Southern Peninsula News 1 June 2021

Page 1

Southern Peninsula YOUR GUIDE TO WHAT’S ON THIS WEEKEND FOR PENINSULA FAMILIES FACEBOOK:

peninsulakids.com.au mornpenkids

INSTAGRAM:

An independent voice for the community

FREE

Your weekly community newspaper covering Safety Beach to Portsea For all advertising and editorial needs, call 03

Wednesday 2 June 2021

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au

ZOE the Spider Crab was out and about last week telling anyone who would listen about the crabs’ annual moult and the gaunlet they run from people eager to catch and cook them. “Zoe’s big day out for hugs” Page 8

Spider crabs stay on the menu Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au THE Victorian Fisheries Authority (VFA) is unlikely to grant Mornington Peninsula Shire Council’s plea to ban the taking of spider crabs from May to July. The council wrote to Fishing and Boating Minister Melissa Horne seek-

ing the spatial ban to protect the crabs during their annual aggregation off Rye and Blairgowrie. Copies of the request were forwarded to Energy, Environment and Climate Change Minister Lily D’Ambrosio, as well as peninsula federal and state MPs. Although it was unclear last week whether the authority had received the request, the VFA’s Dallas D’Silva told

The News there were “lots of crabs for fishers and divers to enjoy – now and into the future”. “The VFA encourages recreational fishers and divers to enjoy this amazing natural phenomenon again this year, if an aggregation of the crabs again occurs near one of these accessible piers,” Mr D’Silva said. “We encourage recreational fishers to enjoy fishing for spider crabs with

family and friends.” Fishers needed a recreational fishing licence and to “follow the fishing rules”. Cr Sarah Race’s notice-of-motion calling for the crab fishing ban carried at the 18 May council meeting aimed to reinforce the shire’s advocacy for the crabs’ protection “and the desire of our local community to have a no-take season”.

Enjoy more quality time with your loved one, by trusting After-Care with their in home care needs For information on how to take the complication out of Home Care Packages and NDIS Support, visit our website or give our friendly staff a call!

NDIS Support

Garden & Home Maintenance

Home Care Packages

All In-Home Care Services

1300 46 46 63

inhome@after-care.com.au

www.after-care.com.au

“The spider crab aggregation is one of the marine world’s great wonders, as highlighted by David Attenborough,” Cr Race stated in the agenda. “Our community has been disturbed by the taking of the crabs during this period – not only due to the sheer number crabbed, but also with the detritus left over afterwards, such as chicken carcasses.” Continued Page 8


READY, SET, SPLASH! Opening 25 June 2021 Visit yawa.com.au for more information

PAGE 2

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021


NEWS DESK

Campaign tackles road trauma Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au OVER the next six weeks, Mornington Peninsula motorists will see blue and white signs in danger areas highlighting reasons to drive safely, such as: Because we need to protect our wildlife. The signs are part of a campaign by the Transport Accident Commission to curb road trauma and serious accidents. In the past five years, 37 people have died on peninsula roads, with another four deaths so far this year. The peninsula is the second local government area to pilot the TAC program, Drive Safely Because, which highlights local reasons to drive safely and lead to a safer community. The TAC’s involvement also follows efforts by Mornington Peninsula Shire and the RACV to drive down the number of road accidents on the peninsula (“Thumbs up to cut road speed” The News 10/5/21). The TAC has worked with the shire to set road safety priorities, particularly around protecting such vulnerable road users as children, pedestrians and cyclists. Its campaign will use events, promotions and visual reminders of how important road safety is to local communities to reduce road trauma. Roads and road safety minister Ben Carroll said keeping local roads safe was everyone’s responsibility. He said the campaign encouraged people to take ownership of road safety “in their own backyard”. “By partnering with local govern-

TAC at Somerville: Christine Albien, Police Acting Inspector Nat Dollard, Christopher-Bree Nyko, Jake Webb, Paulette Ziekemijjer, Paul Mercurio, Millie Davies, Despi O’Connor, Jorgia Goulopoulos and Police Acting Sergeant Raj Sharma. Picture: Gary Sissons

ments and directly targeting their priority areas, we hope this initiative will help make an immediate impact on the way people use roads,” Mr Carroll said. TAC head of road safety Samantha Cockfield said appealing to community mindedness through customised local messaging had an impact. “The grassroots campaign aims to humanise

road safety, and remind people that the foremost reasons to slow down and drive safely are the families and friends that we share our local roads with.” The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said it was every driver’s responsibility to drive safely. “We hope our localised campaign will make people think twice before driving irresponsibly on our roads,” Cr O’Connor said.

SUPPORTING

LOCAL ARTISTS

“Our families and friends use these roads and we want them to arrive home safe every day.” The campaign will target businesses, farmers’ markets, festivals, sports clubs and schools. Insights and data from the campaign will help inform future road safety partnerships with other local government areas.

COVID hot spots THREE Mornington Peninsula businesses have been added to the list of places visited by people confirmed to have COVID-19 while infectious. Visitors to all three premises who were there at the same time as the COVID positive person have been advised to get tested immediately and then quarantine for 14 days. The identification of the three sites and listing by the DHHS came as Greater Melbourne was plunged into a seven-day lockdown. The three businesses listed last week by the Department of Health and Human Services are the Enchanted Adventure Garden, Purves Road, Arthurs Seat; Peninsula Hot Springs (bathhouse reception area), Springs Lane, Fingal; and the Nordie Cafe, Mornington-Flinders Road, Red Hill. The DHHS says the infectious case was at the Nordie Cafe from just after 9am to 9.34am on Wednesday 26 May. Peninsula Hot Springs was visited on Friday 21 May from 3pm-3.45pm and the Enchanted Adventure Garden from 11.25am to 3pm on the same day. The cafe was first listed as a site where visitors have a higher risk of being exposed to COVID-19 on 26 May, followed by the hot springs on 29 May and the adventure garden on 30 May. The sites remain on the DHHS list for 14 days from the most recent exposure. There are nearly 300 exposure sites on the DHHS list at: coronavirus.vic.gov.au/exposure-sites Keith Platt

MIDWEEK GOLF & MEAL DEAL

5. 30PM TIL L ATE

SIMON TRIST Saturday 5th June

LIVE MUSIC EVERY SATURDAY @LIMANI PORTSEA Mediterranean influenced mezze menu, designed to be shared with family and friends

CAFE MEZZE WINE BAR LIVE MUSIC

Let us host your next event in our beautiful Greek inspired space Mon, Wed & Thur: 8am - 3pm Fri & Sat: 8am - late, Sun: 8am - 4pm Tuesday: Closed 2/3760 Point Nepean Rd, Portsea P: 5984 4820 | limaniportsea.com.au

79 18 HO

Includes: 18 Holes of Quality Golf Shared Golf Cart Lunch

LES J

$

PER P

UST

ERSO

N

(Choice of Chicken Parma, Beef Burger, Carbonara or Steak Sandwich)

*Minimum 2 Players. Ends 30/6/21. Not valid in conjunction with any other offer. Subject to availability, excludes Public Holidays.

For further information please contact Golf Shop (03) 5950 0888 207 Boneo Road, Rosebud VIC 3939 www.rosebudcountryclub.com.au Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 3


BOO K NOW !

