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SOUTH maine

FEBRUARY 27, 2004

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VOL. 40, NO. 11

Record-breaking Regional

The Maine South Speech Team poses while waiting for the regional awards ceremony at Fenton High School. This year, more members qualified for Sectionals than have in the past 15 years.

In This ISSU6.

NEWS: Student Council candidates

COIOMHENTARY:

FEATURES:

Spend time

Rap history

SPORTS:

Girls' â&#x20AC;&#x201D;trac*


2 News

SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004*VOL. 40, NO. 11

New driving law passed

Many teens are not aware that from the beginning of this year there have been several new Park Ridge ordinances as well as Illinois state laws passed pertaining to drinking and driving. The Park Ridge city council has passed a new zero tolerance ordinance pertaining to minors and the purchasing of alcohol, as well as consumption while driving. The Cities Liquor Ordinance (Article 12, Chapter 6 of the Municipal Code), now states, according to the December 2003 issue of The Spokesman, "If any underage person is driving a vehicle in which there is any alcohol, or is found to have any alcohol in his/her system, the police will impound the vehicle. The decision to impound the vehicle will not be affected if the alcoholic beverage is opened or unopened; whether or not the driver is the owner of the alcoholic beverage; or if the driver knew of the existence of the alcoholic beverage in the vehicle." The new ordinance also implements a rule stating, "It is illegal for any underage person to have any alcohol in their system that is detectable by observation or blood/ alcohol testing." The penalty for breaking the rule will result in a minimum 500 dollar

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fine and referral of underage persons to a Peer Jury for disposition. The only exemptions to the rule that are accepted are if the alcohol is used in performance of a religious service or if the substance is consumed within the home under the direct supervision of the underage person's parent. The Illinois state government has also passed several new driving laws for first year drivers, which are getting mixed opinions. According to the Secretary of State's office, as of January 1, 2004, "for the first six months of a person's license or until the driver is age 18, whichever occurs first, the number of passengers in a vehicle is limited to one person under the age of twenty, unless the additional passenger(s) is a sibling, step-sibling, child, or step-child of the driver." This law was implemented because teenagers account for 16 percent of all crash fatalities, though they only make up 6 percent of Illinois drivers. Adults are primarilty in favor of the new law, while teenagers disagree with it. School Resource Officer Waddell supports the law stating, "From the standpoint of a parent, I feel that the new law is a good thing because it will help cut down on the number

of deaths and injuries occurred from teens getting distracted behind the wheel." Maine South Security Guard Officer Ross is also in support of the new law. "I know first hand how easy it is for a teenager to get distracted while driving. When my son first began driving, he went out with a couple of his friends and got into an accident because he got distracted. It is easy for anyone to get into an accident, and I think that people should gain experience driving before they decide to take other people's lives into their hands." When several Maine South students were asked what they thought of the new law, there were mixed feelings. One Maine South junior stated, "I just received my license one month ago, and I work with several of my friends. 1 think it's ridiculous that because of this law I can only drive one of them to work with me and the other three need to find their own rides." This law has undoubtedly acquire^j mixed reviews regarding whether teenage! are responsible enough to drive with more than one person. The state, as well as new drivers, will have to wait to see if data will show that less car accidents annually since instituting this law.

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February 27, 1827 - The first Mardi Gras was celebraicd in New Orleans. February 27, 1932 - Elizabeth Taylor, famous actress in Cleopatra, was bom. February 27, 1974 - The famous "People" magazine premieres and begins sales. February 27, 1980 - The daughter of President Clinton. Chelsea Clinton, was bom. Febmary 27, 1991 - Iraqi troops retreat as Kuwait is liberated and the Gulf War officially ends. Febmary 27, 1992 - A t age 16. Tiger Woods becomes the youngest PGA golfer in 35 years.

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SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004*VOL. 40, NO. 11

News 3

â&#x20AC;˘Student Council Candidates Emily Zei Secretary

Erinn Mitchell President

Daniel Leung Vice President

Hi, my name is hmily Zei, and 1 am running for the position of secretary. 1 am a sophomore and have been actively involved with Student Council for the last two years. This past year 1 was the student issues chair, so 1 know the workings of Student Council. If elected, I will help ensure that each eeting is organized and focused to fit our ouncil's needs. I have the responsible and positive attitude needed to make next year's council a great one. I believe that I will be able to contribute to Student Council and its services to Maine South and the

I'm Erinn Mitchell, a junior, and I am running for president of Student Council for next school year. I am a two-year member of Student Council. During my first year, I held the position of Food Drive chairperson. When not working as a chairperson, I frequently help out with Student Council's other activities. My past experience and knowledge of Student Council makes me an excellent candidate for president. As president, I would work to make sure student issues are voiced and changes are made to better the school's environment.

