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Southern Peninsula

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Wednesday 30 September 2020

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au Off they go: Sailors participating in Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron’s Sailability program take to the water.

Wind’s in their sails

BLAIRGOWRIE Yacht Squadron’s Sailability program has won this year’s Australian Sailing Victorian Inclusion Program of the Year award. The aim of the program is to make sailing available to participants from all backgrounds and of all ages and abilities. Volunteers from a group of 30 run the program on Tuesdays, at weekends and on holidays. Since 2002 donations and the use of the yacht squadron’s facilities have enabled a fleet of eight Hansa 303 purpose-built yachts to get young sailors on the water. Footage of the yachts in action and stories from those involved can be seen on YouTube (search BYS 303 Have a go). For information on BYS Sailability 303 sailing contact Brian Jones at 0305@gmail.com or call 0466 273 874.

Candidates debate on social media Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au THE 43 candidates lining up for the 11 seats on Mornington Peninsula Shire have little opportunity for physical interaction with voters, making this the first election that may be decided in large part by social media. Most candidates have Facebook and other social media accounts and online debate has, in some cases, been fast and furious for weeks. The Victorian Electoral Commission will mail out ballot packs between 6 and 8 October and votes must be either mailed back or delivered to electoral offices by 6pm on Friday 23 October. Ominously for some, results will be announced on Friday 13 November. Voting is compulsory for all those on

the state electoral role, including those aged 70 and over. Despite a concerted effort by the Municipal Association of Victoria to encourage women councillors, the number of male candidates on the peninsula outnumber women by 26 to 17. Five of the current councillors are women but three are not seeking reelection. The MAV wanted the elections postponed until next year because of COVID-19 restrictions but was overruled by the state government. Although candidates can letterbox pamphlets, they are not allowed to door knock. Just five of the 11 current councillors are seeking re-election, which means a majority of the new council will be first-timers, although at least one can-

didate has been a councillor in another municipality. Several have previously stood unsuccessfully for the shire. Issues likely to confront the new council include protecting the green wedge, opposing AGL’s plans for a gas import terminal at Crib Point (a decision to be made by the state and federal governments) and the ongoing fractious relationship between the shire and Peninsula Aero Club over operations at Tyabb airfield. The new council could vote to abandon a showdown looming over the airfield at the Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal early in the new year. The ongoing investigations by the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission (IBAC) could also see former councillors named over their involvement with previous coun-

cil decisions affecting the Martha Cove marina and housing development at Safety Beach. There are no councillors seeking reelection in the three-councillor Briars Ward, which has 15 candidates, or single-councillor Watson Ward, with five candidates. At least three Watson Ward candidates can be regarded as being proPeninsula Aero Club, while another has been a prominent member of Save Westernport, the community group opposing AGL’s gas import plan. Candidates: Briars Ward Despi O’Connor, Janet Street, Peter Orton, Julia McCarthy, Anthony Marsh, Wayne Hinton, Barbara O’Reilly, Andrew Ward, Belinda Rodman, Jill Stanszus, Stephen Batty, Peter Fitzgerald,

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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020


NEWS DESK

Fast food not to shire’s taste Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

In the post: One of Mornington Peninsula Shire Council’s rejection letters received by an objector.

10 September, to “provide the community with more information and to answer your questions”. (“Q&A ses-

notice of the council refusal last week. Steve Armstrong said: “Even though this has gone to VCAT, it’s still a great community achievement so far. Well done everyone. It just means we don’t give up on the fight yet. It’s not over until it’s over.” Senior planner Rochelle Reinhardt told the planning services committee the proposed use and development of the site was inappropriate, and the applicant had not suitably responded to the applicable policies. She said it was an overdevelopment of the site, and that insufficient information had been provided to assess its creation of light, noise, odour and litter, as well as contamination risks and impacts on neighbouring vegetation.

Check for out-of-towners

Net gain Up they go: The Sorrento Portsea RSL clubrooms under construction. Picture: Supplied

RSL building for the future SORRENTO Portsea RSL is catering to increased membership by adding a billiard room and undercover outdoor function area to its clubrooms. “This will enable us to welcome more people to our many community events including Anzac Day and Australia Day,” club president John Prentice said. The expansion will assist Tom Katz, the club’s “live” music program, to stage more artists and shows

next year. “We are increasing our venue seating capacity to 150 plus standing,” Mr Prentice said. “Our summer shows are booked ready to go. Post-COVID-19 will be an exciting time.” The non-profit Sorrento Portsea RSL is run by volunteers and has a fully self-financed building program.

CRICKET is getting an upgrade at Olympic Park, Rosebud, thanks to $100,000 from the Community Cricket Program. “This funding will inspire even more Rosebud boys, girls, men and women to sign up for Rosebud Cricket Club and enjoy the benefits of a healthy and active lifestyle while utilising this fantastic new facility,” Nepean MP Chris Brayne said. The project includes construction of multi-use four bay cricket nets with retractable netting as well as a publicly accessible cricket pitch.

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POLICE say they are ramping up patrols to prevent out-of-towners flocking to holiday hotspots on the Mornington Peninsula. The aim is to ensure that only peninsula residents or others travelling with a permitted purpose arrive in the area. Police say they will have a “highly visible” presence at checkpoints on arterial roads, mobile vehicle checkpoints and ongoing patrols as part of Operation Sentinel. A note on the police Eyewatch social media page said anyone pulled over at a vehicle checkpoint could expect to have their licence and work permit checked by police and their residential address confirmed. “Police will also be proactively patrolling popular locations, such as beaches, parks and other areas where people are expected to visit, to ensure that everyone is adhering to the current stage four restrictions. “While these checkpoints may cause some inconvenience for local residents, it’s important to remember that they are an important component in stopping the spread of coronavirus and keeping the community safe.” For information about the latest restrictions visit the Department of Health and Human Services at dhhs.vic.gov.au/coronavirus or call the hotline 1800 675 398. Or visit DHHS page on Facebook.

TOURISM related businesses in the Mornington Peninsula’s hinterland are being offered free membership of the Hinterland Tourism Association for the 2020-21 financial year. “Coronavirus and social restrictions are having a devastating impact on local tourism and we are exploring new ways to support local businesses during these challenging times,” association president Nelly Shaw said. “It’s important that we keep connected and try to emerge stronger when this crisis is over and as restrictions are gradually lifted”. The volunteer-run association supports its more than 80 members with information about government assistance, virtual networking, business to business e-news updates and local government advocacy. The hinterland includes Red Hill, Red Hill South, Main Ridge, Arthurs Seat, Merricks, Merricks North, Balnarring and Dromana. New members normally pay $154 which includes the updating of member tourism signboards at Arthurs Seat and outside the Red Hill south shopping centre, production of 25,000 tear-off maps and hosted events and social gatherings. “At this stage, we will not be including map production and signage renewal as a free member benefit in 2020-21, however we will continue to keep our members connected and informed with e-news, zoom networking, local tourism representation and social media promotion.” Ms Shaw said. As well the free membership businesses will be listed on the association’s website (mphinterland.com. au) as well as social media pages on Facebook and Instagram (@mphinterland). Businesses wanting to receive the benefits of free membership should email info@mphinterland.com.au for an application form.

