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Weekender January 1 2020 • www.weekender.co.uk

Greenwich & Lewisham

Cinema / Theatre / Education / Arts / Music / Food & Drink / Family / Property

String theory

The Blackheath teenager shooting for the stars


START THE DECADE RIGHT NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS GO TO THE CINEMA MORE OFTEN Come and catch all the Oscar favourites, latest blockbusters, gripping documentaries, the best of independent cinema and even National Theatre live specials!

VEGANUARY/DRY JANUARY amazing vegan options all year delicious selection of mocktails and alcohol free beers. Cheers to that!

SUPPORT INDEPENDENT BUSINESSES MORE Catford Mews is home to 5 local food vendors; Daun’s Deli, Fuse, and Patty Man. world right on your doorstep!

LAUGH MORE! After the roaring success of last we will be hosting it every month. Join us on January 9th at 7.30PM Tickets £5

32 Winslade Way SE6 4JU Catford. Find us by the iconic big black cat in the Catford Centre.


Pick of the Week Kundalini yoga, 5K Park run and New Year, New Hobbies By Holly O’Mahony

editor

Laura Burgoine

Run your way into 2020

The 

What better way to start the new year than with a bracing run in the park? Whether you’re an experienced runner or someone who can’t even remember if you own a pair of trainers, Park Run welcomes all to its weekly 5k jogs. Those aged 15+ can take part in the weekly 5k Park Run at 9am on Saturday morning in Avery Hill Park. While younger runners aged 4 – 14 can take part in a 2k run on Sunday morning at 9am in Eltham Park South. January 4 & 5 at 9am. Admission: FREE but register before your first visit. www.parkrun.org.uk

Greenwich & Lewisham Weekender is an independent weekly newspaper, covering the boroughs of Greenwich and Lewisham. We publish every Wednesday, covering every postcode sector of the borough, and boasting, by far, the highest weekly circulation in Greenwich. Each week, we deliver to homes in every Greenwich neighbourhood, with further copies stocked at convenient public stands. We are also the highest distribution newspaper in Lewisham. You can also view each edition online, as well as daily news and events, on our website: www.weekender.co.uk The Greenwich & Lewisham Weekender covers all aspects of life in the boroughs, including music, theatre, comedy, film, events, and food and drink, as well as all your community events and campaigns.

Weekender The Greenwich and Lewisham Weekender is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, please contact 020 7231 5258. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

A fairytale comes to life at New Eltham Methodist Church

Stretch your way into the new year At Greenwich West Community Centre, you can take part in a classic kundalini yoga class led by Joanna DunbarWebb. Physically, the class resembles hatha yoga (think slow movements and postures held for longer than in vinyasa yoga), while a key aspect of kundalini yoga is in the sound, mantras and energy healing involved. Whether you’re new to yoga or an old-timer, book in to start the new year flexibly. Greenwich West Community Centre, 141 Greenwich High Road, Greenwich, London SE10 8JA. January 4, from 10:30am - 11:45am. Admission: £12 drop in/£50 for five classes. www.greenwichwest.org.uk/activities

Thought panto season was over? Think again… because New Eltham Community Productions (NECP) are giving the classic fairytale Rapunzel the panto treatment. Can the lowly village hairdresser Dame Delilah and her son rescue princess Rapunzel from her lonely tower? Or will a villain thwart their attempts? With jesters and dancers, songs and jokes, NECP’s panto hopes to bring a bit of festive cheer into January. New Eltham Methodist Church, 435-439 Footscray Road, New Eltham, London SE9 3UL. January 4 - 11, from 2:30pm - 10pm. Admission: £8. www.necp.org.uk/home/4590154022

Weekender Editor: Laura Burgoine Advertising Manager: Tammy Jukes Media Partnerships: Anthony Phillips Advertising team: Katie Boyd; Clarry Frewin; Lorraine Wood; Sam Ratcliffe Editorial: Michael Holland; Holly O'Mahony News reporters: Katherine Johnston; Josh Salisbury Design Manager: Dan Martin Design team: Aurelio Medina Finance: Em Zeki Managing & Commercial Director: Chris Mullany Managing & Editorial Director: Kevin Quinn Offices at: Unit A302, The Biscuit Factory, Drummond Road, SE16 4DG. Printed by Iliffe Print Cambridge Ltd – www.iliffeprint.co.uk News: 020 7231 5258 / news@weekender.co.uk Ads: 020 7232 1639 / ads@weekender.co.uk

New year, new skills? If a New Year’s resolution of yours was to learn a new skill, visit Deptford Lounge this week, where you can try a taster session or beginners’ class in something a bit different. On Thursday evenings, take part in a group adult singing class led by trained singing teacher Nathan Martin. Then on Sundays, you can join a free ping pong session – bats and balls provided. Deptford Lounge, 9 Giffin Street, Deptford, London SE8 4RJ. Singing class on January 2, from 6pm - 7pm, admission £10/£5 concessions. Ping pong on January 5, from 10am - 4pm. Admission: FREE. www.deptfordlounge.org.uk

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Last chance: See Greenwich’s advent windows If you’re yet to see Greenwich’s live advent windows, you have until Thursday to do so. Now in its 13th year, the tradition – which is organised by St. Alfege Church – sees 24 windows across Greenwich town centre present a unique display centred around one main theme, which this year is ‘waiting’. Those keen to browse the advent windows can pick up a map and wander between the various displays, which remain on show until January 2. Details can be found on www.adventwindows.com

January 1 2020 3


spotlight

Shooting for the stars: Blackheath teenager awarded a place in the National Youth Orchestra

4 January 1 2020

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spotlight

Blackheath teenager Ella Richardson has been awarded a place in the prestigious National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. The 15-year-old is one of just 164 musicians to play with the orchestra, who in 2020 will be performing at Warwick Arts Centre, Birmingham Symphony Hall, the Barbican and the Southbank Centre as part of three UKwide tours. Holly O’Mahony speaks to Ella to find out more about her achievement…

Holly O’Mahony: You’ve recently been awarded a place in the very prestigious National Youth Orchestra (NYO). How does that feel? Ella Richardson: I still can't believe it. I was really sad when my time with the National Children’s Orchestra (NCO) ended, so to be able to continue my musical journey through the NYO is a dream come true. Many of the friends I made at the NCO have continued on to the NYO, too. It just feels like a big family where we are all working as a team to make the best music. HOM: Tell us about your journey with music. What inspired you to get into it? ER: My musical journey started when I joined the Guildhall School of Music when I was four. My mum, who attended Guildhall as a singer, got me into music. She runs stage schools and a music nursery in Blackheath, and music has always been at the heart of our family. HOM: You began playing violin when you were seven years old. Did you immediately feel a connection with the instrument? ER: I immediately felt a connection with the violin. When I first started to play, my mum always told me to focus on trying to make the best sound, while always taking the audience on a musical journey. HOM: Before earning your place with the NYO, you played with the NCO for seven years.

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Can you tell us about your time there? ER: I loved being a part of the NCO. I made loads of friends and got to lead the London Regional NCO in my last year, which was a real highlight for me. Another came in my first year when we got to perform a concert in Birmingham as part of the NCO’s 35th anniversary celebrations. HOM: Is there a particular musician you aspire to be like? ER: Nicola Benedetti is my idol! I got to perform with her at the NCO’s 40th Anniversary celebrations at the Queen Elizabeth Hall. I also took part in a masterclass with her at BBC studios in my final year with the orchestra and managed to get my picture taken with her, which my mum has framed. HOM: What is your favourite piece of music to perform and why is it special to you? ER: I love ‘La Mer’ by Claude Debussy. I have a bias towards French composers because my maternal grandmother is French. HOM: Playing with the NYO will see you perform at some of the country’s top music venues. Is there a concert, or tour, you’re particularly excited for? ER: I'm actually excited for all of it, but I think I’m most excited to perform at the Barbican Centre in January. It's right next to the Guildhall School of Music, which has been my home and happy place for over 10 years.

