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Mama' Appears at South

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The last names of 49 names of the faculty are hidden diagonally, vertically, and horizontally in the word search. The list of names and the solution to the word search w i l l be printed in the next SW issue on Feb. 7.

Shortwords Congratulations to Nancy Moore, Park Ridge Junior Miss, w*o represented the city in the Illinois Jimior Miss Pageant and woo the Talent Award. The Pageant was held at Maine South on Dec. 29. ••* •** •*• The date of the Girl's Choice Dance, sponsored by the Junior and Senior class councils, has • been changed from Feb. 14 to March 15. • • *

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* * *

Interested students are invited to attend the next meeting of the newly-formed "Student Republicans for Action," a group planning to help with civic projects. The meeting will be held on Monday, Jan. 21, at 7:30 p.m. at Representative Juckett's office on Main St. ••* *** *** Due to financial difficulties, Soathwords has had to cut back on its proposed number of issues. Except for the fact that the senior issue wiU be cut from 8 to 6 pages, the remaining number of issues is xmcertain. -The price of eadi issue, consequently, has been changed from 10 cents to 15 cents. •** ••• ••* Freshmen: Don't forget your class party on Saturday, Feb. 1, from 7:30-10:00. Ooen swim, gym, and dance will be provided.

On Feb. 20, 21, and 22, Kim Fritz will star in John Van Druten's I Remember Mama, this year's all-school play. I Remember Mama is the story of a Norwegian immigrant family living in San Francisco in their early 1900's. The play is a series of reminisces given by Katrin, Mama's daughter, about her childhood. The play, adapted from a series of short stories by Katherine Forbes, (the Katrin of I Remember Mama) has a large cast of 22 people. The cast contains many new faces; only seven of the speaking parts are being played by students who have been on stage before. Kim Fntz, as Mama herself, has never performed a major part in a major production until now. Othc- members of the cast include Katrin, played by Roz Bauden'iistal; Papa, by Dan Palm; Uncle Chris, by John Vinopal; and the Three Aunts, by the trio of Nancy Dwyer, Sue Maas, and Mary Peters. The Student Director of I Remember Mama is Cathy Walsh, with Dave Walker and Geri Smith acting respectively as

Stage Manager and Assistant Stage Manager. Director Mr. MarteUo and Technical Director Mr. Pinelli are making a special effort to base the set on the actual Broadway set used when I Remember Mama onened in 1944. With that effort in mind, Mr. Pinelli and several student designers have created a complex set containing, among other things, two revolving platforms and a live cat used on stage. The cast and crew of the play are receiving much help in staging and production from manv Maine South families organized into the Frienfis of the Performing Arts (F.O.P.A.) These peonle are assisting the I Remember Mama staff by providing authentic Norwegian furniture, early 20th ce'ntury costumes, and lessons in speaking with a proper Norweeian accent. This meticulous attention given to every facet of the nlav adds to the already excellent quality of Maine South drama and staging. I Rcnembe'- Mama deals vr^h a family's ability to cone with P'-oblems by stickine together; all cast and crew involved agree

that its theme is love. Many people are looking forward to seeing the play. In fact, Mr. Davis, chairman of the English department, is so pleased with the production that he is requesting all freshmen English classes to read the play in class before its opening. Kim Fritz, the main character of I Remember Mama, is looking forward to the play. "Everyone is very excited because it's a good show with a lot of distinct characters to develop. It is a very touching story." Mr. Mai-tello aff^eed and added a comnliment to the cast, "I have been wanting to do this plav for the last 18 years, but I he";t'tate-i doing it until we had the right people." The plav will be nresented on TTiurs., Fri., and S a t , Feb. 20, 21, and 22. All Derformanres will be held at 8:00 o.m. Tickets a'-e $2.00 for adults. $1.50 for students, and no seats are reserved.

