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Southern Peninsula

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Wednesday 4 November 2020

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Gardens bloom after lockdown THE gardens at Heronswood were open to the public last Saturday (31 October) to be followed on 4 November by its cafe. Heronswood is also home to the Diggers Club and gardens that change and reflect the seasons throughout the year. The Diggers Garden Shop (10am-5pm daily) specialises in heirloom seeds, cottage flowers and edible plants along with flowering shrubs and cool climate trees. Heronswood is in Latrobe Parade, Dromana, call 5984 7321. Picture: Yanni

Eating out, a tasty way back to business A “LIGHT touch, streamlined permit system” for extended outdoor trading is part of Mornington Peninsula Shire’s strategy to help businesses get back on their feet now that COVID-19 restrictions have eased. Features include extending footpath space and adding parklets – which repurpose car parking spaces outside shopfronts – to make more space for diners. CEO John Baker said the shire was also working with the business community to identify key shopping strips that could be opened up to pedestrians and diners. “We want to provide more options to enable people to support our local

economy and enjoy all the peninsula has to offer,” he said. Mr Baker said the shire welcomed the easing of restrictions. “Now it’s time for us as a community to focus on how we can support our local businesses by engaging local service providers and shopping locally, wherever possible,” he said. “The shire’s focus is firmly on getting our local businesses trading again. This is our number one priority. We want to make it as easy as possible for local businesses to trade in a way that will maximise turnover while remaining COVID-safe.” The easing of restrictions means there are no restrictions on reasons to

leave the house, but you must remain within 25 kilometres of home (with exceptions, including care for childminding, end of life, resting place, real estate). Those who can work from home must continue to work from home. If you can’t work from home, you do not need a permit to attend work. However, you still need a permit to travel between metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria for work or study. Up to 10 people may gather outdoors from any number of households, or more than 10 if all are from the same household. Children under 12 months of age are not included in the limit.

Up to two adults and their dependents may visit one home at a time, with visits limited to one a day, from within a 25 kilometre radius of home. Masks are recommended to be worn and a record kept. Households will be restricted to one daily visiting event, meaning those who receive visitors cannot also visit someone else that day. Cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and food courts can reopen. Restrictions apply. Retail shops can reopen, and markets can reopen. Library branches remain open for click and collect (no appointment necessary). Deliveries are available for vulnerable community members.

Worried about Skin Cancer? Need a lesion checked? Dr David Parsons is one of the most highly experienced skin cancer General Practitioners on the Mornington Peninsula and spring is the perfect time to start the process. Dr David also has a special interest in mental health, senior’s health and general practice.

Community halls will remain closed (with some exceptions). Tips are open for all waste but will close 12-12.30pm to allow a change of staff and lunch breaks. All waste vouchers for the 2019/20 financial year have been extended until 31 December. Mount Martha Public Golf Course and the Crib Point Pool are open (subject to restrictions) as are skate parks and playgrounds. Shire offices remain closed with customer service available by phone or online. Details on current restrictions: mornpen.vic.gov.au/outdoordining Stephen Taylor

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Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020


NEWS DESK

Storms create claims havoc Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au MORNINGTON, Mount Martha, Mount Eliza and Frankston are ranked fourth in insurer AAMI’s list of stormdamaged suburbs. This comes after analysis of almost 19,000 storm-related insurance claims across Victoria from June 2019-July 2020. The suburbs are among areas in Melbourne’s south east that copped

the most damage from storms over the past 12 months – especially after one storm in January that produced large hail, damaging winds and flash flooding. The damage led to more than 8000 insurance claims. The south east has consistently topped the list of storm damaged regions over the past three years, with significantly more home claims than any other region, followed by Melbourne’s north east and south west. Flash flooding and large hailstones

caused by severe thunderstorms usually cause the most damage. With a wetter than usual spring and summer expected due to a La Nina, homeowners can brace for more damage as we approach summer. AAMI’s Melissa Cronin said storms were more likely during the warmer months. “Claims data from the past year identified January and February as the top time for storm-related claims,” she said. “However, storms are unpredictable

and can hit at any time without warning. We encourage people to be prepared by doing general maintenance and preparation works now, before it is too late.” Homeowners should check that their insurance policies are current and adequate; make a home emergency plan and have an emergency kit. They should regularly clear their backyards and gutters, trim trees and overhanging branches, and ensure outdoor furniture and toys (including bikes, trampolines

and sporting equipment) are tied down or put away in a shed or garage. Ms Cronin said storm damage was generally covered by insurance. “We encourage people to regularly check and update their policy to ensure it meets their current circumstances,” she said. “If you have any questions regarding what is covered as part of your policy, or the claims process, you should contact your insurer.”

Online festival for fixing things FREE online workshops and events are providing lessons on how to become conscious consumers. Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Fix It Festival focuses on implementing sustainable habits, including repairing broken items, earning money from unused items, growing veggies, composting and recycling. Consumers will be asked to consider the resources used to make the things they own and the environmental impact of throwing them away. Before buying something new, check to see if you have something similar you can reuse or repair. If the answer is no, ask can you borrow, swap, rent or purchase the item second-hand? Buying an items second-hand eliminates excess plastic packaging and minimises air pollution from delivery trucks and vehicles. If there is no choice but to buy new, consumers are being urged to buy local to support businesses. Fix It Festival events: Everyday actions to live more sus-

tainably with Tamara DiMattina from The New Joneses, 5-6pm, Wednesday 4 November. Blairgowrie Community Garden staff will show how to grow your own fruit and vegetables from food scraps and seedlings, and produce your own nutritional compost, 9.30-10.30am, Sunday 8 November. Point Nepean Men’s Shed will show how to repair household items, 12.301.30pm, Tuesday 10 November. What to put in your recycling bin, 5-5.45pm, Wednesday 11 November and 10.30-11.15am, Saturday 28 November. Using food scraps to start a compost or worm farming system, 10-11am, Saturday 14 November. Maximise your second-hand online sales, 8-8.45pm, Thursday 19 November. Seawinds Boomerang Bags will show how to sew, repair and upcycle textiles, 6-7pm, Wednesday 25 November. Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/fixitfestival

Marking NAIDOC Week BECAUSE of COVID-19 restrictions Mornington Peninsula Shire is promoting NAIDOC Week (8-15 November) events online. The Shire will promote local and interstate events on our website for everyone to enjoy. This year’s theme is Always Was, Always Will Be in recognition of First Nations people as being occupants and carers of the continent for more than 65,000 years.

The shire says that one of the ways it supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is through its Warringinee group which works to deliver social, cultural and economic outcomes actions contained in its Reconciliation Policy and Action Plan. Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/naidoc The shire’s Reconciliation Action Plan Innovate 2020-2022 is at mornpen.vic.gov.au/strategiesandplans

Nothing wasted in clean-up ABOUT 100 people “officially” participated in the Big Peninsula Clean up – Clean Up Your Patch on Sunday 25 October. Waste Wise Peninsula organisers Amy Westnedge and Birte Moliere said they were “thrilled to report 99 locals officially participated in the event” but that they had been inundated with phone calls and messages from many more who joined in without officially registering. “We tried to get everyone involved and we were thrilled with the turn out.” The amount of litter officially logged for the Mornington Peninsula on the day was 567 kilograms. “Again, we are aware much more has been collected but, unfortunately, the litter stopper app crashed with many people attempting to use it simultaneously,” Ms Moliere said. Birte Moliere, right, with her rubbish collection and, above, Evie and Julian Westnedge with their clean-up bags.

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CHRIS BRAYNE MP

MEMBER FOR NEPEAN

This year has been really tough for our community as we continue to fight this global pandemic. I want to thank all Mornington Peninsula residents for their hard work in fighting this virus and doing everything they can to support each other. The Nepean electorate covers Safety Beach down to Point Nepean National Park, and Somers through to Flinders – and everywhere in between. As the Member for Nepean, I am always available to assist you and your family with any State Government matter you might have. Please feel free to contact me and my office on the contact details below.

Chris Brayne MP Follow me on Facebook

Shop 1/739 Point Nepean Road, McCrae VIC 3938 P: (03) 5986 6661 E: chris.brayne@parliament.vic.gov.au This publication is funded from Parliamentary budget. Authorised by C. Brayne, Shop 1/739 Point Nepean Rd, McCrae, VIC 3938.

