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JAY AND SUSIE GOGUE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The Stage is Set AUBURN / OPELIKA, AL


SERIOUS PA M P E R I N G ON THE P L A I N S.

From traditional warm stone massages to red carpet ready facials, the six spas on the RTJ Spa Trail offer serious pampering. Recently opened, the Spa at Grand National in the Auburn Marriott Opelika offers three floors of spa services and fitness options. Relax in an infrared sauna or slip into a whirlpool before being pampered by spa professionals. With 20,000 square feet of spa and wellness offerings, experience innovative treatments in four diamond luxury. To learn more call 334.737.2250 or visit SpaGrandNational.com.

AUBURN MARRIOTT OPELIKA RESORT & SPA AT GRAND NATIONAL 3700 ROBERT TRENT JONES TRAIL, OPELIKA, AL 36801 MARRIOTTGRANDNATIONAL.COM

© 2018 Marriott International, Inc.


MFun

a t a ikmeans

MIKATA offers a wide assortment of delicious sushi and hibachi entrees prepared right in front of you!

323 Airport Road Auburn, AL 36830 334.821.5305 mikatarestaurant.com


Barbi Agricola www.agricolalaw.com


FOR THE CALL YOU DON’T WANT TO MAKE, GET THE ATTORNEY YOU NEED Divorce & Family Law Criminal Defense Personal Injury And More… Contact: 334.759.7557 127 S. 8th St. Opelika, AL 36801


Facebook.com/OliverHenryBoutique

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Instagram: _OliverHenry

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CONTENT

VISAGE

VISAGE

town

EVENTS AROUND

B U RG E R WA R S Downtown, Opelika AL 24

CHEERS ON THE CORNER Downtown, Auburn AL 32

AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL Twenty One Acres, Auburn AL 122

5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Oliver Henr y, Opelika AL 132

ÉLEVÉ X INITIAL OU TFIT TERS Élevé, Auburn AL 136

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CONTENT

FEATURES

LOCAL FOCUS

FACES

DR. DUANE RANDLEMAN

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LOCAL FOCUS APEX INTEGRITY CHIROPRACTIC

FEATURE STORY

52

GOGUE PERFORMING A RT S C E N T E R

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CULINARY CORNER JIM’N NICK’S

62

RECIPE FALL

70

T R AV E L

EDINBURGH SCOTLAND

110

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Allman Betts Band Friday, November 1

Béla Fleck and The Flecktones Thursday, November 21

Montrose Trio Tuesday, December 3

Escape to Margaritaville Wednesday, December 4 Thursday, December 5

VOCES8

(Holiday Program) Tuesday, December 17

Tickets available now! 334.844.TIXS (8497) GOGUECENTER.AUBURN.EDU View our complete 2019–20 inaugural season lineup online.


LETTER from

the

PUBLISHER The leaves change and the days grow shorter: winter is here. Now is the time to cherish the friends and family we hold so dear, while looking to the future and the limitless possibilities the new year will bring. In this issue, we examine things to stimulate the mind, rejuvenate the body and satisfy that pathway to the soul — our stomachs. Our cover story: after more than four years of building anticipation, the Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center finally raised its curtains in September (“The Stage is Set”). We spoke with Executive Director Chris Heacox and his team of performing arts experts about what the Gogue Center means to the community, as well as what world-class acts are performing this season. Also in this issue, we talk to chiropractor Dr. Grace Kang about the importance of maintaining healthy spine alignment and the life-altering benefits it can have physically, mentally and emotionally for her patients (“The Healing Touch: Grace Kang and Apex Integrity Chiropractic Clinic”). We journey to Edinburgh in the rocky highlands of Scotland — a bustling modern metropolis rooted in medieval fairytales — to take to on a trip through the land of lochs, scotch and tartan kilts (“Edinburgh: City of Literature”). We discuss how Dr. Duane Randleman is bringing his internationally recognized expertise in the field of venous disease to the community (“Clearing Paths for Better Health — Dr. Duane Randleman & Varicosity Vein Center”), as well as he and his family’s “supernatural” love of Auburn community. Lastly, we sat down at the kitchen table with Oscar Valladares, general manager of Jim ‘N Nicks Bar-B-Q in Auburn, to discuss how his own road through the restaurant industry mirrors barbecue’s origins in community. As your year comes to a close, we at The Southern Tatler wish you and your loved ones the happiest of holidays.

-Matthew Tse

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éLevé for the Spalidays

Spalalalala is December 2 - 7 at éLevé

20% OFF PRODUCTS 20% OFF GIFT CARDS

at Auburn Dental Spa BOTOX : $9 A UNIT

$75 OFF A FULL TUBE OF JUVEDERM

Have you seen our

Louis Vuitton Giveaway? follow us on social media to see how you can win! 334.521.7728

1575 PROFESSIONAL PARKWAY

SPAELEVE.COM

AUBURN, AL 36830

334.821.2846 AUBURNDENTALSPA.COM


SOUTHERN TAT L E R THE ESSENCE OF SOUTHERN SOCIETY

PUBLISHER Matthew Tse

O peratio n S

Monica Townsend Samantha Engelman

A D V E R T I S e M E N T & M ar k eti n g marketing@southerntatler.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kenneth Ngo Mitch McHargue

P hotographer S Glenn McCarley Isaac Leverett Tanisha Stephens

cop y editor S Celeste Dorman Derek Herscovici

W riters

Jarod Johnson Derek Herscovici for questions or comments concerning advertising or general inquiries: 334.539.1780 customer.relations@southerntatler.com Southern Tatler is a bi-monthly magazine by Raw Conceptual, LLC. All material published remain the property of Raw Conceptual, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced, or copied without Raw Conceptual, LLC consent.


Comprehensive financial planning done LOCALLY

Serving the Southeast for over 40 years. 1800 Airport Road

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Securities offered through ValMark Securities, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory service offered through ValMark Advisers, Inc. an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. 130 Springside Drive, Suite 300, Akron, OH • 44333-243 • PH: (800) 765-5201. Smith-Kastner Wealth Management, LLC. is a separate entity from Valmark Securities, Inc. and Valmark Advisers, Inc.


LIFE

SNOW HOTEL

ICE HOTEL JUKKASJARVI, SWEDEN

www.icehotel.com A world famous hotel and an art exhibition made of ice and snow. Located in the Swedish Village of Jukkasjarvi- 200 km north of the Artic Circle. Founded in 1989, it is reborn in a new guise every winter. The Torne River, the arts, and creating a setting for life enriching moments are at the heart of it all. HÔTEL DE GLACE: QUEBEC CITY, CANADA

www.valcartier.com/en/accommodations/ice-hotel/ Located 20 minutes from Quebec City, Village Vacances Valcartier is on of the most popular recreational destinations in North America. The adventure started in 1963 when Adrien Drouin, Guy Drouin’s father, operated “Les glissades du Village”, a small winter playground with toboggan runs located on his property in Valcartier. Hotel Valcartier, a 4-star hotel, Bora Parc, the indoor waterpark, and Hotel de Glace, ice hotel, opened in December 2016, making Village Vacances Valcartier the most important resort in Eastern Canada.

SORRISNIVA: ALTA, NORWAY www.sorrisniva.com Located in Alta, Norway, Sorrisniva was the first ice hotel in Norway and the second in the world. The hotel is 2,500 square meters hotel made up of 250 tons ice and 7,000 cubic meters snow. They offer different themes in the rooms such as, the Vikings, Nordic legends and myths , wild life of Alta Valley and artic life to mention some of them.

SNOWHOTEL KIRKENES: BJØRNEVATN, NORWAY www.snowhotelkirkenes.com Snowhotel Kirkenes is located 8 km outside Kirkenes in the secluded wilds of Northern Norway. Since 2006 they have dedicated their lives to show guests the true sense of artic wilderness. Snowhotel is one of the most famous igloo hotels in Norway, and in the world.

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N O I S I C E R P SS Y A L G MPAN CO m

to

au

om •c

al

i erc

l

tia en

id

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FEATURING: • Window Glass

• Store Fronts

• Custom Work

• Mirrors and Mirror Walls

414 E Glenn Ave Auburn AL 36830 2112 A. Frederick Road Opelika, AL 36801

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EVENT: AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL VENUE: TWENTY ONE ACRES, AUBURN AL DATE: JUNE 22ND, 2019

24

38

106

BURGER WARS

CHEERS ON THE CORNER

AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL


SOUTHERN

TAT L E R

132

136

5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

ÉLEVÉ X INITIAL OU TFIT TERS


VISAGE BURGER WARS 2019

BURGER WARS 2019 Downtown, Opelika AL June 1st, 2019

Zachary Sorenson, Chase McConnell, Craig Montgomery, Bradley Goree, Michael Bass

Christina Harry, Greg Frazier, Savannah Raney Kari & Silas Carpenter

Lindsey Roberts, Sophie

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Burger Wars is a burger grilling competition and tasting event, hosted by Opelika Rotary and Happy Hour Satellite Rotary. Proceeds benefit the “Backpack Meals� program of the Food Bank of East Alabama.

