high school students. Opened in March, the Frosty Penguin, located at 1056 W Busse Hwy, offers many inexpensive, flavorful options fit for a wide variety of palettes. The ice cream and the aroma of the sizzling grill combine to make for an inviting atmosphere. There are choices for both meatlovers and vegetarians, ranging from their 100 percent angus beef burgers, polish sausage, to salads. To fufill a sweet-tooth, choose from the many flavors of ice cream. “The ice cream is awesome,” says senior Molly Pe-

tray. You can mix-in almost any topping into the “Frostbites.” According to co-owner Armen Ovassapian, the Frosty Penguin’s target market ranges from high-school students to those in their mid-twenties. For a healthier choice of dessert, head over to Yogli Mogli. Yogli Mogli is a frozen yogurt shop located at 8200 W. Oakton. It owes its fame to this year’s latest health craze. Upon walking into the shop, patrons are prompted to select a paper cup, and fill it up with frozen treats. Keep in mind that price is based on weight (at 46 cents an ounce), so the customer controls how much they pay. There are eight self-serve machines for a total of sixteen different flavors that rotate periodically. After filling up a mixture of flavors, a topping bar stands in between

the cash register and the self-serve machines. There is a wide variety o f toppings including fresh fruits, candy bar crumbles, and more exotic options. Yogli Mogli even caters to those who can’t have yogurt by providing a machine that serves sorbet, a dairy-free, and equally delicious option. “It’s unique and fun to create your own dessert and you’re able to control the amount of what you desire,” says Michelle Carrico, an employee and patron of Yogli Mogli. It’s destined to be the new “hangout” with a few seats located inside of the restaurant, and a larger outdoor patio on the east side of the shop. Yogli Mogli is part of a restaurant chain spanning four different states, including two locations in Illinois.

Parker (Andrew Garfield) in his quest to become Spiderman. Much like in the original, Parker gains the “Spidey sense” as well as the power to shoot webs out of his hands after being bitten by a genetically modified spider. Trouble brews when Dr. Connors (Rhys Ifans), injects himself with a formula in an effort to regenerate the flesh in his amputated arm. Unfortunately, the formula also turns him into a reptilian-like

monster, otherwise known as the Lizard. After the Lizard tries to mutate all of Manhattan—to accomplish what he believes to be the greater good— Spiderman comes face to face with the Lizard and battles not only to save the city, but to also heal Dr. Connors. On top of trying to save the Big Apple, Peter also tries to get the girl, Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone). Finally, the movie ends with a surprising twist in which a mysterious new character is

Superheroes battle at the box office Staff Writer

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he two greatest super heroes of all time faced one another at last in the box office this summer with the hit movies, “The Dark Knight Rises” and “The Amazing Spiderman.” “The Dark Knight Rises” was the third and final installment in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy. In the movie, the audience sees how much Batman has aged and how taking the blame for Harvey Dent’s death has rattled his life. A new character then surfaces on the streets of Gotham. Bane (Tom Hardy) redefines the word villain as he forces Bruce Wayne to return to his Batsuit. Catwoman (Anne Hat haway), a ls o a ne w addition to the cast, plays a major role in the movie as Batman’s partner and Bruce Wayne’s lover. The ensuing fight between the Dark Knight, Bane, and Bane’s fanatic followers throws Gotham City into chaos. “The Amazing Spiderman” deals with a completely new cast, which makes for a totally different movie than before. The audience follows Peter

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revealed and the possibility for a future film becomes evident. Critics held many different opinions on both films. Many argued that Andrew Garfield made Spiderman a bit too familiar and bored audiences. Tobey Maguire, who played Spiderman in recent movies, had a unique, geeky, and relatable personality that audiences enjoyed. “The Dark Knight Rises” similarly had a strong positive reaction in the Maine South community, with students praising Bane as their new favorite super villain and the film as a fitting conclusion to the series. Rotten Tomatoes, an online database for movie reviews, professional and amateur, gave Spiderman a 73% critic review with comments var ying. Rotten Tomatoes rated “The Dark Knight Rises” 87% in critical reviews. Interestingly, many critics talked mostly about Christopher Nolan, Batman’s director, and how his extraordinary talent was apparent throughout the film. These two heart-pounding sup e r h e ro f i l ms are an excellent choice for your next visit to the movie theater and are guaranteed to keep you at the edge of your seat. GRAPHIC BY LEXI KIOTIS

Sabrina Tamas


September 14, 2012

| ENTERTAINMENT

PHOTO CREDIT DAVID JONES

Opportunities arise for Olympic athletes

GOING FOR THE GOLD

Gabby Douglas brought in a gold medal for all-around in gymnastics. That makes this the fourth time an American woman has won the event. Standing next to Douglas, is Victoria Komova from Russia winning the silver. On the other side stands Aliya Mustafina wearing the bronze.

Jake Ritthamel & Caela Ancona Staff Writers

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he “Fierce Five,” also known as the “Fab Five,” was the United States 2012 Olympic women’s gymnastic team, composed of Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross, and Jordyn Wieber. The five girls, each winning individual medals, also brought home a sparkling gold medal in the all-round team event. These girls have amazed the nation, this being the second time the US has won gold in gymnastics. Holding her silver medal for the individual vault competition as well as a small bouquet of flowers, McKayla Maroney, 16, menacingly stared into the camera. Shortly after, “McKayla is Unamused” memes flooded the Internet. Gabrielle Douglas, 16, took a great deal of criticism from fashion police throughout the U.S. due to the gymnast sporting a “messy bun” hairstyle. Social media outlets such as Twitter and Facebook lit up with judgmental comments, despising Gabby’s “hair don’t.” The not-so-happy Douglas vented her thoughts on USA Today saying, “I just simply gelled it back, put some clips in it, and put it in a bun. Are you kidding me? I just made history, and you’re focusing on my hair?” It turns out that although Douglas faced criticism during the Olympics, this is not the first time in her life that this has happened. According to Douglas, she has had trouble with bullying all her life, often facing racism, bullying, and name calling from

