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Southern Peninsula

Features inside: AROUND THE PENINSULA PAGES 9 – 11 FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT PAGES 22 – 24 SOUTHERN PENINSULA SCOREBOARD PAGES 25 – 27

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26 July – 8 August 2011

MPNEWS (1300 676 397) or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au

Rosebud Rebels roll on NO step aerobics or spin classes for these girls. Their choice of sport is the rough and tumble world of roller derby. The ultra-contact sport of the 1970s – when it rivalled wrestling on the television – is being revived by a new breed of competitive sportswomen, with clubs and leagues springing up across Australia. With names like ‘Bashin’ Bronco’, ‘Vodka Bruiser’, ‘Flash Pance’, ‘Double D-Mon’, ‘Foxy la Roux’, and ‘Ezme Hurchu’, the Rosebud Rebels mean business. Read about the young women, and the very serious business of roller derby, in Southern Peninsula Scoreboard on page 25. Wheels on fire: Roller derby referee ‘General Lee’ (rear) with the chargers from the Rosebud Rebels roller derby team. Picture: Loaded Dice Photography

Liquor shop battle beckons By Mike Hast SHIRE councillors have knocked back a liquor “superstore” in Rosebud, setting up a battle with one of Australia’s biggest food and drink retailers. The decision will likely be challenged in the state planning tribunal, the Victorian Civil and Administration Tribunal. First Choice Liquor, a division of supermarket giant Coles, wanted to build a 1200-square metre store with parking for 41 cars on the old Swan Plumbing Hardware site at 1301 Pt Nepean Rd. It is next to Aldi and would be almost the same size as the German-owned supermarket, which is 1282 sqm. The liquor store would have an entry

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It’s shire versus Coles in VCAT off McCombe St at the rear. It would be the 10th liquor outlet along a three kilometre strip of Pt Nepean Rd between Lonsdale St in the east and Boneo Rd in the west. On Monday last week, Mornington Peninsula Shire councillors led by Crs David Gibb and Reade Smith voted to refuse the application, citing a negative

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“cumulative impact of an additional licensed packaged liquor outlet will contribute to the disproportionately high level of alcohol harm in Rosebud”. They said the proposal also did not have enough car parking. Signs, including one seven metres high, were excessive. The expected VCAT challenge to

the council decision is being seen as a test case, as the shire is believed to be the first council to refuse a liquor shop using the “cumulative impact” regulations introduced by the state government in April. Cumulative impact refers to the positives or negatives of putting licensed premises such as hotels, bars, clubs and liquor shops in the one area. Coles, bought in late 2007 by Wesfarmers, which also owns the Bunnings hardware empire, operates First Choice Liquor, Liquorland and Vintage Cellars as either stand alone outlets or as part of its supermarkets. Its great rival Woolworths, also called Safeway in Victoria, operates

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BWS (beer, wine, spirits), Dan Murphy and Cellarmasters. Cr Gibb said a 10th liquor outlet would contribute to a high level of harm already experienced in Rosebud due to alcohol. Cr Smith said he spent two and a half years as a police officer in Rosebud many years ago, had been employed as a security guard and had worked with young alcohol abusers. “The tipping point [of liquor outlets] was reached a long time ago in Rosebud,” he said. “Alcohol is responsible for violence, domestics and drinkdriving.” Continued Page 5

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Southern Peninsula

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Editor: Keith Platt, 5979 8564 or 0439 394 707 Journalist: Mike Hast, 5979 8564 Advertising Sales: Carolyn Wagener, 0407 030 761 Production/Graphic Design: Stephanie Loverso Publisher: Cameron McCullough, 0407 027 707 REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Barry Irving, Cliff Ellen, Frances Cameron, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Gary Turner, Marilyn Cunnington, Fran Henke, Peter Ellis, Casey Franklin. ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 E-mail: team@mpnews.com.au Web: www.mpnews.com.au

NEWS DESK

Chilly dip kicks off winter walk THE Federal MP for Flinders, Greg Hunt, headed off on another long walk on Monday 25 July – this time to raise funds for and awareness of autism. To help launch the walk, Mr Hunt was joined by the leader of the opposition, Tony Abbott, for an early morning swim at Mount Martha. After the swim, Mr Hunt and Mr Abbott met with community members

and attended a community breakfast. They met with local occasional care providers and local kinders to discuss issues regarding funding cuts and staff ratios. They also met the operators of a small injection moulding company to discuss the impact of a carbon tax on the viability of their business. Mr Hunt walked around his big elec-

torate of Flinders in 2004 and 2007, both election years, to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. His ‘Walk for Autism’ started at Arthurs Seat and ends on 12 August at Phillip Island. Mr Hunt’s first walk raised $65,000 for diabetes research and his second more than $55,000.

Icy reception: Whilst the crowds may have been welcoming, the waters were much colder.

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Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

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Another phone tower headache By Mike Hast ANOTHER proposed mobile phone tower on the southern peninsula has raised the ire of residents. McCrae Action Group has lodged a formal objection to a planned 23-metre high Optus tower at 2 Cornell St, McCrae. The tower is being organised for Optus by Daly International Pty Ltd, which specialises in telecommunications projects in Australia and the United Kingdom. Residents of Tootgarook are also battling plans by Optus to erect a phone tower near Laura St. Optus is also planning a tower near where Mornington Peninsula Fwy crosses the Nepean Hwy at Dromana.

The Optus push for other towers on the peninsula is part of a plan to provide 98 per cent mobile phone coverage. McCrae Action Group coordinator Alan Nelsen says the proposed McCrae tower does not comply with the Mornington Peninsula Planning Scheme’s design and development overlay, which sets out restrictions on structure height, scale and location as well as visual intrusion. “The planning scheme is supposed to restrict the height of structures to eight metres,� he said. “The tower will have a negative impact on the views of homes on the slopes of Arthurs Seat, the scenic tourist lookouts on the mountain and views

from various parts of McCrae, Dromana, Rosebud and Safety Beach.� Dr Nelsen, a retired engineer, said it was incompatible for the shire to support rebuilding of Arthurs Seat chairlift with its iconic views, but then permit an “obtrusive and unsightly communications tower in the immediate line of sight of the magnificent views from the chairlift�. “State government and shire planning documents specifically refer to the importance of protecting the rural vistas of the peninsula. Arthurs Seat is grouped with the Dandenong Ranges as among greater Melbourne’s most important landscapes.� Dr Nelsen said Telstra had achieved mobile phone coverage using antennas

the amenity of an area. The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal says phone towers should provide a net community benefit and contribute to sustainable development. “It may cost Optus more to install two or three lower height towers in more acceptable locations, but overall there would be a net community benefit.� He said that at a site meeting with residents and Optus staff last week, the company had indicated it might be prepared to look at making the tower a fake cypress or gum tree, but “this did not satisfy residents�. “The next step is for a hydraulic lift to be brought on the site to give locals an indication of the height.�

12 metres high, well below the tree line at McCrae, and queried why Optus needed such a tall mobile tower. Also, Telstra had proposed erecting a tower near Latrobe Pde where it crosses the freeway, but had acceded to shire and community requests to move it to a less obtrusive location and disguise it as a fake cypress tree. “If Telstra can service the area without building an obtrusive and ugly tower, why can’t Optus do the same?� he asked. Dr Nelsen said government policy of asking phone companies to share towers had “gone out the window�. “The shire’s planning scheme encourages the use of telecommunications facilities that have minimal impact on

More work at Portsea’s bay beach DEPARTMENT of Sustainability and Environment contractors have returned to Portsea’s disappearing front beach to again build a temporary barrier of rocks. This time they are repairing recent damage to the $3 million sandbag wall erected last year. Officials said the sandbag seawall had sustained some minor damage due to the severe weather conditions. A 30-metre long rock wall was installed to protect the damaged sandbags. A temporary access ramp is needed for access to the eroding beach. Contractors will repair the seawall using a new design that has not yet been finished. The work may not be started for several months.

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NEWS DESK

Public has say on council future By Keith Platt THE process gets underway next month to decide if there should be any change to the number of councillors in each of Mornington Peninsula Shire’s 11 wards. The review by the Victorian Electoral Commission begins with public information sessions on 3 August at Hastings, Rosebud and Mornington. The deadline for submissions follows two weeks later and the VEC will issue its preferred options on 5 September. The shire has already made it clear that it wants to retain the status quo of one councillor in each ward and began a campaign in its May Peninsula-Wide newsletter to convince ratepayers. A public hearing will be held on 12 October to hear oral submissions. The shire’s campaign includes mailouts to clubs and organisations, and website space (‘Shire starts campaign to stay the same’, The News 21/6/11). The unattributed Peninsula-Wide article says single-councillor wards are “clearly the favoured system of our community”. It says residents “overwhelmingly rejected a push for multi-councillor wards” during the 2005 electoral review. The article does not mention that a check of the submissions made during that review showed an alignment of views by councillors, shire employees and Liberal Party members. Peninsula-Wide quotes the mayor, Cr Graham Pittock, as saying “a move towards multi-councillor wards would open the way for party politics or voting ‘blocs’ to enter council”.

CURRENT boundaries and voter numbers for Mornington Peninsula Shire Council were established after the 2005 review. The boundaries of Balcombe, Cerberus and Red Hill wards were changed in a subdivision review in 2008.

Briefly Fire warning THE CFA has again issued a winter fire warning after a spate of accidents involving heaters and fireplaces. CFA chief officer Euan Ferguson said CFA and MFB brigades had attended more than 300 house fires since the start of winter. “Three Victorians have tragically lost their lives, but most of the fires could have been prevented,” he said. “People must be vigilant and check their heaters to ensure they are in good working condition, and also ensure they have a working smoke alarm.” He advised people to check smoke alarms were working, check heaters are working efficiently and chimneys are swept, talk about how you would get out of your house if there was a fire. Be vigilant and plan ahead. For more information, visit www. homefiresafety.com.au

Peninsula web talk The VEC review will consider the number of councillors for the shire and the shire’s electoral structure. Victorian Electoral Commissioner Steve Tully said “anyone interested” in the review could attend one of the three public information sessions. A guide for submissions explaining the review process will be available at the sessions. “The review considers a range of information, including arguments and evidence put forward in public submissions,” Mr Tully said. “Any person or group can make a

written submission to the VEC on the review. Submissions are not required to be elaborate documents and should be limited to the scope of the review.” The Wednesday 3 August public information sessions are at 7.45pm at the Hastings reception room, 21 Marine Pde, Hastings; 4pm at the Rosebud shire offices, 90 Besgrove St, Rosebud; and 6pm at the Mornington shire offices, 2 Queen St, Mornington Preliminary submissions close at 5pm on Wednesday 17 August. Submissions can be made online at vec.vic.gov.au, emailed to review.

morningtonpeninsula@vec.vic.gov.au, faxed to (03) 9629 8632 or posted to the VEC. Responses to the VEC’s preliminary report must be made by 5pm Wednesday 5 October with the public hearing being held on Wednesday 12 October. The VEC’s final report will be sent to the Minister for Local Government and any changes to the peninsula’s electoral structure would apply at the next council general elections in November 2012. For details call the VEC on 131 832 or vec.vic.gov.au.

COMMUNITY advocacy group Peninsula Speaks has a new website that it says is more interactive and informative. The group was founded in 2008 to preserve the environment of the Mornington Peninsula, including opposing incremental development and government policy threats to the green wedge. A spokesman said the group welcomed comments and stories from anyone concerned about the environment. “Archives will be added to the site as we receive content.” The website address is www.peninsulaspeaks.org and items can be sent to penspeaksweb@gmail.com.

Rates going up as wrangling over amount continues By Mike Hast SHIRE councillors were expected to approve a rate rise of 6.8 per cent on Monday night when they approved the 2011-12 budget. Last year’s rise was 6.2 per cent. The shire council, led by CEO Michael Kennedy, has been battling perceptions of an even higher rise since the Municipal Association of Victoria released a comparison of council rate rises earlier this month. MAV figures showed Mornington Peninsula ratepayers would be paying an extra 9 per cent, but Dr Kennedy has told several community budget presentation meetings during June and July the MAV figure is wrong as it included the $130 green waste bin charge, which is paid by residents who opt-in to the service, and MAV had incorrectly added in a new, increased charge for owners of vacant land. Mornington Peninsula Ratepayers’ & Residents’ Association secretary Alan Nelsen said the group had closely analysed the draft budget and compared it with budgets of other councils. “The shire is trying to give the impression that the rate increase is 6.8 per cent in the hope that ratepayers will not become aware of or alarmed about the true increase in cost to the community,” he said. “The shire’s figure is only the increase in the rate in the dollar and does not include revenue from all charges. “After almost a decade of increasing borrowing, the shire now proposes to cut $3.75 million off its debt. “This is a whacking turnaround of $5.25 million in one financial year and we believe the shire is leaving itself open to accusations of incompetence to have a high borrowing strategy in previ-

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Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

ous years and now try and reduce it by such a high rate increase.” Dr Nelsen said three councillors had baulked at the 6.8 per cent rise “Cr Anne Shaw said she could not support a rate rise of more than 6 per cent. “Cr Frank Martin said, ‘I could see a 5.8 per cent rate [increase] with increased borrowings and it wouldn’t affect the bottom line’ and Cr Bev Colomb also voted not to support the budget. “These councillors must be shocked to now find that ratepayers are being asked to contribute 9 per cent in rates and charges this year.” If councillors reduce the rate rise on Monday night, it will mean less than $3.75 million would be paid off the shire’s $38 million debt. Last month when releasing the draft budget, mayor Graham Pittock said it was a “livability budget”. CEO Michael Kennedy said shire rate levels were low compared to other municipalities “and will continue to be so into the future”. He said the shire was committed to ensuring rate increases were within the limits of affordability. “We strive to make best use of every dollar through ongoing review processes that focus on efficiency, effectiveness and innovation across everything we do,” Dr Kennedy said. He said the council would introduce a differential rate for vacant residential, commercial and industrial land. The additional 20 per cent on the general rate would generate $826,000 more. “Vacant land should make a more equitable contribution to council facilities and services; a range of council services are clearly relevant to all property, improved or unimproved,” he said.


No extra cheer in beer for Hillmen the tent when the cricket club dropped out and there was some confusion over who would bring the fence.” Mr Siverson said there was a delay in the fence being brought to the Red Hill Showgrounds by a club member who was a poultry farmer. “He was running late and unfortunately the police arrived first,” he said. Mr Siverson said the club had pleaded guilty, although no conviction was recorded or penalty issued. “We’ve come out of it and learnt our lesson and the mistake won’t happen again,” he said. Mr Siverson said the club had just managed to break even on the day and made sure it complied with the law when running the beer tent at the Red Hill Show in March. “We’ve always had a tent at the show but no fence, although the requirement was clearly written in the licence agreement. “At the show we made sure the fence was there and had a club member on guard to make sure no one wandered off with a drink.” Regarding the footy, Mr Siverson said “it’s been a tough year and we hope to get back next year”. It has been a massive fall from grace for a team that had made the preliminary finals in 2010. At one stage this year Red Hill had 17 injured players and was playing under-18s in the seniors. Last weekend Red Hill defeated Tyabb, but remains second bottom on the ladder.

Running to victory: Red Hill footballers on their way to defeating Tyabb, their second win during a horror, injury-plagued season. Picture: JJ Adams

Councillors to choose on extending CEO’s ad break AN important deadline is approaching for Mornington Peninsula Shire councillors: deciding whether to advertise that the CEO’s $320,000 a year job is vacant. Under local government regulations the current CEO Michael Kennedy must be told next month, August, whether his position is to be advertised. When Dr Kennedy’s contract runs out in February it will be his 13th year in the job and it will be the third time in a row if he is reappointed without council seeking other applicants for the position. Despite dissatisfaction from ratepayer groups about the position not being advertised, councillors are giving no guarantees they will seek other applicants. The mayor, Cr Graham Pittock has said the “final

decision is for the council and not the community”. In response to a question from Tyabb resident David Lines at council’s 27 June meeting Cr Pittock said council was “crucially aware of the process to be followed in either appointing or reappointing the chief executive officer”. According to council minutes Cr Pittock “also confirmed that councillors, as the elected representatives of the community, take this decision very seriously and the final decision is for the council and not the community. At this stage, council has not formally resolved whether to appoint or reappoint the chief executive officer.” Mr Lines had asked why Mr Kennedy’s position would not be advertised “as he has held this office for approximately 13 years, maybe it is time for a change”.