This year in Student Council, I served as the social chair. My duty was to help with the Student Council booth at Freshman Orientation and to organize the Food Drive. This year, I have learned that when someone is in a position of responsibility, it is important that he or she be honest, sincere, and fair to everyone. I believe in equality for each person and this is possible at Maine South. This year, I have already seen the good that Maine South is capable of doing for the community by raising money; I have also seen how a single person can inspire others by donating a gold coin from the heart.

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community.

Katie Katz Treasurer

My name is Katie Katz, and 1 am running for treasurer. 1 am a sophomore and an active participant in Student Council. As a member, I have helped with â&#x20AC;˘ ^ omecoming, V-Show, and Food Drive. I have a great deal of confidence working with numbers and money and would use my skills to help our Student Council and ultimately Maine South if I am elected.

Nick Cosgrove Vice President

My name is Nick Cosgrove, and I'm running for vice president. I have been involved in Student Council since my freshman year and have helped out with almost every activity that Student Council has worked on. I take a lot of pride in doing the best job I can. If given the role of vice president, I promise to fulfill my duties and strive to make a difference.

Vote for the 2004-2005 Student Council officers today in front of the cafeteria during all lunch periods.


4 Commentary

SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2(X)4«VOL.40, NO. 11

Book Review

me eoitDrsJ hy Monika Bysiecki After being at Maine South for four years. I've realized that there isn't much to do in action ridge. But, instead of making the oh-so-lame contention that I'm bored, I'll invite all of the underclassmen to visit some of the places I discovered late in my high school career. These places are especially convenient for the winter month when the cold invades. The Second City: A comedy club that presents a witty themed show. The Chicago Mainstage theatre is located at 1616 N. Wells St. in Chicago. Prices range from SI0-19, depending on the day. Tickets can be bought at TicketMaster or directly at Second City. The show plays daily. The Enchanted Castle: Chicagoland's largest indoor entertainment complex, with Laser tag, mini-golf, batting cages, and bumper cars. The wonderland is located at 1103 S. Main in Lombard. Call (708) 9537860 for more information. Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind: A one-hour production of a comedic hodge-podge of 30 skits. Located in an upstairs theatre on the corner of Ashland and Foster in Chicago, this show plays Fridays and Saturday at 11p.m. and Sundays at 7p.m. Tickets can be bought at the door and range in price from S6-11, depending on the roll of a die. Whirly Ball; Play an intense game that combines basketball, lacrosse, and bumper cars. The arena is located at 1880 W. Fullerton in Chicago. It is open from 12p.m. to 2a.m. every day. Reservations need to be made in advanced by calling (773)486-7777. Putting Edge: A glow-in-the-dark indoor mini-golf course. It's located at "City Park" mall on the corner of Aptakisic and Milwaukee in Lincolnshire and is open from 9a.m. to 1a.m. Admission is S8 for adults. For more information, call (847) 229-8833.

God-shaped, realistic romance by Amy Fisher

"If your intentions are pure/I'm seeking a friend/For the end of the world." A sweet yet powerful line sure caught my attention when I was recommended God-Shaped Hole by Tiffanie DeBartolo. God-Shaped Hole is a moving story about Beatrice Jordan, a jewelry designer living in L.A., and Jacob Grace, a writer who puts a personal ad in the paper (consisting solely of the line above along with his name and phone number). The ad matches him up with Beatrice. Trixie, as Jacob nicknames her, hates L.A. and almost everyone in it. This hate only increases when she meets and falls in love with Jacob, who feels the same as she does. Their plans to move South after Jacob finishes his novel become a dream that he and Trixie share.

The book creates a story that is not only exciting, but also realistic. The character and relationship development is right on the mark. From the sweet and sometimes awkward beginnings, to the wonderfiil bond they share as they learn more about each other, Jacob and Trixie open up new worlds for each other, not only in terms of love, but also in terms of family. Trixie and Jacob both have fathers that have left them, but both insist that each fixes each's relationship with his or her father and try to get on with life. The characters and the story are easy to relate to. The characters have dreams, fights, careers, and exes that they have to deal with, just like the rest of us. God-Shaped Hole is I would recommend to anyone. It's sure to make you laugh and cry; it's also sure to stay with you forever.