Readers Convey Play's Meaning

Lily Dawn and the Three Ladies is this year's Reader's Theatre oresentation. Basically, Reader's Theatre is a group of students interpreting plays, and instead of costumes, scenery and props, they use scripts, voice control, and facial expressions to convey the literature's meonlng. Lily Dawn and the Three Ladies is set in a Southern town and deals with an emotionally Vol. 11, No. 7 Maine Township High School South, Park Ridge, III. 60068 Jan. 17,1975 disturbed girl who is manipulated by three "charitable" old ladies. "The piece has an interesting range in its mixture of comic and tragic elements," remarked Many children will be enter- servant. Tonight is opening night for Mr. Granzyk, director of Readtained this year by The Beauty According to Director and the Maine South Adult Players' er's Theatre. and the Baest, this year's Thes- Thespian President Becky Bu- presentation of Take Me Almig. The play will be performed pian Children's Play which will ford, "Children's Theater is The play can also be seen be presented soon at some of unique. The players and crew Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 18 in competition against other high schools. March 22 marks the District 64 schools. have to adapt to the different and 19. The time for all perThe play is based on the fairy places the play is presented." formances is 8:00 p.m., with the begiiming of the state-wide district competition. tale of a beautiful maiden forced The presentation has three the price being $2.50. The students involved are: to live with an ugly beast who Technical Directors: Kim Fritz, Included in the list of adult Clarmarie Keenan, Mari Coles, repeatedly asks her to marry Clar Keenan and Joann Takehim. When she finally consents, hara. Assistant Director is stars are: Meg Thielen, Mr. Padmaja Pillai, Marybeth Lauthe beast turns into a handsome Kathy Phillips. Greg Stanton Bernie Roer, Mr. Ray Rees, er, Beth Lee, Joe Solon, Rich Pam Bohanna, Bob Leonard, Kingdon, Nancy Niemec, Patty prince. will be the prompter. Chemers and Lisa Collin. Another unique feature of the and Mr. Bob Vinopal. Denise Doherty will play Beauty, Fred Johnston, the children's play is audience participation. The narrator asks the beast. Pat Hennessy will be Melinda, Kim Heidkamp, Lor- children various questions, like what do they think will happen raine; and Heidi Geisler, the next, to help keep their attenminstrel. Orchesis, under the dlrectiMi 8:00 p.m. in the auditorium on tion. The cast also includes: Padof Miss Linda Miles, is plan- Feb. 28 and March 1. maja Pillai as the page, Tim ning many events in the future. Kupjack and Scott PhUlips as Orchesis will also perform at Plans for a show marking the 'Hinge' Offers Gerald and Rubin, Paul Bixby beginning of another decade at Washington Elementary School as the Sea Captam, and Debbie Maine South are being dis- on March 11. On May 2 the New Alt-ernotives Johnson as the Beast's mute cussed. I h e performance, to be group will perform for the Pan The Hinge Coffeehouse, localled New Beginnings, will fea- Hellenic Club of Park Ridge. cated on Busse Hwy. in Hink- ture live music by Sam AbLast week, the Orchesis execley Field, is open Friday and bate '76 and his group, several utive board and sfwnsor chose Saturday nights from 8:00-12:0'' male dancers (not associated nine new members after workfor conversation, refreshments, ments also included writing two and musical or dramatic enter- with Orchesis), and use of emo- shops and tryouts were held. tions in modem dance segments. The new members are: Mary essays. A meeting of all the tainment. The show will consist of bal- Colorato, Sue Ebner, Linda Egstudents who wanted to be an The Coffeehouse also offers a let and jazz dance along with an, Kathy Kropke, Julie LehAFS student was then held. figure drawing class every Tues- modem. Words and props will nert, Vicki Lo Bianco, Anna During this meeting, each per- day evening. In an informal also be used. Schlapak, Sue Tortorella, and son had to give a speech. A setting, Beth Thielen assists stuThis event will take place at Terry Virgilio. series of interviews then fol- dents in quick or long sketches lowed, one of which was with in any media from collage to the parents of each of these pen and ink. students. Beth, a student at the Art Sharon commented, "I'm so Institute of Chicago, encourdo o. ^ CK\ \i\ d a v\ C e — excited about going than I am ages beginners, those who wish scared. I hope to go to a country to expand their knowledge, or Ski CI u y^ !fY\€ m bf r s db, txc^ u . that speaks German because anyone else who just likes to that is what I am taking." draw to come and express themselves. She explained that before they decide what country she will go Each student progresses at bis to, the AFS people make sure own rate in a learning atmo^ a r o n has no relatives or sohere because, as Beth says, friends living in that country. "They are there because they Sharon won't be able to speak want to be, not because they English to anyone in the three have to earn a credit." months she is away unless the Working figures in clay wUl AFS gives her permission. "Ev- begin soon, and Beth is planen if the family that I stay ning a mural project for the with can speak English, they wall of the coffeehouse, in vol varen't allowed to speak it. I •ing the whole class. am supposed to learn about The drawing class is held their ways and do their kinds Thursday evenings from 7:30 xmof things," Sharon summarized. til 9:30 and is free of charge.

southwords

Students, Adults Perform

Orcfiesis Elects Dancers

AFS Student Picked Sharon Beckman '76 has been chosen to be Maine South's AFS student. In June, Sharon will travel to a foreign country and will live there until the end of September, although she is not yet certain to where she wiD be going. There weren't any specific requirements that Sharon had to meet, but she did have to fill out an application, ansMv-ering many questioos. The require-

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SOUTHWORDS

Pag* 1 SORRY! CfiKx

January 17,1975

Editorial

(OPEN UP LOCKERS!