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SMALL business owners are breathing a sigh of relief after Mornington Peninsula Shire Council knocked back plans to build a large convenience store on a busy corner site at Safety Beach. The council received almost 1000 objections to AA Holdings’ proposal to build a McDonald’s restaurant on the site of the company’s existing BP service station, corner Marine Drive and Nepean Highway. The high level of local opposition prompted the council to hold an online community information session,

sion eyes fast-food outlet” The News 25/8/20) Word of the proposal spread quickly among nearby small business owners who said they feared the fast-food giant would drive them out of business. (“No fries with that” The News 14/7/20). They said heavy traffic and litter would stifle trade and “change the whole dynamics and landscape” of the area. AA Holdings has not commented publicly on its proposal, but it is expected to appeal against council’s decision to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal. The Beach Patrol Safety Beach/ Dromana social media page lit up with comments when objectors received

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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020


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30 September 2020

PAGE 5


Southern Peninsula

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NEWS DESK

Agents zoom in to press their case Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au MORNINGTON Peninsula travel agents held a zoom meeting with Flinders MP Greg Hunt last week to discuss their struggles under the pandemic and to seek tailored financial support. The “gathering of the troops” was arranged by Mornington Travel principal Lee Midson, Thursday 24 September. The 30 agents – all members of the Australian Federation of Travel Agents – are seeking federal and state government support for a $125 million travel agent support package “given the travel downturn and refund backlog”. They briefed Mr Hunt on the “critical” need for financial aid for their businesses, which “are all locally owned and all employing local people”. “Retail travel agencies like mine are overwhelmingly small businesses,” Ms Midson said. “The majority handle international travel services which can account for 75-95 per cent of gross sales.” While all the agents are on JobKeeper, and thankful for any stimulus for jobs, Ms Midson said they were all “working harder than ever”. “It’s critical that we stay open [because] it can take longer to cancel and try to obtain refunds for our clients on flights, cruises and in hotels than it was to make the original bookings,” she said. “Agents have to be on the case every day… there’s hours of constant moni-

Fellow travellers: Mornington Travel’s Lee Midson says agents are “all trying to navigate their way through a challenging situation”. Picture: Yanni

toring [yet] we are unable to generate income due to the travel restrictions and domestic and international border closures.” The agents told Mr Hunt federal government support was “essential” to help them help their customers into 2021. “Mr Hunt got it,” said Ms Midson, who has lived on the peninsula for 30 years. “He understood where we were coming from and urged us to continue actively pushing the importance of our sector. While he said he can't promise anything he’s on the expenditure re-

view committee and that will help.” The agents expect the first international borders to open will likely be New Zealand and the Pacific region. The uncertainty is causing problems: “Without a known date it’s impossible for agents to make future bookings,” Ms Midson said. This is preventing their earning commissions on sales. “We need our domestic borders to be open so that, hopefully, future demand for domestic travel can help kick start a recovery in the travel and tourism industry.”

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LAW AND COUNCIL POLITICS: A ROUGH MIX Councillor Hugh Fraser in conversation with freelance journalist Mike Hast

How did all this experience translate to becoming a councillor?

You were first elected to council in 2012 to represent Nepean Ward and re-elected in 2016 and have been a barrister for many years. What sort of work did you do?

It wasn’t easy at first. In court there are rules, ethics and procedures, courtesy and high standards of presentation. There is an independent judge who runs their own court and decides the matter according to the evidence and the law.

Each decade brought a new challenge. In the 1980s, it was insolvency work. In the 1990s I acted for the trustees of major superannuation funds dealing with total and permanent disability claims in the courts. In the 2000s, I did a great deal of work for the Registrar of Titles in land and title fraud litigation – all intermixed with a host other matters including banking, finance, wills, estates, trusts, contracts, property, and misleading or deceptive conduct. This work was mixed in with a stint as chairman of my list of barristers (barristers are organised into lists with a clerk as the administrator). Then I was elected by the Victorian Bar to the profession’s regulator in Victoria – the Legal Services Board.

precise use of the English language and the court’s reliance on counsel appearing before it.

There I worked with its chairperson Colin Neave. He later became the Commonwealth Ombudsman. Colin ran a brilliant, fast but very fair and even-handed meeting. I learnt from him how to efficiently and pleasantly work through a raft of complex issues within a limited meeting time. But what about your early career in the law, before becoming a barrister? I was an associate partner at Russell Kennedy (coincidentally now solicitors to the shire) and then an associate to Federal Court Judge Ray Northrop. I learnt a lot from him about the highest standards of integrity, “keeping court papers under control” (there is nothing worse than the sight of a barrister fumbling with his papers in court),

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Southern Peninsula News

He was a delight to work with (and later appear before) and I enjoyed my 20 months as his associate, working throughout Australia. One case was the celebrated case of Brian Adamson who wanted a transfer between Aussie Rules football clubs. The hearings ranged from Perth to Adelaide and Melbourne with top silks appearing before the court. Adamson obtained his transfer. I then read for the Victorian Bar in the chambers of Ken Hayne. It is a sort of professional apprenticeship. He went on to the High Court and more recently was the Banking Royal Commissioner. It was no surprise to see how well he ran the commission – this was how he ran his chambers and later his court. Careless and woolly thinking, and poor presentation and paperwork were ruthlessly, but fairly, not tolerated.

30 September 2020

In a council meeting, a councillor can have the best argument in the world but, without the numbers on your side, it matters not a fig. Interruptions, poor behaviour and silly tactical points of order can be rife and disruptive. Rulings from the chair may go one way or the other depending on which way the wind is blowing. You need to adapt, be thick-skinned, focused and well prepared – with your papers in order! Individual residents’ concerns must not be overlooked or swallowed up in council management processes. This can be tough going. Councillors should have (and used to have) free access, like the community, to the shire administrative staff. This now occurs less often. Access is now highly regulated; there are policies and controls. Staff members are emboldened to resist. It can make councillor advocacy for residents very hard.

You refer to restrictive policies – what about psychological or physical barriers? These barriers instinctively go up because of locked security doors, security passes and “confidential” information, and “behind closed doors” meetings. Some planning officers no longer present their reports to open council. Their bosses do it instead. It’s a cultural problem and is getting worse. It’s difficult to change and extract accountability – even more so

now during Covid-19 restrictions with “virtual” meetings and staff behind computer screens in “zoom” and “teams” meetings. How then does the work get done?

The shire is fortunate to have many hard-working, highly skilled officers, which I enjoy working with. Our professional engineers, climate change teams and community services staff deliver an amazing range of innovative capital works and services we can all see in the shire and community.

It’s basic common sense to interest the officers in projects – to work with and not against them – to make it a pleasant experience – and take the flak from members of the community who claim to know better. Yes, community consultation is all-important but rudeness towards council officers should not be tolerated. I have read the most appalling emails sent by individuals to management. How do you engage with the community?

There’s great satisfaction in community engagement, problem-solving and just plain “getting things done”. My monthly Nepean Ward “community coalition” meeting is a flexible, informal structure started by my predecessor, Tim Rodgers when he first came on council. Meetings are strictly 90 minutes and they work well. I also meet with ratepayers by appointment on Monday afternoons at the Rosebud council offices to solve problems – although Covid-19 makes this impossible at this stage. Zoom is a poor substitute.

The community demand for capital works and services is very high, particularly with recent waves of longer-term visitors. Minds impatiently

turn to roads and footpaths, playgrounds and other infrastructure that was adequate but is no longer.

It’s easy to underestimate the amount of work required for “simply” building a footpath. The popular Point Nepean Road footpath through Blairgowrie to Rye is a good example. It was constructed over almost 10 years and cost $3 million. It looks fabulous, winding attractively around native vegetation, but required major design with its bridges, boardwalks, retaining walls and many intersections to cross. It was all done with council money; no government grants for this type of project. You’ve had an association with Nepean Ward for at least 40 years. How did this occur?