fellow gymnasts. Aly Raisman has also taken the celebrity stage these past couple of months, much like her fellow teammates McKayla Maroney and Gabby Douglas. Raisman has become a household name all over America. She won three Olympic medals for gymnastics: two gold and one bronze. It’s difficult to imagine that she has accomplished so much at such a young age. The star-studded Olympian recently confided to Ryan Seacrest that one of the three Jonas Brothers, Joe, is her “celebrity crush.” Shortly after, Seacrest decided to take action. During his radio talk show with Joe Jonas, Seacrest questioned Joe if he would be interested in dating an Olympian athlete. Joe replied, “I would love to. Are you going to set that up, Ryan?” Many people look forward to seeing the two becoming a hot new couple. When Aly quit being busy with celebrity crushes, she was featured on “Fashion Police” with Joan Rivers. She showed off her medals to Joan and the “Fashion Police” team, talked about her family, and helped the “Fashion Police” team decide “Which Celebrity Wore it Better.” The threetime medalist was also a correspondent on the red carpet for E! this past week. She interviewed stars like Kirsten Dunst and Isla Fisher while showing off her gold medal. The “Fierce Five” have been nothing but impressive these past couple of months, but the US men’s swim team has also been phenomenal, rising to fame recently. Two US Olympic swimmers, Ryan

Lochte and Conor Dwyer, have also been taking their fair share of the spotlight. Ryan Lochte, the 28-year-old, five-time medalist from Florida has been heating up the celeb social scene after the Olympics came to an end. Lochte reported that he would like to have his own reality TV show. He has already kicked off his acting career by filming a cameo on the popular tv show, 90210. He also stated that he, like the majority of Olympic athletes, would “love to be on Dancing with the Stars.” Lochte also wants to start a fashion line because he says, “fashion let’s him show off his own personality.” The Olympic swimmer was also a guest host on Fashion Police, where he used his fashion sense to pick out the “Best and Worst Dressed Celebrities of the Week.” Another young swimmer that caught many eyes in America is Chicago native, Conor Dwyer. The 23-year-old Olympic swimmer went to one of Maine South’s top rival schools, Loyola Academy. Upon his return to Chicago, Dwyer threw out the first pitch at both the Cubs and Sox games. He also appeared on Windy City Live, the local Chicago morning talk show. In Winnetka, the swimmer’s hometown made Aug. 25 honorary “Conor Dwyer Day.” Placing high in the Olympics and drawing the attention of the nation does not come without consequences. The “Fierce Five” have opened themselves up to a world of unwelcome criticism but also a world of praise and opportunity that they can use to their advantage.

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d e v l o

| September 14, 2012

GET

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A new school year opens the door to an endless number of possibilities. From interesting clubs, to an excellent arts department, to strong sports teams, Maine South offers an activity for each personality, passion, and mind set. Often, students are unaware of the variety of opportunities Maine South offers. To make the most of the high school experience, consider some of these lesser-known activities

September 14, 2012

| FEATURES ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH HANDS

FEATURES

Hawk Links Amanda Svachula

Features Editor awk Links, a student service organization, brings seasoned Maine South students and incoming transfer students together at the beginning of the school year. Started in 2007 as a response to more students transferring into Maine South, Hawk Links, according to coordinator Mr. Tortorelli, aims to “help make the transition of transfer students positive.” “When a new student enters, it’s kind of scary,” said coordinator Mrs. Spillman, “The goal of Hawk Links is to make them feel comfortable.” Beginning with the transition at a kickoff breakfast, transfer students are introduced to a group of about forty Hawk Links, other transfers, staff members, and at least one person in their lunch period. They then receive their schedules, and go on a tour of the school in groups led by one or more Hawk Links. Each individual visits his or her locker, and learns the locations of their classes. The tour is a way of learning not only the way around Maine South, but also about the activities the school has to offer. Regarding the breakfast, Junior Hawk Link, Teresa Colletti, said, “It’s helpful for transfers because they usually don’t know where they are, and they get to see the opportunities of the school.” Ideally, according to Mr. Tortorelli, interaction between Hawk Links and new students extends into the school year, but “it all depends on the individual transfer student.” To become a Hawk Link, a person must be recommended by a Maine South staff member, so if interested, one should talk to his or her counselor. But a person does not need to be a part of the organization to reach out to transfer students during an average school day. Something as easy as inviting a new student to sit at lunch can make a difference. In the end, as Mrs. Spillman said, being a member of Hawk Links or just a welcoming Maine South student “is positive for both sides.”

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Space Exploration Program Maddie McGrady

Staff Writer hat are black holes? Can we really live on the moon? What exactly does NASA do? The Space Exploration Program investigates questions like these and provides explanations—for elementary school students. This club, which meets once a week after school, includes not only Maine South students, but also students from both Maine East and Maine West. Last year, 9 of the 30 program members were Maine South students. Ms. Statema is the club sponsor here at Maine South. One of the goals of the program is to help elementary school students understand complex ideas about space. Program members do this by holding annual outreach events for students in the community. “Every year for the past four years the program has put on an educational outreach event for the community to attend. The past three years, the event has been geared toward elementary school kids” said Statema. Of course, the challenge is interesting and teaching young students about such complicated scientific theories. “It’s difficult to depict how black holes work to a 6th grader,” said program member and senior Tom Spytek. But with its interactive presentations, the Space Exploration Program has managed to inform younger students. Specifically, according to the program’s web page, for the past two years, members have held a Planetary Walk—first at Maine West and then at Maine East—for elementary students to learn about our solar system “This past year, the students created rooms to address different questions that elementary students had about space. The students in the program had rooms centered around the planets, the Earth and the moon, the stars and the sun, black holes, NASA, atrobiology and comets, and the universe and galaxies. Each room had posters, activities and games for kids to participate in,” said Statema. This year’s program has not yet had its first meeting—so keep an ear out for announcements. Students of all grade levels who are interested in space are welcome to join.