Senior Review — Polish J Inexpensive, and simply by Claudia Sulkowski If fine-dining with an ethnic touch is what you're looking for this time of the year, you can find it at Lutnia, located in a wellknown Polish community at 5532 W. Belmont Ave. in Chicago. Lutnia serves traditional Polish food with an elegant flare. Lutnia is a small restaurant with fabulous service and an intimate atmosphere. Much to my delight, a classical pianist plays on a platform overlooking the dining room floor. This romantic setting is perfect for treating your significant other to a highclass meal with a reasonable price-tag. Entrees range from SI5-30—a price comparable to restaurants less chic, like Red Lobster. With Lutnia's great service and sophisticated style, the price is well worth it. Don't firet if polish food doesn't make your taste buds water. There are plenty of other dishes that you will surely find appetizing. From Vienna Veal to roast pheasant a la King Sobieski, this restaurant has something for everyone. If you order

deliciou^

the duck entree, prepare to be amazed. It is roasted beside the table, before your eyes in flames that leave everyone in awe. While in Europe, I fell in love with Hungarian Goulash on potato pancakes. Since I've been back, 1 have searched the greater Chicagoland ^ area for Hungarian Goulash that could compare. Before I tried Lutnia, my efforts were fruitless. The Hungarian Goulash with potato pancakes at Lutnia consists of a delicious brown sauce with succulent meat and vegetables atop two large potato pancakes cooked to the perfect crispiness. The dish was absolutely delicious. Needless to say, my search has ended. I was so impressed with this dish that I had to make a second trip. Host Marek Juszczak proudly declares that Lutnia is ".. .the only fine-dining P o l i s h ^ ^ restaurant in Chicago." The intimate and^^^ elegant atmosphere, in addition to the excellent food at reasonable prices, makes Lutnia a restaurant worth visiting and revisiting.


Commentary 5 â&#x20AC;˘Our literary deviancy SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27. 2004ÂťVOL. 40, NO. 11

Student Opinion

by Erik Johnson I like to read books for fun. A lot of you probably think I need some sense beaten into me with a really heavy sock full of quarters, or maybe some of you think I make Michael Jackson look like an angel and think I should be committed to an institute for the criminally perverted until this disease passes. But, the rest of you probably think I should be beaten with a heavy sock full of quarters as well as committed to an institute for the criminally perverted. Before you do either, stop and think for a moment. What do you do with your free time? Well, there are sports, clubs and jobs Then there are school projects and homework. After that there's nothing but free time, so what do you do? I'd bet that the TV goes on, or maybe you play video games and talk on AOL instant essanger for six hours. Who would want to read when you could do that? I'll admit that Comedy Central and The Simpsons make for a very good laugh every now and again, but the majority of TV is made up of crud reality shows. Am I so weird because I don't want to watch When Animals Attack American Idols VII on FOX or "Survivor: Malibu Beach" on CBS? In fact, these types of shows are so stupid I would rather claw my eyes out than watch them. In addition to the wonderful culture of reality TV, there are computers and AIM. AIM is like a plague that seeps into you and eats up free time. Think about your average AIM conversation. It goes something like this: "sup"-"nm u?"- "nm"- "lol"-"brb." What an intellectual conversation; I think this may be the most important event in the history of the English language since Shakespeare. I don't want to throw my time away, so I like to read books. Books are a very deep form of entertainment that offers ore than your average reality TV show, ^Frihey hold a wealth of knowledge about their topics, and what a myriad variety of topics there are: biographies, science fiction, classics, information books, fantasy, sport books; the list goes on and on. They go

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from fifty pages to thousands of pages, and they cover any topic you can think of For example, I have a book that shows how to build potato cannons, tennis ball mortars, and small rockets, and I also have one about the Opium War in China. Books cover mortars, the opium war. and everything in between, and they are much more rewarding than anything I can find on TV. "But reading is so hard." 1 hear you complain. Well what are you doing right now? Come on, do it again. There you go, you're reading. That wasn't so bad, was it? You've been reading since kindergarten or first grade, so what's the big deal? "The reason books are so hard is because they are so boring, just like the ones we read in English class," you complain again. My advice is to find a genre of books you like to read. If you don't like the books from English class, read something different like murder mysteries or biographies of famous people. Remember that if you read a book for fun, you don't have to prepare for discussions, do projects, or take tests. Your only goal is to enjoy it. I like science fiction and war books. I don't like all of the 'classics' we have to read in English, so I read what I like. When I read something I like, I can get really into the setting, the characters, and the plot. It is infinitely more enjoyable than watching melodramatic people crying because Simon said they smell funny or typing "lol" so often you develop arthritis at sixteen. So think one moment before you start filling your socks ftill of quarters to beat me. What do you get out of reality TV, AIM, and other such wastes? You're lucky if you don't get nightmares about Simon grading your history essays and start talking in AOLspeak. Maybe you should look into books as an alternative. They are funnier, more profound, and more action-packed than any Survivor episode. Maybe they are just what you need. Or, maybe I should just be bludgeoned and sent off to live with sexual deviants and baby eaters.