11 - 14 JUNE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY WEEKEND OVER 50 FREE & TICKETED EVENTS ROSCOE JAMES IRWIN - DARK HEART SPIRAL STAIRS & JOEL SILBERSHER | MARTY ROSE BAND WHISKEY & THE CHASER | ANDY PHILLIPS & THE CADILLAC WALK | KEZRA

MORNINGTON PENINSULA RECORD FAIR | LISA FAITHFULL BAND | CHICAGO DIME THE HOODOO MEN | PHIL ZINGER BAND | THE WARRAINS | DEMI & MITCHEL THE AVENUE | BLUE TUESDAYS | ELISSA RODGERS | THE WHISKY GYPSIES | BENNSONG

JOURDAIN & JACK | ELISHA | OSKAR PROY | COCO MICHELLE | NOTA BENE | SISTER SISTER SUNDAY LEMONADE | SUNNY MOO | RITCHIE LANGFORD | HENRI & MITCHEL | AL FRESCO S.C

Live Music all weekend in venues & free street entertainment! FOR TICKETS & UPDATED PROGRAM SCAN QR CODE OR VISIT:

morningtonmusicfestival.com.au

PAGE 4

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021


NEWS DESK

Claire Grieg (nee Davison), left, at the Historic Winton car races. Picture: Andrew Day; above, Alex Davison, son of Richard Davison, with his grandmother Diana and step-grandfather Tony Gaze, and the 1981 RALT 4 he raced at Winton; right, Richard Davison with the RALT in 1985. Pictures: Davison Collection

Davisons still competing in the fast lane Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au MOTOR sport runs in the blood of the Davison family, of Flinders. Three generations have made their names hurtling around various race tracks over the past 70 years, with the family last month honoured for its service to motor sport at Australia’s longest-running event, Historic Winton. They were awarded the Firth Motors Family Trophy for their “significant contribution” to Winton, and to motorsport in general over 45 years, Saturday and Sunday 22-23 May.

Richard Davison, 67, the son of four time Australian Grand Prix winner Lex, said it was “always wonderful to be recognised” in one’s chosen sport. Enthusiasts will remember colourful Lex, the first four-time winner of the Australian Grand Prix (1954-61), winner of the Australian Driver’s Championship (1957) and three-time winner of the Australian Hillclimb Championship (1955-57). Described by Richard as a “larger than life” character, Lex died when his car crashed during practice at Sandown International Raceway in 1965. He was 42. “His death left a massive hole as we were all under his shadow,” Richard

said. “He raced at the top level but he was down to earth and was always in the pits talking to the other drivers and helping those who perhaps didn’t have enough money to compete at the top level.” Lex left behind wife Diana and Richard, then 10, and older brothers Chris and Jon who also went on to become racing car drivers. Now, Richard’s children Alex and Will continue to forge the family’s legacy, alongside niece Claire. At Winton, near Benalla, Alex won his race in the Q&R Sports and Racing category in his father’s 1981 RALT RT4, while Claire also competed.

“My entire life has been in motor sport,” said Richard. “We get a great deal of enjoyment out of it.” The family races under the Ecurie Australie banner created by Lex in the 1950s and resurrected, after “much pushing” by elder brother Chris, as a “vehicle” for the family passion. Richard first raced a Formula Ford at Winton in 1975 after the track opened in Lex’s heady days in the early 1960s. “I’ve competed there for many years and was pit crew for my brother Jon when he raced Formula 5000s there in the late 1970s. Now I am there for historic racing.” Richard praised Claire, Chris’s daughter, for her drive and determina-

tion. “She was the mover and shaker who got us back to historic racing.” The Historic Winton weekend featured 400 historic racing cars and motorbikes from the 1920s-80s, as well as having veteran, vintage, rare and unusual vehicles on display. Organiser and president of the Austin 7 Club Len Kerwood said he was delighted that the event went to plan despite “organising it in 10 weeks instead of 10 months”. “Competitors were thrilled to be back and the buzz in the atmosphere was fantastic as people were so incredibly glad.”

When there’s no place like home Our communities are open for private inspections in line with current COVID-safe industry guidelines. Contact us to find out more and make a booking. australianunity.com.au

Racecourse Grange Aged Care

Peninsula Grange Retirement Community

Racecourse Grange is a stylish and sophisticated aged care residence designed with comfort and care in mind.

Designed to offer you the ultimate in convenient and relaxed retirement living, Peninsula Grange offers a choice of two- or three-bedroom apartment or villa residences. Each residence also has a single or double car garage with secure internal access for lock-up-and-go convenience.

When you move into Racecourse Grange, you become a part of a broader community. With 7 unique households to choose from, each with its very own lounge and dining area, residents can enjoy absolute comfort and convenience, no matter where they live.

428 Racecourse Road, Mornington 1300 282 604 racecoursegrange@australianunity.com.au

While all the amenities of Mornington are nearby, activities and entertainment are right on your doorstep. Keep yourself active in the gym, hit the bowling green or take a dip in the pool. Or relax in the library before pampering yourself in the hair and beauty salon. You will find what you need to make each day enjoyable.

431 Racecourse Road, Mornington Respite care | Permanent residential care | Memory support | Palliative care

1300 295 763 peninsulagrange@australianunity.com.au

Peninsula Grange Aged Care

Morven Manor Retirement Community

From the moment you arrive at Peninsula Grange Aged Care, you will notice the bright open spaces along with quality, style and innovation of design.

Steeped in history and located in the heart of Mornington, Morven Manor provides a place of tranquility while remaining connected to the vibrancy of the local community.

Each of our private rooms has been purpose-built to enhance your mobility, accommodate your changing needs and afford you your privacy and independence.

Offering a selection of private and secure residences, enjoy the surrounding lush landscaped gardens with towering Norfolk pines or venture to the historical community centre, the Manor House, a hub of social activity and events.

2 Booker Avenue, Mornington 1300 291 013 peninsulagrangeagedcare@australianunity.com.au

77 Tanti Avenue, Mornington 1300 271 389 morvenmanor@australianunity.com.au

Respite care | Permanent residential care | Memory support | Palliative care

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 5


Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

Rosebud shooting A MAN was shot in the leg at Rosebud last week. Armed Crime Squad detectives are investigating the incident on Jetty Road, 9.10pm, Wednesday 26 May. A 38-year-old Rosebud man was airlifted to hospital with what police described as “serious non-life-threatening injuries”. A crime scene was established and detectives had the area in Jetty Road cordoned off on Thursday. Anyone with information is urged to contact Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000 or make a report at crimestoppersvic.com.au

on bail after an alleged burglary in Langwarrin South last week. Frankston police arrested the 44-year-old after his victim, a 79-year-old man, called 000 after returning to his Shepherds Hut Road property about 10pm and seeing a silver Nissan Maxima in the driveway with the doors and boot open. Without waiting for police to arrive the man and his neighbour, 53, confronted the alleged offender in the driveway. Police arrived shortly afterwards and allegedly found a loaded 12-gauge shotgun, compound bow, ammunition and a large quantity of what they say is stolen property inside the car. The man faced Frankston Magistrates’ Court last week and was remanded to reappear midJune. Leading Senior Constable Natalie Dean, of police media, said the investigation was ongoing as police attempted to identify the owners of the property allegedly found in the car. Anyone with information is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or submit a confidential crime report at crimestoppersvic. com.au

Picture: Yanni Police are yet to identify the owners of some of the ornaments. Anyone who believes they have had items stolen is urged to contact property officer Paula O’Brien, 5970 4900, MondayFriday.

Intruder takes laptops A MAN who entered the art room at Bayside Christian College last month allegedly stole two Apple Mac computers and photography equipment. Police say the man slid open an unlocked window at the school in Langwarrin South, 8-8.30pm, Monday 5 April. He then covered the alarm sensor in two rooms to avoid detection. The offender is Caucasian, mid-late 30s, medium build, light brown short hair with receding hairline, wearing a navy blue t-shirt, dark coloured pants and riding a bike. He removed his t-shirt during the incident. Anyone with information is urged to call Detective Senior Constable Brendan Fontana, of Frankston CIU, 9784 5535 or Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Alcohol stolen

Ornaments seized A MORNINGTON man has been charged with theft after police recovered allegedly stolen garden ornaments in his possession. The Mornington police night shift van found the man, 51, in the early hours of Tuesday 25 May with ornaments they believe came from across the Mornington area. The man was arrested and bailed to appear at the Frankston Magistrates’ Court at a later date.