My parents built a house on a hill at Rye in 1971. My wife Clarinda and I bought it from them in 1995 and we added a large dining room to accommodate our large extended families. It has a view but can be very windy, especially in a nor’wester. It’s on the cormorants’ flight path from Somers and Tootgarook wetlands. Their V formations gliding over to Swan Bay at Queenscliff are a magnificent sight. The Mornington Peninsula is a fabulous place to live and work with its bays, oceans and beaches (10 per cent of Victoria’s coastline) and its green rolling hinterland. It’s a precious, delicate legacy to protect and pass on better to the next generation. Email: hwfraser@vicbar.com.au or mobile: 0418 379 335; hughfraser-morningtonpeninsula.com Authorised by Hugh Fraser, 12 Michael Street, Rye 3941


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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

PAGE 7


NEWS DESK

Extending 5G on the peninsula TELSTRA has switched on 5G sites at Somerville and Cape Schanck. “We’re pushing ahead with the roll out of Telstra 5G and we’re reaching more and more people with the next generation of mobile technology,” regional general manager Loretta Willaton said. “Every week we’re expanding Telstra 5G to more areas so, as more 5G devices go on sale, customers can have the latest devices on Australia’s best network.” More than 1500 Telstra 5G sites are on-air across “selected areas” of 53 Australian cities and towns, Ms Willaton said. “More than 1000 suburbs nationally are more than half covered by Telstra 5G and more than 10 million people live, work or pass through Telstra’s 5G footprint every day.” Ms Willaton said Telstra was continuing to invest in 5G. “In the five years to the end of June, [it] invested $7.5 billion in our mobile network nationally with much of this on 5G,” she said. “Not only that, earlier this year we brought forward $500 million of capital expenditure from the second half of FY21 into calendar year 2020 to help us accelerate the 5G roll-out at a time when Australia needs access to the digital economy more than ever.” Coverage maps are at telstra.com.au/ coverage-networks/our-coverage. Areas in Mornington Peninsula and Melbourne bayside with 5G are: Arthurs Seat, Blairgowrie, Cape Schanck, Capel Sound, Carrum

Connected: A 5G crew installs equipment at one of Telstra’s Mornington Peninsula sites. Picture: Supplied

Downs, Crib Point, Dromana, Fingal, Frankston, Hastings, HMAS Cerberus, McCrae, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha*, Pearcedale, Portsea, Rosebud*, Rye, Safety Beach, Seaford, Seaford, Somerville**, Sorrento and Tootgarook. (*One third of sites are switched on at Mount Martha and Rosebud; **the western part of Somerville is soon to be switched on.)

Art Red Hill returns - online THE 40-year-old Art Red Hill will go virtual from 18-30 October despite being delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic. Participating artists include the Mornington Peninsula’s Janet and Mike Green, Neil Williams, Michael Leeworthy, Sophie Perez and Elizabeth Clancy, along with Melbourne artists Skye Jeffreys and Ingrid Brooker. Their works will be among hundreds by artists from the peninsula and around Australia available to view and buy. Their work will include

paintings, photography and works on paper, jewellery, glass and ceramics, and sculpture in all sizes. “There is art to suit every budget and quality remains high with organisers only offering works that meet Art Red Hill standards,” co-convenor Marlo Reyneke said. “Art Red Hill is such an important part of our community and has been connecting people of all ages to art for four decades. This has been a tough year for so many people and we were really disappointed that we had to de-

lay the 40th anniversary show earlier this year due to the pandemic. “We’re thrilled that the show can now go ahead online so that everyone can be inspired by the beautiful works. It’s also a great opportunity for artists to sell their works with all profits going to Red Hill Consolidated School.” View the show online at artredhill. com.au from 18 October. Art Red Hill is taking artist submissions at artredhill.com.au Submissions close 16 October.

EVERYTHING WE’RE DOING IS MAKING A DIFFERENCE Thank you Victoria. As hard as this is, every sacrifice we’re making is making a difference. But we can’t stop now, or lose everything we’ve worked for. We will get through this together.

For details go to vic.gov.au/CORONAVIRUS Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

PAGE 8

Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020


Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

THIS OCTOBER

Charges after crash

VOTE 1

A SAFETY Beach man has been interviewed by police and released pending summons following a “serious” car crash at Baxter, 6.30pm, Sunday 20 September. The man, 43, was driving a Holden Caprice which collided with a Nissan Navara ute which flipped onto its roof in the south-bound lanes of Peninsula Link near the BP service station. The Nissan ended up in the north-bound lanes with the driver receiving serious injuries. Senior Constable Edan Luff, of Somerville Highway Patrol, is urging anyone who saw the collision, or who has dash-cam footage, to email him at VP40746@police.vic.gov. au , or call Crime Stoppers 1800 333000 or email bddy.me/2ZR4EWQ quoting reference T20200016912.

SARAH RACE FOR NEPEAN.

(Mornington Peninsula Shire)

Tools stolen TRADIES have been hard hit in the Balnarring area, with thieves stealing more than $17,000 worth of tools overnight, Monday 21 September. Detective Senior Sergeant Al Paxton, of Somerville CIU, said tools including drop saws, laser levels, nailing guns and drills had been stolen from utilities parked in Seabreeze and Fauconshawe streets. Anyone with information is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Fire at house FAULTY electrical equipment is being blamed for a fire at a house at Mornington last week. Detective Senior Sergeant Al Paxton, of Somerville CIU, said the blaze damaged a “small area” of the house in Iluka Place while the occupants slept, 10.40pm, Tuesday 22 September. Mornington Fire Brigade attended.

Ute seized again SOMERVILLE Highway Patrol members driving a vehicle equipped with automatic num-

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ber plate recognition last week tracked down a Frankston man in Brunel Road, Seaford, for the second time this year. They did a quick U-turn and found the green Holden ute beside some factories on Stephenson Road, 12pm, Thursday 17 September. The 36-year-old driver had his ute impounded again for at least a month with a release fee of $961. He will, once again, be summonsed to appear at Frankston Magistrates’ Court at a later date. Police said the ANPR-equipped vehicles were constantly patrolling Frankston and Mornington Peninsula roads. They can alert police to passing vehicles which are stolen, have false/stolen plates, are unregistered, or which cars are likely to be driven by unlicensed drivers.

#JoinTheRace www.sarahracefornepean.com Authorised by S Race, Candidate for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council 2020 (Nepean Ward) PO Box 407, Rye, VIC, 3941

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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

PAGE 9


LOCKDOWN PICTURES THE weather definitely unleashed a flurry of picture taking over the past week, with contrasting images coming from the calm of a sunset at Blairgowrie by Deb Jordan, left, and Sue Brabender capturing the waves crashing against Mornington pier during one particularly windy day, below left. Grace Fanning, right, looked back on a deserted Dromana beach. But spring is here, as evidenced by Margaret Mead’s backyard lily, right, Glenys Slade’s poinsetta, below, and the blossom hunting bee spotted by Steve Howard, below right. The picture of a hopeful sign on the footpath in last week’s Lockdown Pictures was taken by Lyne Hendrix. Readers are invited to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: lockdown@mpnews.com.au

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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020


‘Map’ shows the way on climate Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au AN “ambitious” climate emergency plan has been adopted by Mornington Peninsula Shire Council one year after declaring a “climate emergency”. The Ensuring Our Future: Our Climate Emergency Response plan aims to guide the peninsula towards having no carbon emissions by 2040 through seven “summits” and 21 “action steps”. However, the shire says the outcome “can only be achieved by the community and the shire working together”. A 10-year program includes targets around leadership and governance, climate advocacy, zero carbon energy, resilient and adaptive community, sustainable transport and travel, sustainable land use and environmental restoration, circular economy and zero waste. The shire says it was the 34th council in Australia to declare a climate emergency - there are now 96 - while its plan is one of the first six developed and adopted by an Australian municipality. The mayor Cr Sam Hearn likened the seven “summits” to a “map to guide us away from the dangerous emergency situation and the kinds of impacts that should still be stark in our mind from last summer”. “The shire is ready to lead by example and show the way,” he said. “In August 2019, the shire declared a climate emergency. Since 2016, we’ve had a five-year plan for the shire’s operations to become carbon neutral, which we’re on track to achieve by 2021,” he said.

