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Southern Peninsula

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Wednesday 3 February 2021

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au Well played: Charlie Lee from Red Hill Primary School congratulates Australian Open tennis legend and serving speed record holder Sam Groth. Picture: Yanni

Serving up some tennis fun IT’S a fair bet that Red Hill Tennis Club players felt Sam Groth’s serve was a little too fast for them to return – after all the former Australian pro player has the fastest-recorded serve in the world. At 263kph the former world-ranked No. 53 (singles) and (24) doubles can serve a little bit faster than the average club player. Groth was at Red Hill last week as a member of the Australian Open Men’s and Women’s Grand Slam Trophy tour around regional Victoria. He currently works for the Nine Network, with regular appearances on ‘Wide World of Sports’ and as a host on ‘Postcards’. Tennis Victoria’s Kelly Smith said club members and their family and friends had been invited to have a hit and meet Sam at the club in Arthurs Seat Road.

Bid to overturn ‘prayer’ decision Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au DEFINITIONS of a prayer and a pledge have become part of the ongoing debate following the December decision by a majority of Mornington Peninsula Shire councillors to amend the wording of the prayer said before council meetings. While the word “prayer” remains as part of the council’s Governance Rules adopted in August 2020, the words recited at the start of each council meeting begin with “We pledge that this council…”. The decision to not change the word-

ing of the rules followed advice from the shire’s in-house lawyer Amanda Sapolu, who said “the form of prayer is not prescribed” in the rules and it was up to council to choose the wording (“God purged from council ‘prayer’” The News 15/12/20). If councillors had decided to substitute “pledge” for “prayer” in the Governance Rules they could not have avoided seeking community approval. At next week’s council meeting (Tuesday 9 February) Crs Antonella Celi and Hugh Fraser will try to overturn the December decision to scrap the council prayer. Cr Fraser, a barrister, will argue that a “pledge” is not a “prayer” and the

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council had amended the Governance Rules which can only be done by seeking community approval. Cr Celi will move that council review the wording of the Prayer (which started with “we pledge…”). She says the adopted pledge was suggested by Cr Anthony Marsh “without community engagement or consultation, thereby excluding the community from being given an opportunity to provide formal feedback and input into the wording of the Prayer which in effect has now become a Pledge”. All dictionary definitions of “prayer” found by The News include a reference to “God”, as in “a solemn request for help or expression of thanks addressed

to God or another deity” or “a devout petition to God or an object of worship”. A “pledge” is mostly described as “a solemn promise or agreement to do or refrain from doing something: a pledge of aid; a pledge not to wage war”. Cr David Gill said the “shallow” decision to drop the prayer had been made “by newly-elected councillors to avoid public consultation”. He said all of the new councillors had, during their election campaigns, criticised the former council for not consulting the public. After the 8 December meeting Cr Celi said the thrust of the debate at the meeting was not about the removal of

God from the prayer, but the lack of community consultation and engagement on what was an ingrained community issue. “Not one of the councillors was elected on a mandate to make this change,” Cr Celi said. “I am most concerned about the precedent for future decisions. What’s the next thing that will be changed without community consultation?” The decision to change the wording of the council prayer was supported by Crs Marsh, Paul Mercurio, Sarah Race, Lisa Dixon, Kerri McCafferty and the mayor Despi O’Connor. Against: Crs David Gill, Steve Holland, Fraser, Debra Mar and Celi.

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Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021


NEWS DESK

Time to listen to Indigenous voices - mayor Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au ORGANISERS were pleased to see a large crowd of supporters at the Changing the Date Yarning Circle event at Willum Warrain Aboriginal Association on Australia Day, 26 January. “Many of our mob are feeling that, at last, our voices are being heard regarding the date,” executive officer Peter Aldenhoven said. “We thank all our non-Indigenous allies and supporters for attending in such large numbers.” Mr Aldenhoven said from the gathering place in Pound Road, Hastings: “It is always a sombre day for our local mob when we least feel part of Team Australia.” He said the group was “especially heartened by the strong commitments made by Mornington Peninsula Shire mayor Cr Despi O’Connor, deputy mayor Cr Sarah Race, Cr Kerri McCafferty and Frankston Council’s Cr Claire Harvey to listen to First Nations’ peoples and advocate for change”. He thanked the Southern Women’s Action Network, Mornington Peninsula church communities, and “everyone who contributed to this powerful gathering”. “We really appreciate your support, interest and advocacy because this date is not a date for celebrations.” Speaking off-the-cuff, Cr O’Connor said she gained inspiration for her talk by standing on the beach at dawn and reflecting on her role and position in

life. “When I was invited to speak I felt it was my duty to stand up and listen and show support. It was like a call to action.” She said being a person of “white privilege” meant it was often hard to understand what First People had been through. “We need to listen more and seek to understand,” she said. “I’m committed to that. It’s part of our education and truth telling. If we don’t listen, we won’t be educated.” Cr O’Connor said the passing of oral histories through Aboriginal generations was often undervalued by white society. “They told stories as their way of handing down knowledge and understanding and we should listen to them and not just dismiss them.” She said just sitting and talking over issues, as is done in the Yarning Circle at Willum Warrain, was an effective way of coming together and learning to understand another’s

Mornington Peninsula Shire mayor Cr Despi O’Connor addresses the crowd at Willum Warrain, Hastings on Australia Day. Standing alongside the mayor are Crs Sarah Race and Kerri McCafferty. Pictures: Supplied

point of view. Later, Cr O’Connor said the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948, which came into effect on Australia Day 26 January 1949, did not offer any special benefits to Aboriginals who could not vote in federal elections until 1962. Similarly, the First Peoples who fought for this country in the world wars didn’t get government assistance afterwards, such as cheap loans or land, they “just went back to

their missions”. “Those attitudes account for much of the trauma.” Cr O’Connor said she had learned much in the past decade about Aboriginal history and culture. “The history I was taught didn’t include their voices as it does now [so] it’s up to us to share what we are learning. If we stay silent, we will not get anywhere.” Cr O’Connor said any shortcomings in the treatment of Aboriginals

were “not anyone’s fault”. “That’s the legacy we have been left and it is up to us now to listen,” she said. “I believe we are at a tipping point for the first time in our history. The time is right for conversation.” The Changing the Date gathering came after a prayer service the evening before called Change the Heart supported by the Village Uniting Church, Mount Eliza, and led by Aboriginal Christian leaders. “[The service] seeks to explore deeper relations between First Australians and non-Indigenous Australians as we all reflect on Australia Day and the need for a more inclusive, less distressing, date,” Mr Aldenhoven said. “Another date would be less problematic.” Mr Aldenhoven said the origin of the current NAIDOC Week was a Day of Mourning commemoration held in 1938.

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PAGE 3


NEWS DESK

Reimagined op shop courts sales success A “BOUTIQUE” refurbishment of the Boneo Lions Op Shop has turned the old and tired Rosebud shop into a light, bright, open and welcoming space where customers can browse and buy quality pre-owned goods. Last week’s Cupcake and Cuppa Day opening, followed the shop’s “soft” opening in December aimed at capitalising on the tourist trade and working out the early teething problems. Since then, feedback has been positive at the shop which opened in 2000 as Rosebud Primary School Op Shop and which Boneo Lions took over in early 2020. Looking back, president Terry Cook admitted: “Although we saw the potential to the community, we didn’t realise quite what we were getting into”. “COVID-19 shut us down before we could to anything. However, it gave us time to reimagine the space. It has been a challenging year for many but, at last, we are able to be here with everyone celebrating today.” Managed by volunteers, the shop in Ninth Avenue, Rosebud, donates all proceeds to Lions club projects as well as providing social connections for residents. Mr Cook thanked the “small but dedicated group of volunteers with their friends and families who put their minds, backs and hands to a list of tasks that has been never ending”. After the opening, a $500 donation was made to Rosebud Primary School – the “first cheque of many to ensure the continuation of the school bus” – and $1000 to Rosebud Hospital for “vital machinery and equipment”. The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor drew the names of three raffle winners.

THE real opening of Boneo Lions Op Shop, Rosebud last week saw invited dignitaries, Boneo Lions Club members and potential customers happily posing for pictures out in the street, above Once inside, left, were Rosebud Hospital’s Jodi Foley and Lions club treasurer Ruth Aeschlimann and, right, store manager Kris Gregson and Lions club president Terry Cook. Pictures: Gary Sissons

COVID-19 RESTRICTIONS ARE IN PLACE Coronavirus restrictions are in place to help keep us safe and open. Keeping on top of this virus is up to all of us.

Keep a face mask handy at all times.