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Ecology Club Ellen Longman

Staff Writer cology club is open to Maine South students interested in exploring environmental issues and finding ways to cultivate the environment. The group meets twice monthly in room A-315 on Tuesdays from 3:15 to 4:00. Meetings focus on planning upcoming projects. At past meetings, members of the club have also helped with forest and roadside cleanups. Besides meetings, the Ecology club features interesting field trips. Over the years, the group has visited Lincoln Park Zoo and the Shedd Aquarium. Other activities the members of the club have participated in include apple picking, visiting a hawk migration site, adopting an endangered species and acres of the rainforest, making bird feeders, and listening to guest speakers. The club also holds frequent visits to volunteer with brush clearing and prairie restoration at the Wild Wood Nature Center. Club sponsor, Ms. Godwin said, “What I like best about being the sponsor is seeing students outside of the classroom in a different setting, and I like seeing students getting involved in something they really care about.” Started in 1982, Ecology Club has raised and donated money to various environmental causes such as the Environmental Defense Fund, the Rainforest Action Network, and the National Wildlife Federation. “The main goal is to have a club where students can meet each other and  share their concern for the environment and to enjoy nature in our community,” said Ms. Godwin. “The goals change depending on who is in the club and their areas of interest.”

Political People’s Club

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Katrina Iorio Staff Writer

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olitical People’s club is sponsored by economics, government, and U.S History teacher, Mr. Trenkle. Unfortunately, many club officers graduated last year, so it has slowly decreased in size. On a typical meeting day, the club picks a discussion topic, and everybody talks about a current issue or their view on a topic. Someone usually provides a small snack too. With the election so soon, there are an endless number of topics to banter about. It’s especially exciting for seniors who are eligible to vote in this year’s election. In less than four years, almost all of us will be able to vote, so it’s so important to stay informed, something this club can definitely do for you. Most of us will also be off to college within the next four years, being on our own for the first time in our lives. By then, we will need to know about our own taxes, laws and rights. While you may not be an analyst on Fox News, it is important to formulate personal stances on ethics and politics. These issues affect people’s everyday lives. Voicing your own views against others who may have different opinions can point out holes in your own logic and possibly change your mind. Maybe the next time your parents are discussing Obamacare, you can chime in and give your opinion. Republican or democrat, Romney or Obama, if you like politics, this is for you. If you’re interested, contact Mr. Trenkle.

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d e v l o

| September 14, 2012

GET

v n I

A new school year opens the door to an endless number of possibilities. From interesting clubs, to an excellent arts department, to strong sports teams, Maine South offers an activity for each personality, passion, and mind set. Often, students are unaware of the variety of opportunities Maine South offers. To make the most of the high school experience, consider some of these lesser-known activities

September 14, 2012

| FEATURES ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH HANDS

FEATURES

Hawk Links Amanda Svachula

Features Editor awk Links, a student service organization, brings seasoned Maine South students and incoming transfer students together at the beginning of the school year. Started in 2007 as a response to more students transferring into Maine South, Hawk Links, according to coordinator Mr. Tortorelli, aims to “help make the transition of transfer students positive.” “When a new student enters, it’s kind of scary,” said coordinator Mrs. Spillman, “The goal of Hawk Links is to make them feel comfortable.” Beginning with the transition at a kickoff breakfast, transfer students are introduced to a group of about forty Hawk Links, other transfers, staff members, and at least one person in their lunch period. They then receive their schedules, and go on a tour of the school in groups led by one or more Hawk Links. Each individual visits his or her locker, and learns the locations of their classes. The tour is a way of learning not only the way around Maine South, but also about the activities the school has to offer. Regarding the breakfast, Junior Hawk Link, Teresa Colletti, said, “It’s helpful for transfers because they usually don’t know where they are, and they get to see the opportunities of the school.” Ideally, according to Mr. Tortorelli, interaction between Hawk Links and new students extends into the school year, but “it all depends on the individual transfer student.” To become a Hawk Link, a person must be recommended by a Maine South staff member, so if interested, one should talk to his or her counselor. But a person does not need to be a part of the organization to reach out to transfer students during an average school day. Something as easy as inviting a new student to sit at lunch can make a difference. In the end, as Mrs. Spillman said, being a member of Hawk Links or just a welcoming Maine South student “is positive for both sides.”

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Space Exploration Program Maddie McGrady

Staff Writer hat are black holes? Can we really live on the moon? What exactly does NASA do? The Space Exploration Program investigates questions like these and provides explanations—for elementary school students. This club, which meets once a week after school, includes not only Maine South students, but also students from both Maine East and Maine West. Last year, 9 of the 30 program members were Maine South students. Ms. Statema is the club sponsor here at Maine South. One of the goals of the program is to help elementary school students understand complex ideas about space. Program members do this by holding annual outreach events for students in the community. “Every year for the past four years the program has put on an educational outreach event for the community to attend. The past three years, the event has been geared toward elementary school kids” said Statema. Of course, the challenge is interesting and teaching young students about such complicated scientific theories. “It’s difficult to depict how black holes work to a 6th grader,” said program member and senior Tom Spytek. But with its interactive presentations, the Space Exploration Program has managed to inform younger students. Specifically, according to the program’s web page, for the past two years, members have held a Planetary Walk—first at Maine West and then at Maine East—for elementary students to learn about our solar system “This past year, the students created rooms to address different questions that elementary students had about space. The students in the program had rooms centered around the planets, the Earth and the moon, the stars and the sun, black holes, NASA, atrobiology and comets, and the universe and galaxies. Each room had posters, activities and games for kids to participate in,” said Statema. This year’s program has not yet had its first meeting—so keep an ear out for announcements. Students of all grade levels who are interested in space are welcome to join.