Clay, William, Jim, & Jessica Corman Don & Kathy Deavers

Faith Twiggs, Tammy McCullough

Kerry McGinnis, John Corbin

Tiffany & Chandler Stallings

Hunter Goodlett, Emma Callicoat

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Renee Paronish


VISAGE BURGER WARS 2019

BURGER WARS 2019 Downtown, Opelika AL June 1st, 2019

Chase Kilpatrick, Madison Lacombe, Ledger Ralston

Faith Twiggs, Tammy McCullough

Jim, Stephanie, Stephen, & Griffin McGinn

Kathy O’Donnell, Melanie Trouse Mary Isbell, Terrill Brazelton Ploy Moonsri

Donald & Shannon Clayton, Robbie Greenlee, Trent & Trish Griffith

Cody & Leigh Ann Parker

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Tiffany, Michael, & Caiden Toland

Vince & Madwin DiLetto

Anthony & Sullivan Terling

Bradley Bowen, Kevin Swatts, Peter Martin

Camalia Rowell, Hugh Glover

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Jonathon, Elizabeth, & Meredith Hatcher

Steve & Carol Ann Carter


VISAGE BURGER WARS 2019

Ryan & Eli Holland

BURGER WARS 2019 Downtown, Opelika AL June 1st, 2019

Sierra & Remington Green, Sunny, Kim, & Tim Fuller

Ashley & Chad Wiggs

Kevin, Hillary, Olivia, & Addison Joyce

Shaniqua Williams, Kayla Phillips

Willow Rozar, Mac Melton, Lera Cate Melton

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Kitty Greene with Violet

TAT L E R


now serving at

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: Proof Of The Pudding

www.rosshousecoffee.com 150 N Ross St, Auburn, AL 36830 | 334-734-5150


VISAGE BURGER WARS 2019

BURGER WARS 2019 Downtown, Opelika AL June 1st, 2019

Blake & Ashton Smith

Jacki & Quinnlynn Posa

Collier, Clark, and Ham Ezell

Sloan Gaither, Adrienne Hames Jeff Finkhousen, Joseph Fuller, Cassie Katy, Scott, & Mason Murray

Chuck Riddle, Heath Cotney, Lisa Jones Nicholas Allen, Courtney Collins

Shane & Elise Howard

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chooseible A variety of gifts

Saugahatchee Square

3794 Pepperell Pkwy C, Opelika, AL 36801

334-759-7367

edible.com


VISAGE CHEERS ON THE CORNER

CHEERS ON THE CORNER Downtown, Auburn, AL July 19th, 2019

Daniel Stith, Jasilynn Kelly Stacy Shi, Alexis Li

Dan & Mary Lou Ponder

Heather Smith, Josh Novak, Lauren & Eric Ruhlmann

Josh & Brittany Hollingsworth

John Kimble, Sydney Gootee, Ronnie Davis, Nonet Reese, Michelle Held

Tyler Tullis, Haven Duff, Kathleen Barber, Danny Earle, Nancy Hall, Tequila Griffin, Daniel Hughes

Christina Harry, Savannah Raney, Katherine Haas

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Cheers on the Corner was held in partnership with Auburn Downtown Merchants Associations. This event has been a sell-out in previous years.

J.T. Thompson, Kathy Powell, Ebbie Gomez, Morgan Lanier

Caryn Davis, Michael Harder, Blake Davis, Rhett Davis

Rileigh Eaton, Patrick Sexton

Evan Thomas, Katie Wilson

Clay & Julie Price

Brandon & Karen Hughes

Sarah Abraham, Brandee Morgan, Scott Cameron, Amanda Miller, Tori Flowers, Nell Kohn, Will Bryant, Brent Sayers

Kate Jenkins, Nick Kellenberger, Emma Owens

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VISAGE CHEERS ON THE CORNER

CHEERS ON THE CORNER Downtown, Auburn AL July 19th, 2019

Katherine Holdren, Lindsey Fuson, Megan Corcoran, Abby Scroggins

Jessica Braswell, Jacob & Mary Evelyn Jordan, Brett & Travis Thompson,Blair DeCoux, Lindsay Neubarth

Donna, David, & Michael Young

Melissa Miller, Eric Crosby

Jennifer & Mike Noon, Carl & Kelley Ethridge

Joel & Tammy Funderburk, Katie & Kyle Lindsey

Matt Holdren, Lindsay Ollis, Markie Pasternak

Joe Eways & Anna Sleeman

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Attendees received a souvenir wine glass and get to enjoy the tastes of downtown at over 20 stops. Each stop will provide you with a savory bite paired with a refreshing beverage sample.

Evan Crawford, Daniel Ross, David, Rebecca, & Julie Gilliland, Alicia Crawford

Kelly & James Dressler

Brendan Schretter, Amy Strong

Bill Schallock, Jonathon Gaither, Steve Nolin

Jeff & Carrie Shiflett

Justin & Jody Shields

Karen Caudill, Allan Horne, Kalyn Frederick, Justin Holland, Hattie Kohn

Frances O’Donnell, Will Blakeley, Natalie Capiro, Bubbles

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Riley Moore, Elle Fuller


VISAGE CHEERS ON THE CORNER

CHEERS ON THE CORNER Downtown, Auburn AL July 19th, 2019

Emily Ray, Betsy Jackson, Sarah Beth Stocks

Caroline Powell Michael & Whitney Owens, Carol & Tony Cope

Rachel Posey, Natalie Killmaster, Emily Colley, Beth Register

T.J. & Kelly Dressler, John Carvalho, Molly Hester, Garrett Bailey,Caspian Roberts, Matthew Carter

Kat Bricco

Barbara Meagher

Robert Courtney, Forrest Knopps, Scott Simpson

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ON VIEW THROUGH OCTOBER 4, 2020 901 SOUTH COLLEGE STREET AUBURN, ALABAMA

@JCSMAUBURN JCSM.AUBURN.EDU

Explore. Experience. Engage.


CHEERS ON THE CORNER

VISAGE CHEERS ON THE CORNER

Downtown, Auburn AL July 19th, 2019

Ben, Addison, Harper, & Megan Burmester

Kim Eardley, Hope Fultz, Abbi McCann, Casey Wilgenbusch Nicole & Daniel Christenson

Leigh Ann Parker, Cody Parker

Matt & Julie Madison, Kathrine Madison

Lisa & Thilo Meinken, Penny

Emmy Sorrels, Elizabeth Garrett, Suzanne Beard, Sydney Gootee

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Indoor Air Quality Experts


VISAGE CHEERS ON THE CORNER

CHEERS ON THE CORNER Downtown, Auburn AL July 19th, 2019

Rheagan Harvel, Andrea Cox, Jake Landon Kemp, Jimmy Goldberg, Ryan Noll, Mary Flynn, Ashley Baath,Wurli-Jane

Manohor Lal, Ravinder Lal, Selvan Singh

J Jones Matt & Julie Madison

Cooper & Hayes Lamon

Trey & Brooke Howard, Addie Smith, Clayton Roberds

Chris Spraggins, Traci Kantor, Daniel Hughes, Kathleen Barber

40 S OUTHERN

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Meg, Jack, & Charlie Branch


C.S. Hall, MS, LPC Couseling

Marriage Run Amuk? Relationships In Ruins? Stress Got You Strung Out? Learn effective coping strategies to manage your life in a positive and effective way

I am a therapist because‌ I believe it is my purpose to serve others and facilitate them ďŹ nding their own purpose in order that they may become a change agent of positive solutions for themselves and others.

www.cshallcounseling.com

334-444-6140 2202 Gateway Dr Opelika, AL 36801, USA


SOUTHERN

TAT L E R


BREATH FACES: DR. DUANE RANDLEMAN LOCAL FOCUS: APEX INTEGRITY CHIROPRACTIC CULINARY CORNER: JIM’N NICK’S RECIPE: FALL


FACES DR. DUANE RANDLEMAN


One of the foremost experts on varicose veins and venous disease,

Dr. Duane Randleman is ready to bring patients world-class care right down the road.


s the highways of

the

human

body, the health of our veins is critically important

to

every

aspect of how we live our lives. Venous disease afflicts nearly one in five adults throughout the United states, severely limiting quality of life while increasing morbidity

and

even

mortality.

Unsightly spider veins, varicose veins and skin discoloration are not just cosmetic side effects, but signs that your veins are not working properly.

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Fortunately, Dr. Duane Randleman, one of the nation’s top venous disease doctors, is expanding his current practice in Auburn, Alabama to a larger footprint at the doctor’s offices right across the street from Church of The Highlands on East Glenn Avenue. At the Varicosity Vein Center, Dr. Randleman and his staff take pride in treating their patient’s like family. Dr. Randleman takes the time to know and understand his patient’s problems and carefully tailor the proper treatment plan to get his patients back to living their best life as quickly as possible. “It’s so rewarding, I never get tired of hearing from patients how we’ve changed their lives,” said Dr. Randleman. “What you and I take for granted in our

daily lives, they can now do without pain or swelling or cramping in their legs. They can sleep at night without waking up with pain in their legs, they can go up a flight of stairs, they can walk without discomfort. I am passionate about what we do because the relief that our patient’s experience is truly life changing.” Dr. Randleman is a respected leader in his field, having performed more than 17,000 cases over the past 17 years. He is recognized as a preferred provider by the Mayo Clinic and is acknowledged as a Top Doctor by the Birmingham Metro magazine. Patients come from not only the entire state, but from the surrounding region and even outside the United States, just to be examined by him and his staff.