HOM: You must have an incredibly busy schedule. How do you balance your violin practice with your school work? ER: I find this really hard, but now I’m a boarder at the Purcell School of Music in Hertfordshire, I have practice time allotted in my timetable. Before I started at Purcell though, I would practice for three hours when I got home after school. On Saturdays, I’m at the Guildhall School all day and on Sundays, I usually spend up to five hours practicing. HOM: Gosh, that sounds like very hard work! Do you have any advice for aspiring musicians hoping to follow in your footsteps? ER: Practice, Practice and then practice some more. For me, it has paid off, but I still have so much work to do. If this is your dream, then go for it and put in the time. The National Youth Orchestra is performing at the Barbican Centre, Silk Street, Barbican, London EC2Y 8DS. January 5, at 7pm. Admission: £10 - £27/£5 for under 25s. www.nyo.org.uk

January 1 2020 5


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Theatre

Missed panto season? Oh no you haven’t! If, between the present buying, work Christmas party, family get togethers and Big Day itself, you didn’t manage to squeeze in a Christmas panto this season, there’s still time: Bob Hope Theatre Actors’ Company have switched things up to stage their production of Snow White in January. Oh yes they have! So while we’re officially in the new year, don’t give in to festive season fatigue just yet, writes Holly O’Mahony… ©©Robert Piwko

Bob Hope Theatre Actors’ Company is an amateur ensemble and the theatre itself is run entirely by volunteers. As a result, those involved with the shows have to fit in rehearsals around other jobs and commitments. “By staging our pantomime after Christmas we can let everyone enjoy their celebrations with friends and family before knuckling down to bring audiences a great show,” explains Kirsty Davide, director and choreographer of Snow White. Though she works with the amateur company, Kirsty’s background is as a professional dancer and choreographer. The former took her all over the world and saw her perform on shows including The Laughter Show and the Royal Variety Performance. The latter, meanwhile, saw her choreograph everything from music videos to cruise ship entertainment and even work on the closing ceremony of the Olympic Village in 2012.

On moving to Eltham, Katy discovered the Bob Hope Theatre. “It is a fantastic, fully-equipped theatre that anyone would be proud to work in,” she says. “They have an incredible set up and a strong, supportive team who run the theatre to a professional standard. The shows are always of a high quality and you would fail to realise that they are all amateur performers.” Snow White is the third panto Kirsty has directed and choreographed for the theatre. “I chose Snow White as I always loved the film as a child and thought it would work well on stage,” she explains. With the story chosen, Kirsty then had to decide which version of it she wanted to work with. “It’s always difficult to find the right script, so I ended up reading tonnes before making my decision,” she says. “I chose Ben Crocker’s script because not only is his writing fast-paced and funny, it’s easy to adapt to suit my vision.”

As membership to the Bob Hope Theatre Actors’ Company is open to anyone above the age of 18, the shows often feature a larger cast than that found at your typical panto, which can prove tricky to choreograph. “It can be quite overwhelming with such a big cast, but I have two fabulous assistants – Wayne Morgan-Williams and Peter Stonnell – who help me out immensely,” says Kirsty. “Wayne plays my Dame, and we spend months on the design and style of the costumes. Peter gives me the freedom once I have choreographed my routines to be able to get back to work with the principals while he drums the steps into the cast. It all works very well,” she beams. With its origins dating back to the 1940s, one thing Bob Hope Theatre is in no short supply of is costumes. “The costume department is a giant treasure chest full of wonderful things waiting to be discovered,” grins Kirsty. As for the particulars of the production, Kirsty is reluctant to give spoilers. “What I will say is you won’t find many amateur productions attempting to stage Snow White as it’s quite challenging to say the least, but I think we will surprise our audience with this version. Expect another all-singing, all-dancing fun-filled show.” Snow White is on at Bob Hope Theatre, Wythfield Road, Eltham, London SE9 5TG. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from January 3 - February 1. Fridays at 7:30pm; Saturdays at 2pm and 5:30pm; Sundays at 2pm. Admission: £10 - £12. www.bobhopetheatre.co.uk/index.html

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January 1 2020 7


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ADVERTORIAL

News from the Royal Borough of Greenwich

10 must-reads this year Royal Greenwich has 12 libraries across the borough with 28 book clubs and more than 270,000 books, so you’ll never be short of a new title to read. But to get you started, here’s 10 top picks from our library staff bookworms that should definitely be on your list. Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo The joint winner of the 2019 Man Booker prize is a sensitive and beautiful novel that explores the lives of 12 black women in modern society. The book explores identity, heritage, feminism and race through a compelling multi-layered timeframe. The writing is raw and emotive yet delivers a readable and remarkable book that will stay with you long after you have finished it.

Big Sky by Kate Atkinson The latest instalment of the Jackson Brodie series. Jackson is a private investigator with a difference – his sensitive and caring nature often leads him into serious trouble. Through an interesting cast of characters, each with a secret past linked to a seedy part of history they thought they’d left behind, Atkinson skilfully unfolds a plot that will keep you guessing until the end in this witty and poignant novel.

You Will Be Safe Here by Damian Barr Set in South Africa across multiple time frames, this novel tells the story of a woman and her young son buried in a concentration camp during the Boer War. We then experience South Africa’s turbulent history during apartheid and finally arrive in 2010. Beautifully written, powerful, poignant and moving, you won’t see the surprising end coming which reveals the link between the characters.

My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite This is the book that had everyone talking last year. Hilarious black humour that is also sensitive, sardonic, wise and astute. The book explores relationships within the family unit focusing on the story of female siblings and asking the reader to consider whether blood really is thicker than water. A satisfying read that manages to be an addictive page-turner.

The Year Without Summer by Guinevere Glasfurd A powerful and beautifully written novel based on a true story, released in March. In 1815, on an Indonesian island, a volcano erupts that covers the sun leading to the loss of lives and worldwide climate change that culminates in abnormal weather conditions. The story is related by six different characters including a traumatised ship doctor and a poor farm labourer, each living their lives in challenging times.

Coming Up for Air by Sarah Leipcigar Inspired by a true story, this book begins in Paris 1899 where a random act leads to a chain of events taking the reader on a journey to Norway in the 1950’s and then on to current day Canada. Each strand of the novel is perfectly plotted as Leipcigar has the capacity to really enthral her readers with beautifully evocative and lyrical writing. Due to be released March.

Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield A delightful and spellbinding gothic tale that begins with a miracle on a winter’s solstice evening. This event at the Swan Inn changes the lives of the inhabitants of a small Oxfordshire village. Setterfield’s pure descriptive writing emanates the traditions of great storytelling, making this the perfect book for cold winter evenings.

Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton Another exhilarating, fast-paced thriller from a Sunday Times bestselling author will be released later this month. Set at a school in rural Somerset, this is no ordinary day – there is a blizzard raging outside and a dramatic siege situation that changes everything. The atmosphere and tension will keep you on the edge of the seat in this tale told through the eyes of multiple main characters.

The Mirror and The Light by Hilary Mantel The hotly anticipated third part of Mantel’s historical trilogy will be released in March.