Stick to visitor limits in our homes.*

And please practise COVIDSafe behaviours to keep us safe this summer. • •

Keep 1.5 metres apart from those you don’t live with. Keep your hands and surfaces clean.

Stay home if you feel unwell, and get tested.

For all current restrictions, go to CORONAVIRUS.vic.gov.au *Babies under the age of 12 months are not included in daily limits. Authorised by the Victorian Government, Melbourne

PAGE 4

Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021


Fire risks are clad in secrecy Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au SECRECY surrounds the location and identities of nine Mornington Peninsula buildings with combustible aluminium cladding. In keeping with its long held policy, Mornington Peninsula Shire last week avoided identifying the buildings uncovered in a state-wide audit by the Victorian Building Authority. Instead of agreeing to call on its own staff to report on the progress of making the buildings safe, councillors at the year’s first Planning Services Committee meeting (27 January) agreed to the mayor telling the state government that its building surveyour, not the shire’s, should be responsible for ordering buildings to be repaired or even evacuated. The decision to overthrow Cr David Gill’s notice of motion calling for a progress report on making the nine buildings safe, followed warnings about legal liability from the shire’s municipal building surveyor manager, David Kotsiakos. Mr Kotsiakos said acting on directions from the state building surveyour posed “a major risk to our municipal building surveyor”. “If the [VBA-appointed] panel of experts incorrectly direct our municipal building surveyor to issue emergency orders to evacuate a building, the legal responsibility and risk to council is potentially the shire’s and not the state government,” he said in a report to council. Setting up the shire’s own review of cladding on buildings “would potentially cost millions of dollars in staff resourcing and possible legal damDECKING T/Pine 70x22 KD ACQ ........................... $2.70mt T/Pine 90x22 KD ACQ ........................... $3.50mt Merbau 70x19 Random ........................ $5.25mt Merbau 90x19 Random ........................ $6.50mt Merbau 140x22 Random .................... $13.25mt Spotted Gum 86x19 .............................. $7.50mt Spotted Gum 135x19........................... $13.95mt

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ages,” Mr Kotsiakos stated. He suggested that instead of a councillors waiting for a report in February, as suggested by Cr Gill, “the mayor write to the Planning Minister [Richard Wynne] raising concerns with the current VBA cladding audit process and that the state building surveyor should be responsible for issuing all notices or orders and not our municipal building surveyor”. Cr Gill told The News that writing to the state government “means we won’t find out anything”. “I just wanted to know if buildings identified with aluminium cladding on the peninsula have been fixed. But this information is, under the relevant act, seen as being confidential.” Cr Gill said there were many single storey buildings on the peninsula with aluminium cladding that did not fit into the three classes specified in the VBA’s audit. Since early 2019, the shire has been wary of making any statements regarding combustible cladding. Despite several emails from The News seeking confirmation that such buildings existed on the peninsula, the closest response, in March 2019 was the following from former chief operating officer Niall McDonagh: “The shire continues to work with the Victorian Building Authority as they investigate the cladding matter across the state. The Shire has not entered into any agreements in relation to cladding matters. If further information is required, it is suggested that contact be made with the VBA.” The shire had not responded by Sunday to a further email sent last Thursday (28 January). Continued Page 8

Pictures: Gary Sissons

Balancing act on A-Day THIRTEEN young skaters competed in a skateboard competition on Australia Day. These included four in the under-12s, eight in the under-18s and lone girl Holly. Jemison Watkins reports that a skater identified only as Ed won the under-18s with “two solid, trick filled runs that made use of the whole park”. “It was extremely close between first and second, but Ed pulled through with his consistency and skill. “Holly competed with huge enthusiasm, mak-

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ing full use of the park in both her runs. She was especially brave being in a competition full of boys.” He said Rex Wheeler “fully shone” in the trick section after starting with a “stylish front smith down the rail, then a kickflip back 50-50 on the kicker to box, before shutting it down with a clean back smith down the rail”. A plaque acknowledging Sorrento Rotary Club’s contribution to the skate park was unveiled before the contest.

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Southern Peninsula News 3 February 2021

PAGE 5


Southern Peninsula

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

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Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 4 FEBRUARY 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2021

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

NEWS DESK

Shire backs down on tin-rattle ban Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire Council says it is not responsible for telling Rye CFA not to hold its annual tin rattle on the first weekend in January. Despite sending an email saying the tin rattle could not go ahead, the shire now says Victoria Police, and not it, is responsible road collections (“Tin rattle ban upset for firefighters” The News 26/1/21). The council last week said it was a “big supporter of tin rattling activities where it is safe to do so” and that police had confirmed that the council “would not be required to provide approvals in future”. The shire’s interim director of place Jessica Wingad said it was unclear why the council had even been asked to issue an approval in the first place.

The shire has not explained how one of its officers thought they had the power to approve or ban road collections. This is cold comfort to CFA crews who feel they were denied permission by the council’s traffic and transport team to hold their popular holiday fundraiser as it was considered too dangerous and posed public liability risks. The tin rattle held annually for the past 10 years usually raises about $10,000. Captain Glenn Diamond said firefighters had been looking forward to this year’s collection day and the usual banter with motorists at the traffic lights at the corner of Nepean Highway and Dundas Street. Logistically, it could only be held on the first weekend in January when many visitors and beachgoers flocked to the peninsula. Now that time has passed, Captain

Diamond says members can only look forward to next year’s tin rattle to raise the much-needed money. Cr David Gill is so concerned about the CFA’s lost opportunity that he says the council should reimburse the $10,000 usually raised. “We need to show some respect to these volunteers who risk their lives on our behalf,” he said. “They are an essential service and they shouldn’t have to waste their time on minor matters such as this.” Cr Gill said issues such as the roadside collections should come to a public council meeting for a decision “rather than being made by officers”. “It doesn’t matter who is at fault, it should be rectified. The mistake should never have happened.” Other volunteer groups, such as lifesaving clubs and SES crews, will no doubt be happy with the council’s clarification.

Support, recognition for volunteers VOLUNTEERING Victoria has given Mornington Peninsula Shire $23,000 to “strengthen volunteer connections on the peninsula”. The shire says it will use the money to help community groups recruit more volunteers in a COVID-safe environment. The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said: “Volunteering allows people to connect with and make a difference in their communities. “Dedicating your time as a volunteer not only helps the cause they

choose to volunteer for, it is also a good opportunity to make new connections and friends.” The shire says it can can help recruit and screen volunteers in a COVID-19 safe way. Resources include the free online portal volmornpen.com.au on which community organisations advertise their volunteering opportunities. Volunteering information hubs are at Mornington Community Information and Support Centre, 320 Main Street, Mornington, and Western Port

Community Support, 185 High Street, Hastings. Anyone is welcome to drop in to learn more about volunteering and available positions The shire’s community development officer can assist community organisations with recruitment, screening, appointing volunteers and offering information about resources under COVID-19 safe practices. Email inquiries to volunteeringmorningtonpeninsula@mornpen.vic. gov.au

EVERY TEST HELPS US KEEP CATCHING UP WITH MATES Every test keeps us on top of this virus. And keeps us doing the things we love. So even if your symptoms are mild, or you’ve been tested before, every test helps.

For testing locations visit CORONAVIRUS.vic.gov.au Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

PAGE 6

Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021


PHOEBE McShane

JULIE Saunders

JOSIE D’Alia

COLIN Blythe

MICHAEL Wunderly

Australia Day awards for ‘community givers’ MORNINGTON Peninsula Citizen of the Year Julie Saunders puts her community first. Like others named in the shire’s Australia Day Local Awards last week, she has spent years working to improve the lives of others. Ms Saunders was honoured alongside Young Citizen of the Year: Phoebe McShane, Community Event of the Year: Senior’s High Tea, Crib Point Community House, Community Spirit Award (accepted by Mary Budd): Josie D’Alia, and Lifetime Achievement Award winners Michael Wunderly and Colin Blythe. When the COVID-19 crisis hit in March, Ms Saunders, of Crib Point, knew straight away how she could help. During the lockdown she and a group of volunteers cooked, packed and home delivered three-course meals to around 60 households every Wednesday. They eventually delivered 1200 meals to mainly older residents in need in the Crib Point area. The community chefs worked out of the town’s RSL kitchen while the Crib

assisted in delivering this one-of-a-kind program to children on the Mornington Peninsula. Ausome Hoops not only taught the children basketball skills but provided the support that many mainstream programs lack. The Community Event of the Year is Senior’s High Tea, Crib Point Community House. Each year the community house organises a free high tea for seniors. Because of COVID-19 and restrictions, including the five kilometre travel limit, the toll on mental health and the need for our seniors to connect, it was decided to take the high tea to seniors in the Western Port area and hold it virtually. In October, 184 “goodie bags”, which contained everything needed for a High Tea at home with a loved one or friend, were made up and delivered from Balnarring to Baxter by volunteers. Community Spirit Award winner Josie D’Alia has the past 30 years been secretary to the Italian Rosebud Club, organising trips, weekend