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“There is very little we haven’t seen when it comes to venous disease, and we’re glad to share that with our patients,” said Randleman. “Patients don’t have to have a referral, either, they can just call, and we’ll see them. Most of our patients do come from a referring doctor, which we do appreciate, because they trust us with their patients.” After graduating from the University of Alabama Medical School in 1983, Dr. Randleman trained at the Mayo Clinic for five years, earning a board certification in general surgery. In 1988, Dr. Randleman transitioned from the Mayo Clinic to Emory University in Atlanta, where he completed three more years of cardiac, thoracic and vascular surgery training. He returned to his hometown of Birmingham in 1991 and joined Cardio-Thoracic Surgeons, providing patients with a broad variety of heart and lung treatments. While working at present-day Grandview Hospital in Birmingham, Randleman met the love of his life, his wife Lynn.They had their first date ¬— a U2 concert — October 7, 1992, then were married exactly three years later to the day and still happily married 24 years later. Though he was trained as a heart, lung and vascular surgeon, vein treatments at the time lacked the capabilities of the less invasive procedures that are used today. By 2002, advancements in vein treatment had enabled Dr. Randleman within Cardio-Thoracic Surgeons to open a center devoted exclusively to the field of venous disease. Dr. Randleman was asked to champion the newly formed Vein Center and apply the minimally invasive techniques to treat venous disease. From the initial launch, the Vein Center was successful, and Dr. Randleman had no shortage of patients coming through the doors seeking help. As business boomed and the Vein Center established itself as one of the premier clinics in the country, he steadily got busier and busier. Over the next eight years, he would head up the robotic mitral valve program at the hospital, in addition to continuing other cardiac,

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thoracic and vascular cases. “I remember I was getting home every night around 9:30 or 10:00,” recalls Dr. Randleman. “I was sitting there, in my scrubs, eating dinner on our screened porch, while Lynn sat next to me. She said to me ‘I love you, but what do you want out of life?’” Randleman describes the moment as “a bucket of cold water in the face.” As his four young children — Carlton, Leland, Wesley and Carlyn — slept inside, he wondered if he would wake up and find them all grownup wondering how life went by so fast. For the next few weeks he and Lynn discussed how he could gain more time with his family while

still serving those in need of help. After much thought and prayer, Dr. Randleman was delivered an encounter that would help guide the decision for his family’s future. During a routine post-operative visit, he met with one of his vein center patients who had suffered with symptoms from venous disease that hindered her quality of life for decades. During the visit the patient was brought to tears by the amount of relief she was in. Over the course of a few short days she was able to regain the strength and confidence she had been without for years to perform simple tasks that most of us take for granted.

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Following this encounter, Dr. Randleman came to the realization that he could still serve others by focusing on his newly found passion, through the treatment of venous disease while gaining the ability to spend more time with his family. “I told Lynn that after much thought and prayer I had realized my passion was to sub-specialize in the vein world and that this would provide me with the freedom to spend more time with our family while still helping those in need. I don’t know if that’s what she thought I would say, but she said ‘OK, let’s do it.’” Leaving the field of cardiac surgery after nearly 20 years was a difficult decision, but Dr. Randleman knew he could truly make significant changes in the vein world and has not looked back since. His timing couldn’t have been more perfect to transition fully to vein treatment. Having grown in the field as it was being developed, he was uniquely prepared to use the

latest technologies and procedures. Through the success of Varicosity Vein Center, Dr. Randleman was able to develop a company called Varicosity Management Group that has developed 60 different hospital-based vein centers in 24 states, personally training more than 300 physicians and clinicians during the process. One of his favorite parts of the day is interacting with his patient’s and having them make the decision of selecting the music they would prefer to listen to during their procedure. The treatment is so minimally invasive that patients walk out of the office the same day as the operation and continue their normal daily routine. “We try to give our patients the highest level of care, in a really compassionate, quality manner. That’s been with me since the mayo Clinic, and we still feel that way.” These days, the Randlemans have made their


permanent home in the Lake Martin area to be closer to the loveliest village on the plains which they have fallen in love with after just two short years. “There is a reason that Auburn is always rated as one of the best places to live, work and raise children and that is because of the people here. I truly believe that the community here was the determining factor in making Auburn our family’s new home.” The Auburn community has also had an impact on the decision for many of the Randleman children as well. Oldest son Carlton, 21, attends Auburn University, where he is studying aviation management and intends to become a professional pilot after graduation. Randleman has already flown with him and has no trepidation about his son’s abilities. Leland, 20, is a sophomore at Samford University who plans to transfer to Auburn at the conclusion of his studies next year. Wesley, 19, is a freshman at the Savannah College of Art & Design with dreams of one day working in the film industry. Carlyn, 16, plans on attending Auburn University upon completion of high school.

The Randlemans often travel together when they can, especially to the mountains. Almost every other year, Duane and Lynn take a trip out to the Grand Teton mountain range in Wyoming — the site of their honeymoon — to celebrate their honeymoon with some hiking and outdoor relaxation. Practicing in Auburn for the past two years now, Dr. Randleman does not shy away from his love for both the area and the people. Almost every patient who leaves ends up a friend, and each visit is an opportunity to grow within the community as well. Faith is of the utmost importance to the Randleman family and they are honored to be active members at Church of the Highlands. When his new office at 1935 East Glenn, Suite 200 is completed in a few short months, Randleman plans to make Auburn his primary home and the Auburn clinic the premier venous disease treatment center in the state. Though his career already stretches several decades, Randleman is far from done helping the community. “Lynn and I have a supernatural love for Auburn and the people that make up the loveliest village on the plains. We are looking forward to becoming a part of this close-knit community for many years to come”


LOCAL FOCUS APEX INTEGRITY CHIROPRACTIC


the


“Everything in the whole body is connected; if your nervous system is not functioning right, you will even have different problems with your hormones,” says Kang. “Emotionally, physically and mentally they are all connected. If people have headaches once a week or once a month, there’s some kind of problem there. They really need to check with somebody, and chiropractic is a really good starting point” What makes chiropractic medicine so unique is its focus on the body’s main structures — the nerves, the muscles and the skeleton that binds them together — to influence the patient’s overall health. Chiropractors like Kang focus on adjusting these structures, and the spine, in

particular, to target specific problems without the use of pharmaceutical medicine or surgery. At Apex Integrity, the entire adjustment and healing process is tailored to each specific patient so they can find the relief they need at their own pace. Dr. Kang knows no two patients are alike, each with their own unique sensitivities and preferences. Over the span of their visits, Kang will learn what kind of treatment works best for each and develop a plan to work their issues out. Sometimes, she says she can diagnose what is afflicting a patient just from watching them walk through her clinic doors.

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“When the patient walks into our clinic, I look at their gait, and if there’s any appearance that they are not walking normal, then I will try to prepare our patient to see if there’s any abnormal tissues or any decreased range of motion.” A common problem among older patients is joint degeneration and stenosis when the spaces between the spine’s vertebrae narrow. With chiropractic care, the muscles around the spine are adjusted to release the nerve impediments and lessen the pain, all without pills or surgeries. “If you have high blood pressure, in the medical field they will try to give you medication to lower the blood pressure. Whereas, in functional medicine and chiropractic work, we are working to release that problem and trying to get rid of that blood pressure without any medication,” said Kang. For stenosis patients, traction systems and thermal steams might provide relief, while others might require a little more force to pop their spines back into place. Dry needling, a form of therapy similar to acupuncture where the nerves in muscles

are loosened using hair-thin needles, is one of many methods Kang provides. “Some patients, I will not give adjustments but just do muscle work, which is called ART or Active Release Technique. On that technique, we just do muscle work and try to relax the muscle.” Born in Yanpeong, South Korea just outside Seoul, Kang moved with her family to Schaumburg, Illinois when she was 13. Her family sought a better life in the United States, but the change was not easy on her. “When I got to America, that was my teen years, and I had a really hard time with English and all the differences,” said Kang. “Back then, it was the early 1980s


and there weren’t too many Koreans or Asians. It was just different for me.” By the time she was out of high school and off to college, things had gotten better for Kang. Always showing an interest in science and medicine, she began studying dentistry at the University of Indiana on the advice of her mother. It proved to be short-lived. “I didn’t like it,” she recalls with a laugh. “I didn’t want to look at people’s mouths all day.” Kang would later switch to immunology and work in a lab running tests, but again felt she should be elsewhere. Drawing blood and urine samples all day was boring enough, but for a tender soul like her, running tests on the lab mice was more than she would bear. Fortunately, fate would intervene at the perfect moment. While earning her master’s in immunology, a friend of Kang’s encouraged her to come to visit her at a chiropractic school in Georgia and look into the program. During that brief trip, Kang’s eyes would be opened to the healing benefits of the chiropractic field, and she would fall in love with the school’s holistic, allnatural healing philosophy. “I said ‘why not try it’” Kang recalls. “People are in pain, sometimes I’m in pain, maybe I could help myself and other people too.” Kang would graduate from the University of Indiana in 2003 and move to the pacific northwest to start practicing in Seattle. After a few years, Kang would move back to Seoul, where she would give birth to a son. In 2016, when he was 13, they would come back to the United States, eventually settling in the Auburn-Opelika area. Despite living in major cities like Seoul, Chicago and Seattle, Kang opted for the more pastoral settings of East Alabama. Though she has only been in the neighborhood for a few years, Kang and her son have adjusted to life in Alabama quickly. But, as she recalls with a bit of humor, that was not always the case.