False Value by Ben Aaronovitch An urban fantasy novel set in an alternative version of London where magic and mystery are common. Detective and apprentice wizard Peter Grant’s life is about to change as he becomes a father and takes a new job where there is, of course, a mystery to be solved. A funny, enjoyable light read that will keep you entertained. Bonus: Ben Aaronovitch will be delivering a talk at Woolwich Library on 12 March, 7pm-8.30pm.

www.royalgreenwich.gov.uk

Mantel skilfully brings the past to life and paints a convincing and compelling picture of life during harsh and dangerous times.

If there isn’t anything here which takes your fancy, or you want to encourage your children to read, pop into your local library and speak to our staff who can help you find something gripping. There is also an extensive range of books available from our online service. Find out more about our home library service or where your local library is at royalgreenwich.gov.uk/libraries

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community trust At The Heart Of The Community

news from charlton athletic community trust

Charlton Athletic Community Trust’s 2019 in review

„„Holiday course participants got their hands on Charlton's League 1 Play-Off Final trophy in June

2019 has been another busy year for Charlton Athletic Community Trust (CACT), which worked with more than 43,500 people in the last financial year. January saw CACT launch its new Street Violence Ruins Lives (SVRL) strategy by inviting Deputy Mayor of London for Policing & Crime Sophie Linden to The Valley as first-team players from both Charlton and Accrington Stanley wore SVRL t-shirts. The Connect project CACT leads on the delivery of has received backing from the Mayor of London, the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Bexley and Peabody Trust.

„„As part of Pink October, youth service members joined Lyle Taylor for a half-time race on Young Greenwich Day

„„City Hall's Lib Peck visited CACT's Summer Activities programme for 11 to 17-year-olds

In February, CACT celebrated the annual Football v Homophobia themed matchday with affiliated LGBTQI+ friendly team CACT Invicta, who took part in a half-time penalty shootout and a friendly against the Kent FA in the run-up to the themed matchday at The Valley.

Community 500 scheme. Her grandmother Carole had benefited from CACT smoking cessation programmes. The following week, the League 1 Play-Off Final trophy toured CACT’s programmes, including football courses for 5 to 15-year-olds that run at two Greenwich venues during school holidays. More than 70 people joined CACT at the Pride in London parade in July. Up & At ‘Em, a CACT mental health programme for over 65s, won one of two national awards in July. The first ever CACT Awards took place in September, as did the inaugural Young Greenwich Awards, celebrating staff and participant achievements. Young Greenwich Day went pink in October to support Lyle Taylor’s Pink October campaign, Lyle visited Avery Hill Youth Hub in New Eltham to judge a poster competition Young Greenwich held to raise awareness for Cancer Research.

Former Mayor of Greenwich Cllr Christine May visited CACT’s E-Z Cycle scheme in March. The e-bike scheme allows residents to hire a bike for just £10 a month.

Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health Jo Churchill visited the Extra Time programme for over 55s in October.

200 supporters did the annual walk to fundraise for the Charlton Upbeats, CACT’s Down’s syndrome team, in April. Four Upbeats also took on Dillon Phillips, Chris Solly, Jake Forster-Caskey and Josh Cullen in a swimming race to promote the walk.

Charlton’s Deji Oshilaja attended CACT’s newlyrelaunched Premier League Kicks programme in November, opening up about taking part in the same programme in Lewisham as an 11-year-old.

Manager Lee Bowyer also led a surprise training session with the Upbeats ahead of the walk. Two months later, the Upbeats won their ninth national title.

More than 400 children from local schools took part in the English Football League Kids and Girls cups. Players Jonny Williams, Dillon Phillips, Jenna Legg and Katie Startup all visited.

Young Greenwich, the youth service CACT delivers on behalf of the Royal Borough of Greenwich, held an event to re-open Valley Central Youth Hub in Charlton in April. Forster-Caskey was present along with more than 75 young people.

CACT finished the year celebrating CACT Christmas Spirit Day at The Valley, where fans visited Santa’s Grotto and an Extra Time choir sang outside the West Stand ahead of the game against Hull City.

A CACT participant’s granddaughter enjoyed a dream day at Wembley in June, leading the teams out for Charlton’s win against Sunderland. Eight-year-old Sydney became a supporter after obtaining her ticket through the Club’s „„CACT’s LGBTQI+ friendly football team & University of Greenwich students took part in Pride in London in July

10 January 1 2020

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ADVERTORIAL

News from the Royal Borough of Greenwich

ENTER THE BEST OF ROYAL GREENWICH BUSINESS AWARDS 2020 Nominations for Best of Royal Greenwich Business Awards 2020 are now open. The awards, in association with U+I, celebrate the variety of thriving businesses within the borough. They are free to enter and open to anyone who manages or owns a business in the borough. The awards have bought many benefits and great opportunities for previous winners: SELENA PANG owner of vintage style hairdressing salon, the Curious Comb and winner of the High Street Retailer Award 2019

GRACE OLUGBODI creator of the multi-award-winning maths board game Race to Infinity and winner of the Micro to Small Business Award 2019 for BeGenio

Selena Pang has just celebrated the tenth SELENA PANG owner of vintage style hairdressing anniversary of the Curious Comb, she moved salon, the Curious Comb and standard of hairdressing the salon to Greenwich four years ago. to the suburbs.” “I have always worked in central London and I wanted to bring a higher standard of hairdressing to the suburbs. The best thing about having my own business is the challenge. There is no limit to what you can do, it can be as successful as you make it. It’s a journey and I have really enjoyed it. We were delighted to win the High Street Retailer Award. We originally entered to get more exposure and build links within the community. “Winning the award has raised our profile. It has helped us attract new customers who would normally go somewhere else in town. It has made them try out local businesses like ours.” Visit: thecuriouscomb.co.uk

ADRIANNA BAKER owner of street food business, Back-a-Yard Grill and winner of the Young Entrepreneur Award in 2019

Grace Olugbodi is the creator of the multi award-winning maths board game, Race to Infinity. She set up BeGenio three years ago after a career in investment banking. “The best bit about running my business is the incredible feeling of achieving my mission to help children fall in love with mathematics. I entered the business awards because my business advisor really encouraged me to. I did not think I would win, let alone win what I was told was the most competitive category. “Since winning, I have had business support from the Council that is worth its weight in gold, and has helped me move forward in leaps and bounds.” Visit: racetoinfinity.com

KATE ZALYUBOVSKAYA Co-Founder and Director of Archery Fit and winner of the Young Entrepreneur Award 2018 KATE ZALYUBOVSKAYA Co-Founder and Director ofKate Archery Fither and winner of the Young Entrepreneur and husband Roman Godin Award 2018Archery Fit in 2015. Kate was opened

Adrianna Baker was a qualified chef working as a mental health carer. Her passion for food led her to start Back-a-Yard Grill in June 2018 in a community space in Greenwich. “I set up Back-a-Yard Grill because, even though I was working as a carer, I was more passionate about food and the service that comes with it. I started the business in Greenwich because I love the area. “Winning is such a massive opportunity. I am about to become a restaurant owner! My advice to applicants is to give it your best shot.” Visit: backayardgrill.co.uk

RAYMOND SHEEHY, Chief Executive of Bridge Support and joint winner of the Business Champion Award 2019

a professional archer and Roman was a banking and financial consultant. “The best thing about running a business is the family-like relations, friendly community, and being paid for doing what you like. We entered the awards because we have a product which deserves it. Winning raised our staff morale, added positive weight to our brand and helped us address a larger audience. “Just apply! If you think that your product or service is worth recognition – don’t hide it!” Visit: archeryfit.com