“The need to act to stop climate change and create a better future story is more urgent than ever.” The shire says it is “focused” on achieving the targets of the plan and has accelerated some projects based on the climate emergency declaration. This has resulted in environmentally sustainable design being included in the planning scheme, it says. Three recycled water projects are supporting agricultural growth and drought proof the peninsula. The Beyond Zero Waste Strategy was also adopted on 25 August 2020. As part of the plan the shire’s economic stimulus projects are being aligned to climate emergency objectives, including tree-lined footpaths. “Along the way, we have encountered a stark reminder that we are all connected and our current and future wellbeing is collective,” Cr Hearn said. “This year, the coronavirus pandemic brought home the fragility of our current systems and the vulnerability we have to existential threats. It has also revealed the value of local connectivity, [and] the immense power we have when we do act with a united purpose and move toward selfsustaining community. “Let’s turn that awareness into opportunity. We can each make climate-friendly choices to rebuild the economy, revitalise our community and restore nature. “The climate emergency plan looks ahead 20 years to a world in which the Mornington Peninsula community has transitioned to net zeroemissions. We know there is steep terrain ahead.” Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/climatechange

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PAGE 11


NEWS DESK

‘Sisters’ take 2020 festival online

Crittenden leads the way in wine WINEMAKER Rollo Crittenden, above, has been appointed president of Mornington Peninsula Wine , previously known as the Mornington Peninsula Vignerons Association (MPVA). This organisation represents peninsula winemakers and grapegrowers and was established in 1982. Mr Crittenden’s father Garry helped establish and is a former president of the MPVA.

Online raffle RYE Lions Club has gone online for its annual raffle, with a first prize of a $3000 10.5 metre propelled kayak and second prize of two smaller kayaks $1800. Tickets drawn 5 December. Tickets can be bought online at raffletix.com.au/ryelionskayakraffle

THIS year’s Seven Sisters October women’s only “empowerment festival” is going online due to the COVID-19 restrictions. Originally held at Mount Martha in 2012 with 350 attending, the festival this year moved to Shepparton in March, ending one day before the imposition of an Australia-wide ban on events. Mornington Peninsula-based Lauren Woodman, one of the founders of Seven Sisters, said Victorians “are feeling the toll on their mental health”. “Lack of social connection, less time outside and anxiety around health and wealth are all massive contributing factors to worsening mental health,” she said. She hopes taking the next festival online will “solve some of the worst symptoms of lockdown”. Ms Woodman, and osteopathic doctor, said the festival - now attended by “thousands” - is run by an all women’s team of more than 150 events contractors and professionals and supports 500 business and sole traders. The presenters, teachers, health professionals, coaches, therapists, speakers, musicians, market stallholders, artists, sound technicians and event staff “have been severely debilitated by the ban of events”, she said. Workshops and talks on business, health, parenting, meditation, yoga, women’s mysteries, dance, relationships, sound healing and wealth at the Shepparton festival would be available online 16-18 October. “The festival will offer more than 80 live workshops on Zoom, which will be recorded and made available

PART of the Seven Sisters Festival at Mount Martha was camping out. after the event for guests to continue to watch at their own time,” Ms Woodman said. She said her life “changed forever” after attending a “women’s circle” in 2011. “The experience changed the way I related to myself and other women.

Burn off restrictions eased for October Mornington Peninsula Shire will again ease burn off restrictions on small properties throughout October 2020 to allow residents to burn off for fire prevention purposes. Coronavirus has had a significant impact on all of us, please consider the potential impacts of smoke on your neighbours if you must burn off or have no alternative to remove vegetation.

For the month of October, Open Air Burning is permitted only on Fridays and Saturdays between 9am and 4pm on land between 500 and 1500 square metres, provided that: • your property is within the Mornington Peninsula Shire Bushfire Prone Area • for the purposes of fire prevention • no more than 1 cubic metre of vegetation is burnt at any one time • the fire is not within 10 metres of any neighbouring dwelling • the General Fire Safety Provisions are followed at all times.

Outside of October, Open Air Burning is prohibited on properties smaller than 1500 square metres.

Open Air Burning regulations for land more than 1500 square metres and more than 40,000 square metres remain the same.

For more information visit our web page or contact the Environment Protection Unit: mornpen.vic.gov.au/openairburning 5950 1050 PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

It installed a deep pride in being a woman; in appreciating the mysteries of my body and tuning into my inner knowing. “The experience of gathering with women to share each other’s stories, wisdom and experiences, felt deep, felt tribal and it connected to a core

part of me.” Ms Woodman said the coronavirus pandemic was “a time where women need this connection, knowledge and support, now more than ever.” Tickets for the October festival are $97. Details: sevensistersonline.com/ schedule Keith Platt


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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

PAGE 13


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Aussies can fix anything, even the coronavirus recovery So much gloom and doom about how hard and long it will be to come out of the post coronavirus downturn, unemployment and national debt. We are Aussies and we will turn this around better and faster than the rest of the world. We have done it before and we will do it again. Let’s look at how we recovered after World War II when there were blackouts, curfews, rationing, people suffering from shell shock (PTSD), money was tight, business had been shut down, unemployment and, of course, everyone knew of deaths or serious injury suffered during the war. We pulled ourselves up by the boot straps and started to rebuild our country, our lives and our way of life. This was all done with 9am to 5pm shopping and pubs closing at 6pm. On Sundays most things were closed. Yet, we recovered quite quickly, building Aussie lifestyles that were the envy of the world. If our current “leaders” cannot lift their game to review that history we will find leaders who can lead us out of this. Our Aussie mindset and ability to “fix anything with a bit of fencing wire” will come through in new ideas and inventions, creating new jobs and businesses. We may need to wear masks for a while and get coronavirus vaccine shots. For a while we will holiday in Ballarat or Ballina instead of Barcelona. We will need to support our local farmers and industries, even if it costs a bit more. Let’s stop all this gloom and doom. We can choose to get over this quickly and be better than ever. Let’s start to prepare and think about how we can do it, because we have got nothing better to do right now. Brian Nankervis, Mornington

Don’t lose compassion All lives are of real value. It does not matter if they are black or white, female or male, sick or disabled, young or old, all should be of equal importance. One could argue that in real life this is not always so, but the important thing is that it should be, always. Forget this nonsense that has come into the thoughts of a number of Australians in the last month or so that older lives should be sacrificed to the economy “they have had their turn” and it is OK if young people may suffer illness and sometimes permanent injury from the virus, for the sake of the economy. A healthy economy is paramount to our wellbeing. We will recover from the damage done to it, just as we will recover from the virus. Don’t let us throw our morality down the gully trap. We will persevere and survive; we are strong Victorians. Mary Lane, Mornington