Coles liquor battle looms Continued from Page 1 A LONE voice for First Choice was mayor Cr Graham Pittock who said that no doubt there were adequate alcohol outlets in Rosebud, but there was a lack of disabled toilets and the proposal include one. “We have the opportunity to get a disabled toilet at no cost to the council,” he said. His colleagues laughed. “I’m serious,” he said. Cr Bev Colomb said the state government was allowing local councils to make decisions about liquor outlets due to the new regulations introduced in April. “We have an opportunity to get involved and the statistics for Rosebud are not good,” she said. Cr Gibb said Wesfarmers/Coles would vigorously oppose the council’s decision at VCAT. “We should rejoice that this will be used as a test case.” Shire planner Sotirios Katakouzinos’s report to the councillors stated they should approve the application, but he was overruled 8-2, with only Cr Pittock and Cr Ann Shaw supporting the liquor shop.

Expressions of Interest Membership of the Crib Point Stony Point Foreshore Reserve Committee of Management Inc Nominations are being sought from the community for membership of a Committee of Management that will manage the foreshore reserve in Crib Point/Stony Point. The Committee is responsible for the day to day management, care and protection of the foreshore reserve on behalf of both the local community and the wider Victorian community. This is a unique opportunity to become actively involved in management of a highly significant area of coastal reserve. Key attributes being sought include interest and enthusiasm, a commitment to caring, protecting and managing the foreshore reserve of Crib Point/ Stony Point and an approach to the task that includes maximising community involvement and participation. Specific interest or skills in one or more of the following areas would be highly regarded:

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By Keith Platt IT has been a season of hard knocks for Red Hill footballers. Halfway through the season they have notched up just two wins and are already looking ahead to next year rather than making the finals in 2011. Plagued by injuries in the early games, the club also had a bad start off the field when it was booked for breaching liquor licensing laws. Volunteers running a beer tent at the Sunday 9 January Red Hill Country Music Festival were surprised when confronted by three uniformed police. The police from Dromana said the club was breaking the law selling unopened cans of beer; not having a fenced off area for drinking; and allowing drinkers to leave the fenced off area – a charge that was eventually dropped when the case was heard in Dromana Magistrates’ Court. “I felt it was a bit harsh when they charged us and that we should have just copped a warning,” club president Roger Siverson last week told The News. “I accept the police have a job and no one likes bad vibes with the local police. “If it had been a hotel or a private company they’d have had every right, but we were a bunch of locals trying to keep the local football and netball club running. It was a bit rough. “It was a BYO event and people were walking everywhere with bottles of wine and stubbies. “We had taken up the offer to run

Customer Service Centre 136 186 Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

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NEWS DESK

Rosebud spoilt for choice when it comes to grog THE Emu felt like a drink; a glass of plonk or two to go with a homemade curry. Luckily I was in Rosebud where there are now nine liquor outlets between Lonsdale St and Boneo Rd; a distance of three kilometres. Four outlets are within one kilometre; two up the McCrae end have one shop between them. Spoilt for choice, Emu thought. Speaking of choice, on Monday night last week our shire council knocked back a plan for a First Choice liquor “superstore” on the old Swan Plumbing Hardware site next to Aldi. (Swan has moved to Henry Wilson Dve in the light industrial estate off Boneo Rd.) The First Choice liquor store would be about the same size as Aldi, but have 41 car parks compared to Aldi’s 103. Buying grog’s faster than groceries, apparently. The 1200-square metre store would have an entry off McCombe St at the rear, next to a physiotherapist, which is handy if you do your back carrying slabs. Shire planners said yes, but the councillors said no, citing the state government’s “cumulative impact” rules introduced in April. Cumulative impact refers to the positives or negatives of putting licensed premises in the one area. Pubs, clubs or bottle shops. The law refers to an area reaching “saturation point” and the councillors went with this interpretation. One more liquor shop in Rosebud

was one too many, they said. A bit like the reverse of the alcoholic’s lament: one drink is too many, 1000 is not enough. At the council meeting, the bloke representing First Choice spoke to the council for three minutes, answered a few tricky questions and returned to the public gallery to listen to the debate (see main story page 1). Forty minutes later he left the council chamber in a state of shock, probably thinking about telling his bosses the bad news next morning. The council has set itself up for a massive bunfight. The owner of First Choice is Coles, bought in late 2007 by Wesfarmers, which also owns the Bunnings hardware empire. Coles/Wesfarmers and its great rival Woolworths (Safeway in Victoria) dominate the Australian supermarket sector with 80 per cent of sales. They compete vigorously in the liquor market, too. Coles/Wesfarmers also owns Liquorland and Vintage Cellars, while Woolies has BWS (beer, wine, spirits), Dan Murphy and Cellarmasters. Can you imagine the boss of First Choice being told the bad news about Mornington Peninsula Shire refusing his liquor superstore? It’s enough to turn a man to drink.

Don’t follow the leader

The boss is in the building

POOR Rupert Murdoch. Did you watch him being grilled by the British politicians over the News of the World phone hacking scandal? It was on the telly very late last Tuesday. The Emu had drifted off on the couch and was woken by everyone yelling. Some lunatic hit Rupert with a shaving foam “pie”, his 42-year-old third wife Wendi Deng leaping like a kung fu master to her husband’s defence and whacking the lunatic. Then all hell broke loose. Some media commentators said Rupert performed poorly during the MPs’ grilling and that his son James, head of the Murdoch empire in the UK and Europe, appeared far more composed, although now many are saying he has more questions to answer, which is code for “some of his answers were less than complete”, which is code for... They’re right about Rupert: the last time he had to answer tough questions from anyone was when he was in short pants at school or facing a grilling from his mum, the indefatigable philanthropist Dame Elisabeth of Langwarrin. For a few minutes Rupert appeared genuinely chastened by the events of recent months and said it was the most humble day of his life. Soon after you could see him seething: “Who are these jumped up little men and women questioning me, the Great Murdoch, ruler of the world’s media?”

THE Emu has a mate who once worked at The Herald, Melbourne’s great afternoon daily that Rupert closed in 1990 and “amalgamated” with The Sun News Pictorial to form today’s Herald Sun. Rupert would fly in to Melbourne from the UK, or New York, or Sydney to meet and harangue his editors and business managers. The moment his limo pulled up outside the Flinders St premises, word flashed around the multi-storey building where hundreds of people were beavering away making newspapers and magazines. People everywhere straightened their ties or made some other vain attempt to improve their appearance. A frisson of fear appeared on the faces of the editors as they left their offices and scuttled up to the boardroom on Mahogany Row. Rupert would sail onto the second floor with his out-of-town executives in tow like a Middle Eastern potentate arriving at an OPEC oil price conference. Grizzled editors of 40 years’ experience would genuflect, scrape and bow. Murdoch could kill you with just one stare.

Hacked off JOURNALISTS on the peninsula are being chiaked by their mates and relatives about the phone hacking scandal. One told The Emu: “Can you imagine wading through hours of mundane, eye-glazing phone messag-

es to find a hidden gem? Purgatory.” Undeterred, The Emu didn’t want to miss out and hacked a few phones last week to find these messages: Flinders federal MP Greg Hunt: “Greg, Tony here, why didn’t you tell me the water off Mt Martha was just 12 degrees, you [deleted].” Dunkley MP Bruce Billson: “Bruce, Tony here. Did that Greenie get away safely from our meeting in Frankston the other day?” Nepean MP Martin Dixon: “Martin, it’s Ryan Smith: are you serious? Will the residents really throw you off the Rosebud pier if you don’t get coastal consent for the pool?” Shire CEO Michael Kennedy: “Michael, it’s [name deleted] of Local Government Executive Search calling; there’s a vacancy at the Shire of West Wimmera. Do you want me to send them your CV?” Shire mayor Graham Pittock: “Mr Mayor, your Pirates of the Caribbean costume has just arrived for the ball. Did you want one or two squawking parrots with that?” Parks Victoria CEO Dr Bill Jackson: “Bill, it’s Stephen Bradford, Port of Melbourne, calling again. You’ve just gotta hold your nerve and keep denying the dredging had anything to do with Portsea beach disappearing.” Have you hacked any phones and found a gem? Got any other hot news tips? Email The Emu at emutips@ yahoo.com.au

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ernments are getting into trouble because of debt and this should send out a clear message. Do not keep borrowing! This Shire is continually putting up the rates at a higher rate than inflation and they also keep borrowing money which equates to bad management. The old Shire of Flinders was virtually debt free. As a result their good fiscal position was used to reduce the debt of the Shire of Hastings and the Shire of Mornington. Ultimately the shire should be doing all it can to serve the community which elected it and to live within its means. Keith Jefferson Dromana

Free speech?

About orchids

‘forgotten flora’, our native terrestrial orchids.”

SPIFFA, the Southern Peninsula Indigenous Flora and Fauna Association, meets at 7.30pm on next Monday 1 August at Parks Victoria office, Hinton St, Rosebud. Guest speaker will be Andrew Dilley of the Australasian Native Orchid Society talking about native orchids, many of which are under threat. Half of Victoria’s 300 orchid species are threatened in some way, with many down to a handful of sites or even just a single location, a SPIFFA spokesman said. “Mr Dilley is involved in threatened orchid conservation programs with the ANOS Conservation Group and will be talking about the cryptic

Generous Rotary

mental health networks, unemployed, disadvantaged, seniors, literacy programs, and funding for organisations to help provide meals for those in need. “International projects have received financial assistance with funding to purchase polio vaccines, for facial reconstructions in third world countries, Rotary health research fund, Rotary Oceanic Medical aid for children, other vaccines and mosquito nets to prevent the spread of Malaria. “A highlight this year was buying a laptop computer and iPod for 21-year-old Elizabeth Colvin, who has been blind since birth, to assist her legal studies at Latrobe School of Humanities and Social Sciences where she is studying crime and criminology.”

AS A past shire president and councillor of the Shire of Flinders, I feel I’m in a good position to comment on the apparent conflict between the Mornington Peninsula Shire and the Rye/Dromana Community Bank. Local Government is all about being local, and serving the community. The Community bank is all about the same thing. The Community Bank is continually giving to the community and working for the good of the community. That the Shire Councillors and officers cannot see this is to their shame. Throughout the world Gov-

WHAT’S going on at the Mornington Peninsula Shire? Not only do we have un-elected bureaucrats barring ratepayers from the peoples chamber or gagging them because they ask difficult questions on contentious issues. We also have Councillors telling the ratepayers to “butt out” because we are concerned about the CEO’s generous stipend. We have every right to question any issue! Perhaps our employees are trying to rise above their station? John Cain McCrae

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THE Rotary Club of RosebudRye held its donation distribution day and handed out $154,000 to 30 volunteer and community groups. The money was raised by the Rye market, Rotary Warehouse and shop. A Rotary spokesman said donations and money raised from purchases at the outlet had “allowed us to pay for muchneeded equipment for our local emergency services and to help fund projects and scholarships in preschools, primary and secondary schools”. “We also had money for cancer support services, carers,


Farewell to CFA legend Bill Jones By Mike Hast A STALWART of Mornington Peninsula fire brigades and a link to the early European settlers, William John “Bill” Jones died at age 94 on Thursday 7 July. Also known as “Mr Moorooduc”, Mr Jones was communications officer of the Westernport Fire Brigade Group for 27 years and a firey at Mornington and Moorooduc brigades for a remarkable 68 years. He was awarded the British Empire Medal in 1968 and the Australian Fire Service Medal on Australia Day in 1994 for services to firefighting. He also received service awards from the CFA, including a 65-year medal in 2008, as well as the Queen’s Fire Brigade Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in 1974, the T H Grigg Achievement Award for outstanding achievement within the fire service in 1985, the CFA Outstanding Service Badge in 1990 and National Medal in 1995. Mr Jones joined Mornington Rural Fire Brigade in 1943 and Moorooduc in 1960. He was an honorary member at Mornington, and life member of Moorooduc, Westernport Group and Victorian Rural Fire Brigade Association’s No. 8 Regional Council Over the years he held the positions of firefighter, communications officer for the Moorooduc brigade and Westernport group of brigades, and Region 8 base radio operator. His wife Bette, also a CFA stalwart, was also a recipient of the BEM. Mr Jones was a member of the pioneering Jones family who arrived on the peninsula in the 1800s, at the dawn of European settlement. Memorial notices in daily newspapers came from CFA District 8 and Westernport Fire Brigade Group as well as brigades at Mornington, Mt Martha, Dromana, Hastings, Somerville, Bittern, Langwarrin and Pearcedale.

He was variously described as a “true CFA icon”, “a good friend and mentor” of various brigades, “an esteemed colleague”, and “always a friendly voice on the end of the radio”. In 1868 Edward Jones, a carpenter of Sandridge (now Port Melbourne), leased land near the corner of Mornington-Tyabb Rd and Stumpy Gully Rd. It was called Spring Farm and had cattle, sheep, pigs, orchards and a dairy. Edward and Sarah Jones had seven children and later bought land at what is now the intersection of Mornington-Tyabb Rd and Derril Rd, which became the centre of Moorooduc. In the 1920s, the family operated a general store at the intersection, which is still known as Jones Corner. The Jones family gave land for the erection of a Nissen hut, a tin shed for the fire brigade, in the 1940s. The brigade converted the first tanker from an ex-Army vehicle. Bill and Bette Jones, along with brothers Len and Ken Gibson, pioneered the installation of ex-Army VHF radios in fire trucks and installed a radio base station. A peninsula fire brigade history records that the first radio call was made at 12.15pm on 29 October 1953. “Today, communications on the fire ground back to a central base is almost taken for granted but this was an enormous achievement in the early 1950s,” wrote Allan Monti in his history. Mr Jones is survived by his wife of 63 years, Bette, daughter Roz, sons Daryl Nev, nine grandchildren and four great grandchildren. His funeral was last Friday week at New Peninsula Church in Craigie Rd, Mt Martha, with more than 800 mourners attending. He was buried at Mornington Cemetery. The Moorooduc Fire Brigade will establish a fund in memory of Mr Jones.

CFA radio pioneer: Legendary fire brigade communications officer Bill Jones of Moorooduc served as a volunteer firefighter for 68 years, first with Mornington and then with Moorooduc and the wider Westernport Fire Brigade Group. Picture courtesy CFA

Quarry a store for fill-in at McCrae ROCKS and soil stockpiled at Mt Martha Quarry will be used as part of works to stabilise Eyrie Gully at McCrae. The work has already been delayed and is now scheduled to start in November, but could be put back to February if wet weather continues. Road contractors Maw Civil were originally given 22 weeks free use of the quarry to use as a depot while constructing nearby Wonderland Terrace. The deadline to reinstate the quarry ran out months ago but the company now appears to have been given a reprieve by the need to use the stored materials at McCrae. Mornington Peninsula Shire’s property and valuations manager Yasmin

Woods said grasses were now growing over the stored material and contractors would soon spray the weeds. “Once the materials are removed, the spoiled site will be reinstated by the contractor,” Ms Woods said. In February Ms Woods defended giving Maw’s free use of the quarry when asked why community groups had to pay to use other council-owned properties. Ms Woods said Maw’s use of the quarry was “a functional solution to the issue of storage of construction materials for residents, the contractor and council as principal”. The News first reported on the use of the quarry in October, when it had already been used for several months.