JULIA DYER Director of children’s shop, Ottie and the Bea and winner of the Independent Retailer Award 2018 Julia opened Ottie and the Bea in 2010, she was formerly an actress. “My favourite part of running a business is the customer side of things and the community. We were invited to apply for the business awards and I thought, why not have a go? “Through the awards we gained a mentor from the Business team at the Council, which was free. It was the first time I had someone to talk to about what I was trying to do.” Visit: ottieandthebea.com

Raymond Sheehy has worked at Bridge Support for ten years. It runs services to help people to be more independent within their communities, and a social enterprise cafe called Stir in Woolwich, which provides training for people to get back into work. “I entered the awards because I am passionate about Greenwich. I have lived in the borough for over 25 years and I was determined to contribute to the community. Since winning the award, we have got noticed by people and that has translated into two new projects with a value of just over a million pounds.” Visit: bridgesupport.org

If you own or work in a great local business, or know someone who does, make sure they are nominated before 24 January 2020. The winners will be announced at an award ceremony on 6 March. Enter now: royalgreenwich.gov.uk/businessawards

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Arts

NOW Gallery’s Jemima Burrill on curating Silent Madness Nigerian punk, a multi-channeled soundtrack and gimp-suited mannequins ‘playing’ tar-coated instruments are just some of the components that make up Silent Madness, NOW Gallery’s fashion collaboration of the year from designer Mowalola. The immersive installation aims to disrupt and question preconceptions of normality, while challenging traditional discourse surrounding African sexuality. Here to tell us more about it is the exhibition’s curator Jemima Burrill, writes Holly O’Mahony… When it comes to choosing a designer for the gallery’s annual fashion exhibition, Jemima always has a specific criteria in mind. “I am always looking for exciting, smart fashion that says something significant,” she says. “This year, we wanted something expansive with a sense of purpose; something less concerned with how fashion is made, more focused on looking at a concept or a way of being.” As well as working off a conceptual checklist, Jemima is responsible for ensuring the exhibition space is given to a diverse range of artists. Having offered the space to designer Charles Jeffrey in 2017/18 and Richard Malone in 2018/19, she was keen to see it filled with the work of a female designer this winter. “We always choose three designers to present an idea for the gallery and then select the one who works best with our theme or outlook,” she explains. “What struck me about Mowalola’s designs was how they [worked on both] men and women. Watching her last show, both sexes looked equally stunning, sexy and powerful,” she says. “Mowalola made the models strut with authority and sensuality, wearing clothes that truly emphasised [their presence], and gave them glamour and glory. It was a really exciting show to watch and there was no doubt in my mind that this was the woman I wanted in our gallery.”

12 January 1 2020

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So, what to expect from Silent Madness, Mowalola’s first solo exhibition? “The space has been transformed into a wild scene filled with music, a band and film,” reveals Jemima. “Mowalola has designed the most extraordinary textiles which wrap around the gallery creating a vibrant space where her band can play.” In what is being described as a ‘marriage’ between Mowalola’s Nigerian punk-inspired aesthetic and her passion for musical expression, the gallery walls, floor and windows have been draped in swathes of printed fabric, while the ‘band’ of mannequins take centre stage. On setting foot in the exhibition, visitors are given a set of headphones and MP3 player with a pre-recorded six-track playlist, from which they can select a song, or multiple songs, to inform their journey through Mowalola’s world. “Music is part of Mowalola’s essence as a creative person. It runs through her fashion and in collaborations with musicians such as Skepta, La Timpa, Dev Hynes and Steve Lacy,” explains Jemima. “She is obsessed with music and so it’s only natural that it has become a vital part of the show.” Visitors also encounter a series of hollowed-out speakers along the way. These house a set of six retro units which play a twominute film directed by Jordan Hemingway. “If you look at Jordan’s

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Arts

work, you can totally see why Mowalola picked him to work on her films,” points out Jemima. “He likes to push boundaries and is not interested in the conventional. Mowalola, too, doesn’t fit a typical fashion designer profile: she steps beyond women’s wear and men’s wear, and produces clothes with attitude that need to be filmed with attitude.” How does the exhibition fulfil its aim of disrupting preconceptions surrounding African sexuality? “Mowalola conjures up images of sexuality through her work, reclaiming narratives from her own Nigerian background and saying it is good to be sexy,” explains Jemima. “Mowalola often dresses in her men’s wear, celebrating her handsome androgynous fashion style. She can be all people and never wants to be pinned down.” For Jemima and the team at NOW Gallery, the annual fashion exhibition is about giving a designer the time, space and financial resources to create something unique in a gallery space. “The exhibition is a chance for the chosen designer to really think out of the box,” she says. “What’s specific to Mowalola’s show is that we want people to leave with a sense of not just understanding her standpoint, but having had the opportunity to create their own narrative.” Silent Madness is on at NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ. December 6 - January 19. Monday - Friday 10am - 7pm; Saturday 10am - 5pm; Sunday 11am - 4pm. www.nowgallery.co.uk

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January 1 2020 13


History

The 90 year Labour of love Mary Mills This article is going to be about a modest little shop in a down market parade in working class East Greenwich. The reason is that it has been in the same use for over 90 years and has just had a major makeover. In the 1890s the parade of shops 22-46 Woolwich Road was almost the last addition to an area which was rapidly changing. The land which once belonged to Coombe Farm near Westcombe Park Station was rapidly being covered with houses and Tunnel Avenue would soon open up as a huge new road through the area. There was a new police station, a Baptist Church and a mission room soon to be joined by a library and a police station. To the west in Woolwich Road were the workhouse and a complex of schools and to the south of these new shops was the Royal Hospital Cemetery - now East Greenwich Pleasance. William Booth's survey, apparently written following a walk in 1899, says that the road was 'unbuilt' as far as the Baptist Chapel at the bottom of Kemsing Road - apart from an 'old farmhouse occupied by a market gardener'. This must have been the last market garden in East Greenwich – as “Westcombe Cottage” it appears on older maps. So the row of shops dates from around the 1890s and hoped no doubt to serve new residents moving into the houses in Chevening and Halstow Roads and Fingal Street. An early street directory has two confectioners, a butcher, a fishmonger as well as, sadly, a pawnbroker and also an ‘incandescent shop’ - whatever that was? No 32, in the middle of the terrace, was the business of Alfred Rees, corn dealer. Ten years later in the 1911

census no.32 has become a draper’s shop run by Sydney and Florence Burns, a couple in their late 20s. What happened next we don’t know – the Great War came to disrupt everyone’s lives. Did Sydney and Florence survive it – a draper doesn’t seem the most vital business for the war effort. In 1926 the shop was taken over by Greenwich Labour Party. Now – before we get any further – we need quite a bit of explanation, because that was something very different in 1926 than it is now. Today the building belongs to Greenwich and Woolwich Labour Party – now that didn’t exist in 1926. There was Greenwich Labour Party and there was Woolwich Labour Party. This article is not going to be about Woolwich Labour Party – in 1926 that was a body which was unique and amazing and lots and lots of articles and theses and even some books have been written about it. Greenwich Labour Party was set up, along with most other local Labour Parties, in 1918 following a decision made nationally to inaugurate a network of local organisations. Labour Parties were set up in most Parliamentary Constituencies and they took their rules and procedures from the existing rule book of Woolwich Labour Party – and most importantly, Woolwich’s ideas of individual party membership. There had been, of course, as in most industrial towns, labour movement activity for some time before 1918. In the 1895 General Election Gas Workers Union organizer, Pete Curran, had stood as the candidate for the Greenwich and Deptford Labour Electoral Committee with support from such luminaries of the trade union movement as Will Thorne, and Tom Mann. His candidacy was also endorsed by the then vicar of Christ Church, East