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4 November 2020

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NEWS DESK

Fly-in hotels for the dispossessed Golf course future Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au

comes to the fore

SOON after the Europeans arrived, they began to colonise territory that was already occupied and providing a living for its long time inhabitants. The original populations were overlooked as the fast-reproducing, more powerful hordes took over the lush valleys and fast-developing agricultural areas. But a growing number of enthusiasts are now coming to the plight of the originals, providing safety and shelter from the spreading hordes. The narrative of invasion and a struggle for survival might sound familiar, but it is one few people know about: the takeover of Australia by European bees. Introduced for their manufacturing and pollinating skills, the honey bees have a habit of pushing aside the smaller native bees. There are more than 1700 species of native bees and although just 11 of them are stingless, their diminutive size means they are unable to deliver a harmful sting. Some of the larger native bees are credited with having a sting as painful as a bull ant bite but are unlikely to do so unless trodden on or threatened in some way. Derek Ryan, of Sorrento is one of those affected by the tales of loss and dispossession suffered by native bees. After hearing Cr David Gill speak passionately about the need for native bees and their value to Australia’s environment, Mr Ryan decided to help

FUTURE “development opportunities” of land now occupied by Mount Martha Public Golf Course will be reviewed by Mornington Peninsula Shire Council. The shire has hired consultants @ leisure Planners and WellPlayed to “develop a vision and long term plan” for the golf course. Described by the shire as an “exciting project”, the shire is inviting public comment. With easing of COVID-19 restrictions the 18-hole course off Forest Drive reopened for golfing on 21 October. “We will be reviewing all aspects of the site, including its role as a significant open space for the peninsula and undertaking a detailed review of the golf course operations, use, management, performance and role in providing for golf in the shire,” a shire news release stated last week. It said golfers, residents, clubs, community groups and other stakeholders would be consulted to find out what was valued about open space and the golf course; how it could be improved; issues, challenges and opportunities that a strategic plan should address; and, what is your vision for this site? The shire will prepare a “state of play” report about the management and performance of the land “as a golf course and as a regional open space”. An “issues and options” paper would assess “development opportunities and desirable directions”.

DEREK Ryan and the “largest bee hotel in Australia” he built and installed on a friend’s farm near Mornington.

a large bee hotel,” he said. “I have foraged for bamboo and other recycled woods and tree cuttings and I “have made a double sided bee hotel for his farm and is probably the largest bee hotel in Australia.” Cr Gill, who often give talks about Australia’s endangered native bees to clubs, community groups and schools, said Mr Ryan’s efforts “makes it even more worthwhile”. Now that the hotel has been installed on Mr Ryan’s friend’s farm near Mornington, he is waiting to see what types and how many of the native bees take up his offer of residency.

Search for thief POLICE are searching for a thief who stole a credit card from a car at Balnarring and later used it to withdraw cash from an ATM at Dromana and to buy cigarettes from a convenience store at Carrum Downs. The offender was wearing a red hoodie, black shorts, and has a tattoo on their left calf. Anyone with information is urged to contact Mornington Peninsula Crime Investigation Unit 5978 1400 or Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Stolen ute A FORD utility with number plates 1RO8UX and a distinctive red motif on the side, “80”, was stolen from a Frankston property, Friday 25 October. Anyone with information about its whereabouts is asked to contact Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000 or report it online at crimestoppers.com.au quoting incident number 200392724.

EN TR $ AN 0 CE FE E

the bees out. “I never knew native bees existed until I heard David when he visited Sorrento Rotary Club,” Mr Ryan said. Also, a member of Sorrento Men’s Shed, Mr Ryan set about making “bee hotels”, using recycled timber and bamboo that he found growing mainly on nature strips. During the COVID-19 lockdown he made and gave away six small hotels. But his crowning achievement, built over five months, was something on a much grander scale. “I have a friend with a 30 acre farm and part of it is a protected orchard. So, I told him that I would make him

As well as planning for sporting and recreational activities the consultants hired by the shire also do “open space planning for new residential development and structure plans”. Submissions about the future of the golf course close 5pm Wednesday 11 November and can be made online atmornpen.vic.gov.au/golfcoursereview or for a form call 1300 850 600. Keith Platt

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4 November 2020

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Southern Peninsula

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly

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Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 5 NOVEMBER 2020 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2020

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NEWS DESK

Landslip closes car park THE ocean car park at the end of King Street, Flinders has been closed due to a landslide. Part of the bitumen covered parking area collapsed after heavy rain on 9 October and Parks Victoria has hired geotechnical experts to assess the situation. Kris Rowe, chief ranger for the southern peninsula, said the collapse posed a “significant risk to the public” and the car park would be closed “until further notice”. “We are conscious of the value of this car park to the local community and will keep people updated as we determine the appropriate next steps,” Mr Rowe said. He said an alternate access to the west end of Flinders ocean was at the Mushroom Reef car park which could be reached through the golf links road. Parks Victoria says the damaged car park is on top of a steep escarpment that is susceptible to landslips and subsidence. It said more rain since the collapse had “additionally destabilised the area”. The geotechnical assessment would help determine the cause of the collapse and provide recommendations for a long-term solution. Keith Platt

Victoria, you know fire. Victoria was hit hard in the 2019-20 fire season. The 2020-21 season is coming and you know as well as anyone how important it is to plan and prepare. Ensure your home is fire ready, ensure your family knows your plan, and be ready to leave early.

Plan. Act. Survive. Go to vic.gov.au/knowfire

Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

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Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020


Power drop to cut fire risk UNITED Energy has been working under and above ground to reduce the risk of power lines causing bushfires. Nearly 600 metres of power lines have been put underground along Valley Views Lane, Main Ridge where a pine tree fell onto the cables earlier this year leaving customers without power for 12 hours. It has also installed aerial bundled cable in high risk bushfire areas The company says 55 large pine trees in the lane are leaning towards the power lines, “posing a risk of starting a fire or causing a power outage”. “This line is located on the north west face of

the slope, meaning any potential fire start would move quickly given the hot summer winds which normally come in from that direction,” project manager Rob Doyle said. “The peninsula is a high-risk area for fires and throughout the year we have continued conducting critical maintenance and major projects to ensure the network is ready for summer,” he said. He said United Energy had installed rapid earth fault current limiter bushfire safety devices in Frankston, Mornington and Dromana. The devices would protect more than 67,000 customer and 982 kilometres of high voltage power lines across the peninsula. Keith Platt

Have your say Annual Budget 2021–22 We want to know what you and your local community would like from the Annual Budget. Help guide the future direction of Shire delivered community programs, projects and initiatives. Tell us your ideas! Pre-Budget submissions close 5pm Sunday 29 November 2020. mornpen.vic.gov.au/budget Please submit your ideas at

For more information

mornpen.vic.gov.au/budget

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

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NEWS DESK

Have Your Say Mount Martha Public Golf Course Strategic Review Mornington Peninsula Shire, in partnership with @Leisure planners and WellPlayed, is inviting the community to work with us to develop a vision and plan for the Mount Martha Public Golf Course.

We want to know: • What do you value about the open space and the golf course? • How could the golf course, the service its offers and the open space generally be improved? • What are the issues, challenges and opportunities that the strategic plan needs to address? • Thinking about future generations, what is your vision for this site? Consultation closes 5pm Wednesday 11 November 2020

How to Have Your Say Fill in the survey online at: mornpen.vic.gov.au/golfcoursereview Hard copy forms are available upon request by phoning 1300 850 600

For more information email:

media@atleisure.com.au

Making a vow for April NOT only did Eastbourne Primary School celebrate World Teacher’s Day, with students all dressing up in Farm Week dress, but it also celebrated a staff wedding. Principal and chauffeur Stephen Wilkinson used one of his classic cars to simulate what might have occurred on this day had COVID-19 not put a dampener on year 6 teacher Nina Hig-

gin’s wedding day. Ms Higgins was picked up in the car from the office and taken to the oval where cheering students and staff celebrated a “what might have been” moment. Her next wedding date is mid-April when she hopes it will be fourth time lucky. Nina’s married name will be Nina Figgins Higgins.

No matter the situation, it’s never OK. There’s no excuse for violence or aggression against healthcare workers. No matter the situation, it’s never OK.

worksafe.vic.gov.au/itsneverok

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Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020


Writers record year of living with COVID-19

THE title of the book says it all: 2020 a year like no other. While nothing could have prepared Victorians for tragic surprises and uncertainties of this year, the writers’ group of U3a Dromana, has completed a book of short lockdown observations to illustrate how individual members fared during the pandemic. “Despite all the upheaval this year we kept on meeting virtually and decided to write a series of poetry and micro stories in the form of a journal,” organiser Sue Brown said. Nine others recorded their thoughts and observations on a weekly basis. “The writers’ group members have led diverse and interesting lives enhanced by education, travel and personal success,” Ms Brown said. “The one abiding sentiment throughout these journals is hope for a better future for all.