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut. It's interesting because of its satirical nature and non-linear storyline. Matt Segawa, '04

o Night by Elie Wiesel. It wa.s an exhilarating book about a boy and how he survived the Holocaust. Katy Shotsberger, '07

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Shogun by James Clavell. A great book, and it gave me some info for the i-search. Simon Hunter, '07

The Davinci Code by Dan c3 Brown, someone recommended it to me to read over winter break and I hked it a lot. Anna Gartner, '04


6 Commentan Junior Opinion We do more than just talk

SOUTHWORDS-FEBRUARY 27 2004'VOL. 40. NO. 11

by Kate Funkhouser To the majority of Maine South, speech team is shrouded in myth and mystery. You ask yourself: what do they do on Saturdays at 6:00 in the morning in crisp suits? Why don't they come home until nearly seven at night? And. most pressing of all, how do they fill their time between? Contrary to what you hear on Monday mornings, Mike Bielaczyc rises speech team is as Regional not a "girl's sport." We are neither a sport nor composed entirely of girls. Rather, we are a group of twenty-odd people who get up very, very early to compete in thirteen events, descriptions of which can be found at http:/ /www. i h s a . o r g / a c t i v i t y / i e / 2 0 0 3 - 0 4 / iechart.pdf. Some of these events relate to drama; others relate to current events or public speaking. Admittedly, if I read my own description, I would place speech team on my "list of things not to do" somewhere between tearing off my eyebrows and eating cookies in front of a dieting wrestler. You simply can't understand speech team until you've tried a meet. Then, you realize how worthwhile it is. You drag your well dressed and exhausted corpse on a bus before the sun has risen. You fall asleep on a fellow team member and wake up in Godknows-where-but-it-often-has-corn, to complete against other speech teams. The people from other schools whom you will meet are unforgettable. If eccentricity were popcorn, some of these people would be a Hawk Pride day. There are drama queens and current event nerds and a few people who are the nicest and most down-to-Earth you have ever met. Our speech team is unique in that we all have social skills, or can at least feign them sufficiently well as to avoid ostracism. Though we are not a speech team clique,

we all get along and genuinely like each other. Speech team is one of the few events you can join where everyone assumes that they will like you. Additionally, other than our few meets (seven this year), speech does not take up copious amounts of time. We practice one day a week after school. For the disturbingly competitive, you can win. I have a quart-sized Ziploc bag full of metals. to get his award If I shake it, it Champion. jingles. This is indescribably satisfying. The myth of speech team is a side effect of being a Hawk. It is assumed that if a club sponsored by Maine South, it is one of the best in the state. When, at a competitive meet, the top three schools were given money to donate to their favorite charity, 2004-2005 Co-captain Erik Johnson suggested that the champion school's charity should be the Maine South speech team. Though the speech team is not as stellar as the football team, constitution team, or chess team, we are no longer charity. This has been our best year in the memory of our Head Coach Mrs. Metzinger. The team had six people advance to the most difficult sectional in the state, where Alex Gillett and Kate Funkhouser each came in seventh place. The team is working hard and establishing the tradition that fuels the Maine South reputation: diligence, excellence, and success. Few students can recall exactly when the football team became so aggressive or the chess team so smart. It seems mock trial has always been superb. Yet, it is the people who establish these traditions who exhibit true Hawk Pride. It's hard to make someone in a suit at 6:03 burst out laughing, but the team has managed it time and time again. This team has been dedicated, inspiring, industrious.

and determined to have a good time. I am grateful for every moment we've gotten to spend together. Thank you, 2003-2004 speech team, for an amazing season. Speech team is an opportunity for personal and school success. It's a chance to start a legacy. It's a time to have many girls fall asleep on you at once or to meet attractive boys from other schools who can speak coherently. Speech team is shrouded in myth and mystery, but only to those who don't attempt to understand it. Those who have made the effort are surprised at the joy they find in what they discover.

Congratulations to the Maine South Regional Speech team: Original Oratory: Merideth Wisniewski Verse: Katie Eichstaedt Special Occasion Speaking: Alex Gillett, fourth place Impromptu: Kate Funkhouser, captain. Champion Humorous Interpretation: Erik Johnson, third place Radio: Melissa Hansen Extemporaneous Speaking: Bike Bielaczyc. Champion Prose: Erin Doherty Dramatic Interpretation: Alexis Waters Humorous Duet Acting: Ellyn Michalek and Amanda Brooks Dramatic Duet Acting: Jessie Salinsky and Adrianna Blanks, second place Original Comedy: Erik Johnson


SOUTIiWORI>S*EGBRUASY27.20M*VOL.40.NO. U

Features?