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Ecology Club Ellen Longman

Staff Writer cology club is open to Maine South students interested in exploring environmental issues and finding ways to cultivate the environment. The group meets twice monthly in room A-315 on Tuesdays from 3:15 to 4:00. Meetings focus on planning upcoming projects. At past meetings, members of the club have also helped with forest and roadside cleanups. Besides meetings, the Ecology club features interesting field trips. Over the years, the group has visited Lincoln Park Zoo and the Shedd Aquarium. Other activities the members of the club have participated in include apple picking, visiting a hawk migration site, adopting an endangered species and acres of the rainforest, making bird feeders, and listening to guest speakers. The club also holds frequent visits to volunteer with brush clearing and prairie restoration at the Wild Wood Nature Center. Club sponsor, Ms. Godwin said, “What I like best about being the sponsor is seeing students outside of the classroom in a different setting, and I like seeing students getting involved in something they really care about.” Started in 1982, Ecology Club has raised and donated money to various environmental causes such as the Environmental Defense Fund, the Rainforest Action Network, and the National Wildlife Federation. “The main goal is to have a club where students can meet each other and  share their concern for the environment and to enjoy nature in our community,” said Ms. Godwin. “The goals change depending on who is in the club and their areas of interest.”

Political People’s Club

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Katrina Iorio Staff Writer

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olitical People’s club is sponsored by economics, government, and U.S History teacher, Mr. Trenkle. Unfortunately, many club officers graduated last year, so it has slowly decreased in size. On a typical meeting day, the club picks a discussion topic, and everybody talks about a current issue or their view on a topic. Someone usually provides a small snack too. With the election so soon, there are an endless number of topics to banter about. It’s especially exciting for seniors who are eligible to vote in this year’s election. In less than four years, almost all of us will be able to vote, so it’s so important to stay informed, something this club can definitely do for you. Most of us will also be off to college within the next four years, being on our own for the first time in our lives. By then, we will need to know about our own taxes, laws and rights. While you may not be an analyst on Fox News, it is important to formulate personal stances on ethics and politics. These issues affect people’s everyday lives. Voicing your own views against others who may have different opinions can point out holes in your own logic and possibly change your mind. Maybe the next time your parents are discussing Obamacare, you can chime in and give your opinion. Republican or democrat, Romney or Obama, if you like politics, this is for you. If you’re interested, contact Mr. Trenkle.

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FEATURES

| September 14, 2012

A Hawk’s declassified school survival guide

Katie Krall & Katie Kaminsky ID is Key: Your ID is an extremely neighbors and family members. The should organize them in a way that Features Editor & Staff Writer elcome to Maine South, Class of 2016. Your four years here will be a roller coaster ride of school work, relationships, and fun. Listed below are a few tips that you should use and a few common mistakes that you should avoid.

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Lighten the load: Your backpack

has everything you will ever need: textbooks, binders, notebooks, calculators, food wrappers, gum, and who knows what else. You may find that you have a “Freshman Backpack.” To avoid this, find time during your day to drop off textbooks at your locker and pick up materials you will need for later classes. This will reduce the size of your backpack and save your back—not to mention your dignity.

Up Your Game: Maine South takes

pride in its sports teams. The Central Suburban League conference has many competitors that are worth learning about. Learn the teams in Maine South’s conference so you can avoid common misconceptions regarding schools. For instance: no matter how many state titles New Trier has won or the depth of the student body’s trust funds, it is still a public school.

important card. It gets you into sporting events, lounge, the writing lab, and the library. Always have your ID on you because you never know when you will need it. It is also a good idea to memorize your ID number for paperwork or purchases at the bookstore.

Maine South has fiveminute passing periods. This leaves plenty of time if you are going from one A-wing class to another, but not a lot of time to get from P.E. to Math. Do not run to class; you will stick out like a sore thumb and become a hazard to yourself and others.

Move It:

key in these interactions is head nods, waves, or a basic “hey.” You do not need to embrace your sister’s boyfriend’s ex-best friend in the hallway because you haven’t seen him in a million years. This slows down traffic, and makes enemies.

The Magic Number: The maximum

number of people you can walk down the hallway with is four. Any more than four across will not stay together. This is simply the truth. It i s understandable that you want to talk to your friends before school starts, but do not stand in a cluster that blocks the hallway. If you must stand in a cluster, avoid the A-wing because this is the busiest part of the school and the place you will most likely be yelled at for clustering.

Just Keep Moving:

works for you.

Learn the Lingo: At Maine South,

abbreviating things is one of our favorite past time. We abbreviate the wings and many of the courses. The wings at Maine South are the C, A, V, and PA wing. Chemistry is referred to as Chem, Bology is Bio, AP European History is AP Euro, AP Environmental Science is APES, and AP United States History is APUSH. Make sure you catch yourself next time you tell your friend you have AP European History in the Academic Wing.

Keep Calm and E-mail On: Start

to feel comfortable e-mailing your teachers. This type of interaction between teachers and students is not only accepted, but critical for your academic success. There will be days when you will miss classes, and it Folders are Your Friends: Keep will be imperative for you to meet to every single piece of paper your discuss the topics that you missed. teacher gives you during the semester. Chances are you will need to refer Texter’s Crossing: Texting down back to it when you are reviewing for the hallways is an art. The key is finals. Furthermore, Algebra notes walking with a friend while you are may save you in Chemistry the next texting. Any person will do as long year. At the very least, you can help as they have clear eyesight. While correct data entry mistakes by proving this may seem rude, you will have Catch the Wave: Going to Maine you got a 10 on an assignment that your own personal crossing guard to South, you will see a lot of people in may be a 1 in the grade book. Not only prevent textidents and possibly save the hallways. This includes friends, should you keep your papers, but you your life.

Challenge Yourself: Gone are the

school days of getting high grades because of your cartoonish Disney smile. You can no longer walk into class on the day of the test without studying and pull off an A. In high school, you will find yourself challenged on a daily basis. Do not panic; you will begin to find study techniques that work for you. For example, study groups are a great way to prepare for tests and quizzes. The key is trial and error. By second semester, you will know your strengths and weaknesses.