Point Football/Netball Club provided volunteers and donations. Ms Saunders also acts as an IP – or independent person – a voluntary position administered by the Department of Justice that involves making herself available to assist young offenders who have been arrested by the police. When a parent or guardian is not available an IP is required to sit with the alleged offender to assist them through the interview. Young Citizen of the Year Phoebe McShane at 15 became the founder and director of Ausome Hoops, a specialist basketball program for children diagnosed with autism. Her brother George was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder when they were both young. A keen basketballer, Phoebe wanted George to play but found that many of the sports and activities he tried were not inclusive. She sought to change that, for George and others with Autism Spectrum Disorder in their community. A team of basketball coaches, teachers’ aides and junior basketball players

outings, dinner dances and shows. She also helps residents by phoning, visiting, driving them to appointments and shopping. Ms D’Alia was also involved in establishing Our Lady of Fatima primary school and the second campus of Padua College. Lifetime Achievement Award winner Michael Wunderly has over three decades contributed to the Mornington community, especially the Mornington Football Netball Club. He has been on the committee since 1997 and started the Alexandra Park project with Martin Scanlon, project treasurer, in 2016. As president of the Alexandra Park project, Mr Wunderly approached Mornington Peninsula Shire, as well as Flinders MP Greg Hunt and The Bays Hospital, to ask them to build a community pavilion for use during the day by the hospital and groups, such as Wallara. Through that vision The Bays Hospital received a federal grant to go towards consulting rooms and a rehabilitation gym in the new building due to be built in 2021/22. Fellow Lifetime Achievement

MARY Budd

Award winner Colin Blythe, has given 25 years to McCrae Lions in many roles, including the past five years as club president. He is well known and respected by many service clubs on the peninsula for the work undertaken by Lions in assisting the needy. For the past 16 years, Mr Blythe has been a driving force on the Dromana Australia Day Committee. Mr Blythe came up with the idea of lighting the McCrae lighthouse for Christmas and it has now become a symbol of support for charities. Pictures: Tanya Fry

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PAGE 7


Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

NEWS DESK

Operation Unity gets results HAVING no marine-related injuries or collisions between boats or jet-skis over the Australia Day weekend proved the success of Operation Unity, police say. Peninsula police teamed up with the Water Police in the three-day foreshore and beach operation focusing on water safety, marine compliance and public order. This followed several weeks of increased and serious marinerelated incidents in waters from Mount Martha to Portsea. Police, supported by other government and volunteer agencies, detected 588 offences and issued 66 infringement notices to jet-ski riders and boaters, with about half relating to speeding or irregular operation within five-knot zones. Rosebud Acting Sergeant Flyn Loughlin said the fact that there was a highly visible police presence on the water, particularly at the southern end of Port Phillip and across the peninsula, helped reduce the number of marine-related injuries and collisions. “We also had a highly visible police presence on land right across our foreshore precincts,” he said. “We won’t tolerate poor behaviour that jeopardises the safety of other water users.”

Player remembered TRIBUTES flowed on social media for Frankston Bombers footballer Ben Tournier, above, who died after his car struck power poles and rolled in Mornington, 12.15am on Australia Day. Police believe Tournier, 29, was heading south

on Nepean Highway when he lost control near the corner of Weber Drive and flipped his car. Frankston Bombers teammates gathered at the club at Baxter later that day to remember him. Tournier played with the Bombers for more than a decade and was a regular member of the senior side before more recently playing in the reserves. Nepean Highway was closed between Strachans and Bentons Roads, both north and south bound, while police investigated the incident. A report will be prepared for the coroner. Anyone who saw the crash, or who has dashcam footage, is asked to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or submit a confidential report at crimestoppersvic.com.au

Teens arrested THREE teenagers have been arrested following a series of alleged incidents on the Mornington Peninsula as well as at Carrum Downs, Bendigo, Bentleigh, Blackburn, and Toorak, from 1-5 January. The three boys, one aged 14 and two aged 15, have been charged under Operation Gully with a range of offences, including aggravated burglary and robbery. They have been remanded in custody. The boys were among a group of 11 alleged offenders arrested by detectives from the Southern Metro Region crime team who have been cracking down on aggravated burglaries, car thefts, robbery and driving offences throughout January. Detective Inspector Peter Harrington said: “[We] have been working closely with police across the state to swiftly identify and arrest offenders committing serious offences. “With the increase of movement throughout the community, we’ve seen a number of instances where groups of young people have been committing a series of offences together across different parts of the state, not just in their local neighbourhood. “We know the deep impact these types of crimes can have on both the victims and broader community [which] is why we have been working around the clock to put a stop to this offending and hold people to account. “With many people returning to on-site work for the first time in almost 12 months, we implore everyone to stay one step ahead of opportunistic thieves by securing their homes and cars.” If you need immediate police assistance always call Triple Zero (000). Report any suspicious behaviour to your local police station or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Drivers warned of school risks SOMERVILLE Highway Patrol is reminding drivers to slow down at school zones as the school year resumes. Police will strictly enforce the 40kph speed limits and be on the lookout for unsafe driving behaviour on the Mornington Peninsula. They say students could be distracted as they

catch up with friends after the holidays and their road safety skills “could be a bit rusty”. Police will be working with Local Laws officers to reinforce parking rules at drop-off and pick-up times. They say parents “should be aware of their local parking restrictions”.

It’s a first: Sorrento Cricket Club girls learn the ropes under coach Kane Gordon, his assistant Rob Dunball and club president Peter Hall. Picture: Supplied

Girls’ cricket dream comes true camaraderie. Team members believe that with assistance from Rob and Will Dunball at training and at matches, success awaits just around the corner. Mr Gordon said: “This year the only goal is enjoyment, to learn some skills of the game, community spirit and playing cricket with your mates. “We are so proud to be part of this special moment in our club’s long history.”

FOR the first time in its 120-year history, Sorrento Cricket Club has fielded a girls’ team. Junior coordinator and coach Kane Gordon, along with his 13-year-old daughter Tammy, gathered girls aged 10-17 for the Mornington Peninsula Cricket Association’s 2020/21 season. With only basic cricket knowledge but a thirst to learn, the girls played two games. In the first game against Balnarring the opposition showed exceptional sportsmanship and

Fire risks kept under wraps Continued from Page 5 When The News first contacted the shire about aluminium cladding in February 2019, it was responding to reports that a hospital was one of the nine aluminium clad buildings on the peninsula. Before last week’s meeting, Cr Gill said combustible cladding was “very controversial” on the peninsula but “our community has been kept ignorant about the facts”. "The state government has stopped open discussion about government locations and even some important non-government buildings. There has been an intent to prevent public awareness by using building regulations to make disclosure illegal.” Mr Kotsiakos report to the planning services committee said the cladding taskforce had inspected 2200 buildings across the state. Buildings to be audited were grouped into classes, including apartments of three or more storeys; hotels, motels and student accommodation of three or more storeys; and hospitals,

schools and aged care facilities of two or more storeys. “In response to the vast number of buildings that have been audited and identified at a high to extreme fire risk … Cladding Safety Victoria [would] provide support and guidance to building owners and occupants of buildings … particularly where rectification work is required to reduce risks to an acceptable level.” Mr Kotsiakos expected the work to take “at least five years”. “Cladding Safety Victoria will provide advice on how to reduce fire risk, help owners to find qualified project managers and other professionals and, in higher risk situations, provide funding for approved works. “Although the establishment of Cladding Safety Victoria is a positive step, it appears to be extremely confusing for building owners and residents within these buildings and very little financial support is provided by the state government.”

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PAGE 8

Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021


KEY FACTS ABOUT THE BOUNDARY ROAD PROJECT Relocating to the old Pioneer quarry means the good work will continue Hillview Quarries is a unique business. Under the stewardship of its philanthropic owner, the profits it earns from quarrying are distributed to organisations supporting vulnerable Victorians, particularly children and young people, as well as environmental and preservation projects across Victoria. Over the past 50 years this generosity has totalled nearly $139 million, including $19 million distributed to organisations on the Mornington Peninsula. Approved stone reserves at Hillview’s quarry in Dromana are running out; relocating to the old Pioneer quarry nearby means this good work will continue well into the future.