“The year 2020 has taught us acceptance, patience – and a new set of values. Late September – as we go to print, Victorian daily cases have fallen markedly, and stage 4 lockdown is easing. Our journey continues.” Excerpts from the 42-page book: Jan Hall (3/4/20): “We have just arrived back from six days in Healesville with Probus Happy Wanderers group. We were lucky with our timing because one week later and we could not have gone. My food cupboard was empty, and I hit the supermarket. Empty shelves. Knowing that we needed to self-isolate I stocked up on what I could. I hit Bunnings, my favourite shop, for plants, potting mix and hanging baskets. This should keep me busy. I have been on fire all week. Making curtains for an old church manse awaiting rental, also helping to clear its overgrown garden. Then my

own garden. I’m exhausted.” Christine Andrews (17/4/20): “I noticed a swing in mood this week. I am happy. Not just grateful for being loved by the family, or my home, or friends, but really happy. The happiness that comes from letting go. I cannot control the events going on in the outer world. I do not have the wellbeing of millions in my hands. However, I can smile and give comfort to people around me who are more affected with this isolation than I. I can keep in touch and listen, yes listen. I am usually so vocal when given the chance, it comes from living alone, but listening is a gift we can give. Happy with that.” John Trainor (24/4/20): “Another month of self-isolation has gone. We’re weathering the lockdown and other restrictions and are even daring to look and plan ahead. News reports

suggest that some of the constraints may be eased soon, given the substantial reduction in virus victims. Fortunately, vital rules like 1.5 metre separation should remain for some time yet. I’ve even started looking at options for renewed holiday plans for 2021, but not as ambitiously as earlier this year – certainly not to Los Angeles. There’s also the pleasing prospect of continuing on with more writing, reading, phone calls, barbecues and walks, plus the vital matters of watching sport – and playing golf again.” Rosamund Champion (8/5/20): “I have spent numerous hours over the past few weeks in battle with my computer, iPad, laptop (whatever). We have been thrashing out how I can master Zoom. Now I’m not sure if it’s me or the computer, but as I am not the smartest with IT technology, it is most likely me. I have endured many tense moments with the stupid thing and, unfortunately, cross words have been exchanged between my husband and me. Not really cross words. More like a barrage of insults. As a result, I should admit defeat, but have decided to soldier on, and when and if I ever succeed, be warned. I will become a blooming Zooming expert.” Penny Liddiard (12/6/20): “Like many of you, I long to return to the easy lifestyle before COVID-19. Weeks spiced with activities to keep mind and body as agile as possible – plus the prospect of catching up with friends and acquaintances who, like us, have been in self-preservation. I ventured to a small gathering last week – but was uncomfortable. I recoil if anyone invades ‘my space’

at the supermarket. I choose where – and when – I walk a footpath or cross a road. Has this pandemic fostered a new paranoia – or am I just being careful?” Max Evans (21/8/20): “Thursday evening, time for my dog Bucket’s walk down to the beach. Nepean Highway traffic is horrendous. Strange, during lockdown. But then again, these bloody terrorists have been arriving like a swarm of locusts every weekend for five months. It resembles a COVID conga-line of dissolute escapees from the big smoke. We stand in awe awaiting a break in the traffic. Come Friday it is all go at the shops, beach, pier, cafes, jogging, walking. No masks, no space, no manners. They have run amok through the entire lockdown. Enough. I pulled up a group last Saturday and asked, ‘What are you doing here?’ They replied: ‘We refuse to be dictated to by anyone’. I knew it. I mumbled, Go home.” Anne George (28/8/20): “Week four of stage 4 lockdown. What do I miss in lockdown? I miss my family. I miss face-to-face contact with my friends – I miss our card games. I miss going to lunch and coffee with my friends. I miss being able to make plans. I miss getting my hair cut. I miss freedom. How trivial that sounds – I feel so guilty when people are losing their jobs, their businesses. I don’t want to feel guilty; I just want to feel normal. I sound as if I’m miserable – I’m not – I’m in lockdown mood. How much longer – who knows – we just have to hang in there.” Stephen Taylor

Volunteer mentor drivers wanted for the Southern Peninsula The perfect L2P Mentor will be someone enthusiastic about contributing to the community and supporting young people by committing one to two hours per week to assist in supervised driving.

Mornington Peninsula Shire is on the look-out for experienced drivers to help supervise learner drivers as part of the TAC L2P Program on the Southern Peninsula. The TAC L2P Program is funded by the Transport Accident Commission (TAC) and managed by the Department of Transport, supported by the Victorian Government. What are we looking for? The Shire is hoping to recruit 10 new mentors into the program who can work with young people to achieve 120 hours of driving experience as required to undertake the license test.

Successful mentors will be provided with full training and support and will have all insurances covered by the Shire when volunteering in the role. Eligible mentors must be full licensed and over 21 years old. For more information: mornpen.vic.gov.au/ l2pmentorapplication

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

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NEWS DESK

Walkers inspired by loss of loved one

NAIDOC on Zoom THE Southern Women’s Action Network (SWAN) is holding a Zoom meeting on Sunday (8 November) with guest speaker Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman, Teela Reid (pictured). The meeting is being held in the first day of this year’s NAIDOC Week (8-15 November) and will hear from the former teacher now criminal defence lawyer and award-winning junior fiction writer about advocacy for enshrining a First Nations Voice to Parliament in the Constitution and a Makarrata commission to enable Treaty and Truth-telling. NAIDOC Week celebrations will be held across Australia to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Details: email swanwomen@outlook.com or call 0408 811 422.

MORNINGTON police took part in the recent Wonder Woman walk to raise money for ovarian cancer research. The walk began in 2016 when Senior Constable Andy Powell’s wife, Helen, was diagnosed with advanced stages of the disease. Six of her friends took part in a 30 kilometre walk from Safety Beach to Sorrento and it has grown in numbers every year since. Their red clothing honours TV’s Wonder Woman character. In 2017 the participants tripled to 18, then in 2018 it grew to 60. Last year there were more than 200 Wonder Woman walkers (including a few men). Helen Powell died earlier this year, but the event continues in her honour. COVID-19 restrictions meant walkers headed off in small groups from Sunday 25 October to Sunday 1 November under the five-kilometre rule. An app recorded their distances. The Mornington members, including Senior Constable Powell, raised close to $650. Over the four years, the Wonder Woman Walks have raised more than $59,000, with $25,000 raised last year and an overall target of $22,000 this year. This money has been donated to the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund with the aim of finding an early detection test and improving treatment for women with the disease. Stephen Taylor

Honoured memory: Wonder Woman walkers, Senior Sergeant Paul Edwards, Senior Constable Steven Fitzgerald, Marea Hunter, Sergeant Chris Stock, Senior Sergeant Andrew Horscroft, Senior Constable Andy Powell, Leading Senior Constable Greg Kraus, Paula O’Brien, Carolyn Ramsay and Sergeant Dennis Ramsay. Right: Helen Powell, whose diagnosis with ovarian cancer inspired the annual fundraising walks. Picture: Supplied

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Amazing kitchen facelifts DREAM Doors Kitchens is a world wide brand with over 30 franchises in Australia. With stores all over Melbourne, they now also service the Peninsula with the opening of the Mornington branch. They are often able to facelift kitchens by keeping the original structure and replacing cupboard doors, drawer fronts, bench tops (laminate and stone) and producing an amazing kitchen facelift at around half the cost of a new kitchen.

They also make new kitchens and cabinets, replace appliances, and usually provide a quote during their free home consultation. Dream Doors Kitchens Peninsula Phone: 1800 373 263 www.dreamdoorskitchens.com.au


Venue cleaning goes for gold

Town’s ‘best trees’ axed

Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au SORRENTO dining hotspots Morgan’s and Sardo Sorrento are taking their cleaning and contact tracing duties up a notch with what is described as the “gold standard” in cleaning and customer safety. The push for higher standards was motivated by the 28 October reopening date to ensure all hospitality venues are able to stay open. Morgan’s proprietor Julian Gerner says the Gold Standard Health and Wellbeing Plan is over and above the COVID Safe plans already submitted to the state government and was developed in collaboration with the Australian Hotels Association, industry gurus and after consultation with the Restaurant and Caterers Association. Mr Gerner, who owns the company which owns the Gold Standard plan, says it envisages a typical day in the hospitality industry, from the moment the cleaner arrives, contactless delivery, staff arrival, order of service to cleaning regimes. A feature is a monthly antimicrobial fogging treatment that eliminates COVID-19 and other bacteria, like e-coli and influenza, and bonds to surfaces leaving a protective barrier for 30 days. The service, supplied by technology-driven cleaner Whizz Technologies, is enhanced by the latest contact tracing technology which checks staff, suppliers and patrons in and out of venues and which can be made available to the Department of Health and Human Services. An accompanying mental health template helps venue owners identify potential issues with staff after what’s been a trying period of lockdown. Morgan’s Rebecca Wilson said the Gold Standard Health and Wellbeing Plan was on top of the venue’s daily cleaning regime. “This is an extra measure,” she said. “I’m blown away by it.”

Ms Wilson said Morgan’s was issuing patrons and staff with temperature wristbands. “We are taking foolproof steps to beat the virus,” she said. “The restaurant and catering industry knows more about cleaning than anyone and we are determined to stay open this time.” Mr Gerner said: “Hospitality is more than cafes, bars, restaurants and pubs. It encompasses farmers, fishermen, bakers, growers, butchers and artisan suppliers, as well as stallholders, wholesalers, truck drivers, and factory and warehouse workers. “Our industry is a major contributor to the Victorian economy, and more importantly, it’s a cornerstone of the character of our state. When tourists talk about Melbourne and Victoria, they talk about our cafe culture, pubs, fine diners, markets and wineries, which are among the best in the world. Our hospitality industry should be revered as a state treasure.”