“Seattle is a bigger place, but I’m beginning to like Auburn. In the beginning, I thought ‘oh I made the wrong choice, there’s not many things to do here, no big shopping malls or whatever,’ but I feel I’m getting more comfortable with this neighborhood, the Auburn city.” An avid golfer in her spare time, Kang intends to get back on the links whenever she finds the time. For now, she loves spending time with her son and helping him grow his interest in ice hockey. Because she can only see her patients every so often, Kang tries to maximize her connections to them and to the community whenever she can. On Apex Integrity Chiropractic’s website, she routinely posts informative blurbs and tips on how to incorporate chiropractic exercises into everyday life. Some are as simple as pain-free habits to form for overall wellness, while others discuss the chiropractic effects on mood elevation, immune systems, and posture improvement. “Time is very limited for me, so I would like to know people and help people as much as I can,” said


Kang. “I like to know people more, and if I can help anyone live a better life, it gives me joy. It makes me feel better if I can help someone in any way, so I’m trying to reach out and connect with the community.” As we get older, excessive sitting, working at computers and not enough stretching can cause injury to our spines, pinching our nerves and preventing us from functioning at our fullest. Aches and inflammations of the skin can be clear symptoms of serious problems, while subluxations — incomplete or partial dislocations of joints and organs that pinch nerves and strain muscles — may require more testing. The important thing to remember, Kang says, is that long-term spinal health is something to consider every day.

Even the straightest of spines require regular check-ups every now and then, but the patients of Apex Integrity can rely on the expertise of Dr. Kang to guide them to long-term wellness. Once patients start feeling better Kang will reduce the number of visits, but she says she still prefers to see patients every three to six months. “When patients come in, I tell them ‘the pain is the first thing that will disappear, but the problem is still there,’” says Kang. “They need to get adjustments even when there is no pain.” for more information on Apex Integrity Chiropractic, visit: c or call: 334.734.5400


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CULINARY CORNER JIM’N NICK’S

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“Jim came by and said, ‘you’re not eating today?’ I said ‘no, I’m a broke college kid,’” recalled Valladares, laughing. “[ Jim] bought me lunch. He recognized that I played football at Faulkner University and there were four other football players that worked there. He told me ‘why don’t you come work here?’” The next week, Valladares was in the kitchen washing dishes. He and his friends would go to football practice, then head to work at the restaurant after. Though he had never worked in a restaurant before, Valladares quickly volunteered to fill in other roles when someone didn’t show up. Some of the managers that he worked for were soft-spoke and took time to explain things to him. Others, he said, reminded him of his football coaches. But no matter their approach, Valladares could tell it all came from the same passion for the restaurant, something he has tried to model his own managerial style on.

Eventually, the restaurant leadership took notice of his curiosity for the business. When he graduated from Faulkner University in 2014, they asked him if he wanted to be a shift manager. “It just felt so natural — I have a degree in performance psychology, which wasn’t necessarily lined up with this, but I enjoyed interacting with everybody and coaching people, talking to guests and creating relationships. It’s never boring,” said Valladares. About three years ago, he was approached again about moving up the managerial ladder and becoming dining room manager of the Jim ‘N Nicks Auburn location. Already loving his job in Montgomery, Valladares said yes and took another step forward. Eventually, he took over for Brian Benson as general manager and still goes back to the Montgomery restaurant for weekly GM meetings, often encountering regular customers who remember when he was their server.


Working in every position in the restaurant has taught Valladares the ins and outs, particularly when it comes to the food. Inside the kitchen, the passion Jim ‘N Nicks chefs have for their work is apparent in every single dish. All of the restaurant’s ingredients are sourced within the state, while every component of the menu is created from scratch every morning. “When I was serving tables, I loved telling people ‘we make it fresh every day,’” said Valladares. “I would tell them there’s no freezer, there’s not even a microwave in this kitchen. If something is not what a guest wants, I’ll go and remake it fresh. There’s no way to cut a corner, you have to start over, make it fresh and make it right.” Jim ‘N Nicks chefs are trained to recognize when the sugary glaze of the barbecue sauce has caramelized all the way, or when the ribs have the proper bone exposure and perfect, flexible tenderness. Even the color of the meat has a high standard.

Because there are no shortcuts to good barbecue, the process requires an immense amount of passion and patience. Barbecue Pit Masters are trained to recognize details at a granular level, from how much hickory wood is needed to the exact chemical changes that produce the right kind of smoke ring around the meat. “You can’t rush the process. If something isn’t ready, it’s not ready. Take the mac n cheese — if the sauce isn’t done correctly, even miniscule changes — you’ll be able to taste it. The noodles won’t soak up the cheese. It will still be delicious, but it won’t be Jim ‘N Nicks mac n cheese.” Throughout the day, chefs have to keep all items on the menu ready to order. At the start of every workday, Valladares comes in and tastes everything on the menu to make sure it is perfect; anything less must be remade. It’s a tedious process, but when done correctly, the restaurant can serve customers anything in a matter of minutes.


“You can’t cook a pork shoulder to order, so we’re holding this stuff hot for guests. You come in, sling together a pork sandwich and fry some delicious, crispy fries and it’s good to go,” said Valladares. “I like that we can be convenient, too — a good lunch on a hard workday can go a long way.” Though tradition is at the heart of their menu, through the years Jim ‘N Nicks has not shied away from innovation when they believed it could deliver customers a better product. Their grilled chicken recipe was originally marinated in a homemade vinaigrette, for example, but in order to give it more of their signature hickory wood-smoked flavor, it now is flash-glazed with their trademark sauce for an extra wood-fired taste. As Jim ‘N Nicks enters its Fall menu, a number of Thanksgiving-inspired dishes like whole hams, smoked turkey breasts, cranberry dressing and cornbread stuffing will take the place of summery

items like black-eyed peas, tomato-stewed okra and succotash. Making a return is the sweet potato casserole, a longtime fan-favorite whose cinnamon and pecan-crusted top makes it as much a dessert as a side. “I love our smoked turkey; it lends itself really well to flavors, so when you smoke it for about four hours, it really soaks in all that hickory and barbecuerub seasoning for this real robust flavor. Then you pair that with this Morgan County White Sauce, which is our homage to ‘Big’ Bob Gibson’s mayo-vinegar based white sauce base sauce — it’s just good, simple barbecue.” Besides being one of the premiere barbecue restaurants in Alabama, Jim ‘N Nicks has made a name for itself as a superior catering service for events around the state, going all-out to provide customers with a restaurant-quality experience no matter where they are.

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In Auburn, few events are bigger than home football games, and the restaurant kicks into high gear to meet the immense rise in demand. To handle the extra business, people are called in from locations in Montgomery and Prattville locations, while extra smokers are hauled in from surrounding locations. One enormous smoker used for Auburn’s home games — affectionately called “the Big One” by Valladares and his staff — is 700 gallons by volume and can smoke at least 80 pork shoulders at once for 14 hours or more. The rig is often called in for regional events outside of Auburn because of its size.

“We have to rent a refrigerator truck because we don’t have enough space in our restaurant,” said Valladares. “But people want to come out here and eat as much as people want us to go out and deliver to them. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s crazy the amount of product that you go through.” Unique to the Auburn and Tuscaloosa locations, Jim ‘N Nicks actually serves customers inside Auburn and Alabama’s football stadiums during games. But events aren’t limited to just football, either. Over the summer, Jim ‘N Nicks catered an event in Atlanta


for airplane company Boeing that had so many people come to eat, it required seven different restaurants to work together. Jim ‘N Nicks also works with Church of the Highlands throughout the state to feed thousands of hungry congregations. During the church’s annual men’s retreat, Valladares and his team smoked thousands of wings on-site, an aweinspiring experience.

No matter the event, no matter the order, Valladares and the staff of Jim ‘N Nicks Bar-B-Q understand the importance of teamwork and the power of barbecue to bring together a community. “Something that we say in the restaurant is, ‘none of us can succeed without all of us.’ I can’t do my job unless I have great people helping me, and whenever everything is functioning right, all the credit is theirs. They are as passionate as much as I am. I think that’s just a testament to Jim ‘N Nicks in general.”


SOUTHERN

TAT L E R

FEATURE 78 _________________________ JAY AND SUSIE GOGUE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THE STAGE IS SET


Then, in 2015, John and Rosemary Brown, both 1957 Auburn graduates, made a multi-million-dollar donation to the university as a part of the “Because This is Auburn” campaign. A major stipulation of the historic gift was the creation of a state-of-the-art performing arts center to be built within four years. This past August, the Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center opened the doors for its inaugural season, formally kicking off nine months of world-class entertainment. For Jay Gogue, Interim President of Auburn University and the performing arts center’s namesake along with his wife, Susie, the facility ushers in a new era of arts, entertainment and education not only for the university, but the entire region. “The world-class performances and cultural opportunities will be a tremendous draw for Auburn students, faculty and staff,” said Gogue in a statement.