POLICE say a man referred to as “The Penguin” climbed over the gate into the candy bar at Hoyts Cinemas Frankston and stole four bottles of alcohol, 5.45am, Saturday 22 May. He is described as Caucasian, mid-late 30s, medium build, wearing a camouflage hoodie, long pants and dark coloured shoes. Anyone with information is urged to call Detective Senior Constable Brendan Fontana, of Frankston CIU, 9784 5535 or Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Bin fires A SPATE of wheelie bin fires at Rosebud could damage cars parked nearby, police warn. Five bins on nature strips in Besgrove and Hinton streets and Eastbourne Road were set alight in the early hours of Wednesday morning, 26 May.

Charges after arrest A Frankston South man was charged with burglary, possessing a firearm, possessing ammunition and committing an indictable offence while

STOCKTAKE

SALE

TIMBER

HYBRID

$2500

$1950

3 ROOMS INSTALLED 3 ROOMS INSTALLED *

* *Conditions apply

• CARPETS • TIMBERS • LAMINATES • VINYL• TILES • BLINDS • ENGINEERED FLOORS • HYBRIDS • PLANTATION SHUTTERS • FLOOR SANDING & POLISHING • WALLPAPER P LU S! Luxury Bremworth# Wool Carpets and a huge range of Timbers and Oaks available in store #

OPEN

7 DAYS

Shop 2/544-546 Frankston-Dandenong Rd, Carrum Downs Shop 9/991 Point Nepean Rd, Rosebud

1300 069 340 www.mikescarpets.com.au

CONTACT US FOR A FREE MEASURE & QUOTE PAGE 6

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

Carrum Downs Store Only

Connect with us


Rosebud Skin Cancer Centre

COVID VACCINATION Rosebud Respiratory Clinic is now vaccinating for category 1b – over 70’s, health care professionals and anyone with medical health conditions.

Taking bookings for category 2a – anyone over the age of 50 We have AstraZeneca only

COVID TESTING We are still testing for Covid - call for an appointment.

Call 0436 033 507 to make your testing or vaccine appointment TODAY!

1079 Point Nepean Road, Rosebud www.rosebudskincancercentre.com.au Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 7


Southern Peninsula

NEWS DESK

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly

Circulation: 22,870

Audit period: Apr 2014 - Sept 2014

Source: AMAA; CAB Total Distribution Audit for further information visit auditedmedia.org.au

Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 3 JUNE 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 9 JUNE 2021

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

Zoe the Spider Crab (Zoe McKenzie) thanks Cr Sarah Race, the mayor Cr Despi O’Connor and Cr Susan Bissinger for trying to protect the crabs when they come close to shore. Picture: Supplied

Police Point Artist in Residence Retrospective Exhibition

12 – 20 June 2021

10am – 12pm and 1 – 3pm Commanding Officer’s House, Point Nepean National Park, Portsea More than 90 local, national and international artists have participated in the Police Point Artist in Residence program since it began five years ago. View a range of creative works by emerging and established artists, writers, musicians, and creatives created on site or inspired by their residency. The Gatekeepers Cottage, the AiR residence, at the adjacent Police Point Shire Park will also be open to the public. To book, visit: airexhibition.eventbrite.com.au For more information: mornpen.vic.gov.au/airexhibition

PAGE 8

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

Zoe’s big day out for hugs ZOE the Giant Spider Crab had a big day out on Monday 24 May, meeting up with the mayor Cr Despi O’Connor and Crs Susan Bissinger and Sarah Race. Along with the rest of their Mornington Peninsula Shire Council colleagues, the councillors want an exclusion zone around piers to prevent fishing for spider crabs, from May to July. The decision rests with the Victorian Fisheries Authority. Members of Save Our Spidercrabs (SOS) thanked the council for its support in working to protect the coming aggregations of spider crabs, with Zoe (SOS committee member Zoe McKenzie) offering hugs all round. Four days earlier Zoe the Spider Crab was telling her story to Sorrento, Red Hill, and Rye

Scouts at an information session on all things spider crabs. The scouts listened to a presentation by Save Our Spider crabs committee member AJ Morton. Mr Morton said the children “deserve an opportunity to experience the amazing spectacle that is the annual spider crab aggregation along the Victorian coastline”. The scouts peppered him with questions about the crustaceans before enjoying cuddles with Zoe. Spider crab presentations at community group functions can be arranged through Facebook or Instagram messenger, or email divealliancevic@ gmail.com #saveourspidercrabs Zoe the Giant Spider Crab will be at Rye Scout Hall, 2pm, Sunday 6 June.

No safety net for spider crabs Continued from Page 1 An existing fishing exclusion zone prohibits the taking of rays, skates and guitar fish within 400 metres of any man-made structure, such as piers. The notice-of-motion was, in effect, asking that an additional fisheries notice be issued for spider crabs. Cr Race added: “This is a phenomenon that should be celebrated, not decimated.” Cr David Gill successfully added that officers organise a publicity plan to highlight the spider crab phenomenon and the need for an exclusion zone. Shire coastal planner Zachary Grimes said that, in June last year, the council had moved: “That urgent action be taken by the chief executive officer to help ensure that the seasonal congregation of spider crabs occurring now in the Rye area be protected from illegal poaching.” The council had then written to the state government detailing community and user groups’ concerns with the overfishing of spider crabs dur-

ing their annual moulting event. It pleaded for a reduced bag limit, education campaigns with interpretive signage “aimed at all coastal users” and tabled the measure of a winter ‘closed season’ to secure the sustainability of the event. In October, the Victorian Fisheries Authority reduced catch limits from 30 to 15. Shire officers recently met with the VFA which agreed to supply additional bins and install educational signs this crab season. Its officers will also provide information, education and enforcement at crab hot spots. “Advocacy efforts for a closed season or spatial ban have not been successful at the officer level to date,” Mr Grimes admitted. Winter aggregations of crabs at the southern end of the bay usually occur in late May or June. The timing is thought to be associated with the full moon and water temperature. Crab aggregations do not always occur at the same places year to year. None had arrived by late last week.


Dredging ‘may help’ pest seastar survive

Quarry pays for state park trees for a comprehensive management plan to assess the site for weeds, identify restorative flora species, grow the appropriate species, organise weed removal works in preparation for planting and plan for ongoing maintenance”. In 2018, weeds such as blackberry, watsonia, pittosporum, cape ivy, Spanish heath, tree tobacco and boneseed removed from the creek line. Weed control had continued to enable the Wednesday 19 May plantings of coastal manna gums, manna gums, swamp gums and peppermint on the sides of the creek line and path. “Too often grants are short-term and focus in on only one element of bushland restoration - this is ineffective to repair the damage to our environment and our diverse habitats suffer,” Mr Fitzgerald said. He said the relationship between the Habitat Restoration Fund and Hillview Quarries started in 2011 “and has consistently achieved positive outcomes for the state park”. Keith Platt

STAFF from Hillview Quarries joined members of the Habitat Restoration Fund to plant 100 trees in Arthurs Seat State Park. The trees planted on land managed by Parks Victoria above the Hillview Community Reserve, Dromana were paid for by a seven-year grant from Hillview to the restoration fund. The Habitat Restoration Fund was started in 2006, “by a group of people who wanted to take a more hands on approach to preserving their local environment”. “The quarry crew offered a combination of enthusiasm, dedication, horticultural skill and area expertise to the job in just two hours, under direction of the Habitat Restoration Fund,” Greg Fitzgerald, who heads the fund’s board, said. “Habitat restoration in our natural bushland requires a long-term view approach and thanks to Hillview Quarries and the Ross Trust, this seven-year grant was awarded in 2018 to the Habitat Restoration Fund for works in this Parks Victoria site.” Mr Fitzgerald said the long-term grant “allows Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