BUSINESSMAN Julian Gerner, below, and, above, Brendan Rice and chef Paul Wilson applying the “gold standard” treatment to Mr Gerner’s Sorrento restaurant. Pictures: Yanni

A MORNINGTON woman has complained to Mornington Peninsula Shire Council over the felling of five gum trees that created “a lovely park-like vista”. However, the shire says the trees were “close to death” and will be replaced. Lynette Catlin said the five gums at the corner of Barkly Street and Waterloo Place were “more attractive than any others in all of Mornington”. “It was a lovely park-like vista. They were not tall, straggly ones with messy bark, like most of the ones throughout the other streets, but low growing, slightly twisted with the most beautiful coloured trunks and weeping type foliage,” Ms Caitlin stated in a letter to the shire. “I’m not sure what variety they were, maybe mallee gums or similar to snow gums. On a hot day it was such a pleasure to drive by and smell the fragrance.” To her “horror” the trees had been “wantonly destroyed, just stumps left in the ground”. “I walked through the now-empty space mourning the loss of the magnificent specimens and their beauty. I am not some mad greenie or anything, I am just an ordinary elderly woman,” Ms Caitlin said. “The nature strip there is around 12 metres wide. The trees were towards the back of the strip, so there was no obstruction to the road visibility, there are no overhead power lines, and they were not diseased. I have taken photos of the stumps; they were very sound, healthy trees.” The shire’s interim director of place Jessica Wingad disagreed. “The trees had recently been inspected and found to be in very poor health and close to death,” she told The News. “We have now removed the trees and will replant this area so it can continue to contribute to the local amenity of Mornington.” Ms Catlin said she regretted photographing the trees while they were alive. “I guess I thought they would be there forever.” She said. cutting down the trees was “an act of criminal vandalism”. Stephen Taylor

Mornington Peninsula’s Short Stay Specialists We are looking for the right people to join our fast growing Superhosts family www.superhosts.net.au

Personal Assistant opportunity. (PA) Do you like too, Work hard, play hard?! Do you have an interest in property, styling, maybe even love events and marketing? Do you love social media and have experience with administration tasks? Are you a person who likes children? We are looking for a passionate, reliable, trustworthy all-rounder to join our team and assist our head honcho (Director) to streamline their needs, assist the business in varied administration tasks. This is a hands on role based on the Southern Mornington Peninsula. Drivers license and reliable car essential To apply for this job: Email us your resume and a cover letter. In your cover letter, please explain: 1) How you think this role may suit you and how many hours per week you are ready to commit at a minimum 2) Which of the aforementioned qualities and skills you believe you have 3) Whether you already have an ABN or not (ref below)

Housekeeper/Cleaner Opportunity Do you love cleaning? Are you a 1st class Cleaner - Housekeeper and are looking for ongoing work with a growing team? We’re looking for three amazing and highly motivated people to join our team and look after our properties. We currently have 3 places to fill:2 people - Southern Peninsula Area and 1 person - Mornington Area If you are conscientious, trustworthy, well-presented and take pride in your work, then we can offer flexible hours, variety of clients & services and a great professional image. You must have, or be willing to get, an ABN and Public Liability Insurance. Benefits to working with us: 1. AN ESTABLISHED REPUTATION 2. GREAT CLIENTELE - modern stylish and newly refurbished homes. 3. ONGOING WORK 4.QUALITY CONTROL & INDUCTION… to ensure that you are confident in providing a premium service 5. EXCELLENT RATES you will receive $25 -$40 depending on service and experience

We will require someone part time up to 25 hours per week, possibly more and optionally to include Saturday and Sunday.

You must also have experience in cleaning or housekeeping to meet our clients requirements - and be available a minimum of 10 hours per week with you own transport.

Applications close Friday 6th Nov 12pm Email hello@superhosts.net.au Reply with Heading: Personal Assistant Application Attention: Superhosts Family

Applications close Friday 6th Nov 12pm Email hello@superhosts.net.au Reply with Heading: Cleaner Application Attention: Superhosts Family

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

PAGE 11


LOCKDOWN PICTURES THINGS took a turn for the better last week with a further easing of lockdown restrictions accompanied by a definite warming in the weather. The brighter outlook was reflected in readers pictures, which found Janet Cooper’s at Mount Martha beach with granddaughters Hayley and Jade who are looking forward to summer (1). However, Helena Van der Haar, saw a sign in a Frankston shop window that could be a taste of what’s to come (2). Bowlers at Mornington were happy to be back on the green, even if it means masking up (3) and Terry Wright noted that there was no call for social distancing among the hundreds of birds having a party in the fresh creek water entering Port Phillip at Capel Sound (4). Mount Martha’s Jeff Matteson was also out and about and wondering where all the surf has gone at Flinders (5).

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Readers are invited to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: lockdown@mpnews.com.au

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Welcome to Mornington Peninsula Shire’s inaugural Fix It Festival celebrates the satisfaction of fixing things without the need for buying something new… Come along to learn how to sew, upcycle and repair household items and how to earn money from items you no longer need! And while we’ve got you, why not learn how to start composting too, Our planet will thank you!

Think, spend, recommend mpbusiness.com.au/suppor tlocal

Join us online for a range of free events: 4 Nov

Everyday actions to live more sustainably with Tamara DiMattina from The New Joneses

10 Nov

How to repair and upcycle common household items Demystifying recycling:

11 & 28 Nov What can you put in your recycling bin? 14 Nov

How to start your own compost or worm farm with Chooktopia

19 Nov

Maximise your second-hand online sales

25 Nov

How to sew, repair and upcycle textiles

Book your free ticket and learn more about the festival at: mornpen.vic.gov.au/fixitfestival PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

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Southern Peninsula News

Seeing double times four FOUR sets of twins graduated from Peninsula Grammar this year. They included Hudson and Jackson Streader, who have been at the school since Prep. The school’s human resources coordinator Kylie Oddy said: “ Hudson and Jackson were both elected by the student body as Prefects, testament to their contribution to the school over many years and the high regard in which they are held. “The boys are high academic achievers, excellent role models, supportive friends and have made huge contributions to various sports for Peninsula over the years, including success in snow sports and triathlon at a national level.” Two other sets of twins – Xander and Amelia Robertson and Alex and John McDonald – have been at the school since year 5. “Xander and Amelia are well liked and respected amongst their cohort for their friendly and outgoing personality and their commitment to high academic standards and sporting goals,” Ms Oddy said. “They have been very successful in their

academic and sporting pursuits over their years at Peninsula. “Alex and John are great sportsmen, hard working in the classroom and well respected by their peers. They have made huge contributions to the Tennis Program at Peninsula over many years and lead the team that won the AGSV First’s Tennis Premiership this year. This is an outstanding achievement and a fitting way for them to finish their tennis careers at Peninsula.” Ms Oddy said Patrick and Anna McAlaneyMatthews had been at the school since year 7. “Patrick and Anna are strong academics who set high expectations for themselves in the classroom," she said. "Their outgoing personalities have resulted in the development of a strong group of close friends that support one another and work together for a common goal.” While having four sets of twins this year was unusual for the school, they had better get used to it: “Funnily enough apparently we have four sets of twins next year as well,” Ms Oddy said.

It’s all right, tough guys read books

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Familiar faces: Twins Hudson and Jackson, Xander and Amelia Robertson, Alex and John McDonald and Patrick and Anna McAlaney-Matthews graduated from Peninsula Grammar this year. Picture: Supplied

4 November 2020

THE only rule of the Tough Guy Book Club is that you do not talk about it. Described as a “fight club for your mind” the club is a “modern meeting place for guys of all walks of life to get together once a month to discuss not just the works of literary greats, but any and all of the issues that men tackle daily”. The inaugural meeting of the Mornington Tough Guy Book Club is 7pm tomorrow (Wednesday 4 November) at The Royal, 770 Esplanade, Mornington. Under discussion is Fahrenheit 451, a book by Ray Bradbury: the dystopian novel about a future American society where books are outlawed, and “firemen” burn any books they find. Book club founder Shay Leighton said members would aim to discuss the themes and topics arising from the previous month’s reading.