“It is impacting our community’s economy by providing opportunities for entrepreneurs, the tourism industry and many others. When businesses and industries are looking to expand operations or relocate their headquarters, they’re searching for locations that offer the highest quality of life with top-performing schools, excellent healthcare and outstanding cultural and recreational amenities. Now, Auburn offers all of these things.” Guiding the Gogue Center from the conceptualization phase to opening night and beyond is Executive Director Chris Heacox. In his conversations with donors, patrons and even

industry professionals, Heacox says there has been a clear need in this part of the country for a facility like this. “The passion and support we’ve received has been amazing,” said Heacox. “I think everybody’s been ready for a venue of this magnitude for a long time, and because of that the support has followed.” For Heacox, the opportunity to open a theater is a dream few in the performing arts industry can appreciate. To begin with, theaters are not built every day, and maintaining high-quality entertainment of any kind throughout the year can be a challenge for even the most prepared and experienced.

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Dr. Jay and Mrs. Susie Gogue and Mr. John and Mrs. Rosemary Brown

Mr. John and Mrs. Rosemary Brown’s family

That friends and donors of the “Because This is Auburn” campaign responded the way they did, with a multi-million-dollar gift to ensure the Gogue Center’s completion and success, speaks volumes not only to the demand for such a venue, but the desire for one of the highest caliber. “[Soprano] Reneé Fleming, who was the first artist to perform as part of our inaugural season, was extremely complimentary of how great the sound was for her,” said Heacox. “She wants to be able to hear herself onstage and know that the audience is hearing what she is delivering. We’ve received wonderful feedback

from both the artist and our patrons, which is what we want to hear.” In August 2019, the Gogue Center hosted a fourday Grand Opening Festival that included free concerts for Auburn students and the community at the outdoor Amphitheatre at the City of Auburn Lawn and Porch. Concerts at the center’s open-air venue drew close to 3,500 guests for live performances by student-selected bands LANY and COIN, and more than 3,000 for a ticketed show by Jason Isbell. Director of Production Taylor Dyleski thinks the amphitheater can comfortably fit as many as 4,000 individuals.

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“Our opening festival was a tremendous learning moment for us, to actually experience the space in use and to understand what it feels like—not only from our perspective, but, more importantly, from the perspective of our patrons,” said Dyleski. Dyleski assists Heacox in making all the ongoing tweaks to the building in order to continually improve the patron experience. Though it’s hard work maintaining and improving the center, for Dyleski it is as much a labor of love as it is a job. Having worked in different theaters across the Southeast, Dyleski finds it both challenging and rewarding to bring this level of theater to a community that has never had it before. “To watch audiences react to something, or just be blown away or inspired, reminds us of how incredible it is to bring something like this to Auburn,”said Dyleski.“You take it for granted in other places like Atlanta or New York City; it’s just another piece of theater. That’s not how it is here. It’s the only thing like it in Auburn now.”

Inside,the 1,202-seat Walter Stanley and Virginia Katharyne Evans Woltosz Theatre is the crown jewel of the Gogue Performing Arts Center, perfectly tailored to dazzle audiences with unbelievable acoustics and luxurious seating accommodations. “A large portion of our resources and vision for this space was to elevate the acoustic experience at the Gogue Center,” said Director of Programming and Education Amy Miller. “It was a very obvious choice to make sure we have strong chamber musicians coming, just to revel in the incredible acoustic space.” Miller oversees all facets of the Gogue Center’s programming and works in collaboration with Heacox to curate the season’s lineup and book visiting artists and performances. Building avenues from the local community to national networks of promoters, agents and other partners, Miller ensures the center always features top-line talent while achieving entertainment and education goals.


But another, equally important aspect of her role is promoting the educational values of the arts within the Auburn-Opelika community and beyond. “Chris [Heacox] and I talked a lot about that during our creation process for the Gogue Center; we were very much aligned in that we did not want education to be an afterthought,” said Miller. “A lot of times in our field, with performing arts venues, education is separate from programming. They work together, but here we’re really hoping that it’s part of the entire ethos of what we’re doing.” Miller envisions that, in the future, all of the Gogue Center departments will staff student workers and interns and provide valuable hands-on experiences to those pursuing careers in the arts. As a land-grant university, Auburn is a place that Miller sees as having plenty of opportunities for cross-sector connections to the arts. For example, architecture, engineering and design students have already benefitted from workshops with DIAVOLO: Architecture in Motion, a dance company that recently performed at the Gogue Center. One of the Gogue Center’s major initiatives this season is its School Performance Series, a K-12 program presenting hour-long matinee shows that will bring the magic of the performing arts to area students. One of the participating acts, Terrance Simien and the Zydeco Experience, will perform a “Creole for Kids” matinee show before their scheduled performance on February 21. “We’re allowing the arts to do what they do best—connect people, connect ideas and inspire audiences. We hope to illustrate that the arts are for everyone and what they can do for our community,” said Miller. Chris Heacox knows what firsthand experiences can do for someone interested in the arts. His own exposure to live music and professional theater while growing up in

Jacksonville, Florida and later as a student at Florida State University helped shape his own career. Prior to his involvement with the Gogue Performing Arts Center, Heacox directed the “Opening Night”series at FSU and was responsible for bringing world-class entertainment to the community. He was also president of the Florida Professional Presenters Consortium, connecting a conglomerate of venue owners and promotional groups across the entire state. “Working with different constituencies has helped, as I moved here to Alabama, to understand the rural to the big city environment, what those needs are, how to identity them and move them in the required direction,” said Heacox. The presence of a world-class performing arts center will enable students and members of the community alike to see major touring productions and to connect with world-renowned artists and entertainers without ever having to leave town. “These interactions can be truly lifechanging,” said Heacox. “Auburn students now have more opportunities to engage with creative professionals than ever before.” Down the road, Heacox hopes that the Gogue Center can be used as a staging ground for Broadway productions gearing up for the road. The theatrical companies would rent the space for rehearsals and stage preparation, then perform a couple shows for the community before going on tour. The center is already hosting several Broadway performances this season, including Jimmy Buffet’s “Escape to Margaritaville,” “RENT: 20th Anniversary Tour” and “Waitress.” Additional bookings not only drive revenue for the center, they provide unprecedented educational opportunities for students across disciplines as well.

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“It’s not just theater students that benefit,” said Heacox. “Each production is unique, and each visiting artist and performance has the potential to resonate with students from any number of programs—from apparel design and music to architecture and engineering. Our performances are very multifaceted, as are the curricular connections they provide.” When the Gogue Center needed ushers for opening night, Patron Services Manager Izzy Brown turned to the community for support and brought in dozens of volunteers

Brown makes sure the Gogue Center’s two main concession stands and satellite bars are well stocked for every occasion. In addition to a full bar serving beer, wine and liquor, snacks of the small-plate variety are also available. Brown says that for certain performances, like Jimmy Buffet’s Broadway show “Escape to Margaritaville,” the concession stands may even offer a specialty margarita for guests. Despite the hours of careful planning and hard work that go into preparing for each performance, nothing matches the excitement

to meet, greet and guide patrons to their seats. “[The volunteer support] really opens us up to do a lot of different things,” said Brown. “The volunteers that we have are so enthusiastic, all of them really want to be a part of the Gogue Center. We’ve been pleasantly surprised with all the support we’ve received so far.” In partnership with Atlanta-based catering company Proof of the Pudding,

that a show night brings, Brown says. “I like being in the lobby as the doors open at the end of the show and hearing everyone’s feedback—what they thought about the performance,” said Brown. “I enjoy just listening to them talk to their families and their surprise by something they didn’t expect, or amazement by the space or the artists—just hearing their reactions to what we’re doing.”


Izzy Brown Patron Services Manager

Chris Heacox Executive Director


Dr. Jay Gogue becomes Auburn University’s 18th president.

John and Rosemary Brown, both 1957 Auburn graduates, commit to Auburn $57 million, the largest gift in school history at the campaign kickoff for Because This is Auburn – A Campaign for Auburn University, Auburn’s first $1 billion campaign. The gift will fund two major new facilities: a new performing arts center and a student achievement center in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering.

Auburn City Council votes unanimously to give $1.5 million to support construction of the new center, naming the Lawn and Porch.

The Auburn University Board of Trustees approves the construction of the performing arts center, an 85,000 square-foot venue supporting musical, theatrical, and dance performances.

JULY 2007

APRIL 2015

FEBRUARY 2017

APRIL 2017

JUNE 2013

APRIL 2016

APRIL 2017

MAY 2017

‘07

The Auburn University Board of Trustees approves a new, five-year Strategic Plan to guide the university’s direction by focusing on five priorities. Included in the plan is an effort to raise the funds required to build a performing arts center supporting student learning and enhancing community life.

The Auburn University Board of Trustees approves the selection of Wilson Butler Architects of Boston, Massachusetts as the architect of record for the performing arts center after a three-day design charette at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center.

Auburn University breaks ground on a new performing arts center located across from the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art on South College Street in Auburn. The performing arts center and museum will create a new arts district for the university, community, and region.

After a national search, Christopher J. Heacox is named as the executive director of the performing arts center.


TIMELINE OF EVENTS

The Auburn University Board of Trustees approves naming the institution’s new performing arts center in honor of Auburn President Jay Gogue and his wife, Susie. Walt and Ginger Woltosz commit $5 million to name the theatre at the Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center.

JUNE 2017

Construction begins at the Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center on South College Street.