Changes Require Organization

SC President Criticizes Present Ruling System Editor's Note: SC President Dan McGrath recently submitted a letter to Dr. Clyde Watson, principal, listing four specific complaints of the present ruling system. Below, major excerpts of that letter are printed verbatim. The entire letter, which consbts of over four pages, can be obtained for reading from a SC representative or a member of the SW staff. Lounge On Monday, Dec. 9, the following incidents took place: —Two of the three lounge doors were locked. Only the farthest door remained open. —There are approximately 1300 students eligible to use the lounge. For all practical purposes, there are only five lounge periods — 1, 2, 3, 7, 8; with 3 and 7 experiencing the heaviest attendance. The average attendance for the five periods could Tvua as high as 250 per period. —In order to use the lounge on Dec. 9, each student had to present his I.D. card. To accomplish this, the students had to line up in single file to pass through the single open door. Those that were in line outside the lounge when the bell rang were forced to give up their I.D. cards because they were "late" for lounge. —Each "late" student lost his lounge privileges. Library -Three of four Learning Resource Centers have been closed to students. This has also eliminated most of the tutoring provided by the faculty. —During periods 4, 5, and 6, large numbers of the students are without seats in the library because of the limited seating resulting from the close of the three Learning Resource Centers. —Two-thirds of the library is now closed in the morning before homeroom. This was done without any formal input from the students, who often found

themselves in severe trouble if located and apprehended in this area. —The Reserve Room has become a great annoyance for students because of insistence on examining the possessions of all students on their leaving and entering the room. —Librarians have exhibited a reluctance to assist students in their tasks of searching for lib'"ary materials on occasion. This has crippled the facility's basic function and caused great difficulty to students. Lockers The breaking open of lockers on Thursday evening, Dec. 19, was a gross violation of student trust. The proportions of this drug hunt are totally foreign and unacceptable to students. It brought about a great disruption in the educational process and has the potential to arouse extreme student anger and reaction. Students lost books or other possessions, were inconvenienced in time, became engaged in difficulties with the faculty because of tardiness, and had their integrity greatly injured. Cafeteria The cafeteria is a sore spot with the students. For instance, are students to be so regimented at Maine South that they cannot add a chair to a table without severe penalty by the deans? Chairs in the major aisles can constitute a fire hazard. However, we see little danger in an extra chair on the sides. Some attempts by the paraprofessionals to keep the cafeteria clean have resulted in a reduction of student cooperation. Student Council has documented records of students who have had their I.D.'s removed and referred to the dean because they refused to dispose of a pile of their neighbor's garbage pushed in front of them by the para-professionals during the course of their lunch.

In the past few weeks, tension has been building and students are upset, anxious, and bitter. Determination to obtain some changes is flaring. But just how they are going to get them remains a big question mark. Aggravated students complain of injustices done to them concerning the lounge, library, lockers, and cafeteria, but they stUl do not know exactly how to go about obtaining satisfactory changes from the administration. So many attempts at change have been presented before with so few results that students now realize that other methods must be investigated. Senior Pete Whitford held a meeting of the newly-formed Student Rights Revival Movement (SRRM) at his house on Wednesday, Jan. 8. Though desires for "the same rights that other students in the district have" and to be "treated like human beings" were voiced and the necessity for an exact, unobtrusive, very organized system was agreed upon, the meeting ended without a clearly defined purpose or plan. SC President Dan McGrath compiled a list of the major student criticisms of present rules in a letter to Dr. Clyde Watson, principal. The letter was definitive of the problems that exist, but few suggestions of change were offered. Basically, only a claim that injustice was done to many students was stated. Both the SRRM and SC know the problems, but they also know that proposals for new ruling must be planned carefully and slowly. They want their plan of action to be one that the administration finds both reasonable and acceptable. Those of us who were here two years ago

Councilwords

Council Outlines Discussed in Meeting by Carol Tomer The events of the past month and a half have no doubt affected the entire Maine South student body, whether through actual personal experiences or the knowledge of the experiences of others. A summary of events that have brought Student Council to its very recent status of having effectively CMIfronted the problems will show that Council is now in a position to pursue the solutions to those problems. Over Christmas vacation, the SC officers met vrith Dr. Clyde Watson, principal, to discuss the locker search and lounge practices. It was also over vacation that Council found out that the proposal to have the Executive Committee meet with the entire Council had been accepted. That meeting was set for Jan. 10. Council met over vacatic« and also devoted the first business meeting after vacation to preparing for this important meeting to insure maximum productiveness from a well-organized session. A letter, written by Dan McGrath, was sent to Dr. Watson outlining major areas of concern: 1) lounge; 2) library; 3) lockers; 4) cafeteria. Then, two days before the appointed meeting, the Executive Committee backed out. They decided that they would really prefer to meet with Council in smaller groups, i.e. officers, complex leaders, etc. At the Jan. 10 Council meet-