Collins Road

Hillview Community Reserve Boundary Road

Existing quarry to shift 800m – 850m to old quarry Old Pioneer quarry and workings Hillview’s current quarry and workings to wind down

Additional resource area being investigated

THE SIMPLE FACTS 1. There are already two quarries at Dromana. The active quarry at Hillview Quarry Drive and the Pioneer quarry on Boundary Road. The Pioneer quarry includes a pit of nearly 160 metres depth and covers an area of approx 18 hectares. 2. When the old quarry re-opens; the current one winds down. With stone running out, Hillview Quarries proposes relocating to the Pioneer quarry on Boundary Road to access rock from within and from land surrounding the existing pit. Current operations at Hillview Quarry Drive will be wound down and the site rehabilitated, ultimately leaving only one active quarry, as is the case now. 3. Approval to relocate and re-open will be based on science. For nearly two years, Hillview Quarries has been undertaking scientific investigations as part of an Environment Effects Statement which will help Government decide whether to approve the relocation. An EES is the Government’s most rigorous scientific and social impact assessment. 4. Multiple scientific investigations are in progress. These investigations cover everything from flora and fauna through to dust, noise and air quality. Initially, these studies assess the current or baseline conditions then they look at what the potential impacts might be.

5. All studies are independently assessed. With the majority of the baseline studies nearing completion, some impact studies have commenced and all will be finished mid 2021. Before each study is finalised it is assessed by the Government’s Technical Reference Group which comprises technical specialists from all relevant Government agencies. Some of the studies are peer reviewed by other expert scientists to ensure fair and independent assessments have been made. 6. Final size and shape are yet to be determined. Information from the studies continues to shape options for the quarry footprint and to refine the additional area being considered for quarrying activities. Currently this additional area for quarrying could be approx 20 hectares over coming decades. The proposed footprint is expected in early 2021. 7. Public comment is essential. Community feedback both directly and through the Boundary Road website is welcome. It is expected that final draft documentation for the EES will be completed in the third quarter of 2021, after which it will be available for public comment. Public feedback together with the EES submission will assist Government decisionmaking about the environmental and community implications of recommencing quarrying at the site.

PROGRESS OF THE BASELINE SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS Baseline studies completed to-date

Baseline studies to be finalised in early 2021

Social

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Call 1300 407 690 or visit our website for more facts. Summaries of the existing conditions studies are posted on the site as they become available. www.boundaryroad.com.au

Southern Peninsula News 3 February 2021

PAGE 9


NEWS DESK

Dogs and dolphins ‘don’t mix’ DOLPHINS have become victims of their own popularity when they come close to shore in Western Port. After years of becoming an attraction at Balnarring for appearing to swim alongside racehorses being exercised in the shallows, there are now concerns about dogs also joining the dolphins in the water. Dolphin Research Centre executive director Jeff Weir said he had received reports of “dogs, paddlers and swimmers pestering dolphins in Western Port”. He had also received “many calls” about vessels in Port Phillip doing the same. In December, the DRI launched a campaign to persuade boaters to keep their distance from dolphins in Port Phillip and Western Port (“Going to water with social distancing” The News 20/12/20). “Dolphin Distancing is not just a quirky twist on COVID,” Mr Weir said. “We saw some appalling harassment of whales and dolphins on the few winter days this year when boats could get out between COVID lockdowns. Mr weir last week said dogs being near dolphins was “particularly concerning when very young calves are present”. “People often say that they have been there for years and their dogs have always swum out to the dolphins and the dolphins are still here - so what's the problem? “The issue is that many small interruptions to a dolphin mother's feeding, resting, nursing, protecting behaviours - albeit small in isolation add up to potentially threatening levels.” Mr Weir said dolphins may move as a result of stress “but, just like us, there is evidence that they will stay where the food is and put up with very stressful situations to the point that it takes a toll on them”. “Because it's so difficult to determine the limit of stress dolphins can cope with, it's best to

Signed up for safety: Harry and his father from Mount Martha have committed to follow the Dolphin Distancing program launched by the Dolphin Research Institute. Harry, who attends Mount Martha Primary, can be seen at: dolphinresearch.org.au/isiccheroes/

minimise stresses where we can,” he said. Approaches to address the issues in Western Port included changing “the social norm” so most people did the right thing; giving community talks; and starting a university intern and community research program. The study results would help the DRI “to better understand the dolphins use of Western Port and what areas are important, and the time they are spending feeding, resting, nursing, socialis-

ing or interacting with other species”. “This will be ongoing and help DELWP Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning) to budget for wildlife officers to focus on Western Port.” Regulations state that boats (including paddle craft) should not approach within 100 metres of a dolphin; jet skis must be at least 300m away; swimmers 30m; and dogs 300m. Fines can be up to $4000. Keith Platt

Easy access for all MATTING has been laid down at Mount Martha beach to help those in wheelchairs or with limited mobility get across the sand to the water. The matting is available at the beach daily and two MobiChairs are available on weekends until Easter Monday 5 April. Mornington Peninsula Shire has laid the matting as part of its Disability Inclusion Plan with help from Mount Martha Life Saving Club. The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said: “COVID-19 has created some challenges for us this year, but we’re working within the guidelines to give access for all to enjoy our beaches this summer. It’s our responsibility to keep everyone safe.” Higher than usual tides have mean matting at Mills Beach, Mornington, is no longer safe to have out, however, a beach wheelchair is available on weekends during Mornington Life Saving Club patrol hours. The shire says it is working to make the beaches accessible to everyone. Those wanting beach matting at their beach should talk to their local lifesaving club and encourage them to contact the shire. The shire says disability access is being improved at beaches through upgrades to parking, pathways and toilets. Audits for our beaches include accessible features in coastal plans. Cr Anthony Marsh said: “Our peninsula has an extensive range of accessible and inclusive activities including accessible beaches. We hope our community enjoys a safe summer at the beach this year.” Cr Steve Holland said: “We encourage all lifesaving clubs to work with us to provide matting and wheelchairs at more beaches across the peninsula. It’s a wonderful initiative to allow everyone to enjoy our beautiful beaches.” To view the live beach conditions, including the beach matting at Mount Martha visit: mmlsc. com.au/webcam To learn more about other accessible shire beaches visit: mornpen.vic.gov.au/accessiblerecreation

POINT of VIEW 2

1

POINT of view contributors have again recorded and illustrated the diversity of life on the Mornington Peninsula. Steve Howard watched the build up of storm clouds over Port Phillip from shire near Fishermans Beach, Mornington, 1; Glenys Slade was again drawn to the interactions between traders and shoppers at Mornington’s Wednesday street market, 2; Amanda Thayer spotted a shining bronze-cuckoo while walking the boardwalk alongside Balcombe Creek, Mount Martha, 3; Liane Willoughby spotted the respectfully distant crowd at Mothers Beach, Mornington; and Adam Richmond saw beauty in the early morning mist from Arthurs Seat, 5.

5

Readers can continue to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: pointofview@mpnews.com.au

PAGE 10

Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021

3

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

‘LAZIO’ - ONE OF MOUNT MARTHA’S MOST PRESTIGIOUS HOMES CELEBRATING the grandeur and opulence of a Lake Como estate, this incredible opportunity to purchase one of Mount Martha’s most prestigious homes glamorously presents itself to the select few. ‘Lazio’, translating to Provence of Rome, proudly sits on 3600 square metres of prime land in a quiet, leafy enclave on the corner of Prescott and Lempriere Avenues. The history or the property makes for astounding reading as the site, among other pursuits, was once a former golf course clubhouse and during World War Two, Lazio was a favourite leave destination for American soldiers. The private, resort-style estate is now a spectacular family haven with a full-size tennis court and

HOME ESSENTIALS

gas heated swimming pool with spa all part of the incredible ambience and facilities. The stunning landscape showcases towering trees, swathes of lush green lawn and park-like gardens; and front and centre of it all is the magnificent five bedroom residence that offers a staggering 511 square metres of living space. Awash with natural light, the soaring ceilings greatly accentuate the already incredible sense of space, and with two ornate fireplaces boasting grand marble finishes and French doors throughout, this home beautifully captures the romance of a mid-century Italian lifestyle. A host of quality zones, each have their own distinct style, and provide multiple living options. A central

kitchen boasts granite benchtops and a walk-in pantry, and to the sophisticated master bedroom wing is a dazzling ensuite with Versace tiles and a spacious parents retreat that includes a charming Juliet balcony which overlooks the pool. There is also a guest suite with sitting area and ensuite bathroom. Among the many external features, which includes extensive off-street parking and secure gated entry from two points, it is the picturesque terrace with water fountain that make this a true entertainers paradise worthy of any discerning buyers inspection.n

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

ADDRESS: 47-49 Prescott Avenue, MOUNT MARTHA FOR SALE: $4,800,000 DESCRIPTION: 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms AGENT: Brad Boyd 0434 260 655, Abode Peninsula, 1/2 Watson Road, Mount Martha, 5974 1100

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 3rd February 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 3


Cooper Rigg Sales Consultant Cooper has been quick to immerse himself in real estate with continuous training and mentoring from the best in the industry. The focus on achieving the best result and determination to continually improve for his clients benefit is always evident. Driven by doing better, doing more, and doing it for the value he creates for both sides of the deal. Cooper Rigg 0447 855 333 cooper.rigg@barryplant.com.au Barry Plant Rosebud

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Offering affordable living within walking distance of beautiful beaches, shops and cafĂŠs, this property presents a fantastic opportunity for those seeking a home they can renovate and add value to. Set on a flat 613m2 (approx.) parcel of land, this solid brick 3 bedroom home provides enormous appeal with an open-plan living/dining area opening up to a private yard. Including an original kitchen with an electric cooker, there is also a central bathroom with shower and bath, and outside is a single carport with undercover patio and two garden sheds.