Quarry questions As a resident of Dromana and a passionate advocate for our environment, I am completely amazed by the spin being produced by the Ross Trust and Hillview Quarries regarding the proposal to quarry our beautiful bushland on Arthurs Seat for the next 70 years. So that everyone is aware of the full facts, perhaps these organisations can show the true size of the proposed quarry, the amount of bushland they are going to remove and the amount of dust generated by blasting, quarrying and many, many truck movements along Boundary Road, Dromana and other smaller roads? The Ross Trust website mentions “backing our biodiversity conservation strategy”, “ensuring Victoria’s biodiversity is conserved, protected and valued by all as part of a healthy and resilient environment” and “protecting Victoria’s threatened habitats and species”. How can the Ross Trust have these values but then apply to quarry virgin bushland on Arthurs Seat – a hole in the hillside 190 metres deep, removing 38 hectares of bush to create a quarry 43 hectares in size (four to five times the size of the current quarry)? How about being honest and up front so everyone gets to know the true facts and show the true size of the proposed quarry?

PAGE 14

Southern Peninsula News

If this goes ahead you can say goodbye to high conservation value bushland, nestled in a state park as well as the health of local residents and say goodbye to tourism. Who would want to drive down and see part of the beautiful hillside removed? Once gone, it is gone forever. It has been left to Planning Minister Richard Wynne to decide, but what about the community. Alison Manning, Dromana

Government ignorant I totally agree with the mayor [Cr Sam Hearn] and feel that the state government doesn’t know what it’s doing (“Shire zoning makes sense mayor” The News 2/9/20). The government has implemented a disastrous lockdown with what appears to be limited thought and consultation after its own monumental stuff up. It doesn’t end there. It initially refused to use the contact tracing software that was offered until it eventually realised that NSW was doing it so much better. Sure, the numbers have come down, but I believe that would have still happened with a less strict lockdown and probably faster with better contact tracing. Unfortunately, the election is some way off as I don’t know one person that would vote for the government after this terrible performance and double standards (referring to not fining family groups in Casey). Mask wearing, I totally agree in and around shops and waiting rooms, but out walking and walking the dog? Come on. I may get within five metres of someone else walking, but runners are often only 1.5 metres away without a mask, where is the sense? David Milne, Mount Eliza

Negative Opposition I am led to believe that if the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, had used police to quarantine travellers in hotels, the Opposition leader, Michael O’Brien, would have screamed “police state”. No matter what Labor does, it’s wrong. Nor was it mandatory to use the armed forces, it seems it was an option, deemed not to be the best one. The failure was trustingly delegating the responsibility for this simple task to private security contractors. A mistake. Contractors will always maximise profits for the owner or shareholders. Profit has to be top priority. Many will cut corners, reduce standards, employ cheaper labour, sometimes even get away with negligence. Compare privately-run aged nursing homes to state government ones. Michael O’Brien is always negative, doesn’t offer constructive criticism, always looking for a “gotcha” moment and failing. Forever just nagging like a bitter wife. He is the best asset the Labor party has; in fact, I sometimes wonder how much they are paying him. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

Pathetic government We have a new descriptor for politicians from one of your correspondents. Pathetic. It certainly applies to the Premier Dan Andrews and his government. Never mind all the scandalous behaviour that went on before. We now have the pathetic handling of the coronavirus quarantine debacle. He may have started off in this pandemic with some defensible actions but now we have Victoria converted to a police state, early states of emergency and disaster now prolonged with connivance of minor parties in the Upper House (what deals were offered?), and no one prepared to take responsibility for the now pathetic state of affairs. No one can explain where the oppressive curfew came from. I believe the parlous state and inadequacy of the Victorian health department can be sheeted home to Andrews and his time as health minister. The way the population is treated is worse than any socialist state and the police are in a frenzy of domination of an initially co-operative

30 September 2020

and accepting populous but now rapidly turning to anger. The pathetic Andrews government is trying to turn a lot of public servants into deputies with the power to invade peoples’ homes for very nebulous reasons. That is truly pathetic. Peter Grey, Rye

Region: think twice It seems rather shortsighted of Mornington Peninsula Shire to try to get the peninsula rezoned as regional because of the pandemic restrictions (“Shire zoning makes sense - mayor” The News 2/9/20). We are now at the stage where restrictions will be eased and life returning to a new normal. In asking to be zoned regional the shire needs to consider how it will effect our future funding and our relationship to metropolitan Melbourne. While I do consider the peninsula as regional the phone numbers are different and there is little public transport, for instance - it is a big step to take and the shire and the community need to carefully consider the pros and cons of taking such a step. The restaurant owner taking legal action against the curfew is drawing comparisons between Mussolini and the state government (“Court challenge to power of the Premier” The News 22/9/20). Under the Mussolini regime she would be unable to take an action to court and probably would have been arrested and imprisoned, most likely in secret. The only government that conducts secret trials in Australia is the federal government in the cases of Q11, Witness K and Bernard Collaery, the latter a lawyer who was representing his client. Oppressive regimes curtail the freedom of citizens to leave the country. Again, something our federal government is doing. Marg D’Arcy, Rye

Mixed up politics The state MP for Mornington Peninsula is Liberal and the MP for Geelong Labor. One might assume there is some political bias as to why one is deemed regional and open while the other is deemed metro and closed, even though the case numbers are the opposite (“Shire zoning makes sense - mayor” The News 2/9/20). Michael Capek, Mornington Editor: The Mornington Peninsula has three state MPs: David Morris, Mornington (Liberal), Neale Burgess, Hastings (Liberal) and Chris Brayne, Nepean (Labor).

Time for reason Where did all this hate come from on the letters page? The late Victorian premier John Cain was much more circumspect than his Mornington Peninsula namesake in criticising those who had a different view of the world (“Political case” Letters 22/9/20). I wonder whether he has any views on the large pay increases that the state government and their underlings have just accepted vis a vis the thousands that they have driven to unemployment and who they expect the Commonwealth to provide for? There are other letters in last week’s paper which are inaccurate and in line with the false claims made at the last election that “they will sell Medicare if they win”. More reasoned and honest debate would enhance the stature of your letters page. Peter Strauss, Mount Eliza

Chaos theory The farcical Victorian inquiry into the hotel quarantine disaster shows an incredible spate of lies and/or an absolute admission by heads of government of their totally incompetent departments who know nothing, did nothing and could not have cared less. Are we surprised then at the chaos and lack of clarity and transparency of this totalitarian, socialist and uncaring government? It all comes from the top. Kay Grey, Rye

Flight path fears As one of the residents [surveyed by] Brewis Atkinson I support his actions in harnessing the thoughts of unhappy residents who live in the flight paths or are impacted by the air traffic from

Tyabb Airfield (“Information lacking” Letters 9/9/20). As a resident with sufficient courage to express their views on the air traffic and its direct impact on me and, despite having twice informed the president of Peninsula Aero Club that I had not complained, I was “rewarded” by at least four low level aircraft flyovers just metres from the top of our roof. My neighbour asked if I was being harassed by the airfield. A few days later we had a visit from two female police officers again asking me whether I had complained about the airfield. Am I surprised about the VCAT (Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal) situation? No. For at least 15 years I have been complaining to the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council which has pretty much paid lip service and ignored residents’ complaints in general, and set bad precedents through its lack of prompt action, particularly when it comes to the airfield. It is about time the council started to at least show some impartiality and deal with residents’ complaints, one of them being substantiated by the National Geographic finding that residents’ health is negatively impacted for those living in the vicinity of aircraft flightpaths. The council also has to address the issues of amenity, safety and privacy for residents. Shelley Beattie, Somerville