Editorial

Key to Locker Invasions Sought Concerning the opening of student lockers on Dec. 19, Dr. Watson stated clearly, "I admit this was a mistake. I can assure everyone that there will never be another mass opening of lockers." Dr. Watson, in fact, knew nothing of the investigation that was conducted by a group of policemen, city council members, and Mr. Elbert Smith, dean of students. Mr. Smith said that he planned to inform Dr. Watson of the check, but didn't. He admitted, "I should have notified him. I made a mistake in not notifying him, and I'm very sorry that I didn't." The unauthorized search was made of tietween 60 and 70 lockers, rather than the rumored 500. Mr. Smith stated that the lockers were picked at random and that the search was conducted for

remember the kind of results that a rash, unorganized plan, "the big walk-out," produced. Sure, a large group of students leaving the school showed the administration that they were dissatisfied with the school system, but it also showed them signs of immaturity. When dealing with the administration, mass participation is probably not the best tactic. Even with the entire student body in agreement with any proposed changes, change will not come about if the administration does not believe it to be necessary. If you want to see changes, offer ideas to the SRRM and SC representatives. Let them relay the ideas to the administration. Better yet, ask parents to write letters explaining the changes they'd like to see. After all, parents stiU supposedly know what's best for their kids, and the administration is much more likely to react favorably to constructive criticism and suggestions from parents than to sarcasm and vengeful acts of vandalism from students. Changes may develop slowly, yes, but that old saying still applies: "Better late than never." The waiting may seem long and the movement may even seem to have discontinued, but the things we want always take a long time and we have to be patient. Above all, be aware that all is not as rosy as a No. 1 rating can imply. Problems do exist, and as long as we accept them, those problems will remain. We've got to at least try, and vrith two student groups working together, maybe this time we'll get what we want.

the sole purpose of checking for drugs. Dr. Watson commented that there was "no report of anything found in the lockers." The problem of not being able to open some lockers the next morning resulted from the fact that several locks had been cut and replaced by new ones. The locks were cut if the combinations and keys received from the counselors didn't open the locks. Many students believe the opening of their lockers to be an invasion of their privacy. However, Dr. Watson stated that the lockers are not the property of the students, but of District 207. "We have every right to open the locker," claimed Dr. Watson. "We are only loaning the locker to you, and if at any time there seems to be substantial evidence of danger to students, we will open them for your safety."

ing, a compromise joint resolution was passed stating that 1) the SC upper house (consisting of officers, committee chairmen and complex leaders) meet with the Executive Committee on Jan. 14, and 2) the entire Council meet with the Exec. Comm. on Jan. 15. This joint resolution was made in an attempt to satisfy desires to meet in small groups and also to meet with the entire Council. The Executive Committee chose to approve the upper house meeting, postponing a decision on a full Council meeting indefinitely. This week, on Tuesday, SC officers, committee chairmen, and complex leaders finaUy met with the Executive Committee from homeroom through first period. Those administrators present were Dr. Watson, Mr. Barker, Mr. Simonson, Mr. Bitta, and Mr. Bonney. The meeting was designed to be a wx^rking meeting, in an attempt to explain problems and find solutions. The first topic discussed was the lounge. Although stating that the loss of semester lounge privileges for tard-'ness was announced in the daily bulletin before being put into effect, the Exec. Comm. did admit that it was a mistake to make peoole stand in line for lounge. The original intent was for onlv those who were late to lounge to show their I.D. cards. The I.D.'s should not have been taken away. Para-professionals have been instructed not to take I.D.'s, but just to get the name from the card. Dr. Watson suggested that SC formulate a proposal for the control of the lounge. Mr. Simonson expressed a receptiveness to SC monitors in the lounge rather than adults. The Exec. Comm. was completely agreeable to opening the closest lounge door. They explained that the reason for choosing the far door for the operating entrance was that it provided easier access to the snack bar line during lounge. As for redress for those people unjustly penalized, the administration stated that those people that were in line outside the lounge when their I.D.'s were taken should taDc individually to the deans, and a reinstatement of privileges will follow.

The next topic d'scussed was the library. TTie administrators admitted that the library is not operating at its full potential. One very valid comment made by SC members was that the library was being used as a lounge by freshmen and sophomores and that if they had lounge privileges, the overcrowding in the library would be cut down. The Exec. Comm. did announce plans to do some reshuffling at the end of this semester to allow for more use of the library at lunch. The administration's suggestion for the solution of the library problems was to form a committee consisting of an administrator, a librarian, and SC members to confront the library problems. The last topic brought up for discussion was the lockers. As stated in cne of the editorials. Dr. Watson admitted that the opening of about 60 lockers was a mistake. The Exec. Comm. went on to explain that the original thought was to pick specific lockers for searching. Somehow, though, a group of random lockers was selected. Dr. Watson summarized the locker incident by saying, "It was a great big goof."

Southwords The e4fieUI student newsnaper of Maine Townsliip Higli Sctiool Soutti, Parte Ridge, Illinois, MOM. Written and edited IS times eacli year by students o< tt<e lilgti school. Subscriptions Included with activity ticket, purchased separately at $2 per year, or Individually for 10c. (Priced higher for Issues of more than 4 pages.)