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


NEWS DESK

Figures down, but 49th art show a success NUMBERS may have been limited due to COVID-19 restrictions at the opening of the 49th annual Mornington Art Show, but attendance records were broken in the following days. Masks were worn and food served individually in cardboard boxes at the opening to the accompaniment of the The Denis Ball Jazz trio. “Despite the show running for fewer days this year and with fewer paintings due to COVID-19 space requirements, the attendances during the week were excellent,” Mornington Rotary Club’s art show director Richard Vautier said. “On two days record attendances of over 300 attended. The final day, Australia Day, was free entry with free coffee.” Sales figures were close to last year’s, with some paintings being bought online in the week following the physical exhibition at Mornington Community Theatre. Pictures: Yanni

SARAH Murray with her painting Saudade which was among the many works sold during this year’s Mornington Art Show.

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IN THE

specialists HANDS

SAI Home and Community Care opens office in Hastings IN a demonstration of ongoing commitment to servicing the Mornington Peninsula area, SAI Home and Community Care has now opened an office in Hastings. With over 40 years of committed services to the Frankston area, SAI Home and Community Care have now expanded their footprint with an office in Hastings. The move has been driven by the new Board of Directors as a demonstration of the commitment in ensuring the continued support of the local community. “There are so many providers that are not based in our community offering both Aged and NDIS services and supports which often mean our community don’t get the personal service that they deserve With long call centre wait times, and a lack of understanding of the geographic area we constantly get calls from clients looking to switch to a local provider. With our new local office, we are providing a front door for face to face interactions for our clients and their families, combined with our in house consultation for care support and coordination services.” Nicole Standfield, General Manager of SAI Home and Community Care confirms. Nicole further shares, “It’s so important for our clients to be served by an organisation that is deeply embedded within the fabric of our Mornington community, and our new office in Hastings cements our commitment to a physical presence in the area.”

With the grand opening on Friday the 29th of January, attended by The Hon Greg Hunt, Minister for Health and Aged Care, SAI Home and Community Care hope that the new Hastings presence highlights the need for local and quality community care focused on individual needs, delivered by qualified and caring local staff within this sector. “Our commitment to growing our service footprint and building on our trusted quality framework to a broader area is demonstrated by our new office opening, and is the first of many more to come” shares founder and Board Director Upali Desilva. For more information or a personal consultation and a tour of the office feel free to contact us on 03 9988 1232 Foot Note SAI Home and Community Care, founded by Upali and Nina Desilva have been serving the Frankston and surrounding community for over 40 years. With a trusted quality care framework and a commitment to personal service in both the Aged Care and NDIS service delivery, and over ten thousand happy clients and family members over the years, SAI Home and Community Care is the local provider you can trust.

Cutting the ribbon for the grand opening. Picture: Yanni

Warm, expert care delivered by locals for locals.

Experience the local difference in your care

Call us today on 03 9988 1238 PAGE 16

Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021


IN THE

specialists HANDS

Finally, Relief From Your Hip Pain DOES this describe YOU? • You get hip pain laying on your side in bed, and just can’t get to sleep. • You place a pillow between your legs to help you get to sleep but laying on the painful side is still waking you. • You find yourself standing on one leg with your other hip hanging lower, or you sitting with crossed legs causes the pain • You are a runner worried your hip pain will get worse and stop you from exercising. If so then read on. The pain on the outside of the hip can be due to inflammation of the gluteal tendon, of Gluteus Medius and Minimus, where the gluteal muscles attach. It can also be where a bursa (a fat pad called the trochanteric bursa) can become inflamed. The hip pain may be associated with a stiff back. Physiotherapist May Wan, says that it is an injury affected by hip weakness and postural habits that place the tendons under stress. It requires a full analysis of the hip and lower limb, looking from the foot to the back biomechanics. It can require massage, and specific strengthening exercises for the gluteal muscles as well as improving core stability to control pelvic movement. In addition to the above solutions, there is a recent healing technology that is making a profound difference to outside of the hip pain sufferers. Practice owner, Paul Rowson says

Physiotherapist, May Wan. “Shockwave Therapy is often useful, because the gluteal tendons are a connective tissue, not a muscle. It puts a significant shockwave through the tissues you apply it to. It is a pressure wave which brings blood flow to the area. Tendons and connective tissue do not have much blood supply and can take a long time to heal. Shockwave artificially stimulates the healing of the tendon.” Shockwave therapy can also be used on Achilles tendonitis, Plantar Fasciitis, golfer’s and tennis elbow, and rotator cuff tendon problems,

and is usually most effective on long term chronic problems, rather than acute injuries. Shockwave is not the first line of treatment for injured patients. Physiotherapy and graded exercise are more likely in the first instance. But for more stubborn conditions, shockwave has shown good results. “The evidence at the moment suggests between three to five treatments are required, but most people should see an improvement within three sessions. It has a success rate up to 90%” May says. The Shockwave therapy is administered for a three-minute period

to the affected area during consecutive weekly appointments. “It is a bit of an uncomfortable sensation” May says, “like most physio hands-on treatments, with a little discomfort during the treatment.” Paul says, “After each session, most people get a significant reduction of pain and symptoms. Long term it stimulates healing, short term it reduces pain. The best thing is, the effects are long lasting. It prevents a lot of people having more invasive things like surgery or injections. The treatment is considered safe, but can produce skin reddening or bruising, short term pain, and

cannot be used on people taking blood thinning medications or with bleeding disorders. “ “It is important to know that Shockwave has a long-term effect. Most of the time you have good outcomes, without having to have further treatments.” Shockwave is now available in Balnarring. Call the practice now and speak to one of our physios to see if Shockwave suits your condition. Back in Motion is at 6/2-8 Russell Street, Balnarring. Phone 03 5983 1021.www.backinmotion.com.au/ balnarring

Don’t let tendon pain stop you in your tracks Up to 90% success rate# | Non invasive therapy Radial Shockwave therapy Clinically proven* to help these conditions: • Heel pain (plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinopathy)

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Back In Motion Balnarring 6/2-8 Russell Street backinmotion.com.au/balnarring Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021

PAGE 17


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Set a new date so all of us can celebrate I support for Mornington Peninsula Shire councillor Kerri McCafferty, who declined to attend any formal Australia Day events on 26 January (“Councillor bows out on ‘celebration’” The News 19/1/21). Like her, I respect the heartfelt requests that are being echoed by First Nations peoples to choose an alternate date on which all Australians can celebrate being part of this ancient land. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples 26 January is a day of deep sorrow. It is a tragic and painful reminder of the commencement of colonisation that ushered in inhumane and systematic policies and practices aimed at destroying Aboriginal culture and to dispossess them of their lands. For more than 230 years Australia’s First Nations peoples have suffered wide ranging injustice. The lack of progress towards achieving the Closing the Gap targets after so many decades, is shameful. The time for change is long overdue. Some signs of hope are emerging. An increasing proportion of people of non-Indigenous heritage are choosing to walk alongside the First Peoples in a spirit of reconciliation. Today, some 90 per cent of all Australians believe that building relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people is critical to the future of our country. If we truly commit to being part of this shared journey then changing the date of Australia Day will be just one step, but an important one, along this path. All councillors and people who live and work within the shire should respectfully observe 26 January, for what it is, a day of mourning. Councillors should follow the lead of several other municipalities and demand that the federal government nominate an alternate date on which all Australians can celebrate being part of this great nation. Diane McDonald, Mount Eliza