Disturbed weekends I would like to see some reduction in the noise and traffic out of Tyabb airport. The planes fly at low level over my property, whether they are taking off or landing. Some are only about 50-90 meters above the pine trees, which suggests they are lower than they should be. At times I and others in this area are bombard by planes about every 15 to 20 minutes and, when this starts early on a weekend, there goes any sense of a sleep in. While the so-called church hour is gone, I fear that this will unleash a barrage that will not be tolerable. While we have all been in lockdown, we have had peace and quiet over the skies of Somerville, Tyabb and Hastings. Clearly this is not going to last. When things return to “normal”, I would like to think that some sense of decency prevails and the noise and traffic levels will not be excessive. I would hope that the airport would be a good neighbour and respect those who live here, and respect decent hours. I cannot chainsaw or mow early, why on earth do we have to put up with this terrible noise from planes. Dr Ian Munro, Somerville

Weighty problems I strongly reject the Peninsula Aero Club president’s allegation that I used “clever and misleading wording” when referring to the lack of a legally enforceable cap on how many aircraft can take off in a day, or in an hour, from Tyabb Airfield (“Missing details” Letters 15/9/20). I make the following points in response. Firstly, it is true that there is no restriction on the number of aircraft that can take off or land at the airfield. Most aircraft that use the airfield have a weight at take-off below 2041kg and under the relevant permits the number of them that can take off or land each day is unrestricted. A restriction is placed on daily use of the airfield by aircraft weighing more than 2041kg. Secondly, local residents care about the noise aircraft make, how frequently they make it and when they make it. Because the noise an aircraft generates has much more to do with technology than weight, the over-2041kg restriction on takeoffs is overshadowed by the absence of a limit on under 2041kg take-offs. Thirdly, the permit restrictions only placed on use of the airfield by heaver aircraft, as cited by [letter writer] Jack Vevers, show exactly why the current permits need to be updated. They currently give little protection against excessive aircraft noise and mean that noise experienced by local residents can increase far above where it was in 2018/19. In addition, I noted in my letter that aircraft not on an emergency operate at night. This is also an ongoing amenity issue regarding noise. No one I know has a problem with aircraft on emergencies using the airfield 24/7. However, 90 per cent of the 827 Tyabb adults I surveyed in 2018 wanted a night-time curfew for aircraft not on an emergency. Brewis Atkinson, Tyabb


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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

VALUE FOR MONEY MOUNT ELIZA STUNNER OCCUPYING a beautifully- landscaped 792 square metre block, this charming mid-century modern home embraces the timeless architectural characteristics from an era where a premium was placed on spacious family living for a lifetime of enjoyment. Underneath the high ceilings, a free flowing floor plan opens the home up to temperate coastal breezes and a thorough renovation takes in the best elements of modern chic and rustic charm. A dreamy kitchen enjoys lashings of natural light that cascades through an eye-catching atrium window and comes complete with sweeping stone bench tops, quality appliances and a walk-in pantry. The kitchen overlooks an equally bright and resplendent open plan

HOME ESSENTIALS

lounge and dining area that spills out through bi-fold doors to the tranquil entertaining zone highlighted by a sublime solar heated, salt chlorinated pool and breakfast patio. Four excellent bedrooms - all with gas ducted heating and ceiling fans - include an upstairs and downstairs master suite with bathroom and walk-in wardrobe, and down a short hallway in the north wing are two more bedrooms with built-in robes that share the third bathroom. The downstairs master is particularly opulent with stunning parquetry floors and gorgeous exposed beams and rafters, all complemented by a sleek and soothing colour palette. Several other features to the property include a second living area upstairs and a

lovely study nook has a day-bed that captures glimpses of the enchanting roses and lavender that adorn the fabulous, well tended gardens. From the street, the property has a secure entry and a circular driveway leads up to a brilliant four-car garage. Beautifully presented in every single way, this stylish and attractive home is a real Mount Eliza beauty with the renowned attractions of the area; shops, beaches and quality schools, all close at hand. n

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ADDRESS: 1 Ti-Tree Lane, MOUNT ELIZA FOR SALE: $1,750,000 - $1,850,000 DESCRIPTION: 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 4 car AGENT: Vicki Sayers 0410 416 987, RT Edgar Mount Eliza, 82 Mt Eliza Way, Mount Eliza, 9776 3369

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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crowdersre.com.au SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

A disorderly couple strike trouble at Frankston Compiled by Cameron McCullough AT the Frankston Police Court, on Monday last, before Mr Knight, P. M and local justices, Messrs Williams, Grant, and McLean, John Daley, age 35 years, and Harriet Bailey were charged with having been drunk and disorderly in a public place, and with having been guilty of indecent conduct on the foreshore. The female was additionally charged with having used insulting language. Senior-Constable Bray gave evidence to the effect that on Saturday last, he, with Constable Delaney, arrested Daley and Bailey at Frankston. Both were intoxicated, and were behaving most indecently on the foreshore at Frankston. When arrested, the female used most disgusting language in Bay Street. Constable Delaney gave corroborative evidence. Both pleaded not guilty, and made a statement to the court. Daley said he had been working about Frankston, and had got “shickered” last Saturday through an overdose of wine. It was, he said, his first offence. Bailey stated that whilst she admitted being drunk, she was quite sure the police had made a mistake as to the immorality on the foreshore. It transpired that Bailey had seven previous convictions to her name, including a sentence at St. Kilda for vagrancy, three months at Prahran for larceny, and a period at Pentridge under the Venereal Diseases Act. On the charge of being drunk and

disorderly, accused were fined 5s or 12 hours imprisonment, and £5 or one month on the charge of indecent conduct. For the insulting language, Bailey was fined £2 or 14 days. *** WHILST motoring from Chelsea to Frankston on Sunday last, a motorist lost a wallet with £14 in it. They used to say one could pick up “a quid or two” following horses. Does not the same apply to motors? *** AT the Frankston Police Court on Monday last, Mr Henry Male was fined 10s and £1 costs for allowing his horse to stray on the railway line at Baxter. Evidence to that effect was given by the stationmaster, Mr A. T. Bowell. *** SENIOR Constable Bray, of Frankston who is at present on crutches, as a result of an injury to the knee, is getting along as well as can be expected. *** THE late Mr Pettit, editor of the “Journal”, Traralgon, died at that place last week, at the age of 74 years. Several years ago he was proprietor of this journal, and will be remembered by many Frankston residents. *** The hon. secretary of the Frankston Athletic Club, acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the following donations towards the New Years’s