Edilor-ln-Chlef News Editor Features Editor InDcplh Editor Sports Editor

Carrie Reckert Maureen Bucliley Ellen Bush Janet Franz Dan McGrath

Assistant Editor

Anna Daskolian

Photo Editor Dave BarlOow Copy Editor Barb Brzozowski Sports Ftioto Editor ... Dave Glblxins Reporters Cheryl Babicz. Sharon Beckman. Ruth Buckley, Sharon Burke, Maria Chakos, Nancy Deswik, Laurie Freeman. JUn Hershey, Tom Holmes, Anne Huedepohl. Mike Keesey, Ken Krause. Margaret Kreppel. Kim Kumiega, Suzanne Kuntz, Donna Lawrence. Beth Lee. Marty McGrath, Mark Meyer. Sue Norden. Mary O'Keefe, Ron Pankau. Paul Ray, Debbie Schwleder. Karen Szymanski. Carol Tomer. News Bureau Editor . Paula PiasecM New^ Bureau Sta(f Gini Barklow, Beth Bower. Dave Downing, Sue Leonard, Tim McCurry. Sponsor ...^i Ken Beatty


January 17,1975

SOUTHWORDS

Page 3

Beware-The Finals Are Coming by Laurie Freeman "The finals are coming! The finals are coming!" cried the tiny messenger of fate throughout the halls of Maine South. What could this frightening warning mean? All the students, except freshmen and transferees, shake at this message because so often finals bring fear, gnashing of teeth, draining of brains, and sometimes failure. This article is directed mainly to the freshmen and transferees as a guide to help prepare and experience finals correctly. But for the other Maine Southians, this article may help you relive, remember, look forward to, and possibly get ill at the thought of finals, for you know what they're all about. The word final has such a negative connotation that half the battle of fear would be won if it were changed. The word final sounds like the end, fin. ished, judgment day, and entering the "Forest of No Return." Other aliases for finals create other moods: the midyear ex• amination (sounds too medical), or the midyear knowledge test (sounds too psychological), or the midyear challenge (sounds too much like a chess game with a Russian). The words term paper is another one of those fearsome phonetics creating sudden heebie jeebies for students. It sounds so terminal, like a gas chamber or an electric chair. Why don't people call term papers and finals unrealistic names so they don't sound so bad? Like midyear funsies, or silly papers? Because that would be deceptive advertising! There are three different ways ? to study for finals. The first way is to review all 250 pages of notes you have been ever so faithfully taking and filing. One who is using this method should have started three weeks ago. On the night before finals a quiet movie is recommended so no harsh pressure is put upon the mind. If you can only find four pages of notes and various scribblings from your classes - and can't recall the first two months of the school year, the ' next method for you is cram-

ming. This means that the night before finals you speed-read over 25 assorted books ranging from "Hamlet" to "The Origin of Man" and try to comprehend what went on in class for the last four months. With this method, the night before finals is flooded with coffee and cold showers and a lot of prayer. The last method of studying is don't. Many students just don't get around to reviewing

and finals come as a big surprise to them. Once in a great while, these students score the highest on these tests, but more often these students get on the five-year plan at high school. Whatever the method you decide on, remember a few things: bring two No. 2 lead pencils, a big eraser, three packs of gum to calm nerves, a rabbit's foot, and a complete set of nails to chew.

Dial BB,S For The Maine Line Pick Up Some Good Vibrations by Donna Lawrence "We're on. Dial 88.5 for the Maine line — WMTH — and pick up some good vibrations weekdays from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m." WMTH is the Maine Township radio station — student-run, faculty-sponsored, and owned by the Maine Township Board of Education. The station's programs reach all of Maine Township and touch Chicago "if there's a good strong wind blowing toward the lake." Mr. Otto Kohler, social science department chairman, Mr. Darin Woodfield, and o t h e r Maine East faculty established the station in 1958. Radio-promoters coaxed the Board of Education into obtaining a license along with a transmitter and necessary equipment. M a i n e East is the master station, but all the Maine schools share a portion of the broadcasting day. WMTH airs 40 hours a week casting news and sports, delivering commentaries, and programming music. Eye-opener news begins at 10:30; international, at 10:35. Local news enters about 10:35 followed by the 10:40 sports cast. The station also forecasts the weather and gives the time. Brief news intervals occur every hour, and at 4:50 the station concludes with the news Roundup. Late sleepers can wake to music at 12:30, the easy-listening WLAK style program. 1:05 is time for great composers — classical music performed by various orchestras around the world. Broadway hits and pop-

music air at 2:05, followed by "Music From the Underground" — FM hard rock. Top-40 music known as "Chicken" rock or "bubblegum" rock comes on at 4:05. The station signs-off at 5 p.m. The station helps students interested in communications break in to radio work. "I'm an advocate of leam-by-doing as opposed to learn-by-reading," related Mr. Wagoner, WMTH sponsor. "With first-hand experience, it puts them in a better position to know what's going on." Students are encouraged to earn a third-class engineering license from the FCC — the Federal Communications Commissicn. "One girl — Nancy Bums, music director of the station — has earned a firstclass license, which is considerably more advanced than a third-class license." Mr. Wagoner pointed out. "They are qualified after leaving here to legitimately say they worked for a radio station." Each staff member reports to PA-102B during an open study. About 35 to 45 students comprise the staff, and each period should have a crew of announcer, writer, engineer and producer. "I don't do anything — if anything goes wrong, I kick Dave Downing, the program director," asserts Mr. Wagoner. The station will currently accept membership applicationsfuture Lujacks can pick up an application in PA-103A, the student office. "Thanks for listening . . . stay tuned to 88.5."