Greenwich. Bottom of the poll he got 391 votes –but it was a start. By 1919 they were doing well in local elections with a number of wards – Deptford, Marsh (Peninsula), West, electing Labour councillors with big majorities. In 1919 came overall control and the first Labour Mayor of Greenwich – Benjamin Lemmon – after whom Lemmon Road is named. The Labour Party was then and henceforth in charge of the Borough. So what do we mean by ‘Greenwich’ in 1919? Certainly nothing to do with Woolwich. In 1899 a new Act of Parliament set up the Metropolitan London Boroughs. Greenwich was made up, I think, of the parishes of St. Alfege, Greenwich, St.Luke, Charlton, and St Nicholas Deptford – roughly the same area as the west part of the current Royal Borough. There was a town hall – the old St.Alfege vestry hall in Greenwich High Road, now West Greenwich House. So – Greenwich Borough was up and running– leftish labour, a bit 'arty', a bit sort of clever- ‘posh’ as has been described to me lately. It built baths, and clinics and libraries, and eventually the first ever local government computer centre – and its ground breaking architecturally important art deco town hall. There was also a lot of help for blind people – you may remember the blind workshops. This was because Arthur Chrisp, a leading councillor, was blind – and hopefully the residents of today’s Chrisp House in Maze Hill are aware of him and his work. Scattered round the Borough are reminders of other activists from these early days. Beacham Close in Charlton is named for Tommy Beacham, elected to Greenwich Council in 1919, Mayor in 1929, LCC member in the 1950s. Minnie Bennett – of Minnie Bennet House was Mayor in 1956 – and told me how pleased she was to prevent a sewage disposal plant being built on the Peninsula. Harold Gibbons (Harold Gibbons House) was three times Mayor of Greenwich. Johanna Gollogly (Gollogly Terrace) was Mayor in 1947 and LCC member in 1948. Ada Kennedy (Ada Kennedy Court) had been a suffragette and was councillor for Marsh ward from 1932. Jack Phipps (Phipps House) was a road sweeper –his portrait hung in the Party offices for many years – where is it now? And – among many others – the redoubtable Peggy Middleton (Peggy Middleton House was pulled down ten or so years ago now). She was a Greenwich councillor in the 1950s and also LCC member. Most famously she knew Paul Robeson In 1963 Greenwich was required to join Woolwich in the London Borough of Greenwich, as a very junior partner – the atmosphere in Greenwich at the merger

14 January 1 2020

„„Jazz band outside Number 32 Woolwich Road on a Marathon day. Picture: Martin Elliot

described in the Mercury newspaper as ‘plain unadulterated gloom’. Neither the posh town hall, nor the revolutionary computer centre survived the transfer to Woolwich for very long This was not, I hope, what was foreseen in 1927 when the Greenwich Labour Party took over the little shop in Woolwich Road – they called it the ‘Labour Hall’ although cat swinging is not a Labour Party activity. Greenwich has always been a 'mass membership' party - for instance in 1929 it had 2,435 members and this office and a meeting room were very necessary. The previous office had been on Blackheath Hill – but this is hearsay and anyone with any on this detail would be very welcome The shop was opened on 22nd December 1927 by Parliamentary Candidate Edward Palmer who said "It was not a large place but it was a good beginning". From then on Committee meetings were held there while large meetings were at Three Cups Hall in Trafalgar Road – as now when they tend to be held at Charlton House. The work of the Party and routine election work has continued at Woolwich Road. Despite success on Greenwich Council the London County Council seats were not won by Labour until 1934. The Parliamentary seat was also less secure. Edward Timothy Palmer had won in 1923, but reflecting the fortunes of the Ramsay Macdonald era, lost in 1924, won again in 1929, lost again in 1931. In each election he stood against a strong local Unionist candidate, Sir George Hume, who went on to hold the seat throughout the 1930s. It was not until 1945 that Joe Reeves became Labour MP for Greenwich with a 10,000 majority, followed successively by Richard Marsh (1959), Guy Barnett (1971), Nick Raynsford (1992) and now Matt Pennycook (2015) Looking at resolutions passed by the Party in the 1930s you realise how nothing changes – there are just as many condemning the Secretary for sending notices out late and to the wrong address then, as now - and moans about lack of time for proper discussions. As the Second World War began there were worries about black out lights – but also support for keeping pigs on council allotments. I note a lecture on proportional representation in 1945. There was great support for the coming of the National Heath Service despite some worries about the future of clinics, which were then largely still council owned. At various times some of the rooms have

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been rented out- for example in 1943 to the Greenwich Rabbit Club - on condition no rabbits to be brought into the building - and in the 1960s to the Barge Builders Union. John Austin remembers them queuing down the road to pay their dues on a Friday night. The Women’s Section met there - who remembers Peggy tearing up her Party card over something or other at every meeting she went to? As Women’s Section Secretary she let men join as long as they were the husbands of women members. Members of Parliament - for instance Guy Barnett – have used it as office accommodation. Throughout the fabric has been maintained by what has essentially been a community effort – every year someone with known handyman skills has found themselves elected ‘in charge of the building’, and so it is only after 90 years that a professional restoration of the fabric has become necessary. And so – this humble little shop has had a makeover – and many thanks to the Party Treasurer who has acted as Clerk of the Works throughout as well as co-ordinating fundraising, because this hasn't come cheap. Structurally sound and smart let’s hope it sees us through the next 90 years so well. It has provided a service not just to the Labour Party but, by providing a base for its elected representatives, and their advice services, the community as a whole as well.

UPCOMING TALKS: • • • • • • •

14th January 2020 Prof Dave Perrett on GLIAS and IA in London 11th February Barbara Holland. James Ellis, Charlton developer 10th March Andy Brockman Woolwich and The Pipeline 14th April David Waller. Men of Iron - Maudslay 12th May Peter Marshall, A photographic walk 9th June Julian Kingston Deptford Shipbulding Heritage and the Lenox 14th July Stewart Ash. Research on development sites Meetings held at 7.30pm at the Old Bakehouse, Bennett Park SE3 (rear of Age Exchange) There is no parking. www.weekender.co.uk


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January 1 2020 15


PUBLIC NOTICES THE ROYAL BOROUGH OF GREENWICH (MORRIS WALK ESTATE AND MARYON ROAD AND GROVE ESTATE) COMPULSORY PURCHASE ORDER 2019 COMPULSORY PURCHASE OF LAND IN AND AROUND MORRIS WALK ESTATE AND MARYON ROAD AND GROVE ESTATE, WOOLWICH Notice is hereby given that the Royal Borough of Greenwich (“the Acquiring Authority”) has made The Royal Borough of Greenwich (Morris Walk Estate and Maryon Road and Grove Estate) Compulsory Purchase Order 2019 (“the Order”) under Section 226(1)(a) of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended). It is about to submit this Order to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government for confirmation, and if confirmed the Order will authorise the Acquiring Authority to purchase compulsorily the land described below for the purpose of facilitating the carrying out of the development, redevelopment and improvement of the Morris Walk Estate and Maryon Road and Grove Estate to provide new residential units, associated access, parking and private and public open spaces. A copy of the Order and of the accompanying maps may be seen at The Woolwich Centre, 35 Wellington Street, Woolwich, London SE18 6HQ between the hours of 9am-4pm Monday to Friday. Any objection to the Order must be made in writing to the Secretary of State for Housing Communities and Local Government, National Planning Casework Unit, 5 St Philips Place, Colmore Row, Birmingham B3 2PW on or before 9 January 2020 and should state the title of the Order, the ground of objection and the objector’s address and interests in the land. In submitting an objection it should be noted that the personal data and correspondence relating to any objection will be passed to the Acquiring Authority in order that they can contact the objector directly to address the issues raised. If any person does not wish personal data to be forwarded to the Acquiring Authority, they should state why when submitting the objection and the Secretary of State will copy the representations to the Acquiring Authority with the name and address removed and if there is to be a local Public Inquiry, the representations will be seen by the Inspector who may give them less weight as a result.