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PAGE 7


NEWS DESK

‘Shameful extinction’: Left, southern brown bandicoot with young in its pouch; above, a juvenile bandicoot; and, right, visitors to Moonlit Sanctuary in Pearcedale admire a common wombat, both species now technically extinct in the wild on the Mornington Peninsula. Pictures: Alison Kuiter and Moonlit Sanctuary

Loss of native fauna on the peninsula By Dr Hans Brunner Original fauna H W Wheelwright and Edmund Hobson in the 1850s wrote: “… the Peninsula was thick with wildlife, with herds of kangaroos, wombats, wallabies, many echidnas and koalas and glorious birds, all unused to man and quite tame and inquisitive. [There were] wonderful trees and abundance of silver wattles which, when in blossom, made the whole country golden and the whole atmosphere filled deliciously with their sweetness.” Henry Tuck and others also stated that kangaroos were like herds of sheep and could never be shot out, and bandicoots and possums were in hundreds and that the native cat was one of the commonest animals. Mrs J Cavill, who lives next to the Moorooduc Quarry Reserve commented in her masters thesis: “In the 1930s we found bush around us, a whole

wonderland of animals, wild flowers, birds, hollow trees, gullies and ground water ways. “Koalas grunted all night, wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums, echidnas, bush rats and water rats, flying foxes and bandicoots were abundant and tame. At night the frogs roared in the darkness. In the evening, swarms of birds arrived in v-shaped formations and landed on the swamp. Black and tiger snakes were common around the huge “Moorooduc Swamp that lay below our property and brown snakes and copperhead were a nuisance around the house. “Our delight in exploring the swamp with its sheets of water, covered with swans and ducks, and its spongy islands of moss and tee-tree was always tempered by fear of these snakes. “On our horse rides there was a never-failing source of interest in the

discovering new wild flowers, gullies of maiden ferns, orchids, minute wild strawberries, egg and bacon bushes, and swathes of pink and white heath.” There were several other similar reports made by Wheelwright and Hobson,

(Australian bustard). They are now listed as threatened fauna in Victoria. Loss of native fauna With the arrival of pioneers and settlers, timber cutters removed nearly all the mature trees on the peninsula and shipped

then used for farming and for fruit orchards. The clearing of land caused massive soil erosion and megatonnes of good soil were washed into the sea especially along Balcombe Creek. With the ever-increasing

Koalas grunted all night, wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums, echidnas, bush rats and water rats, flying foxes and bandicoots were abundant and tame. mentioning many other species and all describing the Mornington Peninsula as teeming with wildlife. Based on historical and recent records, there were at least 40 native species of mammals on the peninsula in the early days. Much the same could have also been said about the many species of birds, reptiles and amphibians. Hobson in 1837 observed the gigantic crane or brolga and the native turkey

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them to Melbourne or used them to build railway lines or as fuel to drive stone crushers, etc or to clear land for grazing. Kangaroos were slaughtered in their thousands on single drives and some of the meat, together with koalas and possums, was sent to Melbourne for food. Animals were also destroyed because of competition with sheep and cattle. Much of the land was

number of people arriving on the peninsula, the remaining natural bush was gradually destroyed and fragmented. Chris Tzaros recently worked out that for every 100 hectares of woodland cleared, between 1000 and 2000 woodland-dependent birds are lost. These figures could be even higher for mammals, reptiles and amphibians. With this drastic decrease of suitable habitat

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Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

for most native birds and mammals, many species have now become locally extinct. Doug Robinson has estimated that about 50 per cent of birds that originally existed on the peninsula are now either locally extinct or are threatened. Ground-nesting birds have suffered most, especially because of predation by foxes and cats. A Mr Woolley and others used to shoot ducks in the 1880s for a living until they were almost shot out. Later, larrikins delighted in the shooting of wildlife when the pubs closed at 6 o’clock. In the Moorooduc Quarry area, bandicoots and kangaroos lasted until about 1940 and wombats and the eastern quoll until about 1960. By 1970 koalas, sugar gliders and antechinuses were still present but have since declined drastically and have become extremely rare. The antechinus is now close to extinction in the Frankston area. There is also a growing concern over a serious decline of invertebrates. Subsequently, there are concerns for the future of many species of bird, mammals and amphibians that feed on them. Habitat loss and habitat fragmentation as well as the overuse of pesticides have to be the main reason. In summary, we have taken over all the prime land on the Mornington Peninsula and the Frankston area. The rest of nature is forced to make do with what is left, which amounts to less than 5 per cent of a much-reduced quality of habitat, especially because of weed invasion and too small and isolated bushland blocks. Plainly, this is the major factor resulting in the ongoing, local species extinction and in an increase in ecosystem stress. From 40 original native mammals on the peninsula, 25 or 63 per cent are locally extinct or endangered. From 40 original native

mammals in the Frankston area, 31 or 77 per cent are locally extinct or endangered. Surveys of 80 bushland reserves on the Mornington Peninsula by Malcolm Legg showed that an average of 5.9 mammalian species were native and 5.6 were introduced (dog, cat, fox, house mouse, black rat, brown rat and rabbit). Surveys of 15 bushland reserves on the Mornington Peninsula by Malcolm Legg showed that an average of 4 mammalian species were native and 5 were introduced (dog, cat, fox, house mouse, black rat, brown rat and rabbit). We now have, in a large number of reserves, more introduced mammals than native species. This does not include farm animals such as horses, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, deer, etc that take up land originally used by native mammals. Recently, two more species were listed as extinct, the wombat and the southern brown bandicoot. The local loss of the bandicoot comes despite all the lobbying and bipartisan political support; insufficient efforts have been made to save this species. The southern brown bandicoot was in great numbers all over the peninsula and its disappearance during the last 30 years has been well recognised and documented. This is yet another frustrating, shameful, local extinction story of an iconic Australian species.  Dr Hans Brunner of Frankston is a renowned zoologist and animal forensic expert whose work is internationally recognised. He published the world’s first book on hair identification and is the author of many peerreviewed scientific and technical papers. He has trained forensic investigators and worked for international scientific organisations. A master of applied science, he has taught at Deakin University, Swinburne College and Chisholm Institute.


AROUND THE PENINSULA

‘Adult’ bookshop to VCAT Tickles takes up the challenge

Fighting words: Somerville mower shop owner Wayne Milburn is taking Mornington Peninsula Shire to task over its refusal of an application for an adult bookshop in an industrial estate.

Fine after axing of street tree By Mike Hast A MT Eliza man has been fined $500 and ordered to pay restitution of $1000 and legal costs of $2000 after contractors cut down street trees in front of his property in Dueran St. David Gladman was charged by Mornington Peninsula Shire with four counts of wilful damage and fined in Frankston Magistrates’ Court on 16 June after pleading guilty. The $1000 will go to the shire’s parks and roadsides team for planting new trees on the shire-owned land. Contractors working for Mr Gladman also removed trees in the front yard of his property, but the shire’s team leader of development compliance, Luke English, said this was a lawful act. Federal MP Bruce Billson, whose electorate of Dunkley covers Mt Eliza, lobbied the shire on behalf of Mr Gladman, seeking to negotiate a settlement and keep the matter out of court. Mr Billson said David and Sophie Gladman had acted in good faith after an arborist had told them the trees were diseased and should come down. “They inadvertedly did the wrong thing and offered to make good at their own expense and undertake rehabilitation works,” he told The News. “I believe the shire and the Gladmans could not agree on the cost of the work. Efforts to solve the issue amicably fell apart.” Mr Billson said he was not in favour of reckless tree clearing but this was a matter of residents not understanding the law. The Dueran St trees were cut down by a tree felling team that has been

working in Mt Eliza and surrounds since the introduction of the so-called 10/30 rule. Mt Eliza Ward councillor Leigh Eustace said the tree cutters were from New Zealand. “The boss goes doorknocking and offers to remove trees cheaply, sending his crew next day in an unmarked white van,” he said. In some cases trees were being removed without valid permits or reasons, he said. The 10/30 rules was brought in by the state government in September 2009 and is due to expire next March. The controversial rule was a reaction to the devastating Black Saturday bushfires of 7 February 2009 and allowed landowners in 59 of Victoria’s 78 municipalities to clear trees 10 metres from a house, and shrubs and ground cover 30 metres from a house without a permit. Trees within four metres of a fence line can also be removed. In October 2009, the state government revoked a Frankston Council environmental planning local law after the council refused to adopt the 10/30 law. The council chief executive George Modrich said he had “significant concern” about the impact on established urban areas not prone to bushfires as “most of the municipality has been assessed by the CFA as low fire risk”. Living With the Bush spokesman Louis Delacretaz said the peninsula risked being denuded: “I would think that the first trees to go will be the ones where people have wanted to cut them down for other reasons.”

By Mike Hast THE shire council refusing an adult book and sex toys shop in a Somerville industrial estate will be challenged in the Victorian planning tribunal. The application to open the shop, called “Tickles”, has caused controversy since Somerville businessman Wayne Milburn applied to Mornington Peninsula Shire earlier this year. Tickles would be next door to the Dance Lab studio in Industrial Dve, where there is a block of six factories. By the end of June, the shire had received about 60 objections and a petition of 90 signatures against the proposal. Shire documents show statutory planner Edward Wilkinson recommended against Tickles on 29 May, a month before all objections had been received by the shire. Now Mr Milburn is taking the shire to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal to try and overturn its decision. Mr Wilkinson’s report to the council stated the grounds of refusal were: “1. The proposed use adjacent to a sensitive use does not satisfy clause 15.01-4 as the proposed use does not contribute to a safe and functional environment. “2. The adult sex bookshop immediately adjacent to the dance academy

that is predominantly frequented by young children is not appropriately located next to the existing sensitive use. “3. The highly conflicting uses between the dance academy and the adult sex bookshop is not consistent with the orderly planning of the area and the decision guidelines of clause 65.” Dance Lab teaches about 200 girls and boys aged from three to young adult. The school was started by Sharon Peters at Factory 6 and the shire issued her a permit to run a performing arts studio on 19 August 2003. It was sold to current owner Emily Grainger about three years ago. Factory 5, 19 Industrial Dve, was bought in 1998 by Mr Milburn, the owner and operator of W & G Mower Services in Frankston-Flinders Rd, Somerville. The shire granted him permission to use the factory to repair, service and store garden equipment such as lawn mowers and chainsaws in May 2007. Mr Milburn has operated W & G Mower Services in Somerville since 1987 after moving from Mornington and watched his business crash in recent years due to the long drought and competition from giant retailers such as Bunnings, Harvey Norman and Re-

travision, “tin sheds” as he calls them. “Our turnover has collapsed from as high as $900,000 a year to $130,000,” he told The News. “When Bunnings opened at Mornington, our sales fell 40 per cent. We lost another 20 per cent when they opened in Frankston.” Good rains of the last 12 months had brought his first profit for 16 years, but he wanted to start a new business. “I did some research and decided that an adult bookshop was something the Bunnings and Harvey Normans of this world were never going to start.” Mr Milburn says objections by Dance Lab and parents of its students are exaggerated. “Some objectors claim parents and students would feel unsafe as the shop may attract unsavoury individuals. “My research shows clients of adult shops include many couples; people of all ages who are just looking to spice up their sex lives a bit. It’s all a bit of fun. Look at the success of the Melbourne sexpo in the last decade or so.” He said many sales would be done online, as is the trend in many modern businesses. The shire has refused the adult shop using an area of the law that is open to interpretation. Now it’s up to the VCAT to confirm the shire’s decision.

Life lessons learnt from stressful time Book to guide women on health challenges By Keith Platt AFTER twice being laid low by illness and gaining good health following months of research Eva Torning decided to write a book so others could easily benefit from what she had discovered. The self-described former corporate high flyer thought she was succeeding in her life as a single mother of two daughters until, aged 30, she was hit by a series of health “challenges”. Relief for one of the major ailments came through using natural and alternative healing methods. This sparked an ongoing interest in natural therapies, eventually leading to her being classed as a certified master and practitioner of neurolinguistic programming (NLP), a hypnotist and gaining qualifications in reiki, pranic healing and emotional freedom techniques (EFT). About 10 years ago Torner was again “burnt out” and facing hormone-based health problems. Once again she turned to her own resources for a cure, finding that conventional medicine was not helping. The collected results of her experiences were the inspiration and the content for her book, Hormone Hell to Hormone Heaven. Sitting in her Mt Eliza home Torner said most books dealing with women’s health are complicated and written by men.

Self help: Eva Torner has turned her health challenges into a book that she believes can help women change their lives.

“There was no way I could sit my kids down and talk about my experiences, but I thought if these lessons were recorded there would be a chance they’ll read them.” But of course the potential audience was much larger than her own family. Much of Torner’s work and writing deals with easing the ailments caused by stress, “something that hits us and threatens our survival”. Stress caused by financial problems frequently causes “deep-seated fears that we often don’t acknowledge …

not a good state from which to solve our problems”. Torner says reversing the “downward spiral” of stress “can only happen when you’re in another state of mind”. “We need to interupt the pattern, break the cycle of thought. “The quality of thinking depends on your emotional state. “People get scared to find out the details of their true position. We do have inner wisdom, but you need to tap into it. “I look at a life as a journey, with obstacles being part of the story. “You need to decide where you want to be – there is something bright and shiny down the track that can act as your compass. Set goals, make a road map.” Torner believs “everything is possible” but people are limited by their emotions and beliefs. “These feelings can be catastrophic, making things, problems, seem bigger than they are.” She wants to give people the techniques to identify their inhibitions and the ability to “blast through them”. “A lot of wealthy people are not happy and I won’t write a book on how to be a multimillionaire until I am one. “The unconscious mind will help devise ways of reaching goals.” Eva Torner’s book is available at book sytores or visit www.hormonehelltohormoneheaven.com/about_eva.

Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

PAGE 9


AROUND THE PENINSULA

No penalties for runaway rig By Keith Platt NO action is being taken against any person or company involved in an incident that saw a 1700-tonne oil rig break free from towlines in Western Port last January. A preliminary investigation by Transport Safety Victoria (TSV) has ruled out any infringement of regulations or work practices. There was no written report and the investigation appears to have consisted of little more than phone calls and a follow-up letter to the Western Port harbourmaster. The Victorian National Parks Association said the incident underlines dangers to shipping in the bay and called on TSV to release details of what caused it. Western Port harbourmaster Shane Vedamuttu told The News that correct procedures had been followed when the Kan Tan IV oil rig broke free as it was being loaded aboard the semisubmerged carrier vessel MV Transporter. He said the TSV had told him in a letter to “make another risk assessment before another one [oil rig] comes, but that always happens anyway”. Mr Vedamuttu said a rope being used by tugs to hold the rig in position above the semi-submerged Transporter had broken because “the wind and tide was too strong for this particular vessel”. “It was a brand new rope and the other ropes then had to be let go. “Theoretically I’m in charge of the operation and the port, but there was

Secured: The Kan Tan IV oil rig finally aboard the semi-submersible MV Transporter after breaking loose in Western Port.

Picture: Andrew Mackinnon of aquamanships.com.au

a pilot and the rig operator on board. “There have been some problems previously, but nothing major. Sometimes you can’t turn a rig around in the Cowes anchorage.” Mr Vedamuttu said once the rig had been secured by tugs he instructed that it and the 53,800-tonne MV Transporter – which had dragged its anchor – be taken to Port Phillip, where tidal cur-

rents were not as strong, for the transfer operation to be completed. “The Transporter was supposed to be able to hold off against the maximum [Western Port] tide – that’s what I was told – but it couldn’t.” Lisa Faldon, TSV’s acting director maritime safety, said the preliminary investigation had been conducted by her predecessor who saw no reason for

any further action. She was unable to release details of what had gone wrong because of privacy provisions in the Marine Act 1988. “This places an obligation on us to treat, with utmost confidentiality, sensitive information provided to us, including information provided by commercial operators.” Ms Faldon said TSV is “satisfied

with the operational improvements proposed to be taken by the operator to prevent a recurrence of this type of incident, and will not be taking any further action”. She said a formal investigation was not seen as being necessary. Ms Faldon said she was unable to disclose what had actually gone wrong but said there had been no breaches of marine safety or any other laws. “I am unable to disclose the specifics of the changes in operational procedures that have been put in place, however TSV is satisfied that they are sufficient to prevent a recurrence. As a formal investigation did not take place, a report has not been prepared.” National parks association marine and coastal project officer Simon Branigan said the failure of the loading operation “further busts the myth that Western Port is a natural deep water harbour – it has fast-moving tidal currents not only exposing over 40 per cent of the bay at low tide, but also complicating large equipment transfers”. “Any findings from investigations that Transport Safety Victoria conducted in regards to this incident should not be a closed shop – the public needs to be made aware of what operational changes have been implemented to safeguard the bay’s marine environment from shipping accidents.”