“The Tough Guy thing is more a theme than anything,” he said. “Mostly we read books by tough guys, rather than as tough guys. The books we choose are guided by a loose central theme of masculinity.” Mr Leighton said there was no need to buy a new copy of the current month’s book as they could be borrowed from a library or bought from a second hand book shop. “The important thing is to come along for a chat, even if the book isn’t finished,” he said. Tough Guy Book Club was a chance to share thoughts, meet others and “foster a community of reading and good old fashioned chat”. “If you have ever wanted to read more, here is that chance,” Mr Leighton said. Details: facebook.com/ToughGuyBookClub Stephen Taylor


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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Become a candidate to get something done Now that the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council elections are over and the results unknown it’s a good moment to reflect on our system of selecting councillors. As a candidate for Watson Ward it has been very interesting. Apart from the bit of mudslinging, an acute shortage of facts, and any analysis of past history or knowledge of how the council actually works, it has at least generated a positive in my area. Since announcing my candidature I believe the council has spent more than $100,000 in cleaning up the Yaringa area. Even all the locals would agree that’s in marked contrast to the past 40 years when nothing was spent and the whole area was just a dump. So maybe, if you want some attention to your particular area, just stand as a candidate, make noise and you may get results beyond your dreams and not even need to get elected. As to the election itself, which reflects the country as a whole, it’s a three-horse race in Watson Ward, between a celebrity, a Green and a businessperson: a simplistic description but one that reflects the choice we need to make for our future. Who do we, the shareholders/ratepayers, want to help guide the shire, a $200 million operation, for our personal long term benefit? Will it be a “Father Christmas” promising to give all - do all for everyone with unlimited cash to splash? Or do we just concentrate on the environment and forget the economy (jobs), or do we strike a balance? Dreams versus reality, a lot depends on where you sit. The view from a secure job is vastly different to being unemployed and having a mortgage. In the end we the voters get what we deserve. Stefan Borzecki, Somerville

Dog psychology I am surprised that a clinical psychologist hasn’t considered the rights and needs of the many of us who are not dog owners/ lovers (Letters 21/10/20). I have been attacked by a large dog on McCrae beach while walking at 9am when the dog was not on a leash. I had to ask for the owner’s identification, who was duly prosecuted. Not every dog owner would have complied with my request, and not everyone feels that they can ask for ID given those circumstances. Many of us feel that most dog owners believe that they are above the law and disregard our anxieties when they walk their dogs off-leash in areas where they should be restrained, like on the foreshore track along McCrae. Yes, anxiety levels are high during a pandemic and so should non-dog owners be subjected to more anxiety by allowing dogs to roam freely? I think not. Heather Forbes-McKeon, McCrae

‘Alarming’ quarry plan I am alarmed at Hillview Quarries’ recent proposal to create a massive new quarry on Boundary Road, Dromana. This quarry site was mined out before Hillview purchased it in 1998. Hillview applied to extend the mining permit in 2016, but this was rejected by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal as mining on the site had ceased. As a consequence, Hillview has sought to gain permission from the state government to recommence mining but, have bypassed Mornington Peninsula Shire Council and the community by applying directly to the planning minister. Besides avoiding the council and the community I believe it has been deceptive in naming this venture the Boundary Road Project and has indicated that it would only mine the former pioneer quarry when having also purchased the neighbouring 65 hectare property at 115 Boundary Road. This property is the habitat for many of our flora and fauna including koalas, wallabies, powerful owls and sea eagles but, more importantly, the destruction of this area would create a break in the green corridor between the Arthurs Seat National Park, which is vital for wildlife access. The Arthur Seat hinterland has myriad walking trails which I have hiked and run over many years and the walk from the OT Dam to Eatons

Cutting is especially beautiful with fern valleys, 100-year-old trees, creeks and a brilliant waterfall. Walking down Eatons Cutting on a spring morning or on a summer night is something to treasure and fight to keep for the generations to come. However, this pleasant and peaceful environment will be destroyed by Hillview’s proposed quarry. It’s time Hillview and the Ross Trust came clean on their intentions and follow their stated intentions to protect the environment. Steve Vosti, Dromana

Lead with trees Has Mornington Peninsula Shire embarked on a serious planting regime as part of its much trumpeted climate emergency? Billions of trees need to be planted globally, with some countries and regions doing just that. The shire could lead by example but is concentrating more on tree removal and allowing rural landholders to demolish rows and indeed swathes of trees, particularly pines. These trees are 70–90 years old and replacing old growth with (say) 20cm pots will take decades before there is any environmental benefit. Most of us will be gone by then. There’s an opportunity here to lead by example with large plantings of established trees and encouraging communities to follow suite. Is the shire really “ahead of the game”? Peter Avery, Flinders

Not adding up The eight-storey, $116 million building proposed for Vicinity’s Bayside Shopping Centre, Frankston is one of six major projects granted priority approval by Victorian Planning Minister Richard Wynne to create jobs and bolster economic recovery. It’s a big private investment tick for Frankston’s languishing CBD but has a major flaw – insufficient car parks. Frankston MP Paul Edbrooke, a keen supporter of the project, stated it would “generate 1470 ongoing jobs” but conceded it would provide just “85 new car parks” for those new workers. This is 389 fewer than required under planning law but it’s been claimed there is sufficient existing parking. It’s a Ponzi scheme that double-counts old parking spaces. Frankston Council was so concerned about insufficient parking that it twice deferred voting on the proposal, asking Bayside to solve the problem. Instead, the project was called in for fasttracking by Mr Wynne. Councillors wrote to Mr Wynne, asking him to reject the development as the car parking discrepancy remained unresolved. The council had commissioned a report that included staff physically counting how many spaces Bayside actually had. This revealed car parks required for Bayside’s previous expansions had not been met. Bayside was 346 car spaces short even before the eight-storey proposal. Total shortfall of spaces is 735. When a developer cannot provide sufficient parking for a new building, the council levies $19,500 per space. This pays for construction of new council-controlled car parks. Bayside’s missing 735 car spaces are worth $14.3 million. This episode makes a mockery of one of the big issues of Frankston’s CBD – insufficient affordable parking. This a key reason why we’ve been advocating for extension of the Frankston rail line to Langwarrin and beyond – to create park and rides and take pressure off CBD parking. Ginevra Hosking, CEO Committee for Greater Frankston

Bookings ramped up The car park by the boat ramp at the bottom of Oliver's Hill, Frankston serves two purposes. One is to allow boats to be launched into the bay, safely leaving their trailers behind. The other is to allow people to enjoy the foreshore.

There is competition between managing these choices. The caricature of a parking Inspector is of someone who is mean and nasty, with no common sense or compassion. Regretfully that was on full display last Tuesday. In these days of COVID-19 the parking area has seen an increase in people wanting to enjoy the foreshore. The day was very windy, there was not a boat trailer to be seen and the parking area was full of cars double stacked in the longer trailer bays. Along comes a Frankston Council parking Inspector and books the whole lot with a $165 fine. Nice one Frankston Council. Ian Cayzer, Karingal

Break with China Leasing Darwin Harbour with its American military base was positively outrageous. Equally insane was the inexcusable sale to China of Bellamy's baby formula company. In damming the flow of life giving rivers through South East Asia and posting noxious crop killing plants throughout Europe and America, [Chinese President] Xi Jinping has made clear the lengths to which he will go to achieve world domination of which the Belt and Road strategy is integral. [Premier] Daniel Andrews, in signing Victoria up to it, is embracing someone I regard as being a 21st century Hitler. China’s boycott of Australian imports and it serious effects on our already damaged economy illustrates the alarming control China has on Australia. We have no choice but to find alternative, friendly trading partners such as India and Malaysia to break China's stranglehold before Australia becomes another Chinese colony. Aussie Sadler, Mornington

Lockdown learning As former primary school teacher and a grandmother of a prep this year I have been amazed at the quality of learning that has taken place during the Victorian lockdown. This has come about by the dedication of my granddaughter’s school, her teacher and her parents all working together to achieve their goals. Perhaps [federal Treasurer] Josh Frydenberg could take a closer look around his own state and see the wonderful things that have taken place. He might even see what cooperation, kindness and understanding can achieve. Marilyn Hoban, Mornington

Opposition ‘support’ We must thank Victorian Opposition leader Michael O’Brien for being so supportive and encouraging to the Victorian government during the pandemic. It has been an extremely difficult and unprecedented challenge. One during which our leaders and health workers have had to continually develop and learn new practices. How thoughtful and courageous of Mr O’Brien that he did not use the opportunity to attempt political gain by continually griping and providing unhelpful negative responses at this serious time. That would, of course, have been divisive and provided oxygen and encouragement to those selfish people in our society who are unable to follow simple rules and understand the situation. Imagine if he had been Premier during 2020. Jim Carr, McCrae

government ministers, from the premier down, none of whom could remember who made the decision to employ unqualified, untrained security guards to supervise the recent hotel quarantine debacle. If it wasn’t such a tragedy it would be a laugh. Michael Long, Frankston

Post no more Today is today, not past activities. Pollies have to be judged by today's voters, who live now. No more letters John. John Hodgson, Balnarring

Memorable minister Federal Aged Care Minister Richard Colbeck denies any responsibility for the almost 700 deaths in Victorian private aged care facilities. That's typical of the Morrison government, stuff it up and then deflect the blame elsewhere. Colbeck is a hypocrite. He claims to have "felt every single one of the aged care deaths". Yet, when asked some weeks ago at the inquiry into aged care, he couldn't provide the number of deaths that had occurred on his watch. Who can forget him walking out of the Senate when being questioned by [Labor’s] Penny Wong. Morrison needs to sack him. John Cain, McCrae