Hawk talk: the people you should know at Maine South Laney Kraus-Taddeo Staff Writer

Name: Mrs. Baseleon Occupation: Bookstore Employee; has worked at Maine South for 13 years If you could join any activity or sport at Maine South, what would you do? I would do soccer. I played soccer in high school, but we did not have shin guards. Now that they do, I

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probably would not mind it so and students ask through the doorway, Enjoy high school more; everyone much. “Are you open?” is rushing through it, just enjoy it. Craziest Outfit Students Wear? For girls, I would have to say short-shorts and crop tops. For the guys, I hate when they wear their pants low.

Wh o i s y ou r f av or i te s u p e r Do you bring your own lunch? hero and why? Batman, because No, I go out to eat. We like Goldy’s h e w a s m y s o n’s f a v o r i t e . and Panera. But we hit pretty much everywhere. What is your favorite type of music? Pepsi or Coke? Coke What music was popular I like soft rock. Adele and Pink are d u r i n g y o u r s e n i o r my favorites. Beach or Mountains? Beach year of High School? Alice Cooper’s “School’s Do you ever dance to the music Sox or Cubs? Cubs Out For Summer,” in the halls? I used to, kids would and Bob Seger. look at you strangely, so I stopped, but Team Edward or Team Jacob? Team the music was louder before. Jacob What is the most common If you c ou l d go b ack to HS Packers or Bears? Bears question asked what would you do differently? b y s tu d e n t s ? I w o u l d ’ v e s t u d i e d m o r e . Deep dish or Thin crust? Deep dish T he d o or w ay is always open If you could tell your 16-year-old Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts? when we’re open self anything, what would it be? Dunkin


September 14, 2012

| COMMENTARY

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leaders in the hallways would’ve helped much though. “A baby Hawk needs to learn to fly on its own. You can’t always go to the big senior leaders to help you out,” said Megally. Others disagree, however. “My first day went pretty well, but it would have been better with only freshmen,” freshman Kelly Bauer said. “I got lost a couple times and it would have helped to have Hawk Pride members in the hall showing us where to go.” The first day of school is hard no matter what. It’s difficult to tell exactly how successful this new first day was for the freshmen because they don’t have anything to compare it to. Since there weren’t any ten-kid pileups in the halls, or massive injuries on the stairs, it’s safe to say that the day wasn’t a disaster. A solution for next year might be to give the freshman their schedules a week ahead of time to allow them to stop by the school with older siblings and walk through their classes. Perhaps the Hawk Pride leaders could be available during book sales to help freshman locate their classrooms. Although it’s clear that the freshmen managed to survive their first day of high school mixed in with the upperclassmen, it’s a shame that we weren’t able to give them their own day to adjust.

GRAPHIC BY SARAH HANDS

friendly personalities gave me a good first impression of the Maine South Staff Writer student body. ne of the great features of Maine “My first day was pretty bad South is how sensitive the and locating my classrooms was administration is to the difficult and like finding a needle in a haystack,” intimidating transition from middle freshman Aidan Megally said. He school to high school. In the past, doesn’t think that having Hawk Pride freshmen have always been allotted the first day of school to themselves in order to figure out the lay of the land with the assistance of Hawk Pride Leaders. Typically, these leaders were stationed in hallways throughout the building to direct freshmen to their classes and answer questions. They were invaluable additions to the first day of school and take the pressure off the new students. Limiting the first day to freshman gave the new students room to navigate the hallways and see some familiar faces. Unfortunately, this year, the freshmen did not have the day to themselves, but instead had to share the jam-packed halls with sophomores, juniors, and seniors. According to Dr. Garlasco, this is due to a new Illinois law stating that in order for the first day of school to count for a day of attendance, all students must be in school for at least five hours. Consequently, Hawk Pride leaders had to go through their own schedules instead of assisting the new students. Although leaders were present in freshmen advisories to lead various ice breaking activities, their absence from the hallways during the most confusing part of the day left frantic freshmen largely on their own to navigate through the wings. I can only imagine how stressful it would be trying to find those pesky rooms within rooms in the C wing, or the hidden classes in the remote PA wing without some form of assistance. Personally, I feel that my first day of freshman year was made infinitely easier with the presence of the Hawk Pride leaders. They directed me to my classes multiple times throughout the day and made me feel much more comfortable in the foreign environment. Their

Hannah Beswick-Hale

Should freshmen have the first day of school to themselves?

Full first day for all students

“Yes, because they have a chance to get around without getting run over.” - Piotr Hadlaw ‘13

“Yes, so they have a day without getting pennied.” - Hayley Miller ‘14

“Yes, because it’s harder to find your classes with a full hallway.” - Steve Mei ‘15

“I didn’t mind. It wasn’t that hard getting around.” - Nick Cecala ‘16

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COMMENTARY

| September 14, 2012

E-textbook program worth a look Vicki Tanquay Staff Writer

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ver yone loathes carr ying around a huge, heavy backpack full of textbooks. Fortunately, new technology may provide a solution. Many textbooks are now available online for download, so the use of e-readers could easily lighten our load. An iPod pilot program was carried out last year at Maine South. Sophomore James Dombro downloaded a copy of his biology textbook onto his iPad and loved it. “[I used it] for everything from studying to notetaking,” said Dombro. “It was amazing.” Dombro presented the information on iPad pilot programs to the math and science departments, but it is unknown if a program will be implemented. Te x t b o o k s a r e e x p e n s i v e ,

falling anywhere from $80 for a math book to $150 for a history book. E-textbooks, because they are paperless, are less expensive than their paper counterparts. The prices of e-textbooks start at around $15. Many of these downloads are only subscriptions, meaning the books will last on the device for a semester or two. The cost of the device has to be taken into account as well. E-textbooks can be used on tablets, computers, iPads, and smart-phones when the proper software is downloaded. The iPad 2, a popular device used in e-textbook pilot programs, costs $765. Despite the high cost of an e-reader, the money spent over the years on e-textbooks would still be cheaper than that spent on paper textbooks. One question raised by researchers is whether students comprehend printed or digital text better.