DESCRIPTION OF LAND Land to be Acquired The land particularised in the Order and the accompanying maps being land not owned by the Acquiring Authority at:Plot 1 Sheet 1 Plot 2 Sheet 2 Plot 3 Sheet 3 Plot 4 Sheet 4 Plot 5 Sheet 5 Plot 6 Sheet 6 Plot 7 Sheet 7 Plot 8 Sheet 8 Plot 9 Sheet 9 Plot 10 Sheet 10 Plot 11 Sheet 11 Plot 12 Sheet 12 Plot 13 Sheet 13 Plot 14 Sheet 14 Plot 15 Sheet 15 Plot 16 Sheet 16 Plot 17 Sheet 17 Plot 18 Sheet 18 Plot 19 Sheet 19 Plot 20 Sheet 20

All interests in approximately 31 square metres of land comprising a strip fronting onto land comprised of footpath, shrubbery and road between Woolwich Road and Cleverly Close All interests in approximately 185 square metres of land comprising a strip fronting onto land comprised of footpath, shrubbery and road between Woolwich Road and Cleverley Close All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 80.75 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 23, Albion Court, Pett Street, London SE18 5NZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 97.94 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 19, Albion Court, Pett Street, London SE18 5NZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 55.24 square metres of land and premises known as 6 Frederick House, Pett Street, London SE18 5PB All interests in approximately 574 square metres of land comprising a strip fronting onto land next to Viking House and Frederick House All interests in approximately 39 square metres of land comprising a strip fronting onto land currently used as a car parking area next to Maryon Road All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 70.42 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 17 Denmark House, Maryon Road, SE7 8DE All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 90.87 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 3, Denmark House, Maryon Road, London SE7 8DE All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 81.62 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 11 Jutland House, Prospect Vale, London SE18 5HZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 56.10 square metres of land and premises known as Flat 36 Jutland House, Prospect Vale, London SE18 5HZ All interests in approximately 397 square metres of land comprising a strip fronting onto land currently used as footpath and shrubbery between Prospect Vale and Jutland House All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 37.41 square metres of land and premises known as 38 Maryon Grove, London SE7 8BY All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 36.59 square metres of land and premises known as 205 Maryon Road, London SE7 8DB All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 36.59 square metres of land and premises known as 213 Maryon Road, London SE7 8DB All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 36.59 square metres of land and premises known as 165 Maryon Road, London SE7 8DB All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 37.41 square metres of land and premises known as 56 Maryon Grove, London SE7 8BZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 44.52 square metres of land and premises known as 78 Maryon Grove, London SE7 8BZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 44.52 square metres of land and premises known as 76 Maryon Grove, London SE7 8BZ All interests except those already owned by the acquiring authority in 44.52 square metres of land and premises known as 86 Maryon Grove, London SE7 8BZ

ROYAL BOROUGH of GREENWICH ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATION ACT 1984 – SECTION 14(1) GREENVALE ROAD PLANNED ROAD CLOSURE (ORDER)

ROYAL BOROUGH of GREENWICH ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATION ACT 1984 – SECTION 14(1) [Cycle route 1] PLANNED ROAD CLOSURE (ORDER)

1. The Royal Borough of Greenwich intends to makes this Order in exercise of powers under section 14(1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. This is to facilitate works by Thames Water who need to carry out a service pipe relay. 2. The Order will come into operation on 13th January 2020 and would continue to be valid for 18 months. However the works are expected to take 3 days. The duration of the Order can be extended with the approval of the Secretary of State for Transport. 3. The effect of the Order would be to temporarily prohibit vehicles from entering, exiting, proceeding or waiting (including waiting for the purposes of loading or unloading) outside 166. 4. Whilst the Order is in operation traffic will be diverted via Westmount Road, Earlshall Road, Glenesk Road and vice versa. Prohibitions remain in force, pedestrians are not affected and vehicle access will be maintained wherever possible. 5. Nothing in this Notice will apply to anything done with the permission or at the direction of a police constable in uniform or traffic warden, to emergency service vehicles, or to vehicles being used in connection with the works. 6. The restrictions described above will apply only during such times and to such extent as shall be indicated by traffic signs as prescribed by the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016. 7. Queries concerning these works should be directed to the Royal Borough of Greenwich’s Directorate of Regeneration, Enterprise & Skills on 020 8921 6340. Assistant Director, Strategic Transportation The Woolwich Centre, 35 Wellington Street, SE18 6HQ Dated 07/11/19 (INTERNAL REF: PL/183/LA375492)

1. The Royal Borough of Greenwich intends to makes this Order in exercise of powers under section 14(1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. This is to facilitate works by Comer Homes Group who need to carry out development works. 2. The Order will come into operation on 8th January 2020 and would continue to be valid for 18 months. However the works are expected to take 18 months. The duration of the Order can be extended with the approval of the Secretary of State for Transport. 3. The effect of the Order would be to temporarily prohibit pedestrians and cyclists from entering or using cycle route 1 between Ferry Approach and Mizzen Mast House. 4. Whilst the Order is in operation pedestrians will be diverted via Woolwich Church Street, Mast Quay and vice versa. Prohibitions remain in force. 5. Nothing in this Notice will apply to anything done with the permission or at the direction of a police constable in uniform or traffic warden, to emergency service vehicles, or to vehicles being used in connection with the works. 6. The restrictions described above will apply only during such times and to such extent as shall be indicated by traffic signs as prescribed by the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016. 7. Queries concerning these works should be directed to the Royal Borough of Greenwich’s Directorate of Regeneration, Enterprise & Skills on 020 8921 6340. Assistant Director, Strategic Transportation The Woolwich Centre, 35 Wellington Street, SE18 6HQ Dated 30th December 2019 (INTERNAL REF: PL/197/LATBC)

Dated 11 December 2019 Sharpe Pritchard LLP Elm Yard 10-16 Elm Street London WC1X 0BJ Solicitors to the Royal Borough of Greenwich

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Royal Borough of Greenwich Town & Country Planning Act 1990 (AS AMENDED) Town & Country Planning (Development Management Procedure)(England) Order 2015 Planning (Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (AS AMENDED) Planning (Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas) Regulations 1990 (AS AMENDED) Notice is hereby given that application(s) have been made to The Royal Borough of Greenwich in respect of the under mentioned premises/sites. You can see the submissions and any plans at http://www.royalgreenwich.gov.uk/planning. If development proposals affect Conservation Areas and/or Statutorily Listed Buildings under the Planning (Listed Building and Conservation Area) Act 1990 (As Amended) this will be shown within the item below. Anyone who wishes to comment on these applications should be made in writing to Development Planning within 21 days of the date of this notice. Please quote the appropriate reference number.