MSW Youth Club— Fun For Everyone The Mary Seat of Wisdom Youth Group, which meets on Wednesdays, provides fun and enjoyment for high school students, 50 per cent of which go to Maine South. The club's current project is the annual V-show, Onstage '75. The show, sponsored by Mary Seat's Youth Council, involves over 200 kids. The completely student-run program consists of music and light comedy. Director Eileen Stuart '75

commented, "There is more interest this year than before, and I just get a better feeling about it. Since there are no tryouts, everyone who wants to can get in it." The V-show will be presented on March 6, 7, and 8. Concerts are also popular at Mary Seat, with almost one held every month. The next concert will be Feb. 22. The benefit concert will feature three local bands: Westfall, Episode

The Maine West " p o m pon squad" wekomet the Hawks at Tuesday's game. Wednesday, February 5, another game w i l l be played between the ^Aaine West and Maine South faculties and M-Clubs in the Maine South spectator g y m .

and Potash. .A big turnout is expected and everj-one is welcome. For the spiritually inclined, the High School Program is offered. This is run by Mrs. Jacqueline Quinn and features such topics as "Death and Dying" and "Morals and Values." Each class is held on a different night of the week, and all are open to anyone who is interested. The Youth Club also participates in many welfare and inner city related projects. A food drive is held at least once a year. Action Club, an off-shoot of the high school program, helps out in the soup lines downtown. The Summer Program is probably the most recognized activity of the club. Every Friday night, tlie group meets at the church, often drawing over 100 people. Volleyball tournaments and trips to the Dunes and to Honeyhill in Wisconsin are popular. An impressive factor in the Youth Club is that it's entirely youth-run. A Youth Council and Sr. advisor. Father John Cusick, oversee the Club. President Kevin McCarthy commented, "It is a loosely run organization, but it works."

Looking For a Job? Look Here First by Nancy Deswik Looking for a job? The routes to follow in tracking one down are numerous. Bulletin boards in school and stores, friends, and signs can all lead to employment. One way to find a job is to look at the job board in the Career Resource Center. Hundreds of students use this service, stopping in anytime during the day. According to Mr. Ken Reese, career counselor, "Usually it is a good service with a nice changeover of jobs." Secretarial and clerical skUls are in the most demand. Although 99 per cent of all jobs are announced to every student, the Career Resource Center also handles special situations. Mr. Reese receives calls from employers looking for someone with special qualifications, and students come for help in finding part-time work related to their major interest or a specialized work program. On occasion, graduates come back when they are looking for work. More full-time job opportunities come to the CRC at the end of the semester and in June, both for graduates and summer workers. Other ways of job hunting include reading bulletin boards in stores and the help-wanted ads. Some students apply at every likely place near their homes; others look for signs. A help wanted sign led Kathy

Banke '75 to her job at McDonald's. "I saw the sign when I went in to buy lunch and asked for an application along with a cheeseburger." A friend told Dave Barklow '76 about his job as an Andy Frain at O'Hare. "I had to go downtown and fill out an application and have a short interview." For students who want to get away for the summer, finding a job is more complicated. Often relatives or friends of friends may know someone who can find a job opening. Bob Juckett '75 has worked in Colorado for two summers, "because there's nothing to do here." He originally found his job through a roundabout method, starting with people his sister knew. In making long distance work plans, start early. Leslie Schiemann '75 began looking last spring vacation for a job in Wisconsin. A neighbor eventually helped her get her job of giving tours of a light house in a State Park near Ephraim. Sometimes being in the right place at the right time can land your job. Sandy Artisuk '75 worked at an airport in Culver, Indiana, during the summer. "I actually found the job by accident," she stated, "and wound up doing everything from typing flight schedules to refueling planes." So if you're thinking of working, keep your eyes open, and check around for opportunities.

Sue Leonard itretehet for another point in Friday's district championship.