Remembering Pulaski by Robert Fabry If you are a Polish-American, then this is a very special time of the year. The first Monday of March is reserved for the remembrance of General Casimir Pulaski, who aided our country in its war for independence. Yet, of all the holidays we celebrate each year, this has to be the most ignored. There are no fireworks, gifts, barbecues, or family gatherings. However, even if you are not a PolishAmerican, you should at least consider Pulaski Day as important as Memorial Day or Veterans Day. This should be a day that you should remember that the American Revolution was fought by men and women of many types of heritage. Today is a day to show your pride as an American, but also honor our foreign allies who deserve just as much respect. In Chicago, we celebrate Pulaski Day on his birthday, which is in the first week of

March. However, in New York they celebrate Pulaski Day on the anniversary of his death, which is the 5th of October. It officially became a holiday in 1973, but we are one of the only areas where schools are closed because of the large Polish population in the area. Casimir Pulaski was born on March 6. 1747 in Warka-Winiary, Poland to an upperclass family. In 1771, he tried to carry out a plan to abduct the king, but it led to Pulaski's exile. He then fled to France for two years before reentering the war against Russia. Again, he lost, and went back to France. In Paris, he learned of the American Revolution and how desperate the young nation was for experienced officei^s to join General Washington. Upon receiving an approval letter from Benjamin Franklin, Washington called Pulaski to the states and

An age-old party by Christie Telkamp Though Tuesday was the actual Mardi Gras, today's date is the 176th anniversary of a festive and colorful worldwide celebration. February 27,1827, was the first Mardi Gras in New Orleans. It has been around for a long ume, even before it came to America, dating back to Greek culture. But the Greeks weren't celebrating Mardi Gras like people in Louisiana do today; they were partying even harder. The idea of Mardi Gras has meant many things. The Greek celebration was to ensure the ferfility of their women. During this time men and women would wear masks, just like they do today. The men would smear the blood of sacrificed animals all over themselves then they would make whips out of the hides of the animals and flagellate their women with them. The lashes and welts left from the beating were I believed to ensure female fertility. The Romans adopted the Greek celebration and renamed it "Lupercalia." The Romans transformed it into an orgy. In time, the masks that were once used for

decoration became used to conceal identity. The Romans used this anonymity to commit crimes, even murder. This time was also an opportunity for questionable activities, such as cross-dressing. When the party was over, the streets weren't lined with masks, beer cans, and beads; it was lined with bodies. Believe or not, Mardi Gras was once a religious festival. In the Middle Ages, the Roman Catholic church took over the Roman festival, tamed it down, and made it a last overindulgence before Ash Wednesday began the 40 somber days of Lent. The tradition of parades and throwing beads, confetti, and candy was added to "Fat Tuesday." When Mardi Gras came to Louisiana, the parties were dull, but it gradually evolved into the spectacle we recognize today. Unlike its ancient predecessors of sex and violence, the modem Mardi Gras. with its diluted religious background, is known as a wild night of drinking, dancing, and incredible costumes. It's an amazing party.

appointed him general of the cavalry. He assisted Washington in many battles includingValley Forge. Pulaski trained his men well in cavalry, sometimes using his own money to buy supplies. In October 1779, he was mortally wounded in Savannah and died. Since then, he has been known as the Father of the American Cavalry. Many monuments, streets, and schools have been dedicated to him for his will to fight for freedom. In his honor, this year, the National Polish Alliance will be having a parade, concert, charity dinner, and hunger walks for needy countries. They will also be having a sale with Polish goods at their headquarters in Chicago. Most people should understand why recognizing this day is important. Without men Uke Pulaski, America had a slim chance of winning the war for independence.

SOUTHWORDS A student-produced newspaper of:

Maine South High School 1111 South Dee Road Park Ridge, IL 60068 Signed letters to the editor should be delivered to room V-131 or given to a member of the editorial staff. SOUTHWORDS reserves tlie right to edit material for clarity and brevity and to reject obscene/libelous submissions. Editors-in-Chief

Monika Bysiecki Kristi Katz News Editors Carly Calkins Ashley Rezaeizadeh Commentary Editors Annie Berndtson Kate Funkhouser Features Editors Kara Collins Corinne Ullrich Sports Editors Greg Mitchell Katie Waller Production Editors Bobby Crismyre Kris Johnson Core Photographers Kiley Borowski Kathleen Pinter Core Staff Artist Joyce Ann Santos Advisor T.R. Kerth