The Semi-Automatic Mason SAM-100 robot receives national attention for its masonry work at the performing arts center.

AUGUST 2017

JULY 2018

The inaugural performing arts season is announced, offering nine distinct series and more than 27 performances.

MARCH 2019

2020

JULY 2017

Rabren General Contractors of Auburn, Alabama is awarded the construction bid for the performing arts center.

DECEMBER 2018

The Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center makes its debut in the Gingerbread Village at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center.

AUGUST 2019

The Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center’s Grand Opening Festival is held over four days, hosting more than 10,000 individuals from 17 states.


Heacox and Miller incorporated several criteria while curating the performances for the 2019–20 season, chief among them a strong diversity of artists and genres. Dance, Jazz, Broadway, Americana Roots and Global Stage all are represented in this one season alone. Once the categories were determined, the team set about booking the highest-caliber talent available, Heacox says. On top of that, it’s very important for me

that we’re bringing artists here to engage with our audiences—there isn’t an invisible wall between the stage and the crowd,” said Heacox. “We want to make sure that each performance is interactive and that patrons are educated and entertained. For Miller, audience engagement is not only essential to showmanship, it’s also a critical aspect of performing arts centers. One such opportunity


for interaction is the “Gogue Center Spotlight Series,” a program which takes place an hour before select shows and allows guests to partake in conversations with performers and local colleagues. Expanding Auburn’s appreciation of the arts is of chief importance to Miller. Engagement opportunities, like the “Gogue Center Spotlight Series,” are dual-purpose by design. They not only connect patrons directly with the arts, they

also connect the artists themselves with the community. “There’s a reciprocal nature in presenting artists from across the country and around the world at the Gogue Center and to introducing these artists to an incredible side of our state,” said Miller. “This is a chance for the South, and for Alabama, to showcase the innovation, the transformative learning and creativity that thrives at Auburn.”


SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

VOCAL SONGBOOK

CELEBRITY CONCERTS

Renée Fleming

Tuesday, September 24 • 7:30 p.m.

Larry, Steve and Rudy – The Gatlin Brothers

Saturday, October 12 • 7:30 p.m.

CELEBRITY CONCERTS

An Evening with Sutton Foster Friday, September 27 • 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ

Chris Botti

Friday, October 18 • 7:30 p.m.

VOCAL SONGBOOK Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox

Sunday, September 29 • 7:30 p.m

OCTOBER

FAMILY

42ft – A Menagerie of Mechanical Marvels by Cirque Mechanics

Wednesday, October 30 • 7:30 p.m.

NOVEMBER DANCE

DIAVOLO: Architecture in Motion Thursday, October 3 • 7:30 p.m.

AMERICANA ROOTS Allman Betts Band

Friday, November 1 • 7:30 p.m.


SEASON CALENDAR

NOVEMBER

JANUARY

AMERICANA ROOTS

Béla Fleck and The Flecktones Thursday, November 21 • 7:30 p.m.

DECEMBER

CHAMBER ARTS Montrose Trio

Tuesday, December 3 · 7:30 p.m.

FAMILY

Dino-Light by Lightwire Theater Friday, January 17 • 7:30 p.m.

DANCE

Dorrance Dance

Friday, January 31 • 7:30 p.m.

FEBRUARY

BROADWAY

Escape to Margaritaville

Wednesday, December 4 • 7:30 p.m. Thursday, December 5 • 7:30 p.m.

CELEBRITY CONCERTS The Beach Boys

Thursday, February 13 • 7:30 p.m.

VOCAL SONGBOOK

VOCES8 (Holiday Program)

Tuesday, December 17 • 7:30 p.m.


FEBRUARY

MARCH

GLOBAL STAGE

Pablo Sáinz Villegas: Americano Trio

Sunday, March 1 • 7:30 p.m.

BROADWAY

RENT: 20th Anniversary Tour

Tuesday, February 18 • 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 19 • 7:30 p.m.

CHAMBER ARTS Matt Haimovitz and Simone Dinnerstein

Tuesday, March 3 • 7:30 p.m.

GLOBAL STAGE

Terrance Simien and The Zydeco Experience

Friday, February 21 • 7:30 p.m.

AMERICANA ROOTS Sierra Hull Band

BROADWAY Waitress

Tuesday, February 25 • 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 26 • 7:30 p.m.

Friday, March 20 • 7:30 p.m.


SEASON CALENDAR

MARCH

APRIL

CHAMBER ARTS Dover Quartet and Bridget Kibbey

Tuesday, March 24 • 7:30 p.m.

DANCE

Camille A. Brown and Dancers Saturday, April 18 • 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Thursday, March 26 · 7:30 p.m.

APRIL

GLOBAL STAGE

Zakir Hussain and Friends

featuring Jayanthi Kumaresh and Kala Ramnath Tuesday, April 21 • 7:30 p.m.

MAY

JAZZ

Alfredo Rodríguez and Pedrito Martinez Duo Tuesday, April 7 • 7:30 p.m.

FAMILY

Air Play by Acrobuffos Friday, May 8 • 7:30 p.m.


As the 2019–20 season progresses, Heacox and his team are determined to build on one stellar, sell-out performance after another, fine-tuning operations to an absolute pitch-perfect experience for the patron. But, based on the community ’s response so far, everyone is excited for what ’s next. “I think it was the perfect moment for this building, this facility and these programs to open here on campus,” said Heacox. “It all happened at the right time, and we’re seeing the results of that with people’s excitement and how many are enjoying our performances.”


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100 S OUTHERN

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CHARCOAL- CHAR-BROIL KETTLEMAN With its oversized damper, the Kettleman is able to control the cooking temperature. This results in even cooking and less risk of burning. The grill features a radiant plate cooking surface that stores heat and reduces the amount of air escaping from the damper. With this feature, you can use remarkably less charcoal. Unlike other kettle grills, this Kettleman has a hinged lid that snaps shut with a latch. Making it very convenient and welcoming for all consumers.

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CHARCOAL- PERFORMER DELUXE The 363 Square inch cooking area of this deluxe grill is what sets it apart from other charcoal grills on the market. While the grill is 22inches, there is a built-in workbench to prep food and hold tools. It also offers the option to cook using gas instead of charcoal, with the ignition system turning on with just the push of a button.

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GAS- REGAL PRO The cool blue LED control knobs aren’t the only thing setting Regal Pro aside from other gas grills. With its stainless steel dualtube burners and innovative cooking system, you will receive even temperatures across the cooking surface resulting in the best quality. Offering 875 square inches of cooking space including a porcelain coated warming rack, you won’t have to worry about keeping your meal warm for guests.

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GAS- WEBER SPIRIT II Family cookouts, have been made easier with this 529 square inch Weber. The system has an infinity ignition starter that fires up all three burners quickly. This allows the grill to heat up rather quickly in only a few minutes. The grill offers a spacious grilling area including side tables to store tools and hold serving trays. The convenience of the Weber Spirit makes grilling for family and friends simple and easy.

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GAS- COLEMAN ROAD TRIP Surprisingly spacious for a portable grill, the cooking area of the Coleman grill is 285 square inches. That creates more than enough space to cook for a family up to four while away from home. The grill offers various griddle or textured plates in order to cook a variety of items. On top of making cooking easy, transportation and storage are made simple. With its compact package, it’s small enough to fit in the trunk of almost any car or stored on a shelf for later.

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ELECTRIC- CHAR-BROIL INFRARED PATIO This 320 square inch grill is the perfect size for small patios such as an apartment balcony. It’s precision dial allows complete control over the 1750-watt burner for perfect meals each time. Unlike traditional grills, this Char-Broil limits the hot air flow and uses natural heat to cook food evenly without drying it out. The porcelain-coated grates on the grill allow for a super easy teardown and clean up

www.charbroil.com

ELECTRIC- GEORGE FOREMAN George Foreman is a well known household name when it comes to electric grilling. With this indoor/outdoor grill, you get all the quality of your indoor grill but with 240 square inches of cooking space. A major feature of the grill is the adjustable temperature control which allows you to choose from five different heat settings to get great even cooking. The grill also has a removable stand that allows the grill to be moved from the kitchen countertop straight outside for a weekend of fun.

www.georgeforemancooking.com


ELECTRIC- AMERICANA ELECTRIC CART The Americana has an astonishing three-position cooking element. This feature allows you to grill traditionally, create a versatile zone of different temperatures to cook various meats, or convert to a vertical position to cook rotisserie style. Cooking for multiple people has never been easier with this 200 square inch grill. Unlike indoor grills, this outdoor electric grill uses a reflector pan to create a smoky vapor to add flavor to any meal.

www.mecocorp.com

PORTABLE- BRONSON 20 PELLET Using a wood pellet grill has never been easier, with this Bronson 20. Simply plugin, place wood pellets in position, set the dial to smoke until the fire lights then set your temperature. Cooking with wood pellets give your food a smoky, woody flavor without any hard work. Surprisingly, with 300 square inches of cooking space the grill is easy to move around for all traveling needs. The grill is HOA approved since there is no open flame, so it’s great for patios, and lakeside fishing.

www.traegergrills.com

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PORTABLE- CUISINART CGG Weighing an astonishing seventeen pounds, the Cuisinart CGG is perfect for on the go cooking. This grill offers 145 square inches of cooking space, which is the perfect size for a small family picnic, or camping trip. With the Cuisinart’s convenient size, it can be used on a tabletop or a pickup truck tailgate. In order to operate, it uses a small propane tank which is great for outdoor cooking. A major feature its ability to fold into briefcase size for easy storage and travel pretty such anywhere.