Day Sports: Mr E. J. Parker, £3 3s; Mr A. E. Rogan, £1 1s; Dr. W. Atkinson Wood,: £1 1s; Dr. Maxwell, 10s 6d; Mr A. J. J. Lucas, £11s. *** THE event of the season – the Hospital Ball on Friday, Oct 1. *** THE annual meeting of the Somerville Fruitgrowers’ Horticultural and Agricultural Association will be held on Monday next, Sept 27th, at eight o’clock, in the Somerville Hall. The business includes report and balance sheet, election of officers, &c. The secretary, Mr S. S. Gault, asks for a bumper attendance. *** AT the Tanti Market, on Monday last, Adamson, Strettle & Co. Ltd (through Mr W. N. Wauchope) sold a fat bull, on account of Mr C. M. Griffith, for £29 10s to Mr H. Young, of Mornington. We think this is a record for Tanti. *** DR and Mrs S. Cameron have returned to “Yarra View”, Hawthorn, after spending the school vacation with their children at Frankston. *** ON Saturday (to-morrow), Messrs Brody and Mason will sell on the property, Gunbower Road, between Somerville and Tyabb, on account of Messrs Anderson Bros., who are leaving the district, a large quantity of farm implements and household effects. Full particulars appear in advertisement. ***

VALUABLE township property will be sold at Frankston on Tuesday next by Messrs Brody and Mason, to be immediately followed by a sale of household furniture. The auction is advertised to take place at Miss Costello’s residence, Young St. *** A CLEARING sale will be held at Bittern, on account of Mr Sam Baker, on, Wednesday, 29th Sept. The auctioneers are Messrs Adamson Strettle and Co. Pty. Ltd., and they will offer cattle, horses, implements dairy utensils, household furniture and sundries. *** CRICKET is once again claiming the attention of district sports. Mr H..S. Cusworth, the hon. sec., advertises in another column that the annual meeting of the Peninsula Cricket Association will be held at Hastings on Saturday, 2nd October, at 8 p.m. *** THE fortnightly meeting of the Frankston Progress Association will be held next Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock, in the Mechanics’ Hall. *** MAJOR Conder, and Messrs T. J McMurtrie and H. Vicars, the subcommittee appointed by the Frankston Soldiers’ Memorial Committee to organise a grand gymkhana on behalf of the Fund, have arrangements well in hand. The display will take place on Saturday, 9th October, in the Frankston Park. The co-operation of the Purple Cross has been secured, and the

event promises to be one of the most successful of its kind ever held in Frankston. The programme will be available early next week, and full details will also be advertised in the next issue of the “Standard”. *** SOME very fine designs have been submitted for the consideration of the Frankston Soldiers’ Memorial Committee, and include memorial designs varying in cost from £500 to £1500. A meeting of the committee will be held at an early date, as it is intended to proceed with the erection of the memorial without further delay. *** THE ball to be held at Frankston on Friday, 1st October, in aid of the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital, Melbourne, is creating interest right throughout the Peninsula. The chairman of the committee Mr T. J. McMurtrie, has secure some very valuable prizes for competition on the night and they will be on view in Messrs Brody and Mason’s window to-morrow evening. Full particulars may be obtained from the hon. sec., Sir Mark Brody. *** MR Manson has obtained the services of an expert shorthand and typewriting teacher from Melbourne. Those desirous of joining the class (Mondays and Wednesdays) should do so at once. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 24 September 1920

Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

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Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 22 for solutions.

THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Time Travel During Lockdown By Stuart McCullough TIME is a relative concept. Probably a second cousin twice removed. Or an uncle you see twice a year and who mumbles a lot and monopolises the cabana at family functions. (Come to think of it, that uncle may well be me.) But I’ll admit the news that our stage four lockdown would be heading into extra time, if not a penalty shoot out, was something of a blow. Not just a swift clip behind the ears, either, but a full-booted kick to the solar plexus. I’d been looking forward to a change. If I’m being honest, I was looking forward to pretty much anything. Like a pair of pants in a world of seats, this whole lockdown thing is wearing a bit thin. On father’s day, it occurred to me that I have seen my father exactly twice this year. The first occasion was his eightieth birthday party (so the chances of running into him were pretty good) at the Cuckoo Restaurant. Had I known there was a lockdown coming, I’d have spent more time talking to him. I’d have also stuffed several Bratwurst into my pockets. The second time I saw him was somewhat more incidental in nature. He was trying to light a fire. It was not going well. Any attempts to converse were consumed by both his efforts to achieve combustion and, frankly, a good deal of smoke. My father must have started thousands of fires. You’d think he’d be better at it by now. But here he was, puffing and prodding and producing so much smoke that even Deep Purple would be impressed.

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Southern Peninsula News

For months, contact with my father has been sparse and infrequent. ‘Zoom’ is out of the question and ‘Facetime’ is a lot less compelling when it’s a landline that you’re calling. When we do speak, he sounds upbeat. I’ve assumed that his appearance is unchanged, but there’s always the chance that he’s stopped shaving 30 September 2020

and has let his hair grow out. Maybe he looks like Tom Hanks in Castaway. Perhaps he’s upbeat because he’s spent the entire day talking to a volleyball. Anything is possible when it comes to my father. The way he sees it, given he’s retired he has no job to lose. As his children are all adults, he’s also off the hook

when it comes to homeschooling. (From what I can tell, it’s highly likely that ‘homeschooling’ will be officially recognised as one Dante’s circles of hell. Most probably as a mezzanine to ‘limbo’.) My brother and sister in law have been delivering groceries and my father seems content to wait it out. Doubtless, we’ll see each other again at some point. Although I’ll probably struggle to recognise him in dreadlocks and a platted beard. Working from home teaches you a lot. Firstly, that no matter how important the meeting, the dog still does whatever she likes. This includes breaking into the room, barking or planting her gigantic paws on the desk to stare into the camera. I had imagined her lying quietly at my feet whilst I laboured. Instead, I have now come to the realisation that I actually work for her and everything else is just an add-on. I don’t miss commuting. Or talkback radio. I’m sure it’s still happening somewhere, but it’s no longer part of my day now that it takes me thirteen seconds to get to work. I don’t miss the push and pull of traffic, or queuing to get on and off freeways. But I do miss people. I miss those I work with and those who sold coffee and sandwiches and whatever else in whose lives I had little more than a cameo. I miss the sense of possibility that comes with human interaction. This period of prolonged isolation has, for us, emphasised how small our family is. Two people and a dog is something, but it’s limited. It’s one of

those rare moments where the smallness of it becomes inescapable. To make matters worse, I think the dog is beginning to lose interest in me. Last week, I caught her in my study, having a ‘Zoom’ session with one of my work colleagues. I know that for those who might live alone, it’s been tougher still. That said, there are probably some upsides. If you’d ever doubted your ability to ensure a prolonged period stationed in the Antarctic, you can rest assured that in the case of an unexpected redeployment to the frozen tundra, you’ll be just fine. It’s funny how quickly new routines develop. Each day, I keep an eye out for the daily total. I finish work mostly on time because the dog demands to be taken for a walk and doesn’t understand that I might want to finish what I’m doing. But it’s not just about what’s happened to now but the consequences of this strange year that I’m starting to think about. Each year, I print a calendar for Christmas with the best family photos I’ve taken during the year. I barely have any photos at all this year. Pictures of furniture, the television, the front lawn (perhaps as a time sequence) and the dog don’t make for much of a calendar. I plan to improvise. Instead, I’ll use the best photos not just from this year but every year, much like a ‘greatest hits’. That way, the calendar will reflect the best of us. Perhaps, in a funny way, 2020 has largely done much the same – it’s shown the best of us. Just not in photo form. stuart@stuartmccullough.com