Page 4

SOUTHWORDS

January 17,1975

Cagers Crush CSL Foes by Jim Hershey Tonight the basketball Hawks travel to meet the Maine East Demons, owners of a 2-3 record in the Central Suburban. The Hawks are now U-1 in overall play and 6-0 in conference with last weekends' victories over Niles West and New Trier West. "Every team we meet is going to be sky-high for us, we are the team to beat," commented Hawk Coach Quitman Sullins. "We know we have to get up for every game. East has some fine shooters in Brown, Mahoney and Bums. They are scrappy and will give anybody a good ballgame." The Hawk netter won second place in the highly comoetitive East Aurora Christmas Tournament and have remained unbeaten in conference play to hold the first spot in the CSL. Against Crystal Lake in the first game of the tourney, the Hawks breezed to a 75-52 victory. Ted Henderson led the scoring attack with 16 points. In the semi-final game against East Aurora, the Hawks jumped to a 39-25 halftime lead. An airtight tomcat defense closed the gap in the second half. However, Boesen put away two free throws in the final minute to seal a 55-52 victory. Coach Kivisto said "Our kids had a lot more confidence in the second half. I think they were awed by Maine's size in the first half." He also remarked "I would rate Maine South and East Leyden as the two best teams in the state." In the finals the Hawks were

matched with East Leyden. The Eagles boasted a front line of 7'2, 6'9, and 6'7. Throughout the game the lead shifted back and forth. With four seconds left in the game, Mike Sellergren made a lay-up over 7'2 Tom Dore to tie the game and send it into overtime. With Joe Crosby hitting a crucial free throw, the Hawks never tired in the overtime until the Eagles' Castro suddenly appeared all alone downcourt, received a long pass, and laid the ball in as the gun sounded. For South, Boesen scored 21 points; Chrzan, 14. The Hawks tallied only 8 of 17 free throws while the Eagles hit 14 of 20. Junior Glen Grunwald totalled 38 points and 17 rebounds. Coach Blackman of Leyden remarked after the game "I still don't know who is the better team." He also said "I have to give Sullins credit for the defense they played. I don't know what it was." Before the tournament, the Hawks beat Niles East 70-58. Boesen had 26 points and 12 rebounds, Henderson and Chrzan scored 16 and 13 points, respectively, as Mike Sellergren grabbed 10 rebounds.

Pete Boesen ripped the nets for 32 points and Joe Pagone made six free throws in the last minute to give the Hawks a 74-70 victory over Niles West. Marty Block netted 25. The Hawks outrebounded the Indians 43-25. Coach Billy Schurr said "John Kuntz really hurt us on the boards; it was one thing we thought we could stop but didn't." Kuntz had 13 rebounds. Previously unbeaten in conference, New Trier West fell victim to the Hawks 83-53. Making 67 per cent of his shots, Mike Chrzan scored a career high 28 points. Henderson tallied 16; Boesen, 14. Chrzan said "The first couple of shots I made really built up ray confidence, so I just kept on shooting." Sullins commented on the last three games: "Saturday night we looked more like ourselves. We were snotty aeainst Maine West and Niles West. Against New Trier we put together four quarters." He said "Our defense is the phase of the game that we have to improve on. I'd also like to see a better scoring balance and a better fast break." Sullins described how he pushes his players to get keyed up

by Ken Krause Hie Maine South varsity swimmers opened the new year last weekend by splitting a pair of dual meets. The Hawks lost

South jumped to a quick start by outscoring the Trojans 22-18 in tumbling, but then proceeded to lose and commit errors that they have rarely ever done. "There really was no reason for us to perform as poorly as we did," commented Coach Tom Higgins. "Neither team looked very good, perhaps Glenbrook

Foilers Look Downstate by Paul Ray The fencing team has returned from the holiday vacation with a resolution to go downstate for the championship playoffs. In the recent Amateur Fencers League of America meet, seven Hawk fencers participated with college foilers vying for first place. The seven, Andy Bonk, Marie Carlson, Dale Franke, Jim Gregory, Fred Perlini, Eric Priest and Mike Thorsen placed well with three of them, Thorsen, Priest and CarlsMi going to the quarter-finals and two, Perlini and Bonk making it to Uie semifinals before being eliminated. In recent district games the

for each game. "Each player plays against himself all week, not thinking about the other team much, giving 100 per cent

a tough meet to Glenbrook South on Friday night by a score of 97-75, then bounced right back at home the next afternoon, crushing Niles East by a whop-

fencers were foiled by Niles West, but paid their respects to Niles East by winning an excitingly close meet, saved at the last moment by Rick Arouz. Coming events to be watched for are the New Trier West meet and the loter-suburban Championships. "The Championships usually is a pretty good indicator of which teams will go downstate," remariced Coach John Doherty. Coach Doherty is pleased with the improvement the team has made and is confident that the team will go downstate. If this happens. Coach DcAerty will pick the top six men to represent the team.