A professor of psychology at the University of Leicaster in England did a test on her students, asking some to read information from a textbook and asking others to read the same information from an e-textbook. The students who read from the traditional book were able to recall more information and the students who used the e-textbooks had to reread the material multiple times in order to remember the same amount of information. This is a disheartening find, but more studies are necessary for people to truly understand the affects e-textbooks may have on learning. The opportunity to store textbooks electronically would be a valuable option for any student to have. E-textbooks would not only be enormously convenient, but would eliminate the need to drag a 20-pluspound backpack around for seven hours.

True brilliance has nothing to do with grammar Sarah Hands Editor-in-Chief

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ver the summer, I worked as a teaching assistant at Cumberland School. I had second and third grade in the morning, and fourth and fifth in the afternoon. As cliché as it may sound, I think that I actually learned more from them than they did from me. People usually think brilliance reveals itself through GPAs and wellwritten essays. Most—if not all—of these kids were on Individualized Education Plans, read at levels far below “average,” and couldn’t tell commas from quotation marks. Even so, I can honestly say that these kids were some of the smartest people I’ve ever met. My job was to help the kids in writing. Like I said before, most of them had very poor understandings of grammar and punctuation. Many of them couldn’t spell basic words or form complete sentences. It wasn’t the writing itself that impressed me, but the raw creativity they displayed. One of the prompts asked them to write about flying tennis shoes. One girl decided to write a story that involved Chinese food, fortune-cookie-

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commands, and more descriptive detail than most high school students could come up with. Another kid was told to write about his own invention. He was a huge soccer fan, so he decided to make a Lionel Messi soccer ball. While the idea itself may not have been the most creative thing I’ve heard, he had a pretty original opening: “So I was thinking who is my favorite soccer player? And I’m like Messi.” I know it’s not grammatically correct, but I was impressed by his ability to write in an original voice. It’s a skill that every English teacher tries to get their students to learn— something that many high schoolers still have trouble with. This kid’s mastery of his own voice was just as natural as the writing itself. Aside from the meaning of true creative genius, these kids taught me valuable lessons in a variety of other subjects. For example, mathematics and global statistics. “There are a zillion people on earth! MORE than a zillion! They counted a zillion and then one, and another one, and another one, and another one, and another one, and another one, and another one, until they FINALLY got to the right number!” “What’s the right number?” “I don’t know, I didn’t count.” They taught me about veterinary medicine, Newton’s second law of

motion, and information-theoretic death. “One time, like a billion years ago maybe, this kid pulled on a dolphin’s fin and pulled it out of the water! They took the dolphin to the vet-doctor and he said the dolphin almost DIED!” “Interesting.” “Like, it survived, but it was DEAD!” We discussed profound ideas often not brought up in normal conversation, such as the existential criticism of employment as it relates to identity. “Miss Hands, what’s your first name?” “Miss Hands.” “Nonono, what’s your FIRST name?” “I don’t have a first name. I was born as ‘Miss Hands.’ That’s always been my name.” “Even when you were a baby?” “I was never a baby. I was always a teacher.” “Are you SERIOUS?” “Of course not. Do your work.” All jokes aside, I did take a lot away from the experience. I learned how hilarious innocence can be and how fun it is to be a kid. I learned that I will probably never be a school teacher. I learned that intelligence doesn’t confine itself to certain ages or letter grades; it shows itself in many different forms and at many different times. At its youngest, it is its most pure.

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Mr. Stathakis


September 14, 2012

STAFF EDITORIAL

| COMMENTARY

Possible policy changes could deflate grades n a world where four years of academic progress is summarized by a single grade point average, it’s important to ensure that grades truly reflect a student’s academic achievement. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. When so much of our grades are dependent on objective exams, it’s difficult to say whether they reflect our comprehension, or the amount of information we can spit out onto a scantron. To be fair, objective tests do serve their purpose. If a student’s grade is determined by bubbles, there isn’t any room for a teacher’s bias for or against the student to get in the way. Also, it does make sense to have some sort of summative exam at the end of a unit— after all, if you really understood the material, shouldn’t you be able to show it? Usually—but not always. The discussion in progress is whether we should implement an 80/20 grading system. This would mean 80 percent of a student’s grade is summative assessments (tests and projects, for example) and 20 percent is formative (smaller assessments like homework and participation). Some students are concerned that this new policy would become overly-reliant on a few test scores, rather than a diverse body of work, regular homework assignments included. This could lead to a number of problems. Most Maine South students can attest that outside factors have a large effect on how well someone does on a test. A late night after a track meet, a head cold that isn’t quite bad enough to justify staying home, or the occasional rough day can prevent the exam from truly reflecting your learning. Clearly, the grade a student receives on a test is not always based solely on how much said student comprehended the material. Some people, for example, don’t test well. Time constraints make people feel pressured to work quickly, which instills panic, which makes one forget facts that came easily the night before. Putting too much emphasis

ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH HANDS

I

on test grades put students who test badly at a disadvantage. This is why it’s necessary to have more than one form of summative assessment. Since projects and papers would be included in the category for assessment, poor test takers would be able to maintain a decent GPA. There is considerably less stress involved with a project assigned over a long weekend than a 70-question math test in a 45-minute class period. The grade generally comes down to how much time and effort the student invests in the project. Having resources and time also means that the subjects being assessed can

be more intricate and detailed, leading to a deeper understanding of the concepts. Depending on the teacher, the weight of objective tests can vary widely. In some classes, especially math classes, most of that 80 percent category is made up of straight testing, with few projects mixed in. However, in other classes such as English, some teachers have made that summative category consist mostly of papers and projects. This would mean that teachers would still be able to fairly assess their students without an overreliance on tests. However, a focus on summative

evaluations in grading could be detrimental for certain classes. For P.E., art, and music classes which rely on daily participation grades, drastic grading policy changes could be on the way. In a gym class where tests come maybe four or five times a semester, would the grade really match the effort and the learning? Concerns regarding daily participation points extend to other classes. As students, we have been conditioned to expect points for formative work —namely homework —that leads to our ultimate learning. If the incentive/threat of a grade was no longer present to motivate students to keep up with their homework, how many would continue to finish it on time? Some might, but others would fall behind on the material, and their grades would suffer. Students need the prospect of a grade hanging over their heads to stay motivated, and not procrastinate on nightly homework. Eventually, when compared by colleges to high school students with a more traditional grading policy, Maine South’s grades might appear slightly deflated with the lack of homework points. We would be competing for admission against students who come from schools where effort, participation, homework, and even attitude are factored into their final grades. This could put South students at a disadvantage. However, there is something to be said for the way the new grading policy would prepare us for college life and beyond. College professors generally rely on summative evaluations to assess their students. You are assigned pages out of the textbooks to read, but no day-to-day homework is collected. That means that it is entirely up to the student to decide if he or she is going to invest the time and effort into learning the material without the motivation of daily homework grades. If any policy changes come to fruition, it is important to work to avoid unfair grade deflation. While grades should accurately reflect achievement, they should not negatively impact a student’s future.