MP says ignore poison Pen Link freeway letter AN anonymous person or group has sent letters to Mt Martha residents claiming more land will be compulsorily acquired for the Peninsula Link freeway currently being built between Carrum Downs and Mt Martha. The 27-kilometre freeway will join the northern end of Mornington Peninsula Fwy and the southern end of Moorooduc Hwy near Craigie Rd, well inland of where the letters have been circulated. Mornington MP David Morris said the letters, claiming to be from a VicRoads general manager, were bogus. “The letter seen by my office claims that a last-minute variation

to the Peninsula Link project will require additional and substantial land acquisition in urban Mt Martha, along a new freeway route never considered in the context of the project,” he said. “The cowardly actions of the anonymous person or group behind these false claims should be condemned.” Letters have been sent to residents of Sefton Grange estate, which is on the north side of Craigie Rd between Dunns Rd and Racecourse Rd. Mr Morris said the intended Peninsula Link route had been identified more than 40 years ago, and had been included on road maps

SouthernPeninsula Peninsula Southern

for almost all of that time. “The final route of the freeway was agreed following extensive public discussions over a number of years. “Any variation to the route, or extension of the freeway to the coast, would require the same … process.” No variation or extension has been discussed, he said. “The claims made in the document are a complete fabrication, and appear designed to cause maximum distress to residents of Mt Martha, and particularly to those who believe the may be directly affected.” Peninsula Link was conceived

during the global financial crisis and is being overseen by the specially created Linking Melbourne Authority and not VicRoads. In December 2009, LMA awarded the $2.3 billion project ($849 million in current dollars) to Southern Way, a consortium made up of the Royal Bank of Scotland, Bilfinger Berger and builder Abigroup.  Construction of Peninsula Link is causing daily short-term stoppages of traffic and speed reductions on many roads, including Baxter-Tooradin Rd, Baxter, Frankston-Flinders Rd, Baxter, Eramosa Rd West, Derril Rd, and Bungower roads, Moorooduc.

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Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011


Southern Peninsula

26 July 2011

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Contemporary coastal living THIS superb four-year-old contemporary home hidden among the moonah trees offers the very best in coastal lifestyle very close to the beach. It features five bedrooms (two with ensuites), three zoned living areas, three stone bathroom, polished blackbutt hardwood flooring, ducted heating, split-system airconditioning and ceiling fans throughout, superb stone and stainless steel kitchen – with a commercial stainless steel upright

stove. Coastal living is synonymous with outdoor entertaining and this home delivers on the promise, with the main living area flowing to the enormous, north-facing external deck with fireplace and stunning gas and solar heated nine-metre by fourmetre pool (with full-length beach step) and large end spa. All this is on 993 square metres of land, there’s a grassy rear play area and sandpit to keep the children even happier.

Agency: JP Dixon Real Estate – Portsea Sorrento. Phone (03) 5984 4388. Agent: Troy Daly, 0418 397 771.

No1 in sales Portsea to Sorrento...

*REIV Sales results Jan 09-Current 2011

STOCK URGENTLY WANTED After a record month in a challenging market, we now urgently require properties to sell in Blairgowrie, Rye, Sorrento, St Andrews Beach and Portsea

WHY DOES JP DIXON PORTSEA SORRENTO ACHIEVE RECORD RESULTS MONTH AFTER MONTH? ˜ +)*':21574'144'061/#+0564''6 .1%#6+10122T1.'5 ˜746#4)'6'&1((+%'0'6914-+04+)*610X 114#-X#0&4+0)*#/#0&'#7/#4+5

˜ 0018#6+8'/#4-'6+0)%#/2#+)05 ˜74(#/175$7;'4&#6#$#5' ˜ :2'460')16+#6+105-+..5 ˜41('55+10#.#&8+%'W*+)*'5624+%'

˜1%#.1((+%'h.1%#.2'12.' ˜.75W,7562.#+0*10'56*#4&914-X 241('55+10#.+5/#0&'06*75+#5/

HERE’S A SAMPLE OF OUR SUCCESS... SOLD

6 Alexander Avenue, Rye

SOLD

1 The Esplanade, Sorrento

SOLD

42 Alex Dr St, Andrews Beach

SOLD

18 Newton Avenue, Sorrento

SOLD

Lot 7, 30 Iona Street, St Andrews Beach

SOLD

SOLD

22 Terry Avenue, Sorrento

SOLD

Lot 5, 50 Iona St, St Andrews Beach

SOLD

STOCK URGENTLY REQUIRED

CALL TROY DALY (PRINCIPAL) NOW ON 0418 397 771 FOR A FREE APPRAISAL AND MARKET REPORT 109 OCEAN BEACH ROAD SORRENTO 5984 4388

www.jpdixon.com.au www.jpdixonportseasorrento.com.au

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011

Page 3


We’re Painting Rosebud Red. hockingstuart’s new office in Rosebud is open – making us the largest team on the Southern Peninsula. It’s brought to you by the same award-winning group who created the number one selling real estate agencies in Rye and Blairgowrie. There’s nothing we can’t do for you, whether it’s real estate sales and rentals, property management, commercial or holiday letting. Whatever your real estate needs, put yourself in the hands of the biggest and best team on the Peninsula. So for a FREE market appraisal call hockingstuart Rosebud on 5986 5777.

Rosebud Office 1/991 Point Nepean Rd VIC 3939 T 5986 5777 E rosebud@hockingstuart.com.au Blairgowrie Office 2819 Point Nepean Rd VIC 3942 T 5988 9095 E blairgowrie@hockingstuart.com.au Rye Office 2361 Point Nepean Rd VIC 3941 T 5985 9333 E rye@hockingstuart.com.au

Page 4

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011


Rye

$1,150,000

Bay views and more THIS magnificent home is not just about its fantastic position opposite the beach or the bay views or the fact it has access from two streets and room for the boat, caravan and cars. The rendered brick home is quality built and comprises three large double bedrooms and two

separate living zones. It incliudes all mod cons including ensuite, full bathroom, modern kitchen and two separate outdoor entertaining decks with spa. If you’re looking for a quality home with bay views and walk to the beach and shops call us about this property.

Agency: John Kennedy Real Estate, Rye. Phone: (03) 5985 8800. Agent: John Kennedy, 0401 984 842.

WINNER of the 2010 Australian Achiever Awards “Excellence in Customer Service”

ROSEBUD WEST

$425,000

TOOTGAROOK

$690,000 - $750,000

ROSEBUD

$350,000 - $380,000

EASY STROLL TO BAY, PLAZA & HOSPITAL.... A stroll to the beach, renovated & set on 583sqm of land, cosy, warm & comfortable holiday home suitable for permanent living, holiday or holiday rental - the choice is yours, comprising 3 bdrms - 2 with BIRs. OPL dining, lounge & brand new kitchen, family/TV rm, polished floor boards throughout, 2 bathrms, gas heater in lounge with A/C, double carport, single garage at rear suitable for workshop/storage, rear decking, low maintenance garden with established fruit trees, vegetable plots for the enthusiast gardener. All within walking distance to Rosebud Plaza, the Bay & High school. Call to arrange your private inspection today as this will not last.

A FAMILY DELIGHT This delightful 3 bdrm home with formal entry & only a stone’s throw from the water’s edge is ideally suited & set up for permanent or holiday living. Formal lounge & dining combined, Master bdrm with ensuite, WIR & split system A/C, BIR’s in the other 2 bdrms, valet vacuum System & gas ducted heating throughout. Huge kitchen with gas cooking, large family with meals area with split system A/C, Outdoor under cover entertaining , DLUG converted with gas heater to teenage retreat/games room. Childrens’ cubby house which can be used as an art studio, garden shed & water feature with gold fish. Plenty of room to store boats & caravans.

CLOSE TO EVERYTHING ROSEBUD HAS TO OFFER This partly renovated 2 bedroom beach house is located in the heart of Rosebud and is within an easy stroll to the Rosebud Shops and Beach. The home features include: separate lounge with gas heating, renovated kitchen with dishwasher and S/S appliances looking over meals area and a 2nd living area, renovated semi ensuite bathroom, new carpets and old world timber floors throughout. Outside there is a single car garage and a nice bright outdoor area. Ideal for BBQ’s and entertaining. This property is perfect for an astute investor who is looking for a property to rent out for either holiday or permanent rental or to use as a holiday house.

Ryan Deutrom 0406 426 766

Ryan Deutrom 0406 426 766

Paul Basso 5981 1200

PROPERTIES FOR RENT 20 Weeroona Way, Rye

$290pw

3 bed 2 bath

Available: NOW

12 Beryl Crt, Rye

$290pw

3 bed 1 bath 2 car

Available: NOW

108 Truemans Road, Tootgarook

$290pw

3 bed 1 bath 2 car

Available: 17.8.11

28 Howqua Drive, Rosebud West

$310pw

3 bed 1 bath 2 car

Available NOW

78 Elizabeth Ave, Rosebud West

$340pw

3 bed 2 bath 2 living 2 car Available: 1.8.11

28 Ruyton Drive, Rosebud West

$330pw

3 bed 1 bath 2 car

Available NOW

72 Johns Street, Tootgarook

$235pw

3 bed 1 bath 1 car

Available 5.8.11

78 Alma Street, Tootgarook

$240pw

3 bed 1 bath 1 car

Available 22.8.11

WE HAVE MOVED After 11 years in Tootgarook, Basso Real Estate has moved to new offices located in the heart of the busy Rosebud West Shopping Village.

OUR NEW ADDRESS IS: 1649 PT NEPEAN ROAD, ROSEBUD WEST

Rosebud West 1649 Pt Nepean Rd 5981 1200

SAME GREAT STAFF, SAME GREAT SERVICE, SAME GREAT NO SALE NO CHARGE SELLING OPTION, JUST A DIFFERENT ADDRESS!

www.bassorealestate.com.au > SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011

Page 5


Rye

Tootgarook

Rye

LD STO ANTED W R E H

Rye

LD STO ANTED W R E H

ANO

ANO

Build Your Dream - Back Beach Style

The Coolest House On The Strip

Huge Value For Money

Ocean Beach Region

St Andrews Beach

Blairgowrie

Rye

Rye

Sunset Over St Andrews Beach

Blairgowrie’s Hottest Buy

The Perfect Starter

Idylic Setting

Tootgarook

Rye

Tootgarook

Tootgarook

Full Of Surprises

Move In And Enjoy - Nothing To Spend

Seaside Rendezvous

Potential Income Producer - Dove In Rye

Tootgarook

Rye

Rye

Rye

Decision Made - Sell Now

Presentation Plus

Captivating Treetop Vista

Outstanding Opportunity

7KLVPDJQLÀFHQWEORFNRIDSSUR[LPDWHO\VTPWVLVORFDWHG WR SHUIHFWLRQ EHLQJ RQ D SULYDWH H[WUHPHO\ ORZ YROXPH PHDQGHULQJFRXQWU\ODQH\HWVWLOOZLWKLQDIHZPLQXWHVGULYHWR DOOH[FLWLQJSHQLQVXODKDVWRRIIHU7KHEORFNKDVDVHOHFWLRQRI FDUHIXOO\FKRVHQYHJHWDWLRQDQGFRDVWDOWUHHV Price: $285,000 - $295,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624 Diane & Phil Key 0419 324 515

$ PDJQLÀFHQW SDUFHO RI ODQG RI P  DFUH SOXV  DSSUR[ VHW DPLGVW WKH7RRUDN RI WKH 3HQLQVXOD$ EHDXWLIXOO\ SRVLWLRQHG SUHVWLJH EORFN ORFDWHG D PHUH P DSSUR[  WR WKH 0RUQLQJWRQ 3HQLQVXOD 1DWLRQDO 3DUN OHDGLQJ RQWR WKH PDJQLÀFHQW6W$QGUHZV2FHDQ%HDFK%XLOG\RXUGUHDPKRPH DQGHQFRPSDVVWKHPRVWDPD]LQJDPSKLWKHDWUHDVDEDFNGURS Price: $380,000 - $420,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Diane Key 0419 324 515

7KLVLVDGHOLJKWIXOKRPHLQHYHU\UHVSHFW,WKDVDXVHUIULHQGO\ ÁRRUSODQWKDWLQFRUSRUDWHVEHGURRPVZLWKDVWXG\RIIWKH PDLQEHGURRPDORYHO\ELJRSHQSODQOLYLQJURRPZLWKIHDWXUH JDV ORJ ÀUH D ODUJH OLJKW ÀOOHG PRGHUQ NLWFKHQ D IXOO IDPLO\ EDWKURRPZLWKWRLOHWSOXVQGWRLOHWDQGQGVKRZHU3ROLVKHG WLPEHUÁRRUVIHDWXUHWKURXJKRXWDORQJZLWKÀWWHGSLFWXUHUDLOV Price: $430,000 - $450,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: *OHQQ.H\

7KHSURSHUW\KDVVHUYHGLWVSXUSRVHDQGWKH9HQGRULVUHDG\WR PRYH2YHUWKH\HDUVWKHSURSHUW\KDVJURZQDQGQRZRIIHUV RQHRIWKHEHVWKROLGD\KRPHVHWXSVRQWKH3HQLQVXOD7KHUHV D IXQN\ KRXVH D  URRPHG EXQJDORZ ZLWK D EDWKURRP DQG ORRDQGWKHELJJHVWGHFNHGDUHDZH·YHVHHQ&RPELQHGLWLVDQ HQWHUWDLQHUVGHOLJKWZLWKURRPIRUWKHZKROHIDPLO\ Price: $450,000 plus Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Diane Key 0419 324 515

'HÀQLWHO\QRWOLNHWKHUHVW7KLVGHOLJKWIXOWLPEHUKRPHRR]HV LQGLYLGXDOLW\ DQG FKDUP ,W ORRNV IDEXORXV IURP WKH VWUHHW VFUHHQHG SDUWLDOO\ IURP YLHZ E\ ZHOO HVWDEOLVKHG QDWXUH WUHHV DQGFRQWLQXHVRQWRRIIHUDORYHO\SULYDWHVHWWLQJIRUDQLG\OOLF OLIHVW\OH )LQLVKHG LQ JUH\ WRQLQJV RXWVLGH ZLWK FOHYHU XVH RI IHDWXUHFRORXUERQGSDQHOVDQGVWDLQOHVVVWHHOEDOXVWUDGHFDEOHV Price: $330,000 - $360,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624

4 Lansdowne Street

2XU 9HQGRUV DUH NHHQ WR VHOO DQG KDYH VHW WKHLU SULFH H[SHFWDWLRQV DFFRUGLQJO\ 7KH KRPH LV LQ RULJLQDO FRQGLWLRQ WKURXJKRXW,WFDQEHXVHGDVLVRUUHQRYDWHGWRVXLW\RXURZQ QHHGV:RXOGVXLWNHHQLQYHVWRUVKROLGD\KRPHEX\HURUÀUVW KRPH EX\HU HDJHU IRU DQ DIIRUGDEOH KRPH LQ DQ DEVROXWHO\ IDEXORXVORFDWLRQ Auction: Saturday 6 August 2011 at 1pm Inspect: By Appointment Agent: *OHQQ.H\