Date check I am surprised you gave front page credence to a furphy that has been floating around for some years now on social media - that January 26 is Australia Day not because that’s the day in 1788 when Governor Arthur Phillip ran up the flag in Sydney Cove, but because it is the day the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 came into effect in 1949 (“Australia’s date with history” The News 27/1/21). The article states the Act came into effect in 1948, the date spread in the social media furphy. It is incorrect, the legislation was enacted in late 1948 and proclaimed on 26 January 1949. That date was chosen because January 26 was already the date widely celebrated across the country as Australia Day, in recognition of Phillip’s flag raising more than a century and a half earlier. Those interested can research this for themselves (for instance, the Australia Associated Press factcheck website: aap.com.au/no-this-is-

PAGE 18

Southern Peninsula News

not-the-real-reason-australia-day-is-celebratedon-january-26/) Ian Sharp, Somers

Changing times It was very heartening to see councillors like Despi O’Connor, Sarah Race, Kerri McCafferty, Antonella Celli and Anthony Marsh out and about supporting reconciliation with First Nations around 26 January. Let’s look forward next year to all councillors supporting a Mornington Peninsula Shire event, like those of our neighbouring municipalities, to honour the survival of First Nations people and acknowledge the truth of our colonial past. Maureen Donelly, Mornington

Meaningless day I think we can all agree that Cook the navigator arrived 28 April 1770 and the First Fleet on 18 January 1778 (“Australia’s date with history” The News 26/1/21). The controversial date of 26 January is deeply significant to some. For others, in 1949 it was the day Australian citizens were recognised as such and not merely as British subjects; however, this was not much more than a token, since in 1975 a properly elected Australian government was dismissed by (the agent of) Queen Elizabeth of England. Since then Australia day has been meaningless to a great many citizens. The Australia Day honours, richly deserved by some recipients, have become degraded when awarded to some other recipients, devaluing the entire system. It is patently obvious that many awards are political, many are to push politically correct agendas for minorities or popular causes, some are rewards from the party, some simply for doing their paid job, some are just plain unearned and unjustified, the recipient being no more entitled to a gong than me. At least you can’t buy a knighthood anymore. Inevitably, our monarch will soon pass away, God bless her soul, and Australia’s date with destiny will have arrived and we should sever all ties and become a republic. No governor general. I think all Australians would welcome this. We could have a new national day. Possibly a change to our flag. Maybe reset the music of our national anthem to a dramatised version of “Waltzing Matilda”, [which is] already instantly recognised worldwide as Australian; and, for Heaven’s sake, write a new national anthem, the present one being a pop song for its time, and replace the ghastly words which always make me cringe and which nobody can recite from memory. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

Court support How preposterous is the opinion of Labor stalwarts that Margaret Court should not be publicly honoured as a true Australian hero both

3 February 2021

in sport and society? Well done Margaret for your lifelong efforts for sport, good pastoral and social work. Bless you for that, we all need a good example, at least now and then, to lift up our drooping spirits. Maureen Federico, Frankston South

Jet skis rule I thought Mornington Peninsula Shire Council had agreed to act on irresponsible jet ski operators. One only has to visit several beaches on Port Phillip to see nothing has happened. At Rye, on Sunday 24 January, jet ski riders were weaving in and out around swimmers. They slowed down a little, but not enough for safety. Does someone have to be killed before the council acts? Wendy Gown, Shoreham

Bring back prayer In reply to the statement that “in our enlightened age, imaginary gods have nothing to do with any of the processes” (“Prayer not re quired” Letters 19/1/21): Besides the Bible, Christ was mentioned by two other historians: Flavius Josephus, a first century Jewish historian and commander of the Jewish forces in Galilee (37–100 AD) and Tacitus (a Roman historian) who referred to Christs’ execution by Pontius Pilate and the existence of Christians in Rome) in his final work, Annals. People have been have been persecuted, tortured and killed for their Christian faith, showing that God is anything but imaginary. This was especially so in the 20th century. Australia’s history since 1788 has been based on Christian principles in law, government, family structures, and where Christian ministers have defended the needs of Indigenous Australians. Some books detailing this influence are The Bible in Australia, a Cultural History (Meredith Lake), Stories of Australia’s Christian Heritage (Elizabeth Kotlawski) and Campfires at the Cross (Heather Le Griffon). In 1606, Pedro Fernandez de Quiros (1563– 1615), a Portuguese sailor/navigator, in exploring the Pacific discovered, he thought, the great south land and called it Tierra Austrialia del Espíritu Santo, literally Southland of the Holy Spirit. History shows that atrocious and shameful acts have been done in the name of Christianity; they discredit Christs’ name immensely. Christian prayers embody God’s wide and encompassing love of people, hopefully making our councillors pause for thought, that issues before them are of spiritual and practical significance. The replacement of Christian prayer was not an item I recall on Cr Anthony Marsh’s 2020 election papers. I believe we should reinstate prayers before Mornington Peninsula Shire Council meetings. Steve Howard, Mornington

‘Token’ help The members of the Mornington Peninsula Ratepayers and Residents Association wish to voice their support for Blair Heading who has brought to light the rates situation on the penin-

sula (“Seek rate relief” Letters 13/1/21. While some municipalities are providing direct support to financially struggling ratepayers, our shire is refusing to do so, claiming that various payment plans which however accrue interest, which will naturally have to be paid back at a later date, are sufficient. Peninsula ratepayers are hurting just as much as their Melbourne cousins with the loss of income because of COVID-19 and deserve much more than this token gesture. Jan Dwyer, secretary, MPRRA, Rosebud

Dangerous path Just putting it out there regarding the state of the bike path in Tyabb, from the airport in Mornington-Tyabb Road to Boes Road. While we were walking there were broken bottles along the path, which my friend and I tried to remove as much as we could. Mums, bubs and children were also on the path at the time, along with dogs Walking towards Flinders college we noticed quite a few branches overhanging onto the bike path. We went around the bend where there was plenty of overhang, a guy on a pushbike was approaching, saw us and ended up in the ditch. If he had not of seen us, we would have definitely collided I did not report this [to Mornington Peninsula Shire] as I had reported a previous incident, and nothing was done A few months ago, I was close to being hit crossing the road at Graydens Road trying to get across to the bike path to Tyabb. Cars fly around that corner (from Frankston-Flinders Road) and they can’t see us due to the bushes on that corner I feel one day, someone is going to be seriously hurt, and that is very worrying, as I had previously reported this and was assured it would be looked into. I really hope that this issue is fixed before there is someone hurt. Cheryl Marris, Hastings

Distant memories It’s an age thing, as in going crackers. Social media prerequisites: All decisions are instant, no need for evidence, no deep thought required and certainly no defence if challenged; similar to what the Navy used to call “Urinating in a public space” (in my day a five pound fine and loss of good conduct badges. No, never charged or perhaps, never caught? Truth is based on feelings, beliefs, perceptions, occasionally adding in education and upbringing. Some may say if you’re relying on people you’re relying on mud. On a personal basis. I’ve lost my instant memory for words. Google helps, but not if you’re lying down in bed after lights out and you search for it, and it evades. If you’re not careful it can keep you there searching for an hour or more, and it’s already 2am. Eventually, occasionally, it arrives, and I mark it, recording the word in my voice memos, but it doesn’t necessarily help next time, particularly if I’ve forgotten I have it on my mobile phone. Similar with a song, but worse. The words, “those demned elusive Pimpernels” - adds in the concern/risk of “losing it”. Cliff Ellen, Rye


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Seafordites don’t want Frankston’s electric light Compiled by Cameron McCullough MR W. Klauer, secretary of the Seaford Progress Association, has received the following communication from the State Electricity Commission of Victoria, under date of 17th January 1921: “I have to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 21st ult., asking that the commission will take the necessary steps to have the Seaford district deleted from the Order granted the Frankston and District Gas and Electric Light Co, in order that supply can be obtained from the Melbourne Electric Supply Co. The question of revoking the whole Order as proposed by the Frankston and Hastings Shire has now been considered by the Commission, and I have this day communicated with that Council, making certain suggestions, which should enable the Council to reach finality in the matter.” A letter has been received by the Council, as stated above, but its contents have not been made public. The matter will come up for discussion at next Council meeting. *** A LOT of unnecessary profanity amongst motorists was caused on Sunday last by the action of the Shire Council in leaving the crossing at Wells Street to the beach in an unfinished state of repair. Scores of motor cars negotiated the area of deep loose sand which separated Bay Street from Wells Street, but it proved a trying experience. Chauffeurs emerged from the ordeal with a wild eye and savage visage. The repairs to the crossing have now been completed, and as the job only took three or four days it seems reason-