Hope for honesty Politics does not just involve political parties (“Council politics” Letters 20/10/20). It is a contest of ideas, the science or art of dealing with social organisation, be it in the workplace, a club or government. Belonging to a political party, of any label, affords opportunities for like-minded people to discuss and reshape their ideas. The same can occur in a sporting club, service club or any other association. An individual joins because of some common interest – and voting within that organisation, to achieve leadership or change, requires forming allegiances of one kind or another. So, to express surprise about aspiring councillors voluntarily disclosing, or not, political party membership, is a matter of individual choice. It is folly to maintain that political views have not influenced councillors’ decisions in the past. Any person standing for public office has an agenda, whether it be personal or something else. There is no “new form of democracy” about to descend on local government in Mornington Peninsula Shire. We will still see councillors pursue their particular hobby horse – be it a climate change emergency, more separation of garbage to be collected, retaining the unique location in which we live or how to ensure we do have vibrant local economies to sustain the payment of our rates. Even decisions to make investments to sustain pension payments are based on decisions of one kind or another. The labels Labor, Liberal, Green or “independent”, are still based on a set of personal beliefs. All we should hope for is that councillors maintain honesty and openness in how they arrive at a particular decision. Coalitions of interests are not new. Don Reeves, Mount Eliza

Victoria wins The women's netball team, Vixens, travel to Western Australia and win the grand final, The AFL team, Richmond’s travels to Queensland. and wins the Grand Final. The NRL team, Storm, travels to NSW and wins the grand final. All Australians, but hail from Victoria. What a state Victoria is. Geoffrey Lane, Mornington

End horse cruelty

Premier praise COVID-19 has never ever happened before. There is no guide book. Critics of [Victorian Premier] Dan Andrews and his team need to show respect. Dan saved your life. Living in Victoria is a privilege. If you can find a safer place - go there. Vic Langsam, Frankston

Group amnesia I am not a Liberal Party voter. However, enough is enough. When a regular Liberal basher and Labor worshipper asserted that amnesia was running rampant in LNP ranks I sniggered at the hypocrisy (“Health before wealth” Letters 27/10/20). John Cain seems to have forgotten about the greatest case of amnesia in Australian political history. I refer to the procession of Victorian

Watching police horses flinch from a stick during a anti-lockdown protest felt like a prescient reminder of the Melbourne Cup Carnival. In this grotesque event, sensitive horses –who can feel a fly land on their skin—are repeatedly whipped to run faster. Juvenile horses are forced on the tracks, despite their skeletons not being developed for such exhausting work. Horses are fed a cocktail of drugs to run through their injuries and push their exhausted bodies to the finish line. In the last racing year, 116 horses died on Australian racetracks, as a result of injured limbs and broken bones. Horses forced to race can also suffer from stomach ulcers and bleed from the lungs. Unlike the scenes we witnessed at the Shrine, all of that abuse is entirely legal. Mimi Bekhechi, campaigns strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

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IN THE

specialists HANDS

Finally, Relief From Your Hip Pain DOES this describe YOU? • You get hip pain laying on your side in bed, and just can’t get to sleep. • You place a pillow between your legs to help you get to sleep but laying on the painful side is still waking you. • You find yourself standing on one leg with your other hip hanging lower, or you sitting with crossed legs causes the pain • You are a runner worried your hip pain will get worse and stop you from exercising. If so then read on. The pain on the outside of the hip can be due to inflammation of the gluteal tendon, of Gluteus Medius and Minimus, where the gluteal muscles attach. It can also be where a bursa (a fat pad called the trochanteric bursa) can become inflamed. The hip pain may be associated with a stiff back. Physiotherapist May Wan, says that it is an injury affected by hip weakness and postural habits that place the tendons under stress. It requires a full analysis of the hip and lower limb, looking from the foot to the back biomechanics. It can require massage, and specific strengthening exercises for the gluteal muscles as well as improving core stability to control pelvic movement. In addition to the above solutions, there is a recent healing technology that is making a profound difference to outside of the hip pain sufferers. Practice owner, Paul Rowson says

Physiotherapist, May Wan. “Shockwave Therapy is often useful, because the gluteal tendons are a connective tissue, not a muscle. It puts a significant shockwave through the tissues you apply it to. It is a pressure wave which brings blood flow to the area. Tendons and connective tissue do not have much blood supply and can take a long time to heal. Shockwave artificially stimulates the healing of the tendon.” Shockwave therapy can also be used on Achilles tendonitis, Plantar Fasciitis, golfer’s and tennis elbow, and rotator cuff tendon problems,

and is usually most effective on long term chronic problems, rather than acute injuries. Shockwave is not the first line of treatment for injured patients. Physiotherapy and graded exercise are more likely in the first instance. But for more stubborn conditions, shockwave has shown good results. “The evidence at the moment suggests between three to five treatments are required, but most people should see an improvement within three sessions. It has a success rate up to 90%” May says. The Shockwave therapy is administered for a three-minute period

to the affected area during consecutive weekly appointments. “It is a bit of an uncomfortable sensation” May says, “like most physio hands-on treatments, with a little discomfort during the treatment.” Paul says, “After each session, most people get a significant reduction of pain and symptoms. Long term it stimulates healing, short term it reduces pain. The best thing is, the effects are long lasting. It prevents a lot of people having more invasive things like surgery or injections. The treatment is considered safe, but can produce skin reddening or bruising, short term pain, and

cannot be used on people taking blood thinning medications or with bleeding disorders. “ “It is important to know that Shockwave has a long-term effect. Most of the time you have good outcomes, without having to have further treatments.” Shockwave is now available in Balnarring. Call the practice now and speak to one of our physios to see if Shockwave suits your condition. Back in Motion is at 6/2-8 Russell Street, Balnarring. Phone 03 5983 1021.www.backinmotion.com.au/ balnarring

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Back In Motion Balnarring 6/2-8 Russell Street backinmotion.com.au/balnarring PAGE 20

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Drive to keep ‘idiotic galoots’ out of Frankston Compiled by Cameron McCullough THE objectionable conduct of those idiotic galoots who visit Frankston in the summer time, is to be stamped out, according to Mr Clapp, the new Chief Railways Commissioner. He has made a special note of the rowdy elements, and proposes to leave nothing undone to put a stop to it. If Mr Clapp’s prohibitive measure actually prohibits, he will have gained the gratitude of the local and visiting people. Frankston, as a holiday and seaside resort, stands second to none, but once you give the rowdies a bit of rope and permit these unthinking ones to make it “free and easy,” in its worst sense, it would become as about as respectable as the worst parts of the city. Hence “The Standard’s” desire to see Mr Clapp’s move successful. *** ON Friday last, several soldiers’ mothers, resident in the city, had a day’s outing at Frankston, assembling at The Towers, the residence of a Mr. Parer. The inclemency of the weather militated against the enjoyment of the outing. *** ON the same date, some 750 boys and girls, students of the Melbourne High School, visited Frankston, for the purposes of sports and a day’s outing. The weather, however, turned out contrary to expectations, and they returned home, disappointed at the way the weather had spoilt the day’s outing. ***

IN THE

THE death occurred at Port Lincoln, Byre’s Peninsula, S.A., last Sunday night, of Mrs Weaver, wife of Mr Edward Weaver, a leading orchardist, and mother of Mrs Harold A. Prider, Kars Street, Frankston. The late Mrs Weaver came to Australia from Ireland, as a child, with Dr T. Atkinson, and had resided at Port Lincoln ever since. *** WHY these late October rains! Already complaints are being made by the orchardists of Langwarrin, Tyabb and Somerville about the unseasonable rains spoiling the apricots and other fruits. Yet, in parts of N.S.W. they have drought, dire and dreadful in its consequence, and the stock losses alone represent the value of a national debt! *** TALKING about land prices, as we were last issue. Recent lists of properties advertised give some idea of the sound values prevailing in these districts, as here noted: Langwarrin, 5 acres, £75; Bittern, 50 acres, £600; Red Hill, 60 acres, £550; Seaford, 10 acres, £250; Rosebud, 2½ acres, £200. Many of these properties, of course, are considerably improved. During the past month or two several estates have been subdivided between Cheltenham and Mornington, notably the Mornington Heights, the Tongala at Cranbourne, the Broadway (with its 81 allotments) at Chelsea, and the Booker and Devon estates at Cheltenham. *** AT the Executive Council meeting

on October 19th, His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, Sir William H. Irvine, appointed Mr J. Nott Marsh of Frankston, a Sworn Valuator (under the Transfer of Land Act, 1915) for the County, of Mornington. Mr. Marsh was duly sworn in by Mr. Justice Schutt on the 25th inst. *** MISS Elsie Ferguson was the artist featured at the Frankston Pictures on Saturday night. Supported by Mr Arthur Standing, the great emotional artist made “The Marriage Price” in reality a drama of life. As the advertising notice says, it was a tense drama of the soul. A very excellent picture, indeed. The management are to be complimented upon the excellence of the pictures they are showing. On Tuesday night, the Pictures visited Somerville, but the violent storm made it impossible to show. As this is the second time they have struck bad nights at Somerville, it is to be hoped the next visit will be more successful. On Thursday night they showed Catherine Calvert in “The Career of Katherine Bush” a story by Elinor Glyn, at Frankston. *** BETWEEN Sandringham and Frankston there is a growing demand for considerable improvements to the beaches and foreshores. Up at Mentone, they are removing the old piles of the old jetty from the water. Directly at the back of the Pier Hotel, Frankston, there are several un-