SouthwordS 13


SPORTS

| September 14, 2012

New coach leads girls’ volleyball program Staff Writer

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his year, Maine South’s girls’ volleyball program not only includes new players, but also a new head coach, Mr. Peter King. Coach King may be the new head coach, but he is not new to volleyball. He also trains the boys’ volleyball club team, Pipeline, and is New Trier’s junior varsity boys’ volleyball coach. “I’m really taking this team and practicing them as if they were guys, and we’re becoming very successful,” says Coach King of their preparation for the season. The season kicked off with a win against Prospect High School on the first day of school, Wed., Aug. 22, at Prospect. The match went to three games, with the Hawks pulling out a victory, winning the third game 25-22. Right now the Hawks are playing non-conference teams, and just completed their first tournament. At press time, the team was 6-4, with non-conference wins against Prospect and Maine East. They also have wins against Schaumburg and

Elk Grove, and losses to Rolling Meadows, St. Pious, and Fremd during the tournament over Labor Day weekend. Despite these losses, the games were close. This is just the beginning of the season and the team is looking for ward to competing in their conference, and going farther than they did last year. “I really think this team can be excellent and go far because we have really talented people and a lot of potential,” says co-captain Kirsten Lee. “I want everyone to improve their skills and raise the level of play as a whole for the team.” “We have a team full of very talented players who invest themselves fully in the game,” co-captain, Jane Acker, says of the varsity team. “I’m looking forward to seeing us evolve into a consistently fierce competitor in every aspect of the sport.” The Hawks will compete in three more tournaments this season: Sept. 14 and 15 at the Maine East Invite, Oct. 5 and 6 at the Glenbrook North Discovery Invite, and Oct. 12 and 13 at the Maine West Pumpkin Tournament.

Seniors Acker, Anna Kinnell, Lee, Alana Sremac, and Pat Wardynski, and junior Katherine Miles are all players returning to varsity. Newcomers to Varsity are senior Kate Thorsen, and juniors Krissy Coppin, Allie Fredrickson, Taylor Martell, Ellen O’Malley, Hailey Schoneman, and Emily Wolf. The team manager is Amanda Sremac.

With an experienced group of girls leading the squad, the program has building blocks to rely on this season and is hoping for wins in conference play. “The team’s looking good so far,” says Lee. “We just need to keep getting better and keep pushing ourselves so we can do well in conference and the postseason.”

PHOTO BY MOLLY PETRAY

Katherine Miles

HUDDLE UP

The team discusses strategy between games during their match against Maine East on Tues. Aug. 28.

Rebuilding year is a success Hope Allchin Sports Editor

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he Maine South boys’ soccer team started the season off strong, opening by sweeping the Quincy Notre Dame Tournament in Quincy, IL, during the first weekend of September. After spending the last year rebuilding, the program was hoping for a solid start to the season, and with a record of 5-1-1, the team certainly seems to have achieved it. The experienced team has 14 returning players, 12 of which are seniors. The team is led by the senior captains, defender Calvin Miller, forward Ryan Pattullo, and midfielder Mike Solberg. According to Head Coach States, the captains are providing the team with a good foundation. “This looks like a very promising year,” says junior midfielder Brendan Faley. “We are off to a great start, fresh off winning the Quincy Notre

14 SouthwordS

PHOTO BY JESSICA GRONKE

PREPARE TO STRIKE

Ryan Pattullo passes the ball off to a teammate during the Hawks’ game against Maine East on Tues. Sept. 4.

Dame tournament. We are heading into CSL play now, which is the most challenging part; however, I think we will make a serious run at state this year.”

The ultimate goal is success at the state level, but right now, the team is focusing on its upcoming matches. On Sept. 14 and 15, they are competing at the Crystal Lake tournament.

On Sept. 4, the team had a victory at Maine East, giving them momentum leading into a stretch of games against conference opponents. The game ended in a shutout, with the Hawks scoring three times. Within the first month of the season, the Hawks have nearly matched their season total of wins from the past year, a major improvement for the program that promises more victories to come. The team is enjoying its success and practicing hard, but the biggest challenge will be from conference opponents. “We have had a great start to the season so far,” says senior midfielder Monty Link. “We hope to keep completing our goals throughout the whole season.” “We are taking it game by game,” adds Faley. The seniors on the team have spent years on the field, and this could be the season where the team goes deep into the postseason.


September 14, 2012 | SPORTS

Mr. Stock, English Department

READY TO RACE

Varsity runners begin their first race of the season at Maine West on Tues., Aug. 28. The team won the meet against their District 207 opponents.