8 Features

SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004ÂŤVOL. 40, NO. 11

Rapping through history By John Gonzalez

Beethoven, Mozart, 50 Cent, and Tupac: many think of these talented artists as legends in their own time. Using different types of music they were all legends in their own respects. Were the rap artists, likeTupac, actually living the life that their music portrayed or were they just displaying an image? Rap originated in West Africa in the seventeenth century. African people used their oral communication as a highly respectable way to express their emotions and communicate with others. They used their words for two things- to inform and to entertain. Then in the late seventeenth century, Africans started to migrate to the Americas as a result of slavery. Africans were imported from Africa and this artful skill of expressing emotions through words entered into America. The Africans discovered that they could express their emotions in the church that their masters attended. They would sing songs, chant, and shout afFirmations; this uplifted them in times of extreme physical and mental anguish. In 1863 Abraham Lincoln passed the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves. There were 4.5 million African Americans now living in the United States. Some Americans fought to keep their slaves but eventually lost the fight in 1917. It was around that time that the Africans started to move into metropolitan areas such as Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, and New York. It was then that record producers realized that they could make good money off of this black culture and entertainment. Musicians such as Jelly Rool Morton, Bessie Smith, and W.C. Handy were hired to produce blues albums. These albums were sold to African Americans and described the pain that many blacks suffered through slavery and discrimination. A sudden explosion rocked America as blues artists popped up everywhere. James Brown was heard by a record executive and soon his song "Get On Up" was a major hit. Artists began gening discovered. Each person had their own unique sound. Jazz

developed after blues as Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, and Louis Jordan experimented with a new style of music. Blacks viewed these kinds of music as more than an expression of feelings; this music was their culture, attitude, and lifestyle. In the 1940s and 1950s, blacks discovered another way to express themselves- disc jockeying. Spinning records and jiving, a new type of speech, was created. Jive was used to keep the

audience entertained by rhyming words together to pass messages along to the audience. In a sense, it was the first crude style of rap. In the 1960s the Black Panthers became a popular group. It was organized to gain equal rights for blacks. They resorted to violence to achieve their goals, but they also inspired many poets to write about the injustices between whites and blacks. They made plays on words having two meaningsa deep meaning and a shallow meaning. The poems were inspirations for James Brown, arguably one of the greatest artists to ever live. His performances were magic and he could light up an entire crowd. He would stand on the stage, dance, and feed off of the audience's energy. Sound systems were beginning to gain popularity to aid singers' performances. Many Jamaicans took flatbed trucks and used them to contain a huge amount of speakers, amplifiers, and generators to power mass vehicles that also doubled as stages for the deejays. In 1969, DJ Hollywood and DJ Kool Here took over New York City. They

became the founding fathers for deejays. They were inspired by Big Youth, I-Roy Prince Far-I. and U-Roy. In 1975 KJ Kool Here started to deejay at Bronx teen clubs. He was the first to use a sound mixer and the now traditional turntable record. The MC, or master of ceremonies, was then created. They would go on stage as the deejay played and mixed music to rhyme to the beat. If the MC's rhyme wasn't good, they would be booed offstage. Then, there became a split in rap culture. Some wanted to be deejays and mix music, while others wanted to become MC's to perfect their rhyme and flow. In 1979 modem rap finally broke out. The Sugar Hill Gang was created and their song "Rapper's Delight" took America by storm. People loved this new style of music and rhymed to the tune of _ "Good Times." Everywhere peoplc^^Bi were hearing talented individuals^^ rhyme to different beats or have rap offs. At first, rap sent out a positive message. However, soon Grandmaster Flash released the song "The Message" and artists realized that they could not only put out happy, uplifting songs, but could also paint a picture of their colorful history. Run-DMC became the first major rap star. They came out with tunes that not only contained a story but was also deep with meaning. By the 1980s rap had evolved somewhat violently. Rappers such as Biggie Smalls and Tupac started to attack each other through their music. This created the modem day stereotype depicting violent rappers. Rap has evolved into a culture that involves violence, sex, drugs, and money. Not all rappers are violent, but some are actually living the lives that they sing about. Rap is an interesting and creative way for people to express themselves and send out a message. Some rappers only use the "gangster" image to boost record s a l e s ^ ^ Others live the life that they sing about b ^ ^ ^ living on the street. Rap however, should be thought about in old school people like Run-DMC just writing poetry rather than foul-mouthed, gun slinging gangsters.


SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004«VOL. 40. NO. 11

•Past the bling-bling by John Kurtz Even in 2004, when most Americans still view rap as derogatory and worthless there is a movement towards songs that don't gravitate towards sex, drugs, cars, or clothes. Rappers are starting to swing towards a broader audience with somewhat toned down lyrics; they are even straying from the usual "I'm a gangsta" motif. This conclusion can be easily derived from looking back on the history and evolution of hiphop and rap. Rap groups, like Public Enemy, with much more politically based agendas have always been round, but in ^mh<e late 1980s and early 1990s the message was quite aggressive in their political commentary. While those groups had substantive social dimensions, rap reached much larger groups of people in the 90s and that is when they changed dimensions totally. The idea of living large made it big. Mainstream rap tended to focus much more toward partying, clubs and women, and away from political ideologies. As rap became simple entertainment for most of its listeners, songs gravitated towards things that its listeners either did or wished that

they could do. Rap became more polished and smooth, attracting even more listeners, especially women, many of whom had been put off of earlier rap due to its abrasive sounds and what could be considered tasteless talk of sex. However, one important side note to that period is the emergence of the notorious rapper Eminem. As the premier white rapper, he struggled to establish himself in the industry, but then exploded and was a new voice for young white males in America. His personal songs about his experiences drew fans towards him and his controversial acts seemed to add to his popularity. Starting in 2002, rap seemed to be changing back towards personal experiences. The main reason behind this is money. Teenage females are now the largest radio listening group so the style has been changing towards their demographic. All of the entertainment communities revolve around money, so this change in the subject of songs will most likely continue. As times change, musicians will put out songs that people will buy, which is what keeps music evolving.