Date: 02/01/2019 Victoria Geoghegan Assistant Director - Planning and Building Control

Publicity for Planning Applications. Applicant: Mrs Biggs

19/3465/HD

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

14 MEREWORTH DRIVE, PLUMSTEAD, LONDON, SE18 3EE Retrospective permission for the construction of a pergola and decking area in rear garden. SHREWSBURY PARK ESTATE

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

65 PRINCE RUPERT ROAD, ELTHAM, LONDON, SE9 1LA Installation of six (6) uPVC replacement windows and a replacement front door to the front and side elevation. PROGRESS ESTATE

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

STANDARD AUTOS, 7A SUN LANE, BLACKHEATH, SE3 8UG Roof extension to facilitate the creation of ancillary office and storage area, including the raising of the ridge by 900mm and installation of six (6) new Velux style windows to proposed first floor office and storage area. SUN IN THE SANDS

Applicant: Ms J Wright

Applicant: Standard Autos

Applicant: Mr Jones

19/3734/HD

19/3758/F

19/3963/F

Site Address: 72B GREENWICH SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8UN Development: Enlargement of lower ground floor rear door to allow installation of new french doors, replacement of front door and rear window at lower ground floor, and replacement of the three windows at ground floor (two at the rear elevation and one at the front elevation). (amended description). Conservation Area: ASHBURNHAM TRIANGLE Applicant: Mr Cox

19/3973/HD

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

63 BLACKHEATH ROAD, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8PD Replacement of front door and paint white parts of the brickwork. ASHBURNHAM TRIANGLE

Site Address:

ORCHARD COTTAGE, HEATHWAY, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 7AN

Applicant: Piltdown Properties Limited 19/3987/F

Development: Conservation Area:

Demolition of existing dwelling and construction of two, 3-bedroom dwellings with associated car and cycle parking, bin storage and landscaping (Resubmission). BLACKHEATH

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

44 GREENWICH SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8UN Demolition of existing shed & external stairs and construction of a single storey rear infill extension. ASHBURNHAM TRIANGLE

Site Address: Development:

Plots 501, 502, & 503 (Parcel 5) Greenwich Millennium Village Phase 3, 4, 5, Peartree Way, London SE10 0HZ Reserved matters application seeking approval of appearance, layout, scale and landscaping, for Plot 501, 502 and 503 (Parcel 5) of Greenwich Millennium Village Phases 3, 4 & 5 development (GMV 345) pursuant to Condition 2 of outline planning permission reference 19/1545/MA dated: 14/11/2019, involving the provision of 4,887 sqm of commercial floorspace (comprising 4,462sqm of Use Class B1 floorspace and 425sqm of Use Class A1 and/or A2 and/or A3 and/or A4 floorspace), plus associated infrastructure, landscape and car parking.

Applicant: Mrs N Meguerditchian 19/3988/HD

Applicant:

Applicant:

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

Greenwich Millennium Village Ltd 19/4058/R

Berkeley Homes (East Thames) Ltd 19/4077/R

THE WATERFRONT MASTERPLAN, LAND OFF BERESFORD STREET/WOOLWICH HIGH STREET, WOOLWICH, SE18 Submission of Reserved Matters Application (Appearance, Landscaping, Layout and Scale) pursuant to Condition 2 of Outline Planning Permission dated 17/03/2017 (Ref: 16/3025/MA) for the undercroft and ground floor levels within the A Blocks (Phases 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 & 14). ROYAL ARSENAL WOOLWICH

Applicant: Motor Fuel Group Ltd 19/4145/F

Site Address:

BLACKHEATH SERVICE STATION, 37A SHOOTERS HILL ROAD, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 7HS

Development: Conservation Area:

Construction of a single storey extension to side and rear of the existing forecourt sales building and insertion of a new class 1 petrol interceptor to the rear of the site, alterations to shop front including new auto sliding door and provision of a 2metre high timber bin store. (May impact the setting of a Listed Building). BLACKHEATH

to the existing driveway and associated works. Conservation Area: RECTORY FIELD Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

M&S FOODHALL, 17 STRATHEDEN PARADE, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 7SX Installation of louver to plant room at first floor level. BLACKHEATH

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

2 SHANNON MEWS, 78A MEADOWCOURT ROAD, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 9DP Construction of a single storey rear extension & front porch. BLACKHEATH PARK

Applicant:

London and Quadrant Housing Association 19/4226/F

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

15 BEACONSFIELD ROAD, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 7LN Installation of 4 x Rooflights, Removal of Rear Raised Patio and Replacement with Stairs and External alterations (amended) WESTCOMBE PARK

Applicant: Mr Dalton

19/4157/HD

Applicant: N Granger

19/4173/F

Applicant: Mr Broughton

19/4180/F

Site Address: 65 GREENWICH SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8NT Development: Proposed glazed structure for existing first floor access walkway to rear residential unit. Conservation Area: WEST GREENWICH Applicant: Mr J Wheeler

19/4181/F

Site Address: TRAFALGAR COTTAGE, GEORGETTE PLACE, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8QA Development: The proposed development consists of the removal of wooden fence separating driveway from garden, erection of an alarm box on front elevation of dwelling and installation of iron gates at vehicular entrance. Conservation Area: WEST GREENWICH Applicant: Mr A Davies

Site Address: Development:

19/4183/HD

11 REYNOLDS PLACE, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 8SX Demolition of existing garage and construction of a single storey side and rear extension, installation of timber sash windows, replacement of portal window and front door fan light, installation of skylight over stairwell and a single A/C unit to the rear. Alterations

ROYAL BOROUGH of GREENWICH ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATION ACT 1984 – SECTION 14(1) [Woodhill] PLANNED ROAD CLOSURE (ORDER)

ROYAL BOROUGH of GREENWICH ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATION ACT 1984 – SECTION 14(1) [Bannockburn Road] PLANNED ROAD CLOSURE (ORDER)

1. The Royal Borough of Greenwich intends to makes this Order in exercise of powers under section 14(1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. This is to facilitate works by SGN who need to carry out gas main replacement. 2. The Order will come into operation on 8th January 2020 and would continue to be valid for 18 months. However the works are expected to take one month. The duration of the Order can be extended with the approval of the Secretary of State for Transport. 3. The effect of the Order would be to temporarily prohibit vehicles from entering, exiting, proceeding or waiting (including waiting for the purposes of loading or unloading) in, Woodhill between Maryon Road and Prospect Vale. 4. Whilst the Order is in operation traffic will be diverted via Prospect Vale, Woodland Terrace, Maryon Road and vice versa. Prohibitions remain in force, pedestrians are not affected and vehicle access will be maintained wherever possible. 5. Nothing in this Notice will apply to anything done with the permission or at the direction of a police constable in uniform or traffic warden, to emergency service vehicles, or to vehicles being used in connection with the works. 6. The restrictions described above will apply only during such times and to such extent as shall be indicated by traffic signs as prescribed by the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016. 7. Queries concerning these works should be directed to the Royal Borough of Greenwich’s Directorate of Regeneration, Enterprise & Skills on 020 8921 6340. Assistant Director, Strategic Transportation The Woolwich Centre, 35 Wellington Street, SE18 6HQ Dated 30th December 2019 (INTERNAL REF: PL/157/LA366430)