able to inquire why the Council did not start the work on Monday instead of Friday, and thus save a lot of unnecessary inconvenience to Sunday visitors.. *** A MEETING to further the object of securing a bowling green for Frankston was held last night. The shire president (Cr W. P. Mason) occupied the chair. Mr Milner Macmaster (hon sec) reported that he had interviewed from 80 to 100 people on the subject with encouraging results. A deputation was appointed to wait on the Council on Thursday next to ask permission to construct a green on the reserve near the tennis court – Messrs E. Barrett, Macmaster and Young being appointed to represent the views of the majority. Cr Oates intimated that he was opposed to the green being placed on the site proposed. He contended that it would be encroaching on the rights of the people who used the foreshore for picnic purposes. The greens would be open to the public and the land required would be small, not greatly exceeding 80ft by say 200ft. The result of the deputation will be awaited with interest. *** WE have received for publication from Mrs Annie Peebles, a letter in which she asks for space to correct a few of what she terms, “the many vicious untruths circulated during Cr Oates unwarrantable and unjustifiable attack on my son at the repatriation meeting.” Mrs. Peebles then says, referring to her son – “(1) It is not true that we financed him; (2) We know he was

trying to sell the business; (3) He does not owe his father any money; (4) My affidavit was so twisted and misquoted that no one could recognise it in its original form.” Mrs Peebles then proceeds to ask “Why should Cr Oates drag our personal and private affairs before the public?” and suggests that it was done to “discredit and blacken the character of a man brave enough to shoulder the responsibilities which others shirked.” “The Standard” regrets that Mrs Peebles should seek to re-open this question, as the matter has already been carefully and exhaustively dealt with by the Repatriation Committee, to which her son, Mr R. E. Peebles made his appeal. He made certain charges against Cr Oates but when asked to substantiate them before the Committee he was totally unable to do so. Mrs Peebles’ reference to Cr Oates “unwarrantable and unjustifiable attack” on her son is ridiculous. It was young Peebles who accepted responsibility for putting Cr Oates on the defensive, although the enquiry disclosed the fact that others were behind pulling the strings. If Mrs Peebles had any “disclosures” to make which would have given any weight to her son’s charges, she should have given her evidence before the Committee at the proper time. She certainly did send in an affidavit which read as follows: “I, Annie Peebles, married woman do hereby solemnly and sincerely declare that some time ago Mr Strong came up to me in Bay St and told me he had left Oates and if Roland was thinking of going on with the case against Oates he

would join with him. On the strength of this statement, I communicated the information to my son.” Mr Strong, at the enquiry, emphatically denied the truth of Mrs Peebles’ Sworn Statement and stated that he had always maintained that Cr Oates had treated him fairly. Young Peebles could not produce an atom of evidence in support of his many allegations. His own witnesses were responsible for the statement that he was under financial obligations to his parents, and Mrs Peebles assertion to the contrary does not help to clear the position at this stage. It was also distinctly proved in evidence that Peebles was endeavouring to dispose of his share of the business unknown to his father and his partner, as was also the fact that Peebles owed his father money at that time. The action of the Committee in finding the charges disproven, and exonerating Cr Oates, has received general public endorsement. Cr Oates really insisted on the enquiry being made public, and he made it clear that his dealings with Peebles throughout had been open and above board. Those who know Cr Oates best were not surprised that he came through the ordeal with flying colors. His long and creditable career as a public man has established for him a reputation for straightforwardness and fair dealing that is not easily shaken. Cr Oates has done a great deal to assist returned soldiers. He did far more to assist Peebles and Strong in their new enterprise than many others would have done. When Peebles was quietly endeav-

oring to dispose of his interest in the business the firm owed Oates considerably over £100 for milk supplied, and this despite the fact that they had raised the price of milk to the public while Oates was still delivering to them at the old rate. By the exercise of reasonable business ability Peebles and Strong should have succeeded in their enterprise. Instead of that they steadily lost ground until things reached such a stage that Peebles, evidently thinking it wise policy to get out, tried to sell his share in the partnership. It was at this stage that Oates stepped in, and in a perfectly legitimate way insisted on provision being made for the payment of his milk account. Peebles admitted that no undue pressure was used by Oates, and that the ultimate sale of the business to Oates was not a forced one. The transaction, apparently did not suit one or two people whose active antagonism towards Cr Oates is very well known. They thought they saw another opportunity of dragging Cr Oates’ name through the mire, and were not slow to embrace it. There is little doubt that Peebles was in the hands of those people, and was largely influenced by them in formulating his charges. All this was made perfectly clear at the enquiry. Whether they succeeded in keeping within the law on this occasion is a question for Cr Oates and his legal advisers to consider. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 28 January 1921

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PAGE 19


PUZZLE ZONE 1

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3 February 2021

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Southern Peninsula News

3 February 2021

PAGE 21


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Collapse costs Moorooduc, Carrum top of the table, Boneo sneak a win over Tyabb By Brodie Cowburn

PENINSULA

A TAIL order collapse cost Moorooduc a chance at victory on Saturday. Moorooduc played host to Long Island. The visitors were sent in to bat first and put a good total on the scoreboard. Brad Bailey was Long Island’s best with the bat with a well-earned half century. His side finished their innings at 6/198. Moorooduc’s run chase didn’t start as planned. Three of their top order batsmen were dismissed early to leave them struggling at 3/23. A brave middle order showing from Pathum De Mel, including four sixes, put Moorooduc back in the hunt. They recovered to reach 6/183, but were quickly running out of overs. Moorooduc lost their last four wickets for just four runs, ending up all out for 187. They finished 11 runs short of the win. Flinders weren’t able to defend a strong total on Saturday as they took on Pines. Flinders set Pines 208 runs to win. Matthew Gale and Blake Hogan-Keogh impressed at the crease - a 114 run stand a highlight of the day. Pines weren’t daunted by the task ahead of them. Damien Lawrence, Billy Humphrey, and Lai Leaunoa each scored over 40 to guide their side to victory. Pines won with three wickets and three overs to spare. The Seaford Tigers notched up a three wicket win on Saturday by chasing down Main Ridge’s total of 126. Somerville also joined the winner’s list with a five wicket victory against Heatherhill.

DISTRICT

CARRUM cemented their place at

their 40 overs Rye were at 9/121, 28 runs short of victory. Steve O’Neill was the best performer for Mt Martha with the ball, taking 3/18. Carrum Downs had a bad day against Skye. They were bowled out for only 76, dooming them to a 52 run loss. Balnarring got a win on their home deck, defeating Tootgarook.

Falling short: A tail order collapse cost Moorooduc a victory over Long Island. Picture: Andrew Hurst

PROVINCIAL

the top of the District table with an impressive win over Rosebud on Saturday. Carrum made the long road trip up to Olympic Park to tackle Rosebud. Both sides were equal on wins for the season heading into the clash. Carrum chose to bat first and had mixed fortunes at the crease. Six batsmen of their eight batsmen that went out to the middle were dismissed for single-digit scores. Luckily for Carrum, Mark Cooper and Jake D’Atri were in good form. They scored 76 and 42 respectively to help their side to a total of 147. D’Atri wasn’t finished there, and dominated with the ball too. He wiped out Rosebud’s middle order, posting final figures of 5/15 off his eight overs. Rosebud ended up all out for 93,

well and truly short of victory. A brilliant knock of 88 from Tim Clarke got Delacombe Park the win over Hastings. Hastings set Delacombe Park 184 to win. Clarke came in as an opener and got his side’s chase off to a dream start. His huge total proved the difference, as Delacombe Park eventually hit the winning runs in the final over with three wickets to spare. Around the grounds, Dromana bowled out Crib Point for 111 to get the win at home. A half century from Nick Barfuss helped Frankston YCW to a comfortable win over Pearcedale.

SUB DISTRICT

BONEO held on to claim a narrow win over Tyabb on Saturday.

Boneo put 172 runs on the scoreboard after batting first. Opener Ryan Jellie was their top scorer with 52 runs. Tyabb’s run chase looked good early, and at 1/71 they were in the box seat. Momentum then swung towards Boneo, and the scoreboard soon read 5/81. The middle order and tail end got things back on track, and Tyabb were able to take the game down to the final over. Needing just 5 runs to win, Tyabb lost their final wicket. Mt Martha were also a winner on Saturday. They took home the points against Rye. Mt Martha batted first and put together a patient innings. They set Rye a target of 149 to chase down. None of Rye’s batsmen could capitalise on good starts. At the end of

SORRENTO got the better of Red Hill in a competitive clash last weekend. The Hillmen were sent in to bat first, and started well. Opener Luke Robertson impressed with a score of 71. After their 40 overs Red Hill finished at 5/168. After losing both openers cheaply, first drop batsman Robert Wilson came in to put Sorrento back on track. He smashed 88 runs to put his side in the box seat. Off the back of Wilson’s hard work, Sorrento went on to grab a three wicket win. A disastrous tail order performance saw Baxter throw away a brilliant chance to win against Mt Eliza on Saturday. Baxter bowled brilliantly, and managed to bowl their opponents out for just 90. Adeel Hussain posted his side’s best figures with 3/10. Needing just 90 to win, Baxter looked to have an easy task ahead of them. They got off to a nervy start though, and lost both openers cheaply. Things hardly improved from there, and wickets kept on falling. At one stage Baxter lost 4/0. Baxter were eventually bowled out for just 62, dooming them to a devastating defeat. In other matchups, Baden Powell defeated Mornington by 117 runs and Peninsula Old Boys defeated Langwarrin by 60 runs.