Lic No: 22042

SPECIALISING IN SENIORS TOURS

bur ton .com

.au

Bea ch Roa d 598 sor ren to@ 4 474 4 kay bur ton .com en tia l sid.au

OLIEVE & OLIE

Tat ian a

Front Cove

Pages .indd All

FULLY ESCORTED SENIORS TOURS 1300 274 880 (local call cost)

Info@daytripper.com.au | www.daytripper.com.au

n

PENINSULA

to Mor ni ng ECHUCA & THE MIGHTY MURRAY s on th e 25 ye ar er ov 12 – 16 JulyCel$1525pp eb ra ti ng ($250 s/s) ALBURY, WODONGA & YARRAWONGA 9 – 13 August $1525pp ($275 s/s) MILDURA & SWAN HILL 22 – 28 August Price TBC

la ! Pen in su

NINGTON

MULTI DAY TRIPS Home Pick Up & Return Service (t&c’s apply)

er. com .au oo dp eck ww w.w r.c om .au od pe cke info@ wo Hw y 1 Ne pe an 90 ton s Hw y Mo rni ng 82 Pri nce 16 st Ea Oa kle igh

ON THE MOR

m.eganplumbing@gmail.com

RED H ILL 159 Sho reh am Roa

d 598 9 100 • Re 0 red nts vel op me hill @k ayb urt on. com erc ial De .au g • Co mm Se rvi cin lat ion • • Ins tal

Bordel et

FREE

OZ DESIGN FURNITURE

a refined profile Cosy up on the Atticus sofa. Featuring legs, the Atticus sofa and sleek base T-cushions and slim for hours. will make you not want to get up Home, Peninsula Showroom D4, 1128 – 1132 Nepean Hwy, Mornington. P: 8560 1137 ozdesignfurniture.com.au

M

NE FORIDTCHEENTURY MO D t�

Peninsula

The Kay & Burton Morningto experien ce, expert n Peninsu ise and pa la Team on the sa has the ssion to se le of your cure a st Morningto rong resu n Peninsu lt la proper ty.

r_June 2021

MOB: 0418 301 980

Mornington

ARTISAN'S ALLEY

lpt Fir nature, r of Scu Fenix Candle Co are Swedish by ive ret aile Fre nch reducing an exc lus Mornington-born. Fired up about hig h-e nd ed ud to be life by gh t aft er, 0 Fou r Sid cke r is pro waste and giving glass bottles a second isio n 800 mo st sou Wo od pe cts , the uin Mu ltiv scented candles. reusable du Seg creating pro re n uin pu St, Co llec tio Available at Artisan's Alley 17 Main ces, Seg de sig ns. is ed firepla Mornington or online at , and Ax fire pla ce suspend uilt let inb rde and Bo and fenixcandleco.com.au ludes JC estanding piration tion inc can be fre ignite ins artisansalley.com.au The collec - which ces will ilders. fireplaces ese firepla rs and bu cast iron aters. Th designe wood he , s, interior panoramic architect fire pla ces , ed you nd nt for of sus pe exciteme fro m all cre ato r d d we ne ow be vie mo st ren they can m. let is the be cau se JC Bo rde in any roo fte d and tem en t han d cra n, gra nd sta the se are pe rfe ct box de sig are the on t of fire in on e, In efr ang les , for 2020, Kay ava ilab le at the in be ing n and are & Burton iro elf t its s cas de reported gin al of $403 mi Se gu in pri pu re ori 128 sales 0% llion - tes ls. 10 de on the Mo fro m tament to gla ss mo eit he r anworking tea cra fte d rnington r sid ed Kay & Bu xib ilit y of m,EPIwh Peninsula, ee or fou rton’s rep 950 ich spans ing the u the fle s tw o, thr yo ast Axi with a tot es bo utation, inn ly history on four office sig n giv al value ce. Pro ud ! ovative ap the s. Last ye pla eri or de ere fire Pe sup sph ninsula, co mi wo od arts proach an pla ces ltip le uni was the str uth ern He bu sti on nfi Ax is fire So mu rm d hardcom se ing the ongest ye wca itsatpre ce in h our to sho en clo sed botmi Kay & eck ar in Kay er is pro ud od fire pla tion sta op en or 7/ er Bu wo lec tus 16 ic rto Col & Burton’s -18 and long-s ce n Fire om s. Wo odp plaMo the pa no ram NR lptisHE t sho wro Y tan Scu rni Eas larges t WI din ng the igh LS g reputatio fro m ONton Oa kle Peninsula’s DV E, gto n and n. Cornin RO SE BU premi ntac Mo t us now er real es D for an ob tate ag • ligation-fr PH 59 ency. ee propert 82 PORTS y apprais 09 92 EA 3741 Poi • al: nt Nep ean WW W. Roa d SORRE OL EI VE 598 NTO AN DO por tse a@ 4 474 4 106 Oce LIE kay an

VISITING

PO Box 101, Rye, 3941.

iting on the

Living & vis

ep lac e

DAY TRIPS MORNING MELODIES n Tue 15 June $75pp incl. M/T, lunch & show l D es ig Adv ic e l l In st al XMAS IN JULY - ROSE COTAGE ly pp Su Thu 22 July $85pp incl. traditional Xmas lunch DOLL HOUSE: MINIATURE WORLD OF WONDERS - COMO HOUSE 6 56 4 Wed 4 August $75pp incl. exhibition entry & hotel lunch 13 00 13

JUNE 2021

A L U S N I N PE

LIVING &

461 Dundas St, Rye, 3941.

& Oli e O

BEAUTI FU HERE O L SKINCARE H AN N THE M ORNING DCRAFTED RIG TON PEN H INSULA T

1 E JUN E 202

Licensed Plumber & Gasfitter

Olieve ESS ENC

M. & A. EGAN

The June edition of the peninsula's most loved magazine is out now.

PEN INS ULA

ENVIRONMENTAL activist Josie Jones, of Rye, got into more than the spirit of things when she removed 5738 northern Pacific starfish from off McCrae beach last week. “It was a great feeling to remove the pests from Port Phillip,” Ms Jones said after the cleanup, Sunday 23 May. “I worked out that it was nearly a wheelie binfull and I needed someone to help me push my bin to the kerb.” The northern Pacific seastar (Asterias amurensis) is described at marinepests.gov.au as a large, aggressive predator of native species, including oysters, mussels and scallops. Ms Jones believes the starfish are moving south towards Rosebud, Rye, Blairgowrie, Sorrento and Portsea. However, she asks that they only be removed if they have been accurately identified. “If you remove them, put them into general waste bins, wear gloves and report your col-

lection to Parks Victoria or the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning.” There are concerns dredging by DELWP of 20,000 cubic metres of sand to replenish McCrae beach may be contributing to the starfishes’ proliferation. DELWP said the works were designed “to avoid impacting any marine values and coastal vegetation” (“Denial over ‘threat’ to marine life” The News 19/4/21). “Our marine biodiversity and natural environment team experts have confirmed there are no specific concerns relating to the project with regards to land-based coastal vegetation, the reef, or the plants and animals that inhabit it,” Port Phillip regional director Stephen Chapple said. Long-time beach users reported that marine creatures were being “shredded” by the dredging machines. Ms Jones said rather than harming the starfish this may help them regenerate and proliferate and disseminate thousands of eggs. “Dredging has been linked to the redistribution of the starfish in the past,” she said. “I suspect the McCrae outbreak came from the dredge.