1. The Royal Borough of Greenwich intends to makes this Order in exercise of powers under section 14(1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. This is to facilitate works by Thames Water who need to carry out water main repairs. 2. The Order will come into operation on 6th January 2020 and would continue to be valid for 18 months. However the works are expected to take 3 days. The duration of the Order can be extended with the approval of the Secretary of State for Transport. 3. The effect of the Order would be to temporarily prohibit vehicles from entering, exiting, proceeding or waiting (including waiting for the purposes of loading or unloading) in, Bannockburn Road outside number 61. 4. Whilst the Order is in operation traffic will be diverted via Brookdene Road, Hylton Street, Benares Road and vice versa. Prohibitions remain in force, pedestrians are not affected, and vehicle access will be maintained wherever possible. 5. Nothing in this Notice will apply to anything done with the permission or at the direction of a police constable in uniform or traffic warden, to emergency service vehicles, or to vehicles being used in connection with the works. 6. The restrictions described above will apply only during such times and to such extent as shall be indicated by traffic signs as prescribed by the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016. 7. Queries concerning these works should be directed to the Royal Borough of Greenwich’s Directorate of Regeneration, Enterprise & Skills on 020 8921 6340. Assistant Director, Strategic Transportation The Woolwich Centre, 35 Wellington Street, SE18 6HQ Dated 13th December 2019 (INTERNAL REF: PL/188/LA375406)

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Applicant: Marks and Spencer 19/4192/F

Site Address: Development: Conservation Area:

20 GLENLUCE ROAD, BLACKHEATH, LONDON, SE3 7SB New front, side and rear timber doors to match existing with double glazing and all existing single glazed windows to be replaced with timber double glazed windows to match existing at 20A & 20B Glenluce Road. WESTCOMBE PARK

Publicity for Listed Building Consent. Applicant: S List Sent

19/4049/L

Applicant: Mr Wheeler

19/4182/L

Site Address: COURTYARD IN GREENHILL COURT, GREENHILL TERRACE, WOOLWICH, SE18 4BS Development: The replacement of existing slate roof covering with new Welsh slate, includes ridge and hip tiles and all flashings in leadwork. Conservation Area: WOOLWICH COMMON Listed Building: Grade 2

Site Address: TRAFALGAR COTTAGE, GEORGETTE PLACE, GREENWICH, LONDON, SE10 8QA Development: The proposed development consists of the removal of wooden fence separating driveway from garden, erection of an alarm box on front elevation of dwelling and installation of iron gates at vehicular entrance. Conservation Area: WEST GREENWICH Listed Building: Grade 2

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Homeward Bound New builds, luxury flats, affordable housing and what’s up your street

Bermondsey Square showcase unveiled

18 January 1 2020

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A Taste of Bermondsey - made in SE1 Director, London Square, said: “Bermondsey is the heart and soul of SE1 and its authenticity and amazing energy is what makes people want to live and work here. We are surrounded by these incredible businesses and we want to support them.” The tantalising smell of freshly baked bread and patisserie will be on offer at the event from Comptoir Gourmand, a family-run company which started in 2010 under the arches in Maltby Street, Bermondsey.

Bermondsey has become a hotspot for independent businesses and start-ups – where the dreams and ambitions of designers, food and drink producers and artists have flourished into successful businesses in the heart of SE1.

new  £220m neighbourhood of former industrial warehouses and new buildings, is taking shape close to fashionable Bermondsey Street, a 12-minute walk to London Bridge station and the Thames, with Jubilee, Northern lines and national rail, Thames Clipper commuter boats, cycling routes and good bus links.

The Sunday Times has chosen the district as one of the best places to live in the capital for the past five years - celebrating its warehouse vibe and its quirky maze of historic streets and arches, with galleries and independent retailers in spectacular former industrial buildings.

London Square is hosting a Love Bermondsey event on Saturday 8th February from 12 noon until 4pm in the sales suite at 58 Grange Road, to showcase some of the best of independent SE1 - with delicious food stalls, craft gin, funky live music and authentic fashion. Visitors will get a taste of the lifestyle on offer at London Square Bermondsey.

At the centre of this exciting district, London Square Bermondsey, a

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Rebecca Littler, Sales and Marketing www.weekender.co.uk

Flakies Fashion specialises in using handmade authentic Ankara prints in contemporary, stylish and funky clothes and a collection of designs will be shown at the event. Also taking part will be Tower Tandoori, one of London’s oldest Indian restaurants, established in Bermondsey in 1978. Today, the business is run by the third generation of the family, with menu influences from Parsi, Goan, Bengali, Nepalese and Gujarati cooking styles. Jensen’s Bermondsey Gin uses only traditional gin botanicals and will be served at the event, along with craft tonic from The Bermondsey Mixer Co. Bermondsey Fayre, a boutique selling locally made clothes and independent designers’ works, plus yoga studio, will be showcasing its products.

Brassbound will be providing the soundtrack at the event, with an amazing live set of soul, funk, jazz, reggae, afrobeat and calypso. Now 70% sold, the first phase of London Square Bermondsey is The Tannery and The Crosse Buildings, designed by Coffey Architects, featuring a striking new building, and the restoration of the original Tannery warehouse, to create apartments and townhouses. The 4.6 acre former industrial site was also the home of a Crosse & Blackwell Branston Pickle factory, being converted into stunning homes, with galleries and studios for Tannery Arts, a charity which works with emerging artists. Tannery Arts will be supporting the Love Bermondsey event. The new buildings and the original Tannery building are arranged around a leafy garden square. London Square is selling a collection of stylish one, two and three- bedroom apartments, including a number of highly individual apartments with quirky, stand-out interiors which retain the character of the old tannery. There is also a range of townhouses, all with excellent specification and detailing. Buyers who reserve in January will have the opportunity to choose from a range of materials for the interior design. Apartments and townhouses offer a choice of timber flooring,

Siematic fitted kitchens with Siemans appliances, underfloor heating and audio systems with speakers in the living room and master bedroom. Many are dual aspect, and in some cases, triple aspect, maximising light and space, with some apartments enjoying fabulous views across the capital, with open plan living areas for entertaining. All apartments have private outdoor space, balcony or a private terrace, with concierge and an on-site gym, equipped with the latest cardio and conditioning machines. The neighbourhood will have extensive landscape green spaces, squares and walkways, opening up the site for the first time. London Square Bermondsey is the showcase scheme in the wider regeneration for the wider Old Kent Road area, set to bring two new tube stations for the Bakerloo Line extension. Apartments are from £625,000 and townhouses from £1,140,000. For more information about Love Bermondsey event and to find out more about the latest sales information, call London Square Bermondsey on 0333 6664343. www.londonsquare/ bermondsey #Lovebermondsey #londonsquarebermondsey

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+ Morley College London is one of the oldest and largest institutions of its kind and has provided education to the working class men and women of Lambeth and Southwark for 130 years.

Ravensbourne University London is a specialist university with a focus on digital media, design and technology, offering courses in fashion, broadcasting, graphic design, music production and computing among others.

Exciting, new short courses for adult learners in North Greenwich We’re launching an initiative to bring Morley’s high-quality short courses to adult learners in Greenwich, with four courses taught at Ravensbourne’s award winning campus in North Greenwich.

STARTING CREATIVE WRITING

LONDON IN DOCUMENTARIES

13 January – 23 March Mondays 6:45–8:45pm Fees: £200/£180 concessions

14 January – 25 February Tuesdays 6:45–8:45pm Fees: £120

A BRIEF HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC FROM 1600 TO 1800

IMPRESSIONISM: A REVOLUTION IN MODERN ART

14 January – 31 March Tuesdays 6:45–8:45pm Fees: £200

14 January – 10 March Tuesdays 6:45–8:45pm Fees: £160

ENROL NOW

www.morleycollege.ac.uk

Profile for Urban Media London

Greenwich & Lewisham Weekender - January 1st 2020  

Greenwich & Lewisham Weekender - January 1st 2020