7KLV KRPH SUHVHQWV EHDXWLIXOO\ ,W KDV EHHQ PDLQWDLQHG WR D YHU\KLJKVWDQGDUGDQGZLOORIIHUSRWHQWLDOEX\HUVWKHSHUIHFW RSSRUWXQLW\ WR DGG D SULVWLQH SURSHUW\ WR WKHLU LQYHVWPHQW SRUWIROLRRUVHFXUHWKHYHU\EHVWEHDFKKRXVHRUSHUPDQHQW UHVLGHQFH6WUHHWDSSHDOLVÀUVWFODVVZLWKDSUHWW\SLFNHWIHQFH DQGHQWULHVIRUFDUERDWYDQDFFRPPRGDWLRQ Price: $400,000 - $440,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624

<RXVLPSO\FRXOGQ·WIDXOWWKLVGHOLJKWIXOKRPH6LWXDWHGZLWKLQD IHZPLQXWHVZDONWRWKHJRUJHRXV7\URQH)RUHVKRUHLWZRXOG EHDSHUIHFWKRPHWRUHWLUHLQWRRUZRXOGHTXDOO\VXLWKROLGD\ KRPH VHHNHUV RU HYHQ LQYHVWRUV VHHNLQJ WKH IXWXUH SRWHQWLDO FDSLWDO JDLQV ZLWK D VHFXUH LQWHULP LQFRPH7KH KRXVH LWVHOI RIIHUVQLFHELJEHGURRPVSOXVDVWXG\DQGIRUPDOORXQJH Price: $490,000 - $539,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624

,I \RX DUH VHHNLQJ JHQXLQH YDOXH IRU PRQH\ UHDO HVWDWH ZLWK SRWHQWLDOIRUDVWHDG\LQFRPHVWUHDPDVZHOODVIXWXUHFDSLWDO JURZWKWKHQORRNQRIXUWKHU%\QRPHDQVDSDODFHLWLVZHOO SUHVHQWHGVXUSULVLQJO\IHDWXUHSDFNHGKRPHZLWKEHGURRPV SOXVDVPDOOVWXG\ORXQJHZLWKSROLVKHGÁRRUDQGJDVORJÀUH Price: $345,000 - $365,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624 3KLO.H\

7KHUH·VQRGHQ\LQJWKHJHQXLQHYDOXHIRUPRQH\WKLVSURSHUW\ RIIHUV7XFNHGEDFNIURPWKHPDLQGUDJ\HWFORVHHQRXJKIRUDQ HDV\VWUROOWRWRZQRURIIWRWKHEHDFKIRUDVZLP7KHSURSHUW\ LV VHFXUHO\ IHQFHG DQG RIIHUV D ZHOO PDLQWDLQHG  EHGURRP UHVLGHQFH ZLWK QLFH RSHQ OLYLQJ DUHD ZHOO DSSRLQWHG PRGHUQ NLWFKHQDQGJRRGEDWKURRPIDFLOLWLHV Price: $380,000 - $410,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: *OHQQ.H\

3URSHUWLHVOLNHWKHVHDUHDVKHHUGHOLJKW6SRWOHVVWKURXJKRXWZLWK PDQLFXUHG JDUGHQV KXJH HQWHUWDLQLQJ GHFN PXFK ORYHG YHJJLH SDWFKDQGIUXLWWUHHVDQGDOOZLWKLQDQHDV\ZDONWRWKHVSDUNOLQJ ZDWHUVRIWKHVDIHED\EHDFK7KHKRPHLWVHOILVYHU\SUHWW\DQG ERDVWVJRRGVL]HGEHGURRPVDQLFHELJIDPLO\IULHQGO\ORXQJH DQGZHOODSSRLQWHGNLWFKHQDQGEDWKURRPIDFLOLWLHV Price: $450,000 - $480,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Diane Key 0419 324 515

&KDUPLQJ \HW QRW SUHWHQWLRXV HOHJDQW ZLWKRXW VDFULÀFLQJ WKDW OLYHG LQ IHHOLQJ7KLV KRPH RIIHUV WZR OHYHOV RI VSDFLRXV IDPLO\OLYLQJZLWKWKHERQXVRIYDXOWHGWLPEHUFHLOLQJVDZDOORI ZLQGRZVWRIXOO\FDSWXUHWKHSDQRUDPLFYLHZVIURPWKHRSHQ SODQOLYLQJDUHDDZRQGHUIXOO\IXQFWLRQDOFRXQWU\VW\OHNLWFKHQ DOORIZKLFKRSHQRQWRDORYHO\ELJGHFN Price: $540,000 - $580,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: *OHQQ.H\

2397 Point Nepean Road, Rye Page 6

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011

$Q DIIRUGDEOH KRPH LQ DQ RXWVWDQGLQJ ORFDWLRQ &XUUHQWO\ OHW WRDORQJWHUPWHQDQWRUDYDLODEOHIRUYDFDQWSRVVHVVLRQODWHU LQWKH\HDU&ORVHWRWUHQG\FRQYHQLHQFHVKRSVDQGRFHDQVXUI EHDFKHV7KHKRPHLWVHOILVDZHOOSURSRUWLRQHGQLFHO\SUHVHQWHG EHGURRPEULFNYHQHHUZLWKDQDGGLWLRQDOIDPLO\URRP Price: $375,000 - $398,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Alana Balog 0412 536 624 3KLO.H\

6HW RQ D ODUJH EORFN RI P DSSUR[  WKLV LV WKH SHUIHFW SULYDWH RDVLV WR FDOO KRPH DIWHU D IXQ ÀOOHG GD\ DW WKH EHDFK &HQWUDOO\ ORFDWHG WR ERWK WKH ED\ DQG VXUI EHDFKHV DQG RQO\ DVKRUWGLVWDQFHWRWKHHYHUSRSXODU%ODLUJRZULH9LOODJH)XOO\ IHQFHG WKH VHWWLQJ LV ERWK VHFXUH DQG SULYDWH7KH KRPH LV ZHOFRPLQJDQGH[WUHPHO\FRPIRUWDEOH Price: $430,000 - $450,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: *OHQQ.H\

7KLV SURSHUW\ LV TXLWH XQLTXH DQG RIIHUV KXJH SRWHQWLDO WR LQYHVWRUV% %RSHUDWRUVODUJHIDPLO\KRPHEX\HUVRUGXDOIDPLO\ DFFRPPRGDWLRQ VHHNHUV 7KH SURSHUW\ LV FXUUHQWO\ UXQ DV D VXFFHVVIXO% %7KHUHLVVHSDUDWHDFFRPPRGDWLRQRQHDFKRIWKH OHYHOVSOXV6&VOHHSRXWDFFRPPRGDWLRQDVZHOO7KHJURXQG OHYHORIIHUVEHGURRPVOLYLQJGLQLQJDQGNLWFKHQSOXVEDWKURRP Price: $430,000 - $450,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Diane Key 0419 324 515

7KLVLVDVWXQQLQJKRPHLQHYHU\UHVSHFW,WLVOLWHUDOO\DFRXSOH RI KXQGUHG PHWUHV WR WKH EHDFK DQG ZDONLQJ GLVWDQFH WR WKH WRZQVKLSDQGIDFLOLWLHV7KHKRPHLWVHOILVPRGHUQEULFNYHQHHU DQG LQ SULVWLQH FRQGLWLRQ 2IIHULQJ IRXU EHGURRPV IXOO HQVXLWH DQGZDONLQUREHWRWKHPDVWHUDORYHO\QGEDWKURRPIRUPDO ORXQJHEHDXWLIXOO\ÀWWHGNLWFKHQZLWKVSDFLRXVIDPLO\PHDOVDUHD Price: $695,000 - $760,000 Inspect: By Appointment Agent: Diane Key 0419 324 515

5985 6555

stockdaleleggo.com.au/rye


Rosebud

Rosebud

Rosebud West

Rosebud

You cannot get closer than this!

Coastal bush setting

Great holiday getaway

Want close to the beach?

Every so often, a rare property presents itself, and this is it! Approximately 400 metres til your toes hit the sand, situated right behind shops, cinema, and the pub. This solid brick home consists of three large bedrooms, all with built in robes, lounge with bar, kitchen/meals area with dishwasher, and a central bathroom. Price $450,000 Address 29 Rosebud Parade Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607

Set on 900 m2 (approx) is this tavern style coachmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house. Open plan family, dining with gas/electric galley kitchen, which opens on to a large alfresco dining area with timber and wrought iron deck. The home also features ducted heating, reclaimed plantation timber Ă RRULQJKLJKFHLOLQJVDQGDQH[WUDODUJHIDPLO\GLQLQJURRP Price $450,000 Address 14 Duells Road Inspect: Call for an inspection Mark Morssinkhof 0400 533 245 Contact:

/RFDWHGRQP DSSUR[ RIODQGWKLVIDQWDVWLFFRWWDJHKDV an abundance of possibilities, from subdivision to investment, or just a great holiday home for all the family. With two large bedrooms, bright and open living area and three outdoor entertaining areas surrounding the home. Price $450,000 Address 14 Teal Street Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607

Here it is! This very neat and tidy brick veneer home is a two minute walk to the beach. With three large, bright bedrooms and an open plan lounge/dining/kitchen area, this home is the perfect getaway. This home would also make a solid investment for those looking for a good return.The home is on 388m2 (approx) of land. Price $390,000 - $410,000 Address 14 Third Avenue Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607

Rosebud

Rosebud

Rosebud West

Rosebud West

Bay views with top class potential

Walk to the R.S.L.

All you want in a rental property!

Loft Style Living

Play a round of golf, wander through the State Park or just sit back and enjoy the ships passing through the bay and out past the heads and beyond with these extensive panoramic bay views. This two bedroom home offers more than just a top class position, with top notch potential too! Price $500,000 - $550,000 Address 10 Carrington Drive Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607

This cottage style three bedroom home has everything going for it! Close to all amenities, it is in excellent condition. With open plan living, gas cooking and heating, plus air conditioning. All on 768 m2 (approx), it could also be a unit site (STCA). Call today for an inspection! Price $359,000 Address 177 Eastbourne Inspect: Call for an inspection Barry Sanders 0423 100 925 Contact:

Address Inspect: Contact:

Rosebud

Rosebud West

Rosebud

Rosebud

Expected rental return $14,500 - $15,000 pa

Hop, skip and a jump to the beach!

Neat as a pin

Ready for the taking

This three bedroom brick home would make an excellent LQYHVWPHQWSURSHUW\RUĂ&#x20AC;UVWKRPH/RFDWHGLQDQLFHTXLHWDUHD close to local shops and golf course, all on 438m2 (approx). Price Address Inspect: Contact:

$355,000 44 Hove Road Call for an inspection Barry Sanders 0423 100 925

This fantastic home in a prime location wants for nothing. With three large bedrooms, all with BIRs (master with ensuite). With open plan meals and living area, opening on to decked entertaining area. Enjoy this property all year round, whether by the gas log Ă&#x20AC;UHLQZLQWHURUFRROGRZQLQVXPPHUZLWKWKHVSOLWV\VWHP Price $460,000 - $500,000 Address 13 The Avenue Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607

Â&#x2021;)RXUEHGURRPVÂ&#x2021;7ZREDWKURRPVÂ&#x2021;2SHQSODQOLYLQJÂ&#x2021;:DONWR 3ULPDU\DQG6HFRQGDU\VFKRROVÂ&#x2021;:DONWRVKRSVDQGEHDFK Price

$360,000 - $380,000 Expected rental return $15,000 - $16,000 P.A (approx). 1A Coleman Crescent Call for an inspection Barry Sanders 0423 100 925

Positioned within walking distance to the beach and all the amenities in Rosebud is this well presented three bedroom KRPHZLWKRSHQSODQOLYLQJDQGDYHU\IXQFWLRQDONLWFKHQ)XOO\ landscaped, fully fenced and low maintenance. Public transport is at your doorstep. Simply move your furniture in and enjoy. Price $360,000 - $390,000 Address 149 Third Avenue Inspect: Call for an inspection Contact: Mark Morssinkhof 0400 533 245

)XOO\VHOIFRQWDLQHGRQHEHGURRPORIWDSDUWPHQWLQFOXGLQJDVKRS DQGUHFRUGLQJVWXGLR7RWDOĂ RRUVSDFHLVP DSSUR[ /LYH work, and party on! $395,000 1/2 David Court Call for an inspection Jon Perrett 0405 123 921

Price Address Inspect: Contact:

Now is your opportunity to enter into the market with this immaculate three bedroom family home. Complete with three great size bedrooms and open plan living. The kitchen and bathroom have both been tastefully renovated. Set in a quiet part of Rosebud, close to schools, shops and parks. Price $375,000 Address 35 Branson Street Inspect: Call for an inspection Mark Morssinkhof 0400 533 245 Contact:

RENTALS Rosebud

Rosebud

Rosebud

Rosebud

Just move in!

Everything you need!

Renovated and ready!

Close to everything!

<RX¡OOIDOOLQORYHZLWKWKLVWDVWHIXOO\UHQRYDWHGKRPH)HDWXULQJ three bedrooms, open plan living with split system, central EDWKURRPDQGDPRGHUQFRPSDFWNLWFKHQ2XWVLGH\RX¡OOĂ&#x20AC;QGD decked area and a garden shed. Close to pre school, shops, golf and national park. Price Address

$290 per week 24A Nixon Street Available Now

Perfect for the family, with easy access to all that Rosebud has to RIIHU)HDWXUHVLQFOXGHWKUHHEHGURRPVNLWFKHQZLWKGLVKZDVKHU ODUJH PHDOV DUHD DQG SROLVKHG Ă RRUERDUGV LQ WKH OLYLQJ DUHDV bathroom with separate shower room. Ducted heating and evaporative cooling, double garage plus ample off street parking. Outside has a decked area and fully enclosed backyard. Price $290 per week Address 199 Jetty Road Available 22 August 2011

This home has been fully renovated and is just waiting for you to move in! 3 bedrooms (bedrooms 1 and 2 have BIR), polished Ă RRUERDUGV DQG IUHVKO\ SDLQWHG WKURXJKRXW DOO QHZ NLWFKHQ with s/s appliances and meals area. The large living area has air FRQGLWLRQLQJDQGQHZOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;WWLQJV&HQWUDOEDWKURRPZLWKVSD bath and separate shower. Price $320 per week Address )HOWKDP&RXUW Available Now

This four bedroom, two living area home is located within easy walking distance to schools, the beach and the Plaza. The property also includes gas heating and a fully fenced rear yard.

Price Address

$280 per week 0RRUĂ&#x20AC;HOG$YHQXH Available Now

5986 8600

1089 Point Nepean Road, Rosebud

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011

Page 7


Rye

$890,000 - $980,000

Utopia peninsula-style WHERE does one start to describe something so gorgeous? Let’s build a dream together. Firstly select a wonderful one-acre (4000 sqm) block with panoramic views across farmlands to the Dunes Golf Course in the distance. Add a substantial rendered brick home that overflows with character and warmth harking back to a slightly Victorian decor style; the result is divine. Then for good measure blend in a fully self-contained second dwelling with modern tonings and finishes that offer a varied selection of potential uses. Little imagination is required to visualise an amazing B&B suite or possibly a safe haven for dependent relatives. Other suggestions include private guest wing or the world’s best teenager’s retreat. The two dwellings are connected by a covered double carport/

garage that, with a touch of innovation, could easily allow the two to be one. While we are on the subject of garages, there are a further two with a separate entrance. One vast double is for everyday tradies’ use and the second is for your very own private toy collection. Now let’s continue: we have an in-ground pool, amazing fully covered alfresco dining and entertaining area, pony paddocks (currently home to the prettiest of miniature ponies), a pony stable/barn cubby and, on top of all this, a striking garden. Walk to shops, stroll to the ocean beaches or comply hibernate in utopia (definition: an ideally perfect place). As Mark Twain wrote: “In 20 years from now you will be more disappointed by things you didn’t do than by the ones you did.” Turn your dreams into reality today.