Features 9 The Academy Awards are February 29th

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Rap or Rap Music: -Genre of R&B music that consists of rhythmic vocals declaimed over musical iccompaniment. -The accompaniment generally consists of electronic drum beats combined with samples from other musical recordings

Interesting facts: -Since the mid-1980s, rap music has greatly influenced both the black and white culture in the U.S. -Much of the slang of hip-hop culture, including such terms as dis, fly, def, chill, and wack have become standard vocabulary of a significant number of young people of various ethnic origins. -Many rap enthusiasts assert that rap functions as a voice for a community without access to the mainstream media. -According to advocates, rap serves to engender self-pride, self-help, and self-improvement, communicating a positive and fulfilling sense of black hi.story that is largely absent from other American institutions.

The downside: -Gangsta rap has also been severely criticized for lyrics that many people interpret as glorifying the most violent and misogynistic imagery in the history of jKjpular music. Tha ctyli'n popMlnritii mith middls glafir inhitac hifi h»8n nttniirhad an iiigarioBC thrill caafcing of ihg moc( innidiown norti ^ —


lOSports

SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004*VOL. 40, NO.l 1

Just getting started by Benz Ng With the season just under way, the Maine South boys" track team has started off on the right foot and continues to compete at a high level. The Hawks recently competed against Highland Park, Lake Zurich, and St. Ignatius and won on both the freshman/sophomore and varsity level. On th6 freshman/sophomore level, the Hawks won with 114 points, with Lake Zurich scoring 68, Highland Park 36.5, and St. Ignatius with 8.5 points respectively. The Hawks took first places in 11 out of the 15 events. On the varsity side, the Hawks also emerged victorious totaling 118.5 points with Lake Zurich scoring 51.5, Highland Park 30, and St. Ignatius with 22 points. Like the freshmen and sophomores, the varsity also took first place in 11 of 15 events. The first place winners in the meet were: the 2-mile relay of Mike Palermo, Pat Moran, Brian Ruder, and Lee Camarano (8:56.7); Brian Ruder in the 800-meter run

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(2:09.0); Gibly Lifton in the 400-meter run (55.5); Dane Volden in the 50-meter low hurdles (6.6) and 50-meter high hurdles (6.7); Pat Moran in the mile (4:57.4): the mile relay of Al Pinter, Dane Volden, Pat Moran. and Gilby Lifton (3:49.1); and Matt Annes in the pole vault (12'6). David Spencer also attributed to the cast of Hawks with three first-place finishes. Spencer claimed first in long jump (19"6), high jump (6'2), and set a Maine South fieldhouse record in the triple jump with a mark of 40 feet 10 inches. With their victory against all three teams, the Hawks pushed their record to 6-0, but refuse to rest on their laurels. The coaching staff, headed by Coach Tumilty. has emphasized that the team must continue their intensity not only in meets but also in practices. The Hawks look to continue their high level of competition with meets against Fenwick, Notre Dame, Hoffman Estates, Prosser, and then the Niles West Invitational on March 5.

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Sports 11

SOUTHWORDS'FEBRUARY 27, 2004ÂŤVOL. 40. NO. 11

by Katie Waller The last buzzer rang for the girls' basketball team the night of Tuesday, February 17. The first round regional loss to Buffalo Grove was a tough one for the Hawks, but the girls can pack up their uniforms knowing they put up a good fight. The first quarter started out with both the Hawks and Bison battling it out neck in neck. In the second quarter the Hawks were able to push ahead and gain a ten point lead at one point. However, Buffalo Grove was unrelentless and stole the lead back with a last Fonle Jrive.s to the hoop. photo by Kiley Borowski second shot by Buffalo

Grove's Ashley Sandstead making the score 27-25 at half time. The Hawks could almost taste victory, with junior Britt Zwolfer leading the scoring attack with eighteen points which included three threepointers. Unfortunately, the girls were unable to get the job done in the second half, losing by a score of 61-46. "We came so close to beating them [Buffalo Grove], and we should have. It's just sad that it's all over