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PAGE 21


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Miller back for three in a row SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie LANGWARRIN has re-signed Scott Miller as head coach for the 2021 season. It will be the former Fulham and Socceroo assistant’s third year at the helm. “I signed on again because I’ve enjoyed my time there,” Miller said. “I think the club needed a little push in a different direction and that’s what I like to think we’ve provided there. “Obviously this year was out of our control but we’d put together a good squad and were performing well in pre-season and starting to play a game style we wanted to play. “My intention and the coaching staff’s intention was to go again and continue that momentum. “It’s really exciting with all the things going on at the ground.” That’s a reference to an extensive makeover of Lawton Park which will deliver new lighting, training pitch and carpark upgrades with much, much more in the wings. “If you want to entice the likes of Tom Youngs, George Howard, John Maclean and others to join your club and stay at your club then you have to give them proper facilities. “It’s not about them being prima donnas it’s about enjoying your work environment so I’m grateful to the government for the money they’ve given us.” Heading towards what we all hope will be the 2021 season the Miller mantra of continuity and loyalty rings loud and clear when discussing the first team squad. “Although it’s too early to say I don’t want huge changes at all. “If you look at our first year if the club had got promoted it would have put it under a lot of pressure because the infrastructure and the support weren’t there. “The average age of our current squad is 22 and if you look at the life cycle of that team then within three to five years you’ll have a core group of boys who have grown together and can sustain the club at a higher level. “And the loyalty of this playing group has been remarkable.” Miller won’t be drawn on discussing specifics in line with club policy but it’s common knowledge that when

Family affair: Scott Miller pictured at the Wallace Cup last February flanked by his father Doug and mother Lea. Picture: Darryl Kennedy, Darken Sportz

the players met after Victoria’s first lockdown earlier this year they all agreed to a hefty reduction in payments. “To put it into perspective no-one’s been paid from that playing group since last year,” Miller said. “We did a complete 16-week preseason (training three times a week) plus a six-week post-lockdown training period for nothing and if that doesn’t show commitment then I don’t know what does.” Miller was on a steep learning curve when he first joined Langwarrin in August 2018 not only assessing what needed to be done to take the club to another level but he also learned much about what he was up against when it came to negotiating terms. “I spoke to players about joining Langwarrin and was regularly blown out of the water by what other clubs such as (Moreland) Zebras and Bulleen were offering. “We’ve got a lot of players that could earn more elsewhere but we’ve got a good product, they enjoy them-

out fear. “If you get relegated then the only thing that takes a hit is your ego. The club doesn’t disappear. “And getting to NPL1 doesn’t mean you have to double or triple your budget. “If loyalty is one of your principal club values then the players that get you there deserve to be given the opportunity to play at that level. “Look you may have to top up your squad with one or two experienced players but you do that within your budget. “That’s loyalty and that’s respect and you live within your means when you go up there.” Miller paused for a moment as if to collect his thoughts then returned to the prospect of guiding Langwarrin to the highest level in the club’s history. “Why would you want to be involved with a club if you don’t aspire to get to the top? “Anything is possible and it would bring a different energy around the place and it would bring a different

selves here and we look after them. “We are consistent in how we deliver our training and how we deliver our messages and it’s not a political club. “While the discussion around player payments is confidential I think people would be surprised where we’d fall among NPL2 clubs and I’d say we’d easily be in the bottom two or three at that level.” Despite operating under budget restrictions Miller remains convinced that Langwarrin can reach NPL1 and stay there in fact it’s a prospect that continues to motivate him. “Imagine if we were to get promoted. “First what an achievement for the local area, second what an achievement for the club and third what an achievement for the players. “I’m a firm believer that you need to have your environment set up to succeed as a business because that’s what it is now. “We needed to upskill certain people as to what it looks like when we get there (NPL1) and to operate with-

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type of sponsor wanting to become attached to the club. “Imagine being there at 7.30 on a Saturday night watching Langwarrin playing Oakleigh Cannons with a team that’s essentially been at the club for two or three years, players like Callum Goulding and Jaiden Madafferi, for example, who have taken massive steps and are at the forefront of leading the club. “How good would that be? “If we link arms and everyone does a little bit we’ll be fine but if people become selfish and put themselves first then they’ll be gone. “I think you’ve seen we’re quite ruthless with players that aren’t performing. “They are out the door. “That’s nothing personal but we have a responsibility to the club to make these decisions if we want to get to where we want to be.” In other news late last week Football Victoria’s football operations executive manager Will Hastie emailed clubs inviting them to the federation’s “Football’s Re-emergence” Club engagement session. The online sessions will be split geographically (north, south, east, west and regional) and will provide “a road map of football activities as Victoria moves through the spring and summer period and into 2021 competition.” The email struck a distinct call-toarms tone. “It is time to wake our football community up and once again fill Victoria’s football fields with laughter, spirit, social connections, camaraderie and organised physical activity.” Amen to that Mr Hastie.


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Pippie powers to second Group One victory HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou CHRIS and John Meagher’s speedy mare, Pippie, ran her rivals off their legs to take out the Group One Moir Stakes and pick up her second Group One success on Friday 25 September at The Valley. The five-year-old daughter of Written Tycoon extended her flawless first-up record to four wins by making every post a winner in the feature $1million sprint. Replicating her first-up win in the Group One Oakleigh Plate last preparation, Pippie again utilised her blistering early speed and controlled the race before holding on to land a 0.8-length victory over Godolphin’s Trekking and the Will Clarken-trained Bella Vella. Another Mornington-trained runner Brooklyn Hustle for Warren/Krongold Racing flew home to finish in fourth. Mornington-based co-trainer Chris Meagher was stoked to see his mare land their main target for the Spring. “To win a race of this calibre is such a huge honour and I’m just rapt for everyone involved,” Meagher said. “We know how fast she is, and we know she can sustain that, so I was rapt with how everything worked out. “Damian (Lane) rode her [at the Mornington jumpouts] twice and was rapt with her so we came here confident as you can be going into a Group One, and to pull it off is just amazing.” Despite crowds not yet allowed at

Speed machine: Chris and John Meagher’s Pippie leads all the way to win her second Group One in the Moir Stakes at The Valley. Picture: Supplied

the Victorian races, Meagher said the ownership group would still be giving a massive cheer from home. “They’ll be on the Gold Coast right now going absolutely troppo,” he said. “They’re a terrific bunch of guys Marty and Glen Heran together with

their racing manager Katrina Smith. They’re just unbelievable supporters of ours and I’m just so over the moon for them.” Pippie holds nominations for the Group One Darley Sprint Classic (1200m) at Flemington and the Group

One Manikato Stakes (1200m) again at The Valley next month. Brooklyn Hustle is also likely to take a similar route. Matt Laurie’s up-and-coming Alfa Oro was another dominant performance on The Valley card from the

Mornington-based trainers. Running in the 955m 55-second Challenge, the five-year-old gelded son of Bachelor Duke (USA) led the entire trip to score a comfortable twolength victory in a time of 55.9 seconds. With the ease of the victory, trainer Matt Laurie said he’ll now be aiming for higher targets with his promising sprinter. “I’m happy to keep his winning record going for the moment but we’ll be happy to step up to black type now,” he said post-race. “He’s just a true racehorse and made that look very easy.” “Should he get the job done next start then perhaps there’s a race here further on that might suit. There’s the Caulfield Stakes over 1000m or perhaps the Schillaci Stakes (1100m) next start and that could possibly lead to a Manikato should we dream but why not? He’s doing everything very well.”

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30 September 2020

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Southern Peninsula News

30 September 2020

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Southern Peninsula News 29 September 2020  

Southern Peninsula News 29 September 2020

Southern Peninsula News 29 September 2020  

Southern Peninsula News 29 September 2020

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