Agency: Stockdale & Leggo Rye, 2397 Pt Nepean Road. Phone: (03) 5981 1200. Agent: Diane & Phil Key, 0419 324 515

www.chelsea.harcourts.com.au

Only the second time offered for sale in 50 years!

Hastings Newsagency

A rare opportunity has presented itself for the purchase of a tightly held local business servicing the community. This well established retail/wholesale/distribution newsagency sells a wide range of products, and is a landmark of the town, trading from its current location for 50 years. Situated in fast growing Hastings, this business enjoys a perfectly central position, with front and rear access, and plenty of parking. Hastings Newsagency products lines include, newspapers, magazines, greeting cards, stationery for school/offices/businesses, books, with a printing and photocopying service also available. This newsagency has a solid trading history, with massive opportunities for growth in both the retail and wholesale side of the business. With a container port on the way, Hastings is set to expand rapidly, and this newsagency is perfectly placed to make the most of the wonderful opportunities. An ideal family business, the owners are pursuing other interests, and are very motivated to sell. Price reduced to $495,000 + gst + SAV.

Terri Adams 0437 773 538 CHELSEA 1/463 Nepean Hwy Page 8

9772 7077

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011


Rosebud

$450,000 - $490,000

Rosebud

$450,000

Close to beach and shops

Three-unit site near everything THIS great three-bedroom brick home has been fully renovated, which means the buyer would have nothing to do but shift in and start enjoying everything it has to offer. The home features a good-sized open-plan living area, a new separate kitchen and meals area, new bathroom and laundry. There is a single lock-up garage and plenty of room in the back garden for the family to move around and enjoy. The property is close to Rosebud beach and shops and is on a 960 square metre block, which makes it a great opportunity for a developer to build three units (STCA). Use the property as a holiday house, permanent living, investment property or development site – the choice is yours.

Agency: Basso Real Estate, 1649 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud West. Ph: (03) 5981 1200. Agent: Paul Basso, (03) 5981 1200.

EVERY so often, a rare property presents itself, and this is it. It’s about 400 metres until your toes hit the sand, and is right behind shops, cinema and the pub. The solid brick home consists of three large bedrooms, all with built-in robes, lounge with bar, kitchen/meals area with dishwasher, and a central bathroom with spa bath. On 590 square metres (approx) of land, the property would make a fantastic holiday home, investment property or ideal for a permanent residence. Check it out if location is important to you and, being solid brick, it will outlast the rest.

Agency: Stockdale & Leggo Rosebud, 1089 Pt Nepean Road, Rosebud. Ph (03) 5986 8600. Agent: Amanda Kaye, 0408 888 607.

Sorrento 120 Ocean Beach Road The last Commercial land site in Sorrento’s exclusive shopping strip. *Wide Frontage of 8 mtrs *Huge Land 487m2 (8 x 60.96 mtrs) *Rear Access to Morce Ave and Carpark *Shop Area 170m2 approx *Apartments 158m2 (17sqs) approx Become part of an exceptional strip that includes Coles, Sportsgirl, Witchery, Mimco, Feathers, Bed Bath n’ Table, Gazman, Historic Athenaeum Cinema, Trigger plus many more including popular Café’s/Restaurants

487 (approx) Thurs 25th August - 12.30pm 157 / A8 POA > OFFICE Commercial 187 Moray Street, South Melbourne 3205 > TEL 9690 6000 > CONTACT Ken Oliver 0412 327 003 Kenny Oliver 0409 144 188 > AUCTION > MEL REF > EPR

hockingstuart.com.au

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011

Page 9


12 Mannana Street, Rye $350,000 - $380,000 BIRDIE SAYS...CHEAP CHEAP!

5 Phyllis Parade, Rye $499,000 TREE-TOPS OVER TYRONE

(OHYDWHG WLPEHU KRPH ZLWK PDJQLÀFHQW rural and tree top views only a short 15 PLQXWH VWUROO WR WKH SRSXODU 7\URQH EHDFK +RPHFRPSULVHVWKUHHJRRGVL]HEHGURRPV WZR EDWKURRPV RSHQ SODQ NLWFKHQOLYLQJ DUHDWZRVXQQ\GHFNVRQHIDFLQJQRUWKWKH RWKHUVRXWK'RXEOHFDUSRUWDQGQDWXUDOORZ PDLQWHQDQFHJDUGHQV

/RRNLQJ IRU D VHDFKDQJH IDPLO\ RU KROLGD\ KRPH" %HDXWLIXOO\ SUHVHQWHG WKUHH EHGURRP KRPH FRPSULVLQJ DQ RSHQ SODQ NLWFKHQ GLQLQJ DQG OLYLQJ DUHD ZLWK SOHQW\ RI QDWXUDO OLJKW EUDQG QHZ NLWFKHQ ZLWK VWDLQOHVVVWHHODSSOLDQFHVVRIWFORVHGRRUV DQG D IXOO\ GHFNHG RXWGRRU HQWHUWDLQLQJ DUHDZLWKVSD7ZRVKRZHUVWZRWRLOHWVJDV KHDWLQJ DQG VSOLW V\VWHP DLUFRQGLWLRQLQJ DQGURRPIRUWKHERDWRUWUDLOHU,QDOODJUHDW KRPHZRUWK\RI\RXULQVSHFWLRQ

Contact: John Kennedy 0401 984 842

3/1543 Pt Nepean Rd, Tootgarook $560,000 PERFECTLY POSITIONED PRIVACY

Contact: John Kennedy 0401 984 842

73 Booran Parade, Tootgarook $495,000 “TWO OF EVERYTHING”

+XJHIDPLO\KRPHRUGXDOIDPLO\OLYLQJ"7KH FKRLFHLV\RXUV&RQVLVWLQJRIWZRVHSDUDWH GZHOOLQJV GLYLGHG E\ ELIROG GRRUV 7ZR EDWKURRPV WZR ODXQGULHV WZR NLWFKHQV WKUHH OLYLQJ DUHDV GXFWHG KHDWLQJ DQG DLU FRQGLWLRQLQJ$IXOO\IHQFHGPSDUFHO RIODQG$XQLTXHRSSRUWXQLW\IRUDOLIHVW\OH DW WKH TXLHW HQG RI WKH VWUHHW ZLWK HDV\ DFFHVV WR JROI FRXUVHV DQG ERWK WKH IURQW DQGEDFNEHDFKHV

6WHS IURP WKH LQYLWLQJ VKRUH RI 3RUW 3KLOOLS %D\DFURVVWKHURDGWKURXJKLQWRDSULYDWH WUDQTXLO FRXUW \DUG 7KH HVWDEOLVKHG JDUGHQ FUHDWHV D OXVK LQYLWLQJ EDFNGURS IRU HQWHUWDLQLQJ RU UHOD[LQJ RQ WKH GHFN WKDW RSHQV LQWR D VSDFLRXV RSHQ OLYLQJ GLQLQJ DUHD $ PRGHUQ NLWFKHQ ZLWK VWRQH EHQFK WRSV DQG TXDOLW\ DSSOLDQFHV ZLOO PDNHGRPHVWLFOLIHDSOHDVXUH&RPSULVHV 7KUHHEHGURRPVPDVWHUZLWKEDOFRQ\WRVLW DQGHQMR\WKHVXUURXQGLQJVRID3HQLQVXOD OLIHVW\OH

Contact: Sam Crowder 0403 893 724

23 Elvie Street, Rye $260 per week

POSITION PERFECT Contact: Sam Crowder 0403 893 724

)DQWDVWLF KRPH LQ JUHDW SRVLWLRQ MXVW P WR EHDFK +RPH FRPSULVHV 7KUHH EHGURRPVRQHEDWKURRPQHZO\UHQRYDWHG NLWFKHQJDVRYHQSROLVKHGÁRRUERDUGVDQG JUHDWEDFN\DUG

15 Bella Vista Drive, Tootgarook $495,000 ELEVATED BAY VIEWS

Not your average home this house has lots WRRIIHU ‡(OHYDWHG  DFUH EORFN ZLWK ODUJH OHYHO EDFN\DUG ‡%D\YLHZVIURPQRUWKIDFLQJGHFN ‡'RZQVWDLUV  IXOO\ VHOIFRQWDLQHG XQLW separately metered ‡8SVWDLUV  WKUHH EHGURRPV ODUJH RSHQ SODQ OLYLQJ IXOO EDWKURRP ODXQGU\ DQG VHSDUDWHWRLOHW $OO WKLV DQG RQO\  PHWUHV WR EHDFK H[FHOOHQW LQYHVWPHQW RSSRUWXQLW\ RU JUHDW KROLGD\KRPH

Contact: John Kennedy 0401 984 842

Contact: John Kennedy 0401 984 842

6 Crestview Court, Rye $270 per week TRANQUILITY

%HDXWLIXOO\PDLQWDLQHGWZREHGURRPKRPH &RPSULVHV 2QH EDWKURRP RSHQ SODQ NLWFKHQOLYLQJDQGGLQLQJ8QGHUFRYHUGHFN DUHD DW WKH IURQW RI SURSHUW\ ZLWK VLQJOH ORFN XS JDUDJH  PRQWK OHDVH DYDLODEOH 1RSHWV

35 Dunlane Court, Rye $450,000 to $495,000 “BED & BREAKFAST”

6HFXUHWKLVIDQWDVWLFEHDFKKRXVHFXUUHQWO\ operating as a small B&B situated in a SULYDWH DQG SHDFHIXO ORFDWLRQ DQG RQO\ D VKRUW ZDON WR WRZQ DQG WKH EHDFK DSSUR[ NP  &RQVLVWLQJ RI WKUHH EHGURRPV SOXV VWXG\ WKUHH HQVXLWHV IRXU WRLOHWV ODUJH WLPEHUNLWFKHQDQGWZROLYLQJDUHDV3ULYDWH GHFNLQJRIIWKHEHGURRPVÁDWXVHDEOHODQG DWUHDUZLWKVLQJOHFDUSRUWDQGJDUDJLQJ

Contact: Sam Crowder 0403 893 724

Contact: John Kennedy 0401 984 842

2327 PT NEPEAN RD RYE

03 5985 8800 www.johnkennedyrealestate.com.au

“Integrity is earned, not sold” Page 10

> SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS realestate 26th July 2011


Bash ‘addicts’ head to Apple Isle By Mike Hast BASHING and crashing 30-year-old plus cars along dirt roads in Outback Australia for 11 days must be addictive. How else would you explain the attraction of taking part in the Variety Club Bash year after year for two famous teams from Western Port and Mornington? The pink 1967 Holden station wagon dubbed the Babemobile – carrying an all-women team dressed in pink uniforms – and the multi-coloured 1986 Ford LTD with three blokes aboard will again trundle up the peninsula to join an expected 100 cars at the Melbourne departure point. This year’s Bash starts on 22 August and takes entrants on a cook’s tour of Tasmania, not visited by Bashers for 15 years. Bashes since then have crossed some of Australia’s most inhospitable country, but entrants return to their comfy lives with a host of tall tales and true – and the satisfaction of collectively raising millions of dollars for the children’s charity since entrepreneur Dick Smith organised the first Bash in 1985. Aboard the Babemobile will be Jill Lewis of Pearcedale, the business manager at Frankston Special Developmental School, and Mornington Peninsula Shire’s 2004 Citizen of the Year Eunice Mathews of Hastings, an indefatigable community volunteer. The seasoned Bashers (Jill’s done 15, Eunice 14) will be joined this year by rookie Marg Rae, a former peninsula business manager and now working for a bank in Bendigo. She’s filling in for regular “Babe” Gayle Shute. The Babemobile has completed 13 Bashes, a remarkable record for a car of its vintage – Broome 1998, Airlie Beach 1999, Kalgoorlie 2000, Gold Coast 2001, Alice Springs 2002, Mission Beach 2003, Darwin 2004, Caloundra 2005, Cairns 2006, Byron Bay 2007, Yeppoon 2008, Alice Springs 2009 and Margaret River last year. In Mornington, restaurateur John Crossin (10 Bashes) and automotive genius John “Bubba” Mackie (9) will be a man short this year in their team the Kippanookas, which they swear blind means “chicken botherers”. Regular teammate Geoff Adshead (9 events) has pleaded for a year off to consolidate his scaffolding business. Bubba has owned Mornington Car and Tyre Services since 1993 and keeps both cars on the road. Bubba and Geoff are one Bash behind Johnny Crossin because both pulled out last year, but Crossin turned up at the start line anyway – on his own. Eunice “Mum” Mathews kindly volunteered to leave the Babes and accompany Johnny for the 11 days from Ballarat to Margaret River in WA, an experience the pair still laugh about. She takes the mickey out of his driving as The News sits with Eunice, Johnny and Bubba over a cup of tea on the deck of Crossin’s newest restaurateur venture, Harba, on the Esplanade in Mornington last Wednesday. “You nearly killed us at Streaky Bay, John,” she says with a big grin. “Don’t exaggerate, Mum; besides, that was Bubba’s fault,” says Crossin, “the nuts came off the rear wheel.” Bubba insists the car left his workshop in perfect nick: “That corner claimed lots of cars, John; I heard the nuts sheared off clean as a whistle. And it didn’t help that you kept driving for another 50 metres.” The banter continues for a minute

Good Bashers: John Crossin, left, John “Bubba” Mackie and Eunice “Mum” Mathews with their Variety Club Bash cars at Mornington harbour last Wednesday. They are gathering support for the 2011 Bash to Tasmania. Below, map on the Babemobile side window shows where the hot pink HR Holden has travelled in the past 13 years.

“Variety is nice and small, and you can see what they do, how they spend the money. You can also have a say about where the money is spent.” – John Mackie, Variety Club ‘Basher’

before it’s explained the T-intersection of a greasy mud road and the asphalt main road did indeed claim several cars during a huge downpour. “That track was a horror,” says Eunice. “We had to wait five hours for the Bash mechanics because they’d come to grief 50km back up the track.” This is how long-time Bashers talk; each year provides a feast of tales and laughter when they get together, both during the event and after. It’s part of the attraction, why they keep coming back. The Bash has a good safety record and human injuries are few and far between. Why do you do it, John? “I’m a lucky man. My kids Rebecca and Megan are healthy, and Variety does a power of good work. “They support the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne; ambulances to take critically ill and premature babies to hospital; Kindilan in Red Hill, which looks after intellectually

handicapped young people; Canteen, the teenage cancer support group; and much more.” Eunice said: “I had two kids who died young; one who was stillborn, the result of a car accident, and one who died at 21 months of epilepsy. I have two boys aged 42 and 44 who are healthy. Variety is a terrific charity.” She also likes the mateship of the Bash, the chance to share a beverage at the end of a hard, dusty day and play a few pranks – all in the name of fundraising, of course.

Bubba said: “Children are our future. Variety is nice and small, and you can see what they do, how they spend the money. You can also have a say about where the money is spent. Installing a Liberty swing [for children of all abilities] at Pelican Park playground in Hastings was something real for our area.” Eunice said the club was now supporting two children in Hastings who suffered from Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle-wasting disease. “You can apply for support directly to

Variety,” she said. The two teams have raised in excess of $150,000 each, with the Babes ahead of the Kippanookas because of their extra Bashes. No donated money goes on the cars or the crews’ living and fuel expenses.  To donate to the peninsula’s Variety Club Bash crews, call Jill Lewis on 0407 361 989 or Eunice Mathews on 0400 863 321 for the Babemobile and John Crossin on 0419 319 479 for the Kippanookas.

Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

PAGE 21


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ALAN BOWLES & CHRISTINA DeROCHE

2389 Pt Nepean Rd, Rye

www.theryepier.com.au


FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT

The unceremonious death of an Astra By Stuart McCullough IT ended with bang, a whimper and then a whole lot of smoke. On reflection, the warning signs were too obvious to ignore. Nevertheless, with steely-eyed determination I succeeded in doing precisely this; like the last of those willing to testify to a Flat Earth, I steadfastly refused to concede that the sound emanating from beneath my bonnet might indicate an impending mechanical failure. Lou Reed’s double album Metal Machine Music comprises just over an hour’s worth of unlistenable noise. As I drove my car through the streets of Healesville, the engine seemed to be playing track one from side three of Lou’s record. There’s a fine line between maintaining a positive outlook on things and a complete, rigid denial of reality. In truth, it’s a line over which I routinely go back and forth as though playing hopscotch. In spite of the fact that I was being told that the engine didn’t seem very well and notwithstanding that it did, indeed, sound like a cast iron egg beater devouring a bag of nails, I dismissed these concerns by simply increasing the volume on the stereo. Luckily, I had a copy of Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music to hand that allowed me to assume the noise my engine

was making was some kind of guitar solo. There comes a point, however, when reality is no longer capable of being denied. For me, this occurred when the engine lurched from creating the kind of cacophony that would make Lou Reed green with envy to an eerie silence. Just to emphasise the point, smoke poured out from beneath the bonnet like dry ice at a Hush concert circa 1978. Even I had to admit that there was something of a problem. The car rolled to the side of the road and I turned down the stereo. It had been some

years since I’d broken down. The same could be said of the car also. I steeled myself to ring roadside assistance and wondered whether they might remember me. My first-ever car had been a Diahatsu Charade, which seemed to break down every other fortnight. For a time, I knew the people at roadside assist on a first name basis. Not anymore. I hoped for the best and expected the worst. And when the mechanic finally arrived, I knew I was in trouble when, after looking at the engine, he put pennies on the headlights and started a eulogy.

Healesville, in some regards, is a good a place as any to break down. Only an hour beforehand, we had been in the middle of nowhere, far from shops, taxis and anything resembling an identifiable street sign. Healesville is best described as a crafty kind of town. By that, I don’t mean the people ought not to be trusted, but that handicrafts have the kind of exalted status normally reserved for neurosurgery. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that Healesville is the craft capital of the southern hemisphere. You can’t turn around without falling over a homemade

jam jar doily or scone. The mechanic made it known that the woollen beanie he was wearing was one he had knitted himself and that for a modest fee they were available to the general public for purchase. I declined and the mechanic called for a tow truck. When he arrived an hour later, the tow truck driver was also keen to spruik his commitment to handicrafts. As he loaded the wounded car onto the tray of the truck, the towie proudly informed us that in his spare time he made his own range of fruit preserves and marmalades under the name ‘Tow Jam’. Two days later we received the news that it would cost more to fix the car than it was worth. There was little choice – we had to sell it for scrap. Let me say now what a splendid industry the automotive wrecking trade is. We rang several trying to see whether they wanted the mortal remains of the Astra and how much they were willing to pay. We disclosed everything about the car and reached an agreement to offer up the car in exchange for three magic beans. When the driver arrived to collect the vehicle, it was about three degrees and pouring with rain. He then asked me how much I wanted. I told him how much his boss had already agreed to pay, the news

of which caused him to wince with pain, before he offered a sum exactly $200 less. It was, I suspect, a clumsy attempt to apply some form of pressure. I took the key from his hand and apologised for wasting his time. Without so much as a moment’s hesitation, he said that he didn’t want to leave empty handed, before retreating to the cabin of his truck. I stood beside my fallen Astra as the rain pelted down and wished that I had picked up one of the mechanic’s homemade beanies. Eventually, the man reappeared and agreed to the original purchase price. There was no explanation. Frankly, it’s as close to organised crime as I ever wish to get. Cars are inanimate, soulless objects. All the same, I was sad to leave behind my Astra in Healesville. It’s probably a can opener and a piece of exercise equipment by now. I returned to the house and tried to console myself by making a cup of tea and heating up some homemade scones, which I then lavished with some apricot Tow Jam I’d purchased earlier. I then slipped Metal Machine Music onto the hi-fi and forgot my troubles. By listening to Lou Reed’s. www.stuartmccullough.com

Mayor masks up for charity WHO is that masked man? While he’s no marauder or saviour of the weak and vulnerable as far as we know, he is the mayor. And with less than three weeks to go, Cr Graham Pittock was willing to put on a mask to round up contenders for this year’s mayoral ball – “a masquerade extravaganza”. The annual ball will raise money for the Mornington Peninsula Charitable Trust and the Mornington Peninsula branch of Make-A-Wish Australia, which last year granted Matilda Airey’s wish to meet Christina Aguilera in Los Angeles. Matilda, of Langwarrin, will be guest singer at the ball, which has the Phil Ceberano Band headlining the entertainment. There will also be live and silent auctions and a three-course meal and drinks. “Make-A-Wish Australia does a fantastic job in helping to grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions,” Cr Pittock said. “And the Mornington Peninsula Charitable Trust assists local charities, so the more funds we can raise for these two great causes the better.” The president of the peninsula branch of Make-A-Wish, Len Kelly, said that since being formed two years the branch had raised more than $26,000 and been involved with the granting of 18 wishes. The mayor’s charity ball will be held at The National Golf Club, Cape Schanck, on Friday 12 August. Tickets through Mornington Peninsula Tourism information centre, call 5987 3078 or www.trybooking.com/ RQS. Charity time: Singer Matilda Airey and shire mayor Graham Pittock step out to promote this year’s mayoral ball.

Artists by the dozen MORE than 40 artists are showing about 90 artworks at Mornington’s Oak Hill Galley until 27 July. It’s the gallery’s annual members’ exhibition, a place to dodge nasty weather and seek inspiration from members of the peninsula’s art community. There is a $2000 prize pool to be distributed among exhibitors for best exhibit, highly commended and en-

couragement award. “The exhibition is as diverse as the artists, and includes works in two and three dimensions,” a gallery spokeswoman said. The gallery at 100 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington, is open Tuesday to Sunday 11am-4pm. For details, call 5973 4299. Pictured is a work by Oak Hill Gallery member Diane Williamson.

Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

PAGE 23


FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT

Entertainment JOHNNY Chester has travelled down two roads in his colourful music career – traditional rock ’n’ roll and country. The Mornington Peninsula-based entertainer was born on Boxing Day 1941. “Dad had a garage and one of his customers serviced jukeboxes and used to give Dad a box of used 78s of classic artists including Bill Haley, Eddie Fisher and Patti Page, which I listened to,” Johnny recalls. Johnny played drums in school bands before becoming a rock star with his first band, Johnny and The Jaywoods, who played at dances in a small hall in Preston. They later changed the name to Johnny Chester and The Chessman. By 1961 Johnny had released his first single, The Hokey Pokey, the first of 12 singles that included Can Can Ladies, Summertime Blues, Come On Everybody and Nick-Nack Paddy Whack. In his late 20s, Johnny took a step that many other rockers had taken and moved into country music. He recorded a swag of singles including Highway 31, Heaven Help the Man, and Irene Goodnight before signing with Ron Tudor’s Fable Label and releasing Kawliga, Glory, Glory and my favourite, Gwen (1971). Then came the novelty song Shame

and Scandal, which gave Johnny a silver disc. Other hits followed: Midnight Bus, Ready Mix Revenge, The World’s Greatest Mum, She’s My Kind of Woman, China Doll, I Love You So, Rebecca and others. Johnny won a Golden Guitar for best male vocalist at Tamworth in 1975 for the bestselling track She’s My Kind of Woman. He was 1981 male vocalist of the year for I Love You So Rebecca, 1982

vocalist of the year for Rough Around the Edges and 1983 vocalist of the year for Ad in the Weekly Times. In June 1983 at the International Country and Western Awards in Fort Worth, Texas, Johnny was voted Australia’s international entertainer of the year. He has supported Roy Orbison, Connie Francis, the Everly Brothers, The Beatles, Kenny Rogers, Johnny Cash, Freddy Fender and other stars.

of brainwashing/propaganda. They surely have a higher connection and responsibility with babies, but aside from that why are these other boundaries set in place; why not share? I’m told it all changed in the ’60s and ’70s. Yeah? A male can go into a pub alone and strike up a conversation; have an aura of being a “nice bloke” with “tea on the table” when he arrives home. A female does likewise and we all know the answer. If men have a choice why not women? Darling wants to do a computer course? Why? Darling wants to grow? What? “Darling is off with the fairies. I’m off to the pub. I’ll think about it. Can we afford it?” Most of these males are blameless to some extent due to the same social training. If you’re lucky enough to strike a partner where selflessness is on either side and freedom of individuality is encouraged, you’re home safe. Me? Read on. *** THE first two years after my wife’s death were a blur of grief and self-pity. It was only then that I began to see the many forms of my ignorance over the years. The number of pluses I enjoyed, taking things for granted. So now I’m

sensible? I wish. I’ve picked up things along the journey but the overriding stupidity factor remains intact, ever a danger. Men generally, according to my instinct/experience, are solitary forever, alone. Females have deeper connections with other females, family, children. Seemingly, so do we men, but unless it’s just me, I think men walk alone. *** WE all know about the five senses, as in sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell, but it’s the sixth sense that’s more interesting. The modern thinking is with extrasensory perception (ESP) along the lines of those types who insist they can see parts of the future or see dead people, or both. I haven’t got it, but if we go way, way back to Joseph Justus Scaliger, a French scholar, we find that he regarded titillation as the sixth sense. That’s a sixth sense I have got. Ahh, but common sense? *** I’M on Skype; something to amuse me other than writing, Facebook and Zoosk. I didn’t set my preferences; what are preferences? So suddenly I had half a dozen females (?) from Ghana calling. We chat. In all cases

The highlight of his career was perhaps supporting The Beatles’ Australian and New Zealand tour in 1964. The same year he became compere of the ABC pop music show Teen Scene. Johnny recalls working with Roy Orbison: “Roy was a wonderful bloke, very humble. It was a great tour, but very disappointing from a crowd point of view. “That first Orbison tour in 1961 was badly promoted in a venue in Sydney that held about 11,000 people. There were less than 1000 there to see Roy Orbison, Dion, Ray Peterson and my group The Thunderbirds. I can tell you Roy never played to an empty stadium again.” Johnny has released a new album, What You Hear is What You Get (on Homespun), featuring Vegemite Kisses, Cute Bootscooter, Under Western Skies and the song he co-wrote with Brian Cadd, The Rock ’n’ Roll Years. The album was recorded in Pakenham at the Cardinia Cultural Centre. Johnny enjoys listening to George Strait, Lee Kernaghan, Bing Crosby, John Williamson and Al Jolson. “George Strait is close to traditional country music but I also like Alan Jackson and Randy Travis. I admire songwriters like Garth Porter, Lee Kernaghan and John Williamson,” he said.

with Gary Turner “Eric Bogle is one of the best songwriters for his style. He has a sense of the ridiculous and is clever at putting a story into a song. It’s one thing to write a song about your feelings, but it’s another thing to put it into a time frame; Eric can do this.” Johnny next project is a compilation of all his rock ’n’ roll songs recorded between 1961 and 1966. He would also like to write songs for other artists. www.johnnychester.com Top 10 albums 1 What You Hear is What You Get – Johnny Chester 2 Cloudland – John Waters 3 Red Army – The Red Eyes 4 Snow – Brendan Radford 5 Far Away Places – Jetty Road 6 Rumours – Fleetwood Mac 7 101 60s Hits – various 8 The Harrow & The Harvest – Gillian Welsh 9 Wasting Light – Foo Fighters 10 Falling into Place – Adam Harvey

A Grain of Salt AFL Geronimo Andrew Demetriou gets six million and the players want more. Bugger them. They’re well looked after as it is. We saw by their classy dress sense at the players’ meeting that they all run expensive clothing accounts. As for where would we be without the players: where would the players be without the AFL, apart from having to suffer the dictatorial Adrian Anderson? There’s something quite bizarre about the money the AFL takes, and the players, and the clubs, and yet we read of the plight of the poorer clubs while we are asked to pay more and more. And now Heath Shaw, who cops eight weeks for a stupid $10 bet, while they make a fortune encouraging us to gamble every which way. There’s something sick about it all. *** ONE of my enjoyments is getting stuck into males who strut like cockatoos for no good reason, as you may have noticed. Many females lead a life of self-suppression but are sadly unaware of it, generally by way of social training over many years, as in a wife’s place (cooking, cleaning, budgeting, kids and the cot), as in no individual identity, as in a form

Joke!!! John got off the elevator on the 50th floor and nervously knocked on his blind date’s door. She opened it and was as beautiful and charming as everyone had said. “I’ll be ready in a few minutes,” she said. “Why don’t you play with Spot, my dog, while you’re waiting?” He does wonderful tricks. He rolls over, shakes hands, sits up and if you make a hoop with your arms, he’ll jump through.” The dog followed John onto the balcony and started rolling over. John made a hoop with his arms and Spot jumped through--over the balcony railing. Just then John’s date walked out. “Isn’t Spot the cutest, happiest dog you’ve ever seen?” “To tell the the truth, “ he replied, “Spot seemed a little depressed to me!” PAGE 24

Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

RIddle Solution

ANSWER: A snake.

Sudoku Solution

their parents had apparently carked it. They’re all in their 20s, all looking for love, all sending sensual pictures and all in terrible situations desperately needing cash, via Western Union, to a box number. I now know how to block them and remove them from my contact list, after lots of chatting back and forth. Stupid. Heath Shaw has nothing on me. Once bitten 50 times shy? I’m 69, but age is just a number? And Port Adelaide will be premiers. A dram of pleasure, a pound of pain. *** MY dentist Dr Stanley Cheung at McCrae Plaza is the best. As he was about to plunge the needle in for 20 minutes of torture (after I successfully dodged it for five years) he asked “Do you vote Labor?” I froze in the seat. It instantly flashed through my mini-brain “what if he votes Liberal and barracks for Carlton?” I declined to answer. You never can tell with nice people. *** QUITE amusing if it wasn’t so serious. The phone hacking saga with Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World. Front page splash in The Age and almost an aside in Rupert’s Herald Sun. Did someone mention journalistic ethics?

with Cliff Ellen God help me if he hacked my Skype or Zoosk. Time wounds all heels? *** “WHAT concerns me is the harm you are doing to yourselves. I mean, by perpetuating this talk of guilt and punishment, of banning and proscribing, of whitewashing and blackballing, of closing your eyes when convenient, of making scapegoats when there is no other way out, I ask you pointblank – does the pursuance of your limited role enable you to get the most out of life?” (Henry Miller). Centrelink magazine: “Make your money work for you”. Hilarious. Adios amigos. cliffie9@bigpond.com

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Rebels with a cause won’t be rolled over By Cameron McCullough WHEN the couples skating is over and the popcorn machine switched off, a dramatic transformation occurs at the roller skating rink. In come the young women from the Rosebud Rebels – resplendent in their red and black, fish-nets and plaid, corsets and tattoos. The rink comes alive to the sounds of yells, grunts and clashing skates with knee and elbow pads getting a good workout. It is a sight that would have even the most ardent speed skater rolling off the rink to play some pinball and eat a Chicko roll, anything to avoid tangling with these broads and the boards. Rosebud Rebels started when Erin Cameron and her friend Caitie Foster became besotted with roller derby at a Victorian Roller Derby League bout in Reservoir late last year. Erin and Caitie, who go by the roller derby names of ‘Ezme Hurchu’ and ‘Flash Pance’, went away from the event intent on starting a new league. So the Rebels were born. “We formalised the league in March, became incorporated and started recruiting members,” Erin said. “This was such an exciting time for us as both our passion and roller derby skills began to grow.” Erin attended a regional derby camp at Daylesford in March, which helped the budding idea consolidate into a long-term as-

piration with achievable shortterm goals. “During autumn, we skated and skated and skated some more.” Numbers have steadily increased as the word got out about a new force in roller derby. The Rosebud Rebels added off-skates fitness sessions and invited their first guest coaches to conduct an assessment of their skill levels in addition to running a all-day clinic. “It was an incredible honour to skate with ‘Nine Lives Isis’ and ‘Savage Blanc’ [of the Geelong Roller Derby League], coaches with such commitment and drive when it comes to sharing roller derby knowledge.” The next step was to attend a regional camp in Moe at the end of May. ‘Ezme Hurchu’, ‘Flash Pance’, Naomi ‘Bashin’ Bronco’ Braddick, Sage ‘Foxy la Roux’ King and one of their treasured referees, Lee ‘General Lee’ McQueen, all put their hands up for this invaluable experience. “The Moe camp allowed us to form alliances with other regional leagues under the watchful eye of international coaches ‘MisFit

Maiden’ and ‘Calamity Crush’,” Erin said. “Filled with laughter, tears, hope and pain, the camp reinforced such a strong sense of pride not only in how far the Rosebud Rebels had come as a league, but also in the friendships we had developed along the way. “We returned home weary but happy, with grand plans to consolidate our skills, grow our league and promote the Rebels within our community. “We already have a big Facebook following.” The Rebels held a trivia night at The Dunes Golf Links in Rye. “It was a humbling experience as we revelled in an abundance of community support and enthusiasm,” Erin said. “We have a stall at the Vintage Market at Eastbourne Primary School hall, Allambi Ave, Rosebud West, on the third Sunday each month, where we sell Kerry ‘Double D-mon’ Howlett’s delectable cupcakes.” Their boldest fundraising event so far, the brainchild of Erin ‘Vodka Bruiser’ O’Neill, is ‘Rebels With A Cause’, a night of burlesque, an internationally renowned hula dancer, a Melbourne-based rockabilly band and DJs on 12 August at The Evelyn Hotel in Fitzroy. Somehow it seems inevitable that it will be a roaring success. Who, after all, would stand in their way?  For details about the Rebels, call Erin Cameron on 0431 819 398.