sightly piles that ought to be removed by the local authorities. They are eyesores at present. Likewise, one or two bridges over the Kananook Creek are in a most disreputable state. The one close to the Prince of Wales Hotel, leading to the beach, scarcely tends to the beauty of the otherwise fine for shore at Frankston. All these in themselves are but little things, but it is more pleasing to see a bridge so much used by the public neat and tidy than rotting, breaking and falling to bits. *** MR Alfred Downward, M.L.A., who now commences his 27th year as Mornington’s representative in the State Legislature, is, so friends say, “as young as ever he was” though he has seen 75 summers and winters flit by in his time. The recent contest showed that the veteran does not lag superfluous on the political stage. Some few years ago the “too old at 40” cry originated. How men of Mr Downward’s type must smile at that old rot! *** LAST week’s “Table Talk” gave a photo of the Haag-Kann wedding celebrated some little time ago at St Patrick’s Cathedral. The bride, Miss Elsie Kann, is a daughter of Mr and Mrs Kann, Hanover Street, Fitzroy, who have a summer residence at The Heights, Frankston, where the honeymoon was spent. *** MR F. J. Groves, M.L.A. had little

difficulty in retaining the Dandenong seat at the recent elections. A plumber by trade, Mr Groves resides at Aspendale, and “struts the civic stage” as Mayor of Carrum. Altogether, the Dandenong people have a very live representative. *** AT the last Melbourne market, 13 heifers, bred by Mr Thompson, Red Hill, brought nice prices, averaging £14 9s 4d, whilst 12 sent from Bittern averaged £11 14s 7d, selling to £14 12s 6d. On a/c Mr A. H. T. Sambell, Stony Point, 109 shorn hoggets brought 28s 7d. *** AT the last euchre party and dance under the Auspices of the Frankston Brass Band, a waltzing competition was contested for a prize of £1 1s. The judges chose Mr Gardiner and Mrs Tait as the most graceful couple in the contest. The verdict was a popular one. The Frankston Orchestra, under Mr H. Blaskett, supplied captivating music. *** OWING to the shortage of ballot papers, no voting took place at KooWee-Rup on the 21st inst. In response to a message, Mr Mark Brody dispatched a bundle from Frankston by motor, which arrived at closing time. The electors exercised the franchise yesterday. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 29 October 1920

specialists HANDS

®

s elbow shock relief Take time to care for your feet

WE are often told to think on our feet but rarely think about our feet until we have a foot problem or injury that makes us realize how important feet Long term it stimulates healing, short term it Physiotherapy and lifestyle, graded exercise are to our mobilityare andmore independence. reduces ikely in the first instance, but for stubborn Irrespective of your agemore or lifestyle you need to pain.” “Probably the best thing is, the effects are conditions, shockwave shown good results. ensure that youhas have proper fitting shoes that give “The evidence at the moment between good support for yoursuggests walking gait to preventlong lasting. It stops a lot of people having more invasive things like surgery or injections. The hree to five areknees required, but most soretreatments feet, ankles, and back pain. It starts treatment is considered safe, but can produce people should see an improvement within three from supporting the developing feet of an infant essions.toIt creating has a success ratearch up to 90%,’’and comfortskin effective support for reddening or bruising, short term pain, and cannot be used on people taking blood thinning Ternes says. ageing feet. medications or with bleeding disorders.” The Shockwave administered for a This hastherapy focusedisseveral health professionals in The Revere range offers elegant style and sup“It is important know that Shockwave has hree-minute period towith the affected during collaboration specialistarea shoe manufacturers port all intoone shoe. long-termFashion effect. Most of the time consecutive weekly appointments. “It is a bit to design “foot solutions” that give excellent afoot and function formyou thehave pillars of revere good outcomes having to have of an uncomfortable sensation” Ternes says, support for those standing on their feet all day, Shoes’without design philosophy with further every design decitreatments.” “like most physio hands-on treatmentsteaching with a or retail such as nursing, hairdressing, sion made with these principles at the forefront. is now available Balnarring. ittle discomfort during the treatment. Rowson as well as treat and prevent foot problems suchShockwave Revere Shoes’ latest in Summer collection is no Call in and speak to the physios to see its if itinternational suits ays “After each session, most get a toes and as plantar fasciitis, heelpeople spur, hammer exception as its styles capture your condition. ignificant reduction of pain and symptoms. bunions. designs of Verona, Geneva, Portofino, Catalina, Bayside Shoes in partnership with the podiatrist Osaka, Miami, Zanzibar and Tahiti reflecting a design manufacturer of Revere & Vionic has global elegance. made available a fashionable range of orthotic Bayside Shoes has been operating for over 30 support and orthotic friendly shoes, boots and years and has established an excellent professionsandals that have inbuilt arch support with the al reputation for its service and endeavors to creflexibility to replace this with your customized ate a high customer satisfaction by finding shoe orthotic where necessary. This range offers not solutions for(outside) difficult orside damaged feet. Bayside Right arm, lateral only an orthotic support but is very elegant and strives to ensure a high level of personal service attractive to wear for all occasions whether work, and shoe choice with the best quality, supportive play or that special occasion. shoes from Kid’s First Walkers through to school, The Vionic range offers fashionable style that work, play and formal shoes across all age groups doesn’t hurt your feet. and special occasions. Vionic Shoes incorporates over 30 years of Bayside Shoes also offers an extensive range podiatry science into a simple, and elegant of work & formal LARGE size shoes for women contoured foot bed – supporting you from the (11/42 – 14/45) and men (12 / 46 to 17/51). ground up. Bayside Shoes is located at 103 Railway Each Vionic foot bed, features arch support for Parade, Seaford on the corner of Clovelly Parade alignment, deep heel cups for stability, and a flexand has both free and disability parking near its ible forefoot for mobility. entrance with wheel chair ramp access to the With an extensive range, Vionic Shoes offer store. comfort footwear options from trendy casual and View the Bayside Shoes range on its website sports sneakers to elegant boots, stylish work baysideshoewarehouse.com.au or phone 03 9785 shoes and casual sandals. 1887 if you have an enquiry. Physiotherapist, David Ternes. Picture: Yanni

Tennis Elbow

Southern Peninsula News

4 November 2020

PAGE 21


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ACROSS 1. Assortment 5. Money rolls 7. Make bet 8. Tiny island 9. Resentful desire 10. Keepsake 11. Grills 13. Strike with foot

14. Cowardly 18. Cruelty 21. Lose (fur) 22. Peacock & ... 24. Social blunder 25. Authentic 26. Leak slowly 27. Not as common 28. Small vipers

29. Quivers DOWN 1. Collectively 2. Brewed drinks 3. Large jugs 4. Ever youthful 5. Ruined 6. Gadgets

12. Also 15. Entreats 16. Paying guests 17. Battle 19. One-spot card 20. Bodyguards 22. Tapering fruit 23. Scent

Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 24 for solutions.

THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Tips for Surviving a Sausage-free Democracy By Stuart McCullough DONE. My postal ballot is complete and has been posted. All within time. As one very small cog in a very large democratic wheel, I have done my duty for that most noble and compelling of reasons – to avoid being fined. With the greatest of respect to all those candidates who bravely offer themselves up for public office, voting to avoid a fine is kind of how it goes with local council elections. Especially since it’s all being done by post and we’re deprived of the one thing that truly drives us all to the ballot box – sausages. When my ballot arrived, it was accompanied by information about each candidate, written by the candidates themselves. Where’s the fun in that? It’d be far more interesting to see what they wrote about each other rather than themselves. To be clear - I don’t know any of these people and I’m really not sure how best to choose between them. Short of drawing names from a hat, all I’ve got to go with are the profiles. It’s a struggle. And, in order to navigate this challenging area, I needed to come up with a series of rules. I admit I took a strict approach. Profiles that begin with the words ‘hello’, ‘greetings’ or ‘live long and prosper’ are instantly disqualified. That may seem something of an over-reaction to a heart-felt salutation, but it means the candidate hasn’t grasped that their profile is written rather than spoken. And if they struggle to tell the difference between written and spoken communication, then I harbour serious concerns that they’ll spot the difference between green bin and yellow bin week. Clarity over which bin to put out is the cornerstone of good governance when it comes to local councils. I got the sense the candidates weren’t revealing their true feelings. Mostly they talked about how our area was a great place to live, before detailing its problems at length. There was a lot of talk about inappropriate development which I discovered referred to buildings and not – for example – learning to read, and several people promised

PAGE 22

Southern Peninsula News

to ‘bust congestion’ which sounds like something you do when you blow your nose really, really hard. Others vowed to reduce rates but left out helpful things such as how they planned to reduce expenditure. Invariably, people identified something about themselves that made them worthy of support. Some pointed to the fact they’d produced children as proof they were qualified for high office. Others went so far as to prove that they remembered the names of their offspring as evidence of an eye for detail. One guy made it clear he rode a bike. Which, of itself, is no bad thing. Others