www.cuisnart.com

PORTABLE- WEBER 10020 SMOKEY JOE Constructed just like some of the larger Weber grills, this Smokey Joe does the same high-quality job. This grill features 147 square inches of cooking space which is triple nickel-plated. The adjustable norust top vent provides great airflow needed to help control cooking temperature for the perfect meal. Weighing only 10 pounds, this grill is perfect for any tailgate or camping trip. Measuring 14.5 in diameter, you can easily cook up to 6 burgers making the grill efficient and convenient.

www.weber.com

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ELEMENTS

HOME TV SPEAKERS

c

a

a - KLIPSCH THE SIXES POWERED MONITOR $499.95

www.klipsch.com Part of the Klipsch Heritage Wireless series, The Sixes is an incredibly versatile audio system. Able to connect directly to a turntable, TV, computer or Bluetooth® wireless enabled device – these speakers deliver amazing acoustics no matter what source.

b

b - JBL BOOST TV COMPACT BLUETOOTH SOUND BAR $149.95

www.jbl.com JBL Boost TV is an ultra-com pact TV speaker that instantly improves your TV audio experience with surprisingly powerful, room-filling sound.At only 15” long (380mm), JBL Boost TV delivers knockout sound quality for your bedroom or home theater TV.

c - POLK AUDIO MAGNIFI MINI HOME THEATRE SOUND BAR SYSTEM $299.95

www.polkaudio.com

d

Enjoy immersive home theater surround sound via 5.1 Dolby Digital. MagniFi fits in tight spaces and still delivers big, room-filling audio. Plus, wirelessly stream your favorite music directly from your smartphone, tablet or other compatible device using Google Cast or Bluetooth.

d - VIZIO SB3821-C6 38-INCH 2.1 CHANNEL SOUND BAR WITH WIRELESS SUBWOOFER $149.98

www.vizio.com Boost your TV audio and enjoy your entertainment in full audio clarity. The wireless subwoofer delivers a room-filling audio experience with deep thumping bass. TV shows, movies, and sports games become loud and clear. Upgrade to premium audio with performance that delivers up to 100dB of sound with less than 1% total harmonic distortion.


PROJECTORS

ELEMENTS

a

b a - TRUE 4K HDR PROJECTOR $1499.00

c

www.benq.com

Get ready for true 4K HDR projector experience with cinematic wonder like you’re in an authentic digital cinema. For audio-video enthusiasts who want to take in every little detail for truly cinematic experiences, enjoy the super-wide DCI-P3 color space with film-like texture and playback as directors envisioned, BenQ HT3550 4K HDR CinePrime Projector with CinematicColor™ technology ushers awe-inspiring movie magic into your personal AV room.

b - OPTOMA UHD65 $580.00 www.epson.com

The Optoma UHD65 is a state-of-the-art 2,200 lumen 4K Ultra High Definition (UHD) projector for home cinema capable of delivering ultra-sharp images with a high level of detail and astounding color. It delivers breathtaking picture quality with its 1,200,000:1 contrast ratio and RGBRGB color wheel.

c - EPSON - HC1450 1080P SMART 3LCD PROJECTOR $205.00

www. epson.com

Ideal for large, well-lit spaces, the Home Cinema 1450 home theater projector delivers immersive, ultra bright Full HD 1080p entertainment. Turn sports, games, movies and popular streaming content into a truly blockbuster event. Offering high Color Brightness*, Epson® 3LCD projectors ensure vivid images.

d - LG PH450UG MINIBEAM PROJECTOR $524.56

www.lg.com

d

Ultra Short Throw projectors deliver vivid imagery within a very short distance of the projection surface. Set it just 3 inches from a wall or screen to get 40 inches of bright, vivid viewing or just 13 inches away to get images up to 80 inches.


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TRAVEL EDINBURGH SCOTLAND

Rich in history, lush in culture, Edinburgh, Scotland is one of Europe’s most storied and celebrated cities. Home to castles, kilts and the birthplace of golf, you will find no shortage of excitement and adventuresome straight out of a storybook.

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Edinburgh Castle This historic fortress dominates the skyline of Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland, from its position on the Castle Rock.

Towering above the cobblestone roofs of Scotland’s ancient capital, Edinburgh Castle is the epicenter of this modern metropolis in more ways than one, the link between the modern House of Scots and an ancient history dating to before the Roman Empire. Ancient Edinburgh, known as Eidyn, was regarded as the northernmost outpost of the Roman world. Just beyond its city walls, the country’s wilderness gave rise to countless

mysteries and legends, some still alive today. The rings of surrounding hills around Edinburgh — remnants of an extinct volcano — are known collectively as Arthur’s Seat, a mythic reference to the legendary king and his castle Camelot. Though there is little factual evidence to bolster these claims, they are in keeping with a local tradition that often seems as much a work of fiction as real life.

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A walkable city full of lush botanical gardens, open parks, and the hiking-friendly hills, Edinburgh is a city meant to be explored. Along the narrow streets of Old Town, winding hallways called “closes” filter out into tranquil gardens away from the noise of the city, while the closes themselves often contain their own stores, bars, and restaurants. One only has to walk a few blocks in any direction to find deep green fields just around the corner. Calton Hill, one of the highest points in all over Edinburgh, allows for commanding views of the city and the countryside only blocks away from Princes Street, one of the city’s main drags. As the City of Literature, there are plenty of book-themed attractions that can properly introduce you to Edinburgh, none more iconic than The Scott Monument, commemorating Sir Walter Scott, the towering

figure of Scottish literature and inventor of the historical novel who romanticized figures like Rob Roy and Edward Waverly. Upon his death in 1832, the city dedicated a Victorian Gothic spire inside the Princes Street Gardens. The monument has viewing platforms at the top that are open to the public. The Scottish poet and playwright Allan Ramsay opened the world’s first circulating library in Edinburgh in 1725, and today you can explore the country’s printed heritage at The National Library of Scotland (nls.uk) open Monday through Saturday. The library is currently hosting its exhibition “Northern Lights: the Scottish Enlightenment” through April 2020, showcasing an unparalleled collection of books, maps and other printed materials that highlight 18th-century Scotland’s leading intellectual lights.

BOTTOM: CALTON HILL Calton Hill provides a panoramic view of the city, with Princes Street, the castle, and the Old Town silhouetted against Arthur’s Seat. To the east and north you can see the Firth of Forth and the docks at Leith. At the foot of the hill stands the 13th-century Royal High School, where Sir Walter Scott was once a pupil.


ARTHUR’S SEAT Arthur’s Seat is often mentioned as one of the possible locations for Camelot, the legendary castle and court of King Arthur. NATIONAL MONUMENT OF SCOTTLAND This is Scotland’s national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic War


THE BALMORAL is a luxury five-star hotellocated in the heart of the city at the east end of Princes Street

In the Scottish Poetry Library (scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk), a remarkable hall dedicated to the power of verse, guests can explore the work of Scotland’s national poet Robert Burns and immerse themselves in the vibrant world of contemporary Scottish poetry. At the Writers’ Museum of Edinburgh (edinburghmuseums.org.uk), the lives of Edinburgh’s three most celebrated authors — Robert Burns, Sir Walter Scott, and Robert Louis Stevenson — are retold through an enormous collection of personal items, manuscripts and more. There is no shortage of golf courses to choose from throughout Scotland, and around Edinburgh, there are dozens well within the city limits alone. But just a two-hour tram ride north is the Mecca of the golfing world, The Old Course at St. Andrews (standrews. com). The birthplace of golf and home to the

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NIRA CALEDONIA is a unique boutique hotel that offers a rich cultural experience.


THE SCOTCH WHISKY EXPERIENCE This place offers tours and whisky tutoring sessions

British Open, for over 600 years St. Andrews’ windswept fields have seen countless legends tee off. While the hallowed old course is available for private tee times, reservations can take years in advance to book; fret not, as there are six modern courses to choose from, each set amongst beautiful panoramic vistas of the Scottish coastline. Inside the Castle Course Clubhouse, a full-course meal overlooking St. Andrews Bay is an excellent way to your day. Inside the hamlet of St. Andrews just down the road are accommodations for those staying overnight or longer, with plenty of quaint streets lined with shops and cafes perfect for strolling. One day certainly is not enough to take in all that Edinburgh has to offer, so finding the right accommodations can mean the difference between a trip full of tram stops, bus rides and tired feet or a rejuvenating stay that goes beyond a good nights’ sleep. An Edinburgh institution, The Balmoral (roccofortehotels.com) overlooks Castle Rock in the heart of the city and is a perfect entrance to Scotland. Authentic tartans, Michelin-starred restaurants, and over 500 whiskeys to choose from make any stay an

CRANACHAN Traditional scottish dessert, cranachan with raspberry, whipped cream and roasted oatmeal in a glass

event. Luxury trumps affordability here, but these suites are fit for royalty. Designed like bespoke apartments, each is replete with its own sitting and dining area, original artwork and its own private library filled with classic authors. One of the major highlights of the Balmoral is its excursion packages, ranging