FLIND E R&SOlie's must have head to Olieve 47A Coo moisturiser, rich in antioxidants toek Stre et 598 100readily absorbed. Made from 0 flin der s@ 9and kay bur ton and organic oils to soothe natural.com .au and protect all skin types. Available at Olieve and Olie Factory 6 & 7, 16-18 Henry Wilson Dr, Rosebud

Real Estate

�lb�x ERN mag ic

W

ith ne arly tw enty ye produc ars in t gam Olie ar the ol e, the e pass ive oil team ionate at Olie luxurio and ex ve and us high perienc qu locally ality pr ed in pr on the oducts ovidin Penins g that ar It mus ula. e hand t be sa made id th in love with Au at we are ab st so makes ralian lutely sense extra he ad vi that it over he of our is alway rgin olive oi els natura l. So, it l skinca s antioxi only re prod the 'heart' in dants ucts. O every and vi benefit one tam live oi s and l is ric help re in E which pr won't h in store clog yo skin sm ovide anti-ag ur skin w oothne ing hilst pr pores as it pe ss. Oliv ovidin e oil g a clea netrates de Olive eply in oil is al nsing to the effect. so one to the of the fact th most su e tree PRODUCT S FROM THE to be staina s requ spraye ble oils, ire little PENINSU LA WE'RE SURE dw harves due water, chemic HOUSE YOU WILL LOVE ted ye KIWIith do not als, an ar afte need d WhereA winter staple, the year apex poncho is the olive twor tone withou we ca s can t dest be merino blend. possum from th an, we so roying urce ou e prodin 5 different colours, thisrdiagonal th e Available tr uc ingr ees. how ou ers. Th cover. edient r ingred knit has is enarm generous s direct sure ie s St, free, gr textured ly Mornington s we know Main are own an7/90 nt grown, exactly d haP: sustai that th rv5973 este4233 nably. ey are d natu kiwihouseonline.com.au Thes ch and w ra e em lly pr , ethica ical incipa e lo ls are lly and who re ve to suppor 27 VIC really t our lo import TOalRlyIA are th cal farm ant to By Andrea Louis CeRba Eck us, e Thomas Photo ers an SC bone EN s Yanni racing the d prod of T, ourM pages of O ucers w U on N de Ho T SISTERS thi .C OM .A me DREAM BIG rful pr MAR s classic mi U oducts THA d-century Beautiful magazine mo ornington dernis . beauty in m in Eu carpe nterTHJake Alexa rep kind,6,handcrafted boho style of a196

THE FA MILY TE OLIEVE AM AT & OLIE MAKIN G LUXU HAVE BEEN RIOUS BASED OLIVE O PRODU IL CTS FO ALMOST 20 YEAR R S

Peninsula

Styles

G M

one resent ean homE FACTOR nder isThis of inspirtradesmanrop shine as one your snot the typic emhanging e ofign ation for – he’s one Y SH OP rope erg of the hal ANout wall ingalis made from locally D des tha dayWi box. SATUthe renowned lmark pro t waIns ISsuc job, and addit OP an entre RDAY ion a driftwood torcehisFeaturing lliahe’s h EN perties of Peacefu amaterials. m Pat sou hithas 10 AM MO sourced who ects, lly set alon rick. preneur arc NDAY Mount Ma wellness progr devel Da oped- Ch 2Phealt wrapped - FRerrope, M. g the ban am desig cotton rtha. plush wat What was hOS and IDview brancha hanger, ancCLello ned to help trade vid AY 9A k of Balcom put rED SU tha M t- 4P lud speop toare ofssparkle. yles ND pap a touch le for that be Estuar yarn live andlifest er metallic M, e a glim freebec S AN D inc the vision, ofam eAYhas thee som y with ple kindethofingback andwith gold healthierto hom pse of Por PU BL wonde profeirssion any home! aAvailable asant addition t Phillip rful stan joint IC infi gorgeous als still A pain ly typic dinsuff nitely mo HO windows brig ally g tru Bay, this LID htAY er.e som inte re tan trade and Sisters

e 55 yea

gibat online le Dream Big

vaulted

S. rior brough

timeles

s rs later, con ceilings tha t to life by living zon contin Fortinu All espage. full length t create a resplenden next to ..p/DreamBigSeisters etsy.com/sho ketball ued spectacula t with han elegant fires r light-filled dsome pol ion Boost • Bas Cheeseinstagram/draneambigsister place. ished tim ed Away • Populat June 2021 facebook.com/dreambigsisters ber floors • Come SailPeninsula essence ional Flavour • Boatsh and lbox Too t Year • Reg_JUNE 2021 76pThe One For The NE 2021 76pg continued ut Park e Las Sco ed.indd Tims resav gs resa next pag Peninsula essence_ 65 ved.ind e... JUNE 2021 76pgs d 41 His Eye • This 4:29:07 PM er2021 resaved. eph Harris And indd Und June 2021 8 18/05/2021 June Are In! • Jos 6 | PENINSULA PENINSULA The Results

E ssence

8 | PENINSULA e.com.au olieveandoli

Peninsula

essence_JU

E ssence

18/05/2021 2:52:46 PM

Peninsula essence_JUNE 2021 76pgs

resaved.indd 6

E ssence | 65

June 202

18/05/2021 2:52:52 PM

1

June edition out now!

OZ DESIG N FURNIT UR

AUSTRALI

PENINSU

18/05/20

21 2:58: 53 PM

E ssence | 41

E MORNI

NGTON AN OWNED & O P E R AT ED

LA

18/05/20

21 2:56 :51

PM

Peninsula Essence offers great reading and stunning photography of people and places on the peninsula. To advertise in the July edition phone Brooke on 0409 219 282 Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 9


NEWS DESK

Peninsula facing ambulance ‘crisis’ - MP THE lives of residents are being put at risk because of an “ambulance crisis” on the Mornington Peninsula, says Hastings MP Neale Burgess. “While our paramedics are doing everything they can to provide their life saving services in the fastest time possible, the state government is letting them and Victorians down badly,” he said. “The latest quarterly performance data from Ambulance Victoria shows ambulance wait times are the highest they’ve been since the Andrews government came to power.” The figures from Ambulance Victoria show 71 per cent of the 2669 callouts on the peninsula were responded to in 13 minutes 19 seconds as opposed to 12mins 15secs for 76 per cent of the 2510 calls the previous quarter. “Victoria is the midst of a rapidly escalating

public health system crisis. The figures from the January-March 2021 quarter highlight how extreme this crisis is becoming and how the government’s response has been grossly inadequate,” Mr Burgess said. He said the Ambulance Victoria figures for the peninsula show blow-outs in wait times, with the average code 1 response time increasing by more than one minute in the last quarter. Also, that the percentage of code 1 ambulances responding within 15 minutes has fallen by 4.4 percentage points. “The lives of locals in Somerville, Hastings and surrounding areas are being put at risk because of the state government’s growing ambulance crisis,” Mr Burgess said. “We need proper investment and resourcing

in Ambulance Victoria to ensure it’s a reliable service that these communities can rely on when it matters most.” Ambulance Victoria metro regional director Michael Georgiou said the Victorian health care system, like the public health system across Australia, was experiencing “enormous pressure at present and Ambulance Victoria is not immune to this”. Current levels of patient demand were the highest in the past 15 years, he said. “We welcome the state government’s announcement of a $759 million package to address the challenging demand and COVID-recovery pressures across the public health system – including in rural and regional Victoria. “The package includes significant funding to

support Ambulance Victoria to provide the right care at the right time and ensure that emergency ambulances are available for those needing time-critical care. “But, we can always do better, and Ambulance Victoria continues to invest in initiatives to provide regional and rural Victorians with access to the best of care.” To see ambulance performance data visit ambulance.vic.gov.au/about-us/our-performance/ Mr Georgiou said the 85 per cent benchmark is a state-wide aggregate target. “Typically, areas with large, geographically concentrated populations, such as cities and suburbs, record faster response times, with paramedics travelling to many more cases over shorter distances,” he said. “In more rural or remote and sparsely populated areas where distances are greater, it can take longer for an ambulance to reach the scene. “What is of concern is in the past three months alone, more than 36,000 callers to 000 did not need an emergency ambulance and were, instead, connected to more appropriate care through Ambulance Victoria’s secondary triage service. “When an ambulance responds to a nonemergency call, it takes paramedics away from life-threatening emergencies.” For health advice call Nurse on Call 1300 606 024 for free medical advice 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If the situation is not life-threatening, contact your GP. For enyone experiencing heart or breathing problems or who needs urgent medical attention call 000.