4 November 2020

had volunteered at local sporting clubs, run businesses and supported various charities. The profiles were short, but there was a lot of life packed into those paragraphs. Given how little I knew about the candidates, photos mattered. There have been heaps of placards around the neighborhood. So many, in fact, that you can’t set foot outside without the feeling that you’re being watched. Some photos look professional. Others look as though they’ve been snapped as the subject was leaving court. I had to disqualify one candidate from consideration because he was wearing a turtleneck. That may

seem a trifle harsh but it’s difficult to trust someone so willing to disregard the conventions of fashion. Granted, he was an incredibly handsome man and he really rocked that turtleneck, but I’m not sure I can trust him with the enormous responsibility that is filling potholes. People who wear turtlenecks are generally untroubled by such things. One guy kind of looked like he could be a serial killer. Doubtless he isn’t, but he must have really hated the photographer. If you’re going to run for council, the least you can do is choose a photographer you don’t despise. Believe me, if you harbour ill will for the person taking your photo, it’s going to show. Really, I just want to avoid voting for someone who might be insane. That’s pretty much where I set the bar. Indeed, if someone were to run under the slogan ‘I’m not crazy’, you’re a good chance of getting my vote. Not that I feel entirely comfortable relying on your say-so. Ideally, there be some kind of independent third-party commission that issues a ‘certified not crazy’ stamp of approval. I appreciate that being certified as sane is something of a departure from tradition, but it’s all for a greater good. I don’t want to discover that someone I voted for has hateful or intolerant views or is keen to build a wall around our local government area and make the other council pay for it. Motivated by our love for democracy and our commitment to not getting fined, we filled in our ballot papers and put them in the post. I have to say, it takes a lot of guts to put yourself out there as a candidate for anything. To subject yourself to a process where the most likely outcome is rejection of the most personal kind takes courage. Congratulations to those who were willing to put themselves forward; even the bike-riding turtleneck wearers. The first decision should be to grant sausages for all. Long live democracy! stuart@stuartmccullough.com


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PAGE 23


scoreboard Barr backs Baxter for title SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie WHEN it comes to long-range forecasts Baxter captain Izaak Barr doesn’t hold back. The 22-year-old and his teammates have set their sights on winning the State 4 South championship next year. “I was absolutely devastated when we couldn’t play football this year because (with) the team that we had I reckon we could have won the league,” Barr said. “We put some absolute quality into the team with guys coming back from 2019 and a couple of Mornington senior players coming down in Charlie O’Connell and Charlie Parker as well as Robbie O’Toole in centre mid. “And Ben Meiklem came back plus Owen Kilner.” Barr is one of the youngest captains in local senior ranks and has played the game since childhood. Born in the New Zealand capital Wellington he arrived in Melbourne as a 10-year-old and joined Mornington at under-12 level. Darren Collins and Marc Slack were the two main influences during his progress through junior ranks at Dallas Brooks Park. “I was with Darren and ‘Slacky’ through most of the juniors. Started off as a striker but ‘Slacky’ put me back to centre back. “They’re just winners these guys. They get the best from you and make you want to play for them.” Another winner at Mornington was former Glasgow Rangers striker Craig Lewis who was coaching the reserves. Lewis gave Barr his first call-up to that level and the squad was primarily made up of Mornington juniors. When Lewis took over at Peninsula Strikers for the 2015 season he enticed the youngster to follow. “That first year at Strikers I was pretty much a reserves player. I got a few call-ups (to the senior squad) then in my second year I played a lot in the ones at right back or centre back then in my third year we had a really good team with Raph, Danny and Leo.” Barr is referring to Swiss defender Raphael Stulz, English midfielder Danny Brooks and Italian midfielder Leandro Parrella who had arrived at Centenary Park as visa players thanks to football agency Soccer Smart Ltd.

Baxter boast: Club captain Izaak Barr, pictured against Sandown Lions, is confident his side can have a big year in 2021. Picture: John Punshon

But Barr suffered his first serious injury in 2017 when he damaged his hamstring tendon and he struggled to recover from the setback. “Every time I came back I’d redo it so I didn’t play much that year.” When season 2018 arrived Barr had switched to Baxter, a choice made easier by his friendship with players there. “Benny Meiklem and a few other mates were there and they got me down to training. “I just rocked up and they were the best bunch of lads. “I got my first carpentry job there through Liam (Kilner) so when you think about it I wouldn’t be a carpenter now if I hadn’t joined Baxter plus I wouldn’t have all these mates if I hadn’t gone there.” That’s Barr’s way of saying that the connections he made at Baxter Park are special and you sense that the need to repay the club motivates him to succeed next season.

an opportunity lost Barr recognises that the enforced break can benefit the senior squad by allowing powerhouse central defender Matt McDermott to fully recover from a broken fibula and help Nathan Yole to deal with a lingering back injury. “If everyone sticks together – and I’m pretty confident that they will – then I’m certain we’ll do well next year. “It’s just a matter of picking up from our last training session. “We have the depth and the quality and looking back at State 4 last year I think football-wise we can be a class above everyone else in the league.” Barr’s next training session with his teammates looks likely to be later this month after recent easing of pandemic restrictions by the state government. Sport and Recreation Victoria is expected to release detailed guidelines for community sport this week and FV will then update its return to play conditions.

This would have been his third year there and it’s been a rollercoaster ride. In 2018 Baxter went within a point of being relegated and a mass player exodus during the following pre-season brought the club to its knees. “Yeah last year we had a shocker at the start but we got a few players back and won a few games and ended up finishing off the season well.” Being senior captain doesn’t weigh heavily on Barr’s shoulders in fact he thrives on the responsibility. “It means a lot to me to be captain at a club like Baxter. “Obviously we’ve got great facilities but we’re also supported by really good people. “George (Hughes) isn’t just a great coach but he’s also a great person off the park and we can always talk about team things. “Robbie (Mathieson) is the same and the banter between them and the players is always good.” Despite feeling that 2020 has been

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It’s expected that Frankston council and Mornington Peninsula Shire council will allow clubs to access their facilities in line with FV’s timeline. In NPL2 news Langwarrin announced last week that goalkeeper Fraser Maclaren had returned to the club for a second stint. The ex-Dandenong Thunder, South Melbourne and Melbourne Victory youth played for Langy in 2019 before rejoining another former club, Beaumaris, last February. Young keeper James Burgess who joined Langy from Springvale White Eagles this year is believed to be on South Melbourne’s radar. Langy also announced its junior boys’ NPL coaches for 2021: Jim Constantinou (under-14s), Johnny Martin (under-15s), Gary Brisbane (under16s) and Liam George (under-17s). Mark Cassar has stepped down from his technical director’s role at Lawton Park and his replacement is club legend Gus Macleod. The big man will combine his junior NPL TD role with his community juniors’ TD role. Ben Caffrey and Mark Negritas have been retained with Caffrey in charge of the under-21s and Negritas in charge of the under-19s. Peninsula Strikers and Mornington are the other local junior boys’ NPL licence holders. Strikers have retained this year’s coaching staff for the 2021 season so Jonathan Magee is technical director, Danny Topping is under-14s coach, Graeme Ferguson is in charge of the under-15s, Darren Hili has the under16s and Christian Castro is under-17s coach. Lee Davies, who doubles as Frankston Pines president, is Strikers’ junior NPL goalkeeping coach. Mornington is expected to announce its appointments shortly.


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Princess Jenni bounces back in Bendigo Cup HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou DAVID Brideoake’s Group One winning mare Princess Jenni spoiled the internationals Melbourne Cup party to win the $400,000 Group Three Bendigo Cup last Wednesday. Despite having been winless for over a year, Princess Jenni took control of the race at the top of the straight before fending off the challenge of the Lloyd Williams-owned import, Pondus, who was having his final crack at gaining a Melbourne Cup start, to win by a headmargin. The Archie Alexander-trained Haky finished a further two lengths away in third. Stepping up to the 2400m trip for the first time in her career, Brideoake’s High Chaparral mare went into the Cup looking to turn around her run of four unplaced finishes this preparation. Despite this, Brideoake was still adamant that she had been progressing nicely for the staying contest. “She’s just such a good horse and I knew she was in good shape, to lift like that. But the ride, the ride was outstanding,” Brideoake said post-race. “This preparation she hasn’t done anything wrong, she’s just had a series of gates, and bits and pieces that didn’t allow us to get a result. But, today it is a good result.” The re-application of ear-muffs clearly paid dividends for Princess Jenni, having raced at her past couple of starts without them. Inform jockey Jye McNeil, who had

Jenni’s back: David Brideoake’s Princess Jenni wins the Group Three Bendigo Cup defeating the Lloyd Williamsowned Pondus. Picture: Supplied

also won the Geelong Cup the week prior on Steel Prince, said she felt like the winner a fair way out. “Her form probably wasn’t going the best into it but a small little gear change and everything going well during the racing, she put her best foot forward

and put in quite a nice performance,” McNeil said post-race. “I was travelling so well before the turn that I nearly fell into the trap of improving too early, but she was starting to peak a little bit on her run late. The race was over by then and the way

things went during the race it was just perfect.” Princess Jenni had been nominated in early September for the Melbourne Cup but was not among the first acceptances late last month. Brideoake said the mare will likely

head to the Group Two Matriarch Stakes (2000m) on the final day of the VRC Spring Carnival instead. “We just didn’t get enough mile-anda-half work into her. There’s always next year.”

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