Uniforms ‘not a right’

Girls’ cross country members told they would run in gym clothes until work ethic improved Claire Raphael Staff Writer

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t their first meet on Tuesday Aug. 28, at Maine West, there was something odd about the uniforms that the members of the girls’ cross country team were sporting. Rather than wearing their usual cross country attire, they took home their win wearing their gym uniforms. “The girls need to understand that being a part of this team is a privilege, not a right,” said Coach Downing. “[They need to understand] that it means something to run a race for Maine South, wearing our jersey. You need to attend practice, work hard, strive to get better, and display a willingness to encourage your teammates to do the same.” Coach Downing and Coach Meyer told the girls that they had earned the right to wear a jersey in time for their first invitational. “After much anticipation, we are getting our uniforms this week,” says Emma Ropski. “We will look more

like a team than ever because for the Eckhart and Mirae Mastrolonardo, first time we’ll have one hundred and freshman Gina Johnson, who complete the top seven for varsity girls all in matching uniforms.” Despite not having their uni- this season. “This year’s team looks great,” forms, the girls’ started their season on a high note at their first meet on says Coach Downing. “We have the Aug. 28 at Maine West. The girls’ JV biggest team ever, with 120 girls. We and Varsity won by a large margin have some of the most talented runners we have ever against the othhad, and we have er 207 District the depth to be teams, Maine East and “The girls need to under- very successful ” Maine West, stand that being a part of thisCseason. o a c h making it their first win this team is a privilege. It D o w n i n g ’ s for this of the season. means something to run a goals season are to be The girls’ cross country race for Maine South, wear- competitive in the major inviteam hopes to tationals, finish have another ing our jersey.” outst anding —Coach Downing in the top two in the conferseason. Last ence, which year, the team made it down state with the help of includes current state champions their top two runners, Emily Leon- New Trier, and finish in the top 10 at State. ard and Megan Lemersal. “Personally, I am very excited At the successful state meet, Leonard came in sixth and Lemersal about this season,” said captain came in ninth. This season Coach Lemersal. “Not just myself, but the Downing is hoping to return down whole team has been working exstate, for the fourth time in the last tremely hard over the summer and the dedication that the girls show four seasons. Running alongside Leonard and makes me a proud captain.” The team hopes to continue its Lemersal are seniors Emma Ropski and Maddie McGrady, juniors Cailin success at conference meets.

hile most students know him as an English teacher and coach here at Maine South, Mr Stock was a varsity athlete who played football at the University of Nebraska and Elmhurst College as an offensive lineman. To get to this level, Mr. Stock did everything he could, including attending summer and travel camps, special workouts at national universities, weight-lifting clubs, and clinics. He believes that working out with teammates, rather than working out alone, will help you in the long run. As a collegiate athlete, he most enjoyed “being a part of something and learning to see something through.” Mr. Stock also made friendships that have lasted for years. His teammates during college are now coaching, just like Mr. Stock. One of his former teammates is the head coach at Addison Trail and another at Glenbard West. For athletes hoping to continue playing at the collegiate level, Mr. Stock had some advice: “Listen to your coaches. Go to camps and special workouts, even if you think they are above your level. Try to absorb something from everything. The hard work will pay off.”

Photo courtesy of mr. stock

Photo by jessica gronke

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GIRLS’ SWIMMING | CROSS COUNTRY | FOOTBALL | GIRLS’TENNIS | GOLF | BOYS’SOCCER | GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL

Winning is what they do Staff Writer

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fter an Aug. 31 victory against Wheaton Warrenville South, the Hawks were happy to see a zero in their own loss column. The Hawks started out the season with two wins, both in dominant fashion. Opening the season with two away games is always a difficult task, especially with a fierce battle against a topten team like Wheaton Warrenville South in week two. This, however, has not stopped the Hawks from doing what they do best: winning. Maine South beat Warren 28-14 week one, and then beat the tigers of WWS 19-13. Maine South was recently recognized by CSNChicago.com as the team in the state with the highest winning percentage in the last two decades at 86.4%. “I think it’s a statement to the tradition and pride we have here and I think it’s their [the players] time to uphold that tradition,” said Coach Inserra. The Hawks this season have a large group of senior leaders on both sides of the football. On offense, they are led by Northwestern recruit Matt Alviti at the quarterback position. The offensive line is driven by Ball State recruit Pat Maloney at left tackle, Donny Nordstrom at center, and Dan Poulos at left guard. Senior Mike Bosco and junior George Sajenko lead the receiving core. The defensive leaders of the Hawks are junior safety Clay Burdelik, senior linebacker Chris Buscemi, and senior Nate Gruber at cornerback. Defensive ends Tom Hader and Noah Meyer are also players to watch for during the season. The motto for this year is “Purpose: the fuel of champions.” “We try to approach each play, each practice with purpose,” said Coach Inserra. “The fuel that makes the machine run well is the players and staff.” After last year’s second round up-

set loss to Stevenson, the Hawks look to bounce back with changes in both the coaching staff and the players. One major change has been calling up Coach Fee to varsity. The other major difference is the change in the position of running back. For the past four seasons, the Hawks have had two running backs—Matt Perez from ’08-’09 and Paul Preston from ’10-’11. This year, senior Anthony Mitchell and Burdelik will split the job. Even though this will be the first running back in four years who did

not start the previous season, Coach Inserra said, “They are still two of the top backs in conference, they are both hard-nosed and quiet, yet deadly.” Each ran for 90 yards during their first week at Warren. In addition, Mitchell scored a touchdown. In the week two victory over Wheat Warrenville South, Burdelik had 123 yards rushing on 14 carries. There are also many juniors who are new faces to the varsity football team. Some new juniors that are on varsity for the first time are John Hader, who

will take over the punt and kickoff return duties, Phil Uhlig, on special teams and linebacker, Luke Durbin, at offensive tackle, and Sajenko at wide receiver, who got called up for the last couple of games of the regular season and playoffs last year. “There is a lot more pressure, the intensity is greater, and there are a lot more fans who are supporting us,” says Hader on the difference between playing sophomore football and playing at the varsity level. The biggest challenges in conference this year will be the week five home match-up against arch-rival New Trier. “We are going to show what we’re made of,” said Inserra about the upcoming games. The Hawks will be away tonight against Niles North.

 Eye to Eye

Clay Burdelik approaches a Wheaton Warrenville defender during the Hawks victory.

 Running To Victory

Matt Alviti shows off his athleticism while rushing for a touchdown against Wheaton Warrenville.

Photos courtesy Mr. sus

Brendan Ploen

Vol 49 issue 1  
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