Firewood fines

AGED 50 AND OVER? COVID-19 vaccines continue to roll out to those most at risk. People aged 50 and over can receive their COVID-19 vaccine at one of the selected vaccination clinics or at participating general practices. It’s voluntary, free and the best way to protect you and your community. Our Therapeutic Goods Administration continues to closely monitor the safety of all vaccines in Australia.

To find out where you can get vaccinated visit australia.gov.au or call 1800 020 080

SEVERAL government agencies are running a combined operation to stop firewood being collected illegally from parks, forests and reserves. Operation Hollows is designed to protect wildlife habitat from the impacts of illegal wood removal. Firewood should only be collected from designated areas during the two collection seasons, as trees and fallen wood outside these areas are crucial habitats for native wildlife, including birds, animals and reptiles. The ongoing operation also targets people selling illegal firewood. The maximum penalty for people caught illegally destroying habitat trees is $8261 plus potential seizure of equipment, including vehicles and chainsaws and/or one year in prison. From March to November 2020, 183 people were fined a total of $98,801 for illegally removing wood from widespread areas across the state. For details of where, when and what firewood can be collected, visit www.ffm.vic.gov/ firewood and https://www.vic.gov.au/collectingfirewood.

Roadworks done MORNINGTON roads advocate Ken McBride says Mornington-Tyabb Road from Nepean Highway to Bruce Street has been resealed with contractors “fixing the terrible potholes and covering the patchwork”. “While the Department of Transport stated they would resurface Bruce Road and Racecourse Road ‘next season’ they actually performed major patchworks between Bruce Street and Racecourse Road on Mornington-Tyabb Road,” he said.

Artists get the Point

Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

PAGE 10

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

AN exhibition of works by artists who have participated in the Police Point Artist-in-Residence program will begin over the Queen’s Birthday Weekend. About 90 artists, writers, musicians and creatives have been involved in Mornington Peninsula Shire’s program as residents of the Gatekeepers Cottage. Built around 1888, it will also be open to the public. The retrospective of diverse works will be held at the Commanding Officer’s House on the cliffs of Point Nepean National Park. It will run 10am-12pm and 1-3pm, Saturday 12 to Sunday 20 June. Register at: airexhibition.eventbrite.com.au


Community rallies after shop raid

Refresh for Crib Point

THREE offenders wearing balaclavas pulled a door off its hinges before robbing Crib Point Cellars of $30,000 in cigarettes and alcohol. Somerville detectives said the men used a stolen “small black car” in the 4.30am raid on the Stony Point Road business on Thursday 27 May. Devastated proprietors Danny and Terri Bemelen, who have had the business for seven years, said they had “just stocked up” on cigarettes. “It’s amazing how quickly they go up,” Mr Bemelen said. “One packet can cost $50.” The couple were “completely blown away” by the generosity of customers and well-wishers contributing through a GoFundMe campaign. Organiser Kiara Lacey is hoping to raise $5000. “Danny and Terri will give you the shirt off their backs if you need it. They would never ask anybody for anything. These absolute legends have done a lot for our town and it’s time we give back to them,” Ms Lacey said. “They would never even ask for us to do this fundraiser for them – I didn't give them a say – but I know our town wants to help out any way we can.” “I had to sit down when I became aware of [the GoFundMe campaign],” Mr Bemelen said. “You have some bad days when you wonder what you are doing wrong but then you get support like this. The cricket club has also helped us out.” Stephen Taylor

THE Crib Point Refresh plan was adopted at the Tuesday 4 May Mornington Peninsula Shire Council meeting. The Refresh is an update of a 10-year-old plan and was placed on public exhibition for community feedback last winter. The plan sets out to provide a long-term vision and guidance for the development of Crib Point and give greater certainty to residents and landowners over the next 10-20 years. It was prepared in consultation with residents and those connected with the town, following community concerns that out-of-character, multi-unit developments were appearing. Cr Lisa Dixon, whose Cerberus Ward takes in the township, said the original vision remained current with the updated plan “setting the strategic vision and direction for the township’s development, aiming to protect the character of tree-lined streets and mix of old and new houses”. The mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said the updated plan “ensures Crib Point will continue to have the look, feel and function of a country town on the coast”. An amendment to the peninsula’s planning scheme will allow further public comment on the proposed changes.See the plan at mornpen.vic.gov.au/cribpoint

Devastated: Crib Point Cellars proprietors Danny and Terri Bemelen after the robbery last week. Picture: Yanni

SALE ON NOW!

25% OFF ALMOST EVERYTHING* * T E R M S & C O N D I T I O N S A P P LY.

A U S T R A L I A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D MORNINGTON PH: 8560 1137, SHOWROOM D4, PENINSULA HOME, 1128-1132 NEPEAN HIGHWAY | OZDESIGNFURNITURE.COM.AU *See in-store or online at ozdesignfurniture.com.au/ozpromotions for more information.

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 11


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Art highlights contrast with trust’s actions and words I was moved and buoyed by the multifarious eloquent expressions encapsulated in the Holding Ground exhibition at Silver Leaf Art Box (“Holding Ground for Arthurs Seat” The News, 19/04). How lucky we are to have leaders like Silver Leaf’s Chiara Finnigan and Penelope Gebhardt. And how fortunate to have dynamic, principled artists such as Rosie Weiss. The contrast could not be starker between them and the [Hillview Quarries’] Ross Trust and its proposal to blast an open-cut mine on Arthurs Seat - destroying some 94 acres of native bushland in the process - represents a moral failure of epic proportions. The trust’s ethics charter is itself a masterpiece of self-deception and hypocrisy. “prioritising social responsibility” and “enhancing our environment” are two purported aims of its fourpoint charter. These trustees vow to ensure “Victoria’s biodiversity is conserved, protected and valued by all as part of a healthy and resilient environment”. Paint it anyway you like, that’s insidious greenwash at its worst. What a shame the board of this self-styled philanthropic conservationist charity does not consist of true nature-loving visionaries like those behind Holding Ground. Ed Merrison, Shoreham

Time to retire

Confusion reigns I see the statement by [Federal Treasurer] Josh Frydenberg “Australia is playing its part on climate change, having met our 2020 commitments and on track to meet and beat our 2030 target,” as arguably the biggest incorrect statement of the past five years. Currently, some 29 per cent of Australians are carrying on like pork chops. Somebody mentions blood clots and they run for cover; one in