Stacking up the wins by Kevin Collins The Maine South boys' basketball team went through upset city just a couple weeks ago, as they knocked off both Niles West and Prospect in the same week. Against Niles West, the Hawks started out slow, behind the Wolves with a score of 7-0 before they scored even their first basket. However, the Hawks were able to rally back on their home court despite being down seven at halftime. The guys accelled and ended up beating Niles West by a solid seven points. After the game, junior Sean Price was asked his thoughts on the game, "It was just real fun, ya know. Basketball, it's just a fun game. That game was just a whole lot of fun." Price and the rest of the team keemed very pleased and excited about the fun win over the Wolves In their next contest, the Hawks were taking on Prospect, a highly regarded team with a fine reputation who just missed an

upset over one of the top teams in the state, Glenbrook North. The Hawks started out slow once ag ain. being down by 18-8 after the first quarter. Colin O'Malley was asked about the reason the Hawks start out slow before big upsets and he replied, "I don't know." The Hawks then outscored Prospect 21 3 in the second quarter and never looked back, winning the game by a whopping ten points. This Friday the Hawks are taking on the Evanston Wildkits in a big conference game. Evanston will be coming in undefeated in conference. The Hawks nearly beat them last time, the game being tied with 4 minutes left, until Evanston edged away. The regionals will start the Tuesday after the Hawks last game, and they will be playing Glenbrook North at Glenbrook South. Come watch if you want to see an upset.

now," commented senior post Lauren Shesek. While the Hawks did not come out of the game victorious, there were some individual victories for two of the players before the game in the Country Three-Point Showdown. Senior Melissa Rauschenberg and junior Patti Ristau pulled out their Agame for the shootout prior to the game and both were able to advance to the next round that was held Thursday, February 19. Some tears were shed, but for the most part the Hawks held their heads high as they exited their gym for the last time as a team. With an overall record of 15-17 for their season, the girls know that they have improved tremendously from last season. The four seniors will be missed, but with eight returning players next year, the Hawks will be looking to make a run for the state title.

Hey, You! With the winter sports winding down their seasons, Southworc/s\s looking to start covering all the exciting spring sports, and that's where you conne in! If you would like to write for Southwards by covering one of the spring sports, stop by V130 and drop off an article, or talk to Greg Mitchell or Katie Waller.


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2,U04> SPORTS Boys' Basketball • Girls' Basketball • Indoor Track • Boys' Swimming • Girls' Gymnastics • Wrestling

It's that time of year again by Caroline Kochmit It's that time of year again! Yes, that's right, it is time for the girls" track season, While training all winter, the girls worked hard and their times proved it. Last Thursday, the girls hosted Lane Tech and Taft. They won with a score of 69 to 59. Congratulations to Karen Magiera for placing first in the 220-yard dash, Ashleigh Morris in long jump, Caroline Kochmit in 50-yard high hurdles, and Jenny Curry in pole vault. The 880-yard relay team also placed first along with the 4 x 1 relay. The lady Hawks were now looking for a challenge, and that is exactly what they got on February 17. The Hawks hosted Lake Zurich and St. Viator's in a tri-meet. The meet was a close

one. but Lake Zurich was too much to handle in the distance races. The lady Hawks took

high for coming meets and the girls are excited to run this Friday in the Hawk Invite, where the Lady Hawks take on six of the top teams in the state. But the girls cannot rest after the invite. Conference meets will begin soon after. The Central Suburban League conference is one of the most competitive conferences in the state for girls' track, as is the case with most other sports, and the team is expecting to do well, the team will face powerhouses such as New Trier, Glenbrook Sout and Niles West, the girls are ree' to step it up. In order to meet these expectatons, the team will continue to work hard and set new records and personal best times.

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second. The girls did a great job even though it is the beginning of the season. Anticipation is

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Who; The Maine South boys' indoor track team What: The Fifth Annual Wolfpack Track and Field Indoor Invitational

Annual Wolfpack Track and Field Indoor Invitational. The participating teams this year will be Aurora East, Barrington, Bartlett, Fenton, Immaculate Conception, Niles North, Niles West. Rich South, Schaumburg, Lyons, and your very own Maine South. Three levels of competition will be run including freshmen level, sophomore level, and varsity level. The Invitational will start at 5 p.m. at Niles West High School on Oakton. and will include fourteen track events and

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When: Friday. March 5 Where: Niles West High School Why: The 2CX)4 Maine South boys' track team will be battling it out against eleven different schools next Friday, March 5 during the ever competitive Fifth

five field events. If you are looking for something to do next Friday and want to support your boys' indoor track team, head out to Niles West and catch a competitive invitational with plenty of events to watch. If traveling to Niles West is too far for you, stop by Maine South's fieldhouse to watch the annual Hawk Relays which will feature the Maine South girls' track team and numerous other area teams. Go Hawks!


Vol 40 issue 11