In the fray: Erin “Vodka Bruiser” O’Neill mugs for the camera while adjusting her skates. Picture: Loaded Dice Photography

Sharks take their place among the country’s best THE Southern Peninsula Sharks under-12 basketball team was the first team from the southern peninsula to compete in the nationals after the winning the Country Victoria Championships. As a result, they are now ranked sixth in Australia. The Southern Peninsula Big V team acknowledged the young boys’ achievements recently at a Big V game by presenting the boys with an award and including them in their prematch introductions and the National Anthem.

Big moment: Above, the Southern Peninsula Big V team congratulates the juniors. Predators on the court: Left, the Southern Peninsula Sharks. Back row, from left: Matthew Cumming, Nic Sakalis, Reid Nanscawen, Jai Nanscawen and Stephen Cumming. Front row, from left: Noah Torres, Evan Fatouros, Toby Bedford, Nathan McKenzie and Jensen Cervi. Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA scoreboard

Hawks fly west to take on Freo Melbourne, but I believe they learnt a lot from that loss. West Coast by 17 points.

Round 19 preview Friday 29 July North Melbourne v Carlton, Etihad Stadium 7.40pm For the first time this year North Melbourne are scheduled for a Friday night game in which they play the improving Blues. North on the weekend kept themselves in the race for the finals when they destroyed Brisbane after a close first half. The Blues got revenge on the Bombers when they destroyed them by 74 points, with Eddie Betts and Chris Judd best on the ground. Despite the Kangaroos’ form of late they are no match for the Blues. Drew Petrie would need a big one if they are going to challenge. Carlton by 33 points. Saturday 30 July Western Bulldogs v West Coast, Etihad Stadium 2.10pm It was a big weekend for these teams. The Bulldogs needed a win to keep their finals hopes alive but failed against the Swans and the Eagles kept in touch with the four after beating Fremantle by a point in the derby. Barry Hall won’t hang his head; he announced his retirement, responded with five goals and there’s a chance he will continue his form. Beau Waters returned to the Eagles side at his courageous best, after missing the majority of the season with an arm injury. The Eagles faltered last time they were in

Geelong v Melbourne, Skilled Stadium 2.10pm After a couple of weeks of less than impressive performances by the Cats, they finally got their act together and wiped Richmond off the field despite making six changes. Melbourne struggled to keep up with Hawthorn and lost by 54 points. Pressure is mounting on the Dees but Geelong will be too good. Joel Selwood slotted back into the side nicely after four weeks on the sidelines due to suspension. Geelong by 39 points. Gold Coast v St Kilda, Metricon Stadium 7.10pm For the fourth consecutive week the Suns play in Queensland, this time St Kilda, which is in the top eight for the first time this season. The Suns put up a great fight against Collingwood. As might be expected, they were well beaten early but in the second half stayed with Collingwood, the teams kicking six goals each, which was a great effort. Trent McKenzie this year has been consistently kicking goals from outside 50, a skill that has slowly died out of the game. The Saints have finally started playing good football and it’s at the right time of the season. St Kilda by 22 points. Fremantle v Hawthorn, Patersons Stadium 7.40pm In the match of the round, Fremantle play to retain their spot in the eight when the Hawks fly to Perth and attempt to bridge the gap to Carlton. As the home and away season draws to a close, the draw

for Fremantle gets harder with three topfour sides still to play, but this game is definitely winnable for the Dockers. The sides met earlier in the season and the Dockers outplayed the Hawks for the best part of three quarters before injuries got the better of them, so the Dockers know they can match it with the Hawks. Hawthorn by 4 points. Sunday 31 July Collingwood v Essendon, MCG 2.10pm The stakes have never been higher for the Bombers. The second-half fadeout by the Bombers on the weekend was a blow so substantial that it cost their spot in the eight. Now with a tough run home the Bombers need to start winning games they’re not expected to and sooner rather than later would be preferable. The Pies did what was required of them against the Gold Coast, Pendlebury played another classy game and Leon Davis continued his dominance across the half back line. Collingwood by 49 points. Adelaide v Port Adelaide, AAMI Stadium 4.40pm In the second showdown of the season, the sides couldn’t be in worse shape. Crows coach Neil Craig will be lucky to hold on to his job at the end of the season as his team sinks. Port Adelaide are facing an uphill battle to not only win matches but also get fans along to watch them. It’s not very pretty South Australian football at the moment. Earlier this season when they met, the Power surprised everyone by coming back from a hefty deficit to win the game, and recently the bye has been beneficial to most teams. Port Adelaide by 11 points.

Langy poised to head into finals LANGWARRIN has secured an important 1-0 away win against an in-form Fawkner that will go a long way toward its 2011 campaign in the state league division 1 heading into the business end of the season. In the typically competitive division, Langy could jump from 11th to fifth position with just one win as eight teams are separated by less than four points. Caleb Nicholes headed home the only goal of the encounter just before half-time following two soft penalties, one for each side, that were not converted after both keepers produced quality saves. Langy keeper Michael Sivulja skilfully disarmed two one-on-one attempts by the Fawkner strikers early in the second half before Langwarrin took control to secure a vital three points on the road ahead of its home game against Altona Magic. “They really came at us early in the second half but we held on and gradually we had complete control of the match,” Langy coach Gus MacLeod said. “It was a tidy three points to get.” In state league 3, Mornington Gulls have pinched a three-point break on Kingston City atop of that

league’s table with an emphatic 5-1 win over cellar dwellers Croydon City Arrows. The Gulls led 3-0 at the break before adding another two in the second half to assert themselves as the frontrunner in the tightly contested competition. Peninsula Strikers continued its good form with a tidy 4-2 win over Berwick City to put them in fourth place in division 3. Meanwhile, still in division 3, Pines suffered a 2-0 loss to midtable side Nunawading City to keep them a distant last on the table. Pines is 12 points adrift of its nearest competitor Croydon City Arrows and will need some sort of miracle to avoid being relegated from the division and the state league. Pines’ dramatic fall from Premier League grand finalists to possibly the Provisional League will force the club to look at alternative revenue streams than gate takings, which are not allowed in the lower leagues. In the Provisional leagues, Skye copped an 8-1 hiding from Old Melburnians to keep them perilously close to being a one-year wonder in the division 1. In division 2 Seaford remain mid-table after a comfortable 2-0 win over the Casey Kings to keep them in the hunt for a promotion place.

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Cranbourne Turf Club prizemoney on the up CRANBOURNE Turf Club announced two $25,000 increases in prizemoney for this year’s Cranbourne Cup meeting on Sunday 9 October. The cup goes up to $200,000 and the other feature event, the program the Apache Cat Classic (1200m), is worth $100,000. Significantly the club has reached an agreement with TAB Sportsbet to pay a $2 million bonus to any horse winning this year’s Cranbourne and Caulfield cups double. This represents a massive $1 million to the bonus money offered last year. One of the difficulties for trainers aiming their horses at both races is they are only six days apart. However there is no doubt the size of the incentive will encourage numerous trainers to have a go at hitting the jackpot. Among them are likely to be Cranbourne trainer Michael Kent who had the first two home in the cup last year with Starmon and My Bentley. This year he already has a much higher rated horse in AJC Oaks winner Absolutely, who is heading Caulfield Cup betting and now will consider adding the Cranbourne Cup to her agenda. *** THERE are no Mornington Peninsula trainers in more sparkling form than David Brideoake. After a landing the first race with the

emerging Dance With Her at Caulfield on Saturday, he followed two races later by winning with the promising filly Bianco Rose. Brideoake also has a coming winning in the classy Warm Love, whose efforts featured a third to champion Black Caviar in the Group 1 Lightning Stakes. The Octagonal filly resumed with an encouraging third to in-form Secret Flyer in the Sir John Monash Stakes (1100m). She looked above herself and will be fitter for the outing. Cranbourne-based team Colin and Cindy Alderson are also making their presence felt on a regular basic. For the third consecutive Saturday they landed a metropolitan winner when Josimar scored over 1400m at Caulfield. A talented two-year-old, Josimar lost his way last year but is now back on track and should win more races. While it was an off-season meeting at Caulfield, there were a number of two-year-olds who indicated they could be worth following into the spring. Foremost among them was the Hawkes-trained Chivvy. An impressive winner on debut at Sandown, the Flying Spur filly settled a mile back from her outside draw but was putting in big strides late and will be suited when she gets out to 1400m. Others who impressed were Unique Quality, Infinite Energy and Chase The Rainbow. Unique Quality, a $13,000 purchase, showed tremendous speed to lead to well into the straight and will benefit great from the experience; the Peter Moody-trained Infinite Energy only

warmed up over the final 200m and will be suited over a mile while Chase The Rainbow went much better than his finishing position would indicate. A nice type, he was working home nicely when stopped in his tracks at the 200m. Another Rick Hore-Lacey galloper worth backing over the next few months is Snitza.

Regarded as a wet tracker after easy staying wins at Mornington and Ballarat, the Snitzel colt produced a dazzling performance when an allthe-way winner on a near-good track at Caulfield. Others worth following are Abitofado, Star Of Gizelle, Happy Angel, Cellarmaster, Sorel Miss and Time Matters.

All Cranny finish: Michael Kent-trained Starmon with Glen “Group 1” Boss aboard leads home stablemate My Bentley in the 2010 Cranbourne Cup. Third was another Cranbourne-trained horse, Tube, trained by Alan Williams, the father of leading rider Craig Williams. Picture: Slickpix

Lucky 13 for Rye seniors AFTER 13 rounds of Nepean Division football, Rye Demons remain undefeated and on top of the ladder, two games clear of Sorrento. The last two matches were two homes games against Red Hill and Rosebud. The Red Hill game was a real slog, with the Hillmen taking the game right up to Rye well into the last quarter. With the upset of the season looking highly likely early in the last quarter, when Red Hill took a four-point lead. The Rye boys finally moved into a higher gear, kicking the last six goals of the match to record a 33-point win. It was great to have Doogie Howie and Rima Tipene play their first senior games against Red Hill. Last Saturday the Demons took on arch-rival Rosebud, a team Rye has dominated over the last three years, winning each encounter. Saturday continued the theme. From the first bounce Rye was playing some of its best football of the past month. With the inclusions of Ben Holmes, Mark Chaffey, Mick Cain all back from injury and Jimmy Jennings back from the TAC side Dandenong Stingrays, Rye fielded one of its strongest teams for the year. Rosebud was no match for the Demons’ bigger bodies and its more experienced players, and Rye ran out comfortable winners by 88 points.

It was a great percentage booster for the boys and keeps the team on track to finish the season in top spot. The former Rosebud players who transferred to Rye over the summer enjoyed the win. The reserves have had two great wins over the last few weeks, taking the team to second on the ladder, now just one game shy of top team Sorrento. Reserves coach Travis “Tractor” Sawers is second on the league goalkicking ladder with 31. The under-18s with Danny Walker in charge have put together an amazing four weeks winning every game and are now in the final five for the first time this season. Andrew “Jimmy” Dean has been in scintillating form, with Jesse Johnston, Rima Tipene, Jack Kerr, Scotty Shea, Tim Purchase, Brady Egan and Josh Garner playing well. The club wishes Jack Noseda a speedy recovery from his injuries, and hope he can make it back for the finals.

Talking netball, the A grade team under Amy Jobling is starting to hit its straps, and is second on the ladder, one game away from Tyabb in top spot. After winning the premiership last year, the girls are very hungry for back-to-back success. Charlie Rice in the centre position and Assunta Gailbraith in defence have been outstanding over the last few games. The B Grade team under the watchful eye of the “Big E”, Ellen Millar, also are finals bound, sitting third at the moment, one game from second spot. Lorena Tarca, back from an overseas holiday, has been in great form up forward, combing well with Keeley Aglinskas to form a potent forward set up. Last Saturday also saw Chad Ambrose, a 2007 and 2009 reserves premiership player and past vice-captain, play his 150th club game. Sean Cain played his 100th game for the club, continuing the Cain name and tradition. The family has much history with the Rye Football Club. The new date for the big raffle draw is Sunday 14 August, still at the Hepburn Football Club. See any committee member for a ticket, call 5985 8800 during business hours or 0419 583 378. Tickets are $250 with a maximum 1000 for sale.

Freestyle kickboxing winter tournament THE International Freestyle Kickboxing Federation (IFKF MMA Inc) will be holding its Winter All-Styles tournament at Frankston South Leisure Centre, 55 Towerhill Rd, Frankston, on Sunday 31 July starting at 2.30pm. There will be a variety of competitions from Kata and Point Scoring to ‘3x2’ Continuous Full Contact Kumite/Fighting (AllStyles Rules). The IFKF is an amateur organisation that embraces traditional techniques and adapts them to modern fighting styles. The sport is a true mixed martial art form that encourages good sportsmanship and is not a ‘ground and pound’ style.

The tournaments are professionally run and observe strict safety guidelines as set down by the Victorian Amateur Contact Sports Association. The tournament will draw from all styles of martial arts including Karate and Boxing styles, Kung-Fu, Tae-KwonDo, Muay-Thai, wrestling and others. All grading and belt systems are honoured. There are students at all levels of grading involved in the tournament, from beginners through to intermediates and advanced

up to black belts. The IFKF MMA Inc is interested in networking with other clubs in the hope that they can develop and share martial artists’ skills. If you would like to be involved in the next tournament or have some students who you would like to bring to compete, call Shihan Paul on 0410 378 299 to register your interest or email ifkf.mma@ gmail.com. Rules and more information can be found on the IFKF webpage www.ifkfmma.co.cc The IFKF Winter Tournament will be a fantastic opportunity to get together, to compete, to learn and to demonstrate respective styles.

Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011

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July is FREE Membership Month! Join us on any Wednesday night during July for our popular Members Steak Night and each customer will receive a FREE membership card worth $25.00! Enjoy discounted Steak from $13.90, with any meal purchased.

loyalty reward points, priority entry over summer and much more! Limit 1 membership card per customer. Cards must be activated at hotel reception upon collection.

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Southern Peninsula News 26 July 2011


July 26th 2011