Praiseworthy, but … Congratulations to Mornington Peninsula Shire for approving the new row of shops taking shape beside the old Mitre 10 store in Sorrento - far better than the bland and corporate ticky-tacky versions originally proposed. They make a positive contribution to the town, both in terms of heritage character and streetscape continuity. But I am puzzled. Retaining the former Mitre 10 shopfront is clearly a worthy heritage objective, and the contractor went to significant expense to brace it in position until it was fixed into the new structure behind. I suspect the

rendered brick, half-round parapet is about to be sheeted in some new material, probably to make it look just the same as the new shops on each side. If this is so, it will obliterate the only remaining heritage feature in this part of the street and negate the whole reason, as well as the expense, of retaining it. Why not repair the facade with a handful of bricks and a bucket full of lime mortar and let it live proudly on for another 100 years? Would it be too much to expect a heritage sensitive colour scheme and sign? Dale Kelly, Rye

Hospital up for parking A MULTI-deck car park is the major item added to the expanded Frankston Hospital project, now costing $605 million. An 11-storey twin tower on the old tennis club land will be completed late 2024 and include 120 beds, operating theatres, and mental health, oncology, maternity and paediatric facilities. Committee for Greater Frankston CEO Ginevra Hosking said government support for the health and education sector was crucial to economic growth of Frankston, the wider southeast and Mornington Peninsula. “We are already leading research in mental health, social disadvantage and addiction. Frankston is where the next generation of doctors, nurses and allied health professionals will be trained. “The state government and local MP Paul Edbrooke are to be congratulated for seeing the light and revising original hospital plan to now include enough car parking to accommodate future demand. “It is reassuring to finally see Frankston’s transport needs being considered and then designed into a big project before construction. “This should be the mantra for how we build in the future – projects must always have adequate affordable car parking.

FSA/DET0016-03

I know for a fact that our local member doesn’t have to worry about transportation on his patch as he has enjoyed the labours of being our MP for yonks by driving what I regard as luxury vehicles. Secondly, his latest free handout dropped into letterboxes asking for our considered opinion on supporting “a full public transport

overhaul for the Mornington Peninsula”. Additionally, his spiel compares us with Frankston. Ha, I’m rolling on the floor with uncontrollable guffaws, anyone can see why we have a disconnection at the Frankston transportation terminal. It’s called political power. The most creative thing I think he could do for the peninsula is retire and open up the possibility that Dan Andrew’s government and the Victorian Labor Party would encourage a suitable socially aware and member of the working class to stand as a representative. Please [Mornington MP David] Morris, give the younger generation an opportunity to participate. You have earned the right to retire and further enjoy the fruits of your many years of public service. Yes, I have made an executive decision to recycle your electoral transport survey card as a bookmark and, please, no more rhetorical dead certs mailers when the taxpayers’ money could be better spent on surveys of homelessness, social housing availability, aged care improvements and ambulance response times. Yes, for an overhaul, and no, I don’t belong to any political party. Ian Morrison, Mount Eliza

200,000, thereabouts. I hope they don’t swim in Port Phillip, keeping in mind the risk of a shark attack, some seven deaths the past 175 years, ignoring the 35,000 or more who died driving here for a day at the beach. Beware of cars? Smoking, drinking, a dozen other reasons. There’s a risk factor in walking to your letterbox; spiders? It was only a year ago we were hoping someone would invent a vaccine. Now you have your cake, and you can’t find a knife? I need big words to expunge these frightened people from my everyday existence. Not only our leaders of course. Listening to the radio and reading the various letters pages emphasises our confusion. Well, my confusion anyway. The vacant reasons for not taking the needle. They’re waiting, for what? A second, third wave, Godot? I’ll try Thoreau: “Let us settle ourselves, and work and wedge our feet downward through the mud and slush of opinion, and prejudice, and tradition, and delusion, and appearance, that alluvion which covers the globe, through country, church and state, through poetry and philosophy and religion, till we come to a hard bottom and rocks in place, which we can call reality, and say, this is, and no mistake.” Do I feel better now? Not really. The cold mornings, the Collingwood disaster. One day at a time. Cliff Ellen, Rye

To dream big, our kids need the best start in life. It’s why the Victorian Government is rolling out Three-Year-Old Kinder across the state in 2022. This means new kindergartens, upgraded facilities and new teaching jobs.

Find out more: vic.gov.au/kinder

PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021


Southern Peninsula

property

PRIVATE HAVEN PAGE 3 WEDNESDAY, 2nd JUNE 2021

SAFETY BEACH, DROMANA, McCRAE, ROSEBUD, CAPEL SOUND, RYE, BLAIRGOWRIE, SORRENTO, PORTSEA

Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au. Be seen everywhere.


SOLD

WALK TO BAY BEACH & CAFES

VACANT LAND

10 Grandview Avenue, RYE

270 DEGREE VIEWS

3

2

2

34 Fairhills Drive, TOOTGAROOK

$600,000-$630,000

$1,150,000 - $1,250,000

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724 MARNE PULS 0417 339 350

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724 MARNE PULS 0417 339 350

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

MARNE PULS 0417 339 350

SOLD

SERENE LIFESTYLE

3

1A Panorama Drive, TOOTGAROOK $1,150,000-$1,250,000

2

2

THE LAND OF PLENTY 2 Merchant Street, RYE $750,000

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724 MARNE PULS 0417 339 350

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724 MARNE PULS 0417 339 350

2375 Point Nepean Road, Rye Ph: 5983 3038 mpnews.com.au

VACANT LAND

crowdersre.com.au Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

ESCAPE THE EVERYDAY IN YOUR OWN SLICE OF PARADISE NESTLED amongst a stand of native Moonah trees that afford absolute privacy from neighbours and the street, this owner built home sprawls across a spectacular 8997 square metre block for the ultimate in peninsula lifestyle living. Constructed from handsome limestone blocks, the home has a distinct ranch-style appeal with the long, single level design embraced on all sides by wide verandahs; whilst inside is an eye-catching array of bespoke features including raked timber ceilings, timber dados and lovely bay windows. A glamorous sunken lounge sits beneath a pitched timber ceiling and complementing the bay window is a wonderful wood heater set into a feature wall. The wide hallway continues through to an incredible kitchen that

HOME ESSENTIALS

showcases gleaming timber benchtops, crisp white cabinets that bounce off the fantastic limestone walls perfectly, and a huge stainless-steel oven with gas hotplates and range hood. Adjoining the kitchen is a large dining area that will comfortably seat eight, and from here you can step out to the rear verandah and backyard. A second, separate living area with parquetry floors sets up beautifully as a fantastic rumpus room for adults or kids. There is a comfortable lounge and still enough room for the pool table, with a full bar to the back wall. To the north corner of the home are the three bedrooms that enjoy the most lavishly large bathrooms you’ll find. The large main bedroom has a walk-in robe and to the enormous ensuite is a corner spa and a shower with

rainfall head. The beautifully styled main bathroom has separate bath and shower plus a separate powder room. Adding that extra dimension to the property, one that really adds value and options for extended family is the superb separate self-contained cottage in the block’s south corner. Offering comfortable accommodation for guests and in-laws, there is the one bedroom and bathroom, a well-appointed kitchen and adjoining, air-conditioned open plan living that leads out to an undercover deck. Blissfully private, custom designed to offer plenty of character and convenience, and with enough space both inside and out for the largest of families, this versatile property is one of a kind.n

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

ADDRESS: 51-57 Glenvue Road, RYE FOR SALE: $2,000,000 - $2,200,000 DESCRIPTION: 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3 car AGENT: Ben Kenyon 0413 697 203, Stockdale & Leggo Rye, 12 Nelson Street, Rye, 5985 6555

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 3


51-57 Glenvue Road, RYE

4

3.5

3

Expressions of Interest, Closing 22 June at 12pm nd

n

Land Size 2.22 acres (approx.)