John Davit performs an iron cross in the loss against Glenbrook North.

had an edge because they had a meet two nights before We hadn't had a meet in one month." Craig Martin broke his own record, edging up to a 7.59 in the all-around competition. Craig was really the only Hawk to do well in any event. Martin tallied an 8.25 on the P-bar. a 7.55 on sidehorrse and an 8.55 on the high-bar. "The high-bar killed us, we got scores of 4.0 and 4.3 other than Craig's total," commented Mr. Higgins. Charlie Haapala did win the tramp though, scoring well-below his average with a 6.45. John Davis was the lone other Hawk bright spot, tallying an 8.3 on the rings. "John did just a great job, if he can keep this up, he is a sure-bet for sectionals. It is the best he ever has done." Higgins remarked. Commenting on tonight's match against Highland Park, Coach Tom Higgins remarked. "Highland Park is a low scoring team. I don't think we will have much of a problem with them. They score in the 85 point range." Not all the meets are going to be as smooth as tonights; the Hawks travel to Niles West tomorrow afternoon to challenge one of the state's strongest teams. Bart Connor, state champion last year in all-around competition leads a band of talented Indians. "NUes West is the number one team in our conference and one of the tops in the state. It is a very tough team. The team has a great deal of depth and experience." The Niles West meet is a crucial one if the Hawks are to advance in the division. "Bart Conner is a fantastic gymnast, he'll be very tough and will be sure to score plenty of points. This meet depends on us, our team is capable of scoring 130 points, but we haven't done any better than the 123 points we scored in our first meet," remarked Mr. Higgins.

effort. If he doesn't give 100 per cent effort, then he has defeated himself mentally before the game has even started."

Grapplers Improving by Tom Holmes Most of us have been busy trying to get back into the swing of things since the Christmas vacation; South's varsity wrestlers were grinding heads the whole time. South's matmen managed a fourth place at the Prospect Tourney, losing to state-ranked Downers Grove. Tonight the Hawks face the

Tankers Meet Deerfield Tonight

Flexers Face Niles Indians by Mark Meyer The varsity gymnasts dropped a 120-113 decision to the Glenbrook South Trojans in conference action. The Hawks now hold a 2-2 conference slate and 5-2 overall record. Maine meets the Highland Park Little Giants tonight in the last home meet. Against Glenbrook South,

A Hawk swimmer strokes his way ta a second place finisii ever Niles East.

ping 115-39 margin. At Niles East, the Hawks were led by Dane Kozie, who won both the 200-yard freestyle and the 100-yard backstroke. Kendall Banks, winner of the 100-yard freestyle, also joined Jeff Leigh, Ken Krause, and Kozie to take the medley relay event. Leigh also placed in the backstroke after turning in an excellent time in that event the night before, and Krause won the breaststroke event. Last week's action left the Hawks with a divisional record of one win and no losses, and an overall record of 4-5. They now enter the home stretch, mostly against divisional opponents, with a good chance of improving their record, starting with a tough meet against Deerfield tonight. Last year, the Hawks barely edged out Deerfield in the last event, and Coach Art Johnson is look'ng for a repeat. "Deerfield also lost their meet with Glenbrook South, but by a slightly larger margin than our loss." he commented. "It should be a tight meet all the way, but 1 think we can win it."

powerful Deerfield Warriors and tomorrow to meet the equally tough Niles East Trojans. "Deerfield is a very tough team this year, it is a well-balanced team with a great deal of strength in the middle weights. Niles East has come close to beating Glenbrook North and Waukegan, two of the state's best teams. This weekend should tell us if our efforts to improve have taken hold," explained Hawk Coach Tom Ziemek. At Prospect, the Hawks had but one winner, Kurt Fiech (126). Fiech defeated one of the state's top wTestlers in the finals of that class, Russo of Maine North, a once-beaten wrestler. Jim Cox, returning from an injury gained at Maine East, did very well. Cox took second at 185, losing in the finals to Downers Grove. "Several of our guys lost early in the first round." eaid Ziemek. "Most of these guys lost to finalists as it later turned out. We did well in the wrestleback brackets, but would have needed a better early showing to have moved past third place York." At Niles North, the Hawks wrestled mostly juniors and sophomores for the sake of experience and destroyed the hapless Vikes. 64-0. "I think the team is now emerging from some of its problems. We had a good attitude and good performances. Everything we do now is geared for the districts. It is our hope to win the district and place as many boys in the district and on the allconference team as possible," concluded Mr. Ziemek.

Sportswords

Talented VB Team Beaten; Rank As Hustling Team by D^n M c G r a t h , Sports Editor

On Wednesday evening, South's talented Girl's Volleyball Team was knocked out of the state playoffs by powerful area leader, Barrington. The Mustangs edged the Hawks in two matches, winning hard-fought contests by the scores of 15-7 and 15-11. South earned the right to play the Mustangs by winning the Maine West District. "Our girls played very well under pressure, they have never cracked all season. That is one of the reasons for our success," commented Coach Chris Voelz. "We played a &-1 offense all season because the great talents of our setter Lulu Cislak allowed us to have more variety and power in our offense. Though we had a small team, the girls hustled and had a great attitude." South defeated sister schools Maine East and Maine West before crushing Schaumberg 15-9. 16-14. and 15-4 in the district championships at Maine West. "Schaumburg played very well against us, but we expected them to be tougher on the court. "Though Barrington emerged from a relatively weak conference and district, they were a powerful and weUcoached team. We suffered an earlier setback to them in the season, losing in three games. The Mustangs used a 4-2 offense and a fine blocking defense. They also had a consistent serving game."


Vol 11 issue 7