HAGGIS Scotland’s national food, made of oatmeal, various spices, and sheep or calf’s entrails and internal organs

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SCOTT MONUMENT This enchanting monolith was built to commemorate one of Scotland’s greatest authors, Sir Walter Scott


from classes in tea brewing and a culinary excursion through Edinburgh to full-day trips outside the city into the Scottish Highlands, into the islands around the harbor or through Edinburgh’s major historic sites. Only a few minutes’ walks from the shops and cafes of the Stockbridge neighborhood, Nira Caledonia offers levels of comfort suited to all manner of taste. Seven different lodging accommodations ranging from single rooms to a “jacuzzi suite” are sure to take loads off weary travelers, while the in-house Blackwood’s Bar & Grill provides meals worth dining in for. Nira Caledonia’s own private whiskey selection, an 8-year-old single malt whiskey from Caol Ila on the Island of Islay, is available for discerning guests. Winding throughout the city is the Edinburgh Tram, capable of transporting visitors from one edge of the city to another in a matter of minutes. Novotel Edinburgh Park Hotel is only a brisk walk away from Edinburgh Park Rail Station and makes for the ideal, off-the-beaten-path stay, especially for families. With 170 contemporary-style rooms, an indoor swimming pool and fitness room, this is the perfect respite from the bustling city no matter how brief. When one thinks of Scottish cuisine, haggis — a pudding made from sheep heart liver and lungs, minced and spiced then cooked in a sheep stomach — is probably what comes to mind. But the reality is the Highlands are replete with steaks, seafood, and locally-sourced vegetables.

As always, there are literary connections. Robert Burns, Scotland’s national poet, wrote his famous “Ae Fond Kiss” in 1791 while staying at The White Hart Inn (32-34 Grassmarket). Edinburgh’s oldest pub still in operation, you can grab a pint and lunch or dinner in the original hall over 500 years later. Through a unique historic partnership with France — forged through a shared enemy in the English — Scottish cuisine features a unique strain of French cooking that elevates even the simplest of ingredients to gourmet fare. Among the high-end options, the environs of The Dome (thedomeedinburgh. com) on George Street in the heart of New Town is a first-class choice option. Designed to dazzle as well as dine, guests have several unique halls to choose from, each with its own personality. For a real-life storybook meal, the Tower Restaurant (tower-restaurant.com) is open throughout the day and offers flavor-packed dishes like Dingwall haggis with pineapple salsa, Scottish seafood bouillabaisse and a long list of Scottish teas, each with their own unique history. Sitting atop the National Museum of Scotland (nms.ac.uk), this is the perfect place to watch the sun sink below Castle Rock and savor all that Edinburgh has to offer.

THE SCOTTISH POETRY LIBRARY was founded in 1984 by poet Tessa Ransford. It has been described as “a poem in glass and stone”

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SOUTHERN TATLER The Essence of Southern Society

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SOUTHERN TATLER “The essence of Southern Society”

SOUTHERN TATLER

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TAZEWELL MORTON

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IN LIVING COLORS

ISSUE 32

AUBURN / OPELIKA, AL JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

SINCE 1946

111 South College Street, Auburn • 334.821.7375 The Shoppes at EastChase, Montgomery • 334.386.9273 Eastern Shore Centre, Spanish Fort • 251.338.9273

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MATT AND JANA POIRIER ISSUE 31

Ambitious Visions AUBURN / OPELIKA, AL

your CITY, your MAGAZINE e: customer.relations@southerntatler.com l phone: 334.329.1780


VISAGE AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL Twenty-One Acres, Auburn, AL June 22nd, 2019

Anna McDonald, Averi Cofield, Lisa Blackburn, April Merritt

Randall & Kristin Meadows, Joy & Will Brinkley

Donna, Michael, & David Young

Peggy & Billy Elmore, Sheree Golden, Faye Knotts, Sonya Bedsole, Jessica Praeger

Dade, Rachel, & Marguerite Nunnally

Kenny & Amanda Eaton

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Katie Stine, Mary Helen Martin, Anthony Martin, Macon Martin


The Auburn Food & Wine Festival featured 150 different wines, food from 20 restaurants and a selection of beer and spirits, benefitting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Lee County. Numerous local restaurants was presented at the festival, including Bow & Arrow, Acre, Lucy’s, Amsterdam Cafe, The Hound, The Depot and more.

Bill Fortier, Jason Lynn, Rachel Megan, Debbie Lynn Todd & Michele Scholl

Dan & Jennifer Thompson, Julie & Neil Starling Wanda Lewis

Scott & Michelle Ayers, Joanna & Andrew Albrecht

Charles & Nancy Veale, Jeff & Tracy Smalley

Shawn & Dave Roman

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Becky Martin, Elizabeth Grant, Tara Jones


AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

VISAGE AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

Twenty-One Acres, Auburn, AL June 22nd, 2019

Margaret Caruso, Alyssa Bailey

Tim & Alison Austin, Kevin & Kristen Copeland

Randy & Oline Price

Kevin & Sherry Adcock

Nancy Blanco, Jesus Martinez

John & Katy Perko, Dana & Mary Perko Jennifer Thompson, Emily June Ellis

J.D. Hammond, Wynter Battiste, Ashley King, Nicole Kubilins

Matt & Michelle Schultz

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The event will also include live music featuring performances by Graham Harper and Ben Sutton Band. In addition to Josh Nagel, the festival’s co-chair and sommelier, wellknown chef and caterer Christine Healey of Christine’s Unlimited is the other co-chair for the festival.

Dan & Allyson Jackson

Catherine & Robby Boswell Paige Ellison, Craig Young Anne McKinley, Jessica Blackburn, Baxlee Byrnum

Andrew & Candice Barber

Jimmy & Ashlea Armstrong

Hunter Smith, Rachel Hoffman, Grace Tatum, Colby Smith

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Blake & Katie Ashley


VISAGE AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL Twenty-One Acres, Auburn, AL June 22nd, 2019

Hope & George Nunnelly Courtney Rochelle, Stephen Harris, Meagan Gordon

Aaron Norris, Mary Grayson Nix

Allison Keasel, Hans van der Reijden Erin & Eron Brown Jennifer & Dan Thompson

Buddy Merrill, Cecile & Nance Lovvorn, Becky Merrill

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VISAGE AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL Twenty-One Acres, Auburn, AL June 22nd, 2019

David & Christin Bancroft

Jordan & Ricky Macatee

Camryn Swain, Rich Bright

Taylor Franklin, Brian Perkins Tara Harbison, LaQuell Webb, Katie Daniels, Miguel Figeuroa

Jon and Rosa Ellis

Christian Watson, Chandler Hardin

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Megan & Buck Battles


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AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

VISAGE AUBURN FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

Twenty-One Acres, Auburn, AL June 22nd, 2019

Nancy Veale, Eli Mazer Ashley Field, Jennnifer Keasal, Josh Nagal, Christine, Healey

Bob Harris

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Max Carlisle, Jeff Robinson

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VISAGE 5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Oliver Henr y, Opelika AL June 20th, 2019

Candy Smith, Pat Giddens, Janice Ryan, Dawn Pierce, Tracy Hill

Brooke Kirkpatrick, Virginia Cook

Dott Dailey, Linda Bell

Andy, Stacey, Oliver & Henry Jordan

Natalie & Riley Yates, Caroline & Jennifer Graham

Cecile & Nance Lovvorn, Becky & Buddy Merrill

Katie Neal, Pat O’Quinn

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Robin Fraley, Bailey Pugh, Holly Smith Steven & Leanne Presley

Barbara Sforzini, Beverly Chapman, Linda Hardy

Amity Neighbors

Summer Williams, Rebecca Parvin

Mary Emma Stephens, Davis Whittelsey

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5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

VISAGE 5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Oliver Henr y, Opelika AL June 20th, 2019

Andy Jordan

John & Kathy Dickman

Sarah Jenkins, Julie Brown

Jimmy & Tammy Holcomb

Kevin & Leigh Smith

Jennifer Schmidt, Carrie Collett

Jean Holland, Debra Jordan

Barbi Agricola, Carmen Cantrell

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Sandra Battye, Karen Plunkett

Jennifer & Janet Cooper Angie & John Jordin

Amy, Anna, & Amelia Horak

Meredith Bryan, Emily Lett Ashley Butler, Miriam Russo

Keri Miller, Andrea Mitchell

Amanda Martin, Kim Recktenwald

Sarah Foster, Holly Smith

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VISAGE ÉLEVÉ X INITIAL OUTFITTERS

ÉLEVÉ X INITIAL OUTFITTERS Élevé, Auburn AL October 22nd, 2019

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Your University. Your Hotel. The Hotel at Auburn University has been the Front Door to Auburn for more than 30 years. Adjacent to Auburn University and downtown, we’re more than a place to stay. We’re a place to

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111 South College Street, Auburn • 334.821.7375 The Shoppes at EastChase, Montgomery • 334.386.9273 Eastern Shore Centre, Spanish Fort • 251.338.9273

Profile for Southern Tatler

Southern Tatler Issue 33  

Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center - The Stage is Set, Faces: Dr. Duane Randleman - Clearing Paths for Better Health, Local Focus -...

Southern Tatler Issue 33  

Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center - The Stage is Set, Faces: Dr. Duane Randleman - Clearing Paths for Better Health, Local Focus -...

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