Portland Sky’s back on track HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou MATT Laurie’s promising sprinter Portland Sky has made amends for his unsuccessful trip to Queensland with an all-the-way victory in the $160,000 Group Three Manfred Stakes (1200m) at Caulfield on Saturday. Having finished at the back of the field in the Group Three Vo Rogue Stakes (1400m) at his only run in Queensland in January, Portland Sky bounced back into form at Caulfield to land a three-quarters of a length victory. The three-year-old son of Deep Field held off the challenges of some talented gallopers with the Caulfield Guineas runners-up Aysar and last year’s Blue Diamond Stakes winner Tagaloa failing to reel in the speedy colt. Moving on from his horror trip to Queensland, Mornington-based trainer Matt Laurie is now setting his sights on some of the feature sprints in Adelaide over the Autumn carnival with Portland Sky. Laurie said races like the Group Two Euclase Stakes (1200m) and possibly the Group One

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Southern Peninsula News

Goodwood (1200m) could be on the colt’s agenda. “Happy to put a line through his run in Queensland as he trialled beautifully last week and we were very happy with him coming into today,” Laurie said post-race. “He’s got good tactical speed. He can relax and he’s got a good sprint. He’s always shown us plenty right from (being) a young horse. We’ll no doubt get the opportunity to run in something better.” Despite some classy horses looking to run him down, jockey Luke Currie said he was always confident in the race. “He’s a nice horse and he was going to win a long way out,” he said post-race. “Only went steady through the first part of it and then he kept quickening the tempo from the 600 himself and he was always going to be hard to run down. He’s a really nice horse.” Now with two Group Three victories to his name, Portland Sky holds a record of three wins from six career starts. He has accumulated $243,000 in prizemoney.

3 February 2021

Sky’s the limit: Matt Laurie’s Portland Sky wins the Group Three Manfred Stakes at Caulfield on Saturday. Picture: Supplied


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Spotlight falls on Wallace Cup SOCCER

Wallace Cup action: Langwarrin midfielder Callum Goulding in possession as Mornington midfielder Kyron Kerr closes him down during last year’s cup final. Picture: John Punshon

By Craig MacKenzie THE ninth staging of the Wallace Cup takes place this Saturday at Monterey Reserve. The annual charity event commemorates the contribution to the local game by the late Steve Wallace, who died on 19 July 2011 at the age of 54. Wallace was a Langwarrin life-member and former club president, committeeman, coach, player and Bayside League referee. Along with former Pines president Alan Hodkinson he played a pivotal role in forming the soccer liaison committee that has provided an important line of communication with Frankston council for clubs in that municipality. Mornington has won the Wallace Cup five times while Langwarrin broke its duck last year with its inaugural success. However Mornington has been hit by injury and is expected to be without star English imports Josh Heaton and Josh Hine, multiple NPL Golden Boot winner Milos Lujic and defender Andy McIntyre. The other clubs in this year’s 10-team tournament are Peninsula Strikers, Skye United, Frankston Pines, Baxter, Seaford United, Somerville Eagles, Rosebud and Mount Eliza. The day kicks off at 12 noon when Baxter takes on Somerville (Pitch 1) and Rosebud clashes with Mount Eliza (Pitch 2). The semi-finals kick off at 3pm and 4pm and the final is at 5.15pm. Work on a multimillion dollar revamp of Monterey Reserve is due to start shortly. The project includes demolition of the existing social rooms and dressing rooms and a complete rebuild and Pines will take up residency at the multipurpose sporting facility at Wedge Road in Carrum Downs throughout the coming season. Last Thursday night Pines defeated State 2 outfit Peninsula Strikers 4-1 in a friendly at Monterey Reserve. CJ Hodgson (2), Tito Vodawaqa and Jordan Avraham scored for Pines while Strikers’ reply was an own goal from Scott Webster whose twin brother Simon played for Pines after leaving Doveton due to work commitments. Avraham’s skill was pivotal in two of Pines’ goals. He set up the opener for Hodgson in the first half with a ball over the top curled with the outside of his right foot and syncing with the striker’s diagonal run. Hodgson’s first touch was excellent enabling him to then slot the ball past a stranded Robbie Acs from close range. Avraham’s goal came from a second half freekick bent into the top corner. On Saturday Strikers drew 2-2 with Chelsea at Centenary Park. All four goals came in the second half and Chelsea led twice with goals from Max Timuska-Carr and Adrian Lotca. Jai Power scored Strikers’ opener thanks to a Shane Tagliaferro through ball while Danny Brooks was brought down late in the game inside the area and Tom Hawkins converted from the spot.

Chelsea are closing in on the signing of Dylan Scott from Mornington. “He’s a great pick-up as he is a quality player. He is a cousin of our captain Connor Scott,” Chelsea gaffer Carlo Melino said. Scott, 23, can play in midfield or central defence. Also on Saturday Pines downed Skye 3-1 with goals from Fijian internationals Tito Vodawaqa (2) and Savenaca Baledrokadroka. Mark O’Connor scored for Skye. It was Pines’ third straight State 2 scalp in January, a run that started with a 4-3 victory over Berwick City. The other Saturday friendlies saw Baxter draw 3-3 with State 2 opponent Mooroolbark at Baxter Park while Aspendale Stingrays defeated Tullamarine 3-2 at Kingston Heath Soccer Complex. Baxter was impressive against an opponent two divisions higher. Matt McDermott, Nathan Yole, Nico Juric and Lawrence Komba were missing from the Baxter matchday squad. But central defender Charley Hunt, central midfielder Jack Buttery, left back Liam Duff, attacking midfielder Nat Daher and striker Drew Reid stepped up to the mark. Daher was the pick of the bunch and his performance was highlighted by a stunning move that netted the equaliser after Mooroolbark had gone 3-1 up in the second period and looked to have a fitness edge on the home team. Daher received the ball near the halfway line and immediately spun past his opponent then unleashed a precise through ball that enabled Lewis Gibson to charge through on the right before striking a firm low shot that went in off the far post. Baxter’s other goals came from Luke Grant’s looping first half header and a Ben Meiklem fol-

low up after Daher’s second-half penalty had been saved. State 5 South outfit Aspendale led its State 5 North opponent Tullamarine 2-0 at half-time with goals from James Macnab and Kenan Nuhanovic but Tullamarine hit back early in the second half to level. Matt Bruce came on late in the game and grabbed the winner. Aspendale’s best were Nuhanovic, Macnab and Ben Garside.

The big clash on Sunday was the Lawton Park match-up between NPL 2 side Langwarrin and NPL 1 visitor Eastern Lions. A second half goal from Lions’ striker Ardi Ahmeti settled the issue. Other Sunday friendlies saw Seaford United go down 7-4 to Hampton Park United at North Seaford Reserve while Mount Martha lost 5-4 to Mount Eliza at Mount Eliza Secondary College. Dylan Waugh scored all of Seaford’s goals and his haul included a first-half hat-trick. Mount Martha’s scorers were Ali Giordano (2) and Marcus Poda (2) and Mount Martha coach Chris Sanderson used a squad of 14 made up of six senior squad players, some triallists and some reserve squad players. “We played four 25-minute quarters in what was a cracking game and a really good hitout for both sides,” Sanderson said. Meanwhile the draw for the first and second qualifying rounds of the 2021 FFA Cup will be livestreamed on the Football Victoria facebook page at noon on Thursday 4 February. The first qualifying round is scheduled to take place on the weekend of 13/14 February. Entry for NPL and State League clubs is mandatory and clubs must complete the FFA Cup registration form by Wednesday 3 February. The FFA Cup will retain its name while Football Australia (previously Football Federation Australia) consults with the football community throughout 2021 regarding the possible renaming of the competition. This week’s friendlies: WEDNESDAY: Seaford Utd v Mount Eliza (North Seaford Reserve, 7pm). SATURDAY: 2021 Wallace Cup (Monterey Reserve starting at 12 noon), Pakenham United v Chelsea (IYU Recreation Reserve, 6pm & 8pm), Dandenong South v Aspendale Stingrays (George Andrews Reserve, 1pm & 3 pm).

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3 February 2021

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3 February 2021

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