Private and peaceful, enveloped by mature Moonah trees n Extra generous accommodation with three bedrooms, two living areas and self contained bungalow n Immaculately landscaped gardens n

PRICE

$2,000,000 to $2,200,000

VIEWING

As advertised or by appointment

CONTACT Ben Kenyon 0413 697 203 RYE, 12 Nelson Street

6 Harold Road, RYE

3

2

Just 100m to sand dunes and short walk to 16 Beach and General Store

PRICE

$1,100,000 to $1,200,000

Three generous bedrooms with built in robes, Master with ensuite Immaculately presented modern home

VIEWING

As advertised or by appointment

Auction, Saturday 5 June at 10.30am n Land Size 864sqm (approx.)

2

th

n n n

CONTACT Ben Kenyon 0413 697 203 RYE, 12 Nelson Street

stockdaleleggo.com.au/dromana-rosebud stockdaleleggo.com.au/rye mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


15 Sara Street, RYE

3

1

2

Auction, Saturday 12 June at 10.30am th

n

Land size 1032sqm approx.

n

Ideally situated just 650m to sand dunes and short walk to 16 Beach and General Store

PRICE

$820,000 to $900,000

n

Open plan living and dining with open fireplace

VIEWING

As advertised or by appointment

n

Double lock up garage

CONTACT Ben Kenyon 0413 697 203 RYE, 12 Nelson Street

We’ve got the Mornington Peninsula Covered If you’re looking for local expertise, backed by a National Brand. You’ve made the right move. Stockdale & Leggo Mornington Peninsula Dromana-Rosebud 1159/1165 Point Nepean Road, Rosebud VIC 3939 P (03) 5986 8600 Rye 12 Nelson Street, Rye VIC 3941 P (03) 5985 6555 stockdaleleggo.com.au/dromana-rosebud stockdaleleggo.com.au/rye mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 5


Rosebud 838-840 Point Nepean Road

Absolute Beach Front.

Just listed.

Set on approximately 1400m2 of absolute prime beachfront and offering unimpeded beach access with ocean views, this architecturally designed, craftsmen built home features seven bedroom, three bathrooms and three kitchens. The ground level offers two fully self-contained units with secure separate access that includes two and three bedrooms & laundry. Upstairs is another two bedrooms, main bedroom with bay and city views, there is a massive sundrenched open plan living / dining area & a fully equipped kitchen. Serviced by open fire, refrigerated reverse cycle air conditioning, ducted vacuum, masses of storage, undercover parking, exterior games room, plumbed outdoor hot and cold shower. The perfect property holiday for multiple families and friends or to maximise in a hot rental market and short stays whilst travel is limited, with the potential to earn $100,000’s in yearly holiday income. A rare and exciting opportunity.

3

7

3

AUCTION Saturday 19th June at 12:30pm INSPECT As advertised CONTACT Craig Leo 0412 502 938 Milly Smith 0455 458 296 Barry Plant Rosebud 5986 8880

BINGO STARTS ON MONDAY 7TH JUNE EYES DOWN 1:00PM.

WE’RE BACK! FRIDAY 4th JUNE 2021 1 HOUR ENTERTAINER: CEE JAY JONES ARRIVE 12:30PM SHOW STARTS AT 2:00PM AFTERNOON TEA SERVED AT 3PM RAFFLES, TRADE TABLE,

FRIENDSHIP! ENTRY MEMBERS : $5:00 NON-MEMBERS: $10.00 -

MEMBERSHIP: $15 PER YEAR

CONTACT THE OFFICE ON 03 5986 1923

121-123 NINTH AVE ROSEBUD mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 6


56 Bruce Street, Rye VIC - Sold Jan 2020 by Anastasia Arvanitakis

Suburb spotlight: Rye January to March 2021***

133 Homes

$3.27m

$425k

Sold from January to March

Highest sold price

Lowest sold price

A total of $107,942,888 in sales for Sold & Settled Sales as reported by CoreLogic.

***

Want to find out the new value of your property? Call us today on (03) 5985 0000

To find out more visit shoreline.eview.com.au mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 7


Auction

Wednesday 9th June at 12:00pm 5 Main Street, Mornington

WANT THE BEST PRICE? R U O Y T C A T T N S O O C M S ’ A ARE E REAL . IV T T N C E A G A E T A EST

Your Main Office Opportunity

Total building area: 590sqm* (over 2 levels)

Total land area: 378sqm*

Corporate office fit out with bayside views Rear access & parking via council carpark Beach end of Main Street, surrounded by premier dining and retail precinct

5925 6005 nicholscrowder.com.au

*Approx

Jamie Stuart 0412 565 562 4/230 Main St, Mornington Vic 3931

Honest Authentic

Lloyd Hillard Licensed Estate Agent & Auctioneer

Real

0458 258 200

lloyd@activerea.com.au

To complement any marketing campaign for your property, consider print media advertising. Talk to your agent about advertising with Mornington Peninsula News Group. It could be more affordable than you think.

activerea.com.au mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 2nd June 2021

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 8


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Mr Cooper grows a giant Swede turnip Compiled by Cameron McCullough A SWEDE turnip, weighing 7½lbs grown by Mr Cooper, of Frankston, was brought to ‘’The Standard” office on Wednesday. It was grown in sandy soil. *** IN the “Standard” of the 20th inst. it was stated that Miss Florence M. Vines, of Somerville, had secured third prize for soprano solo at the A.N.A. Competitions. This was incorrect, as the competition has not yet been concluded. The fact is that competitors are arranged in sections; that in which Miss Vines sung being the first of six sections. The names mentioned in the Press are those securing the highest number of marks – not necessarily in order of merit, but as they appear on the printed programme. After all competitors in the six sections have sung, those obtaining the highest number of marks are selected for a final competition, which in this class is not until June 17th. We thank Miss Vines for drawing our attention to this matter. Her many friends and admirers throughout the district are delighted at the high place she has won in competition with some of Australia’s best vocalists. *** IF you are looking for Prime Meat go to Clarke’s. *** ALTHOUGH not a dancing teacher, Miss Rene Galt, of “Balmoral,” Melbourne Road, Frankston, is willing to give private lessons in the 1921 ball-

room dances, as taught by the Misses Eileen and Jennie Brennan, who have just returned from London, Paris and New York. The new dances are said to be very graceful and attractive when properly executed, and the young folk of Frankston should be glad to avail themselves of the offer of Miss Galt, who may be consulted at “Balmoral,” Frankston. *** MR. W. H. Prider, of Swan Hill, has been on a short visit to Frankston and Hastings. *** MRS Hay, of Frankston House, who has been on an extended holiday to New Zealand, returned home this week. *** TO the Editor. I would like to give the facts with regard to a letter appearing last issue re my refusing to admit disabled soldiers to the benefit race meeting at Mornington. I did not refuse to admit the soldiers in question to the meeting, because injured and disabled soldiers always obtain free admittance to all parts of the course, and a good many soldiers were granted these privileges as usual on May 12th inst. I did, however, refuse to admit their motor car to the Paddock, for the reason that there is a minute on the books of the club to the effect “That no motor cars be allowed inside the Paddock, and that any cars containing injured and disabled soldiers be paddocked in the space set apart for members cars at the paddock cntrance

gates.” This letter gives the other side of the case. Thanking you, Yours &c. HERBERT DOWNWARD, Sec. Mornington Racing Club.. *** AT the Frankston Police Court, on Monday, before Mr C. G. V. Wiliams and Cr Oates. J.’sP., a man named Berg was charged with assaulting William Donald Wilson. Both parties described themselves as laborers, residing at Pearcedale. Mr L. L. Rostron, who appeared for the complainant, explained that Wilson and a man named Smart were driving home in a waggonette from Frankston market on the evening of the 18th inst. They were overtaken by defendant, who was on horseback. They passed the time of day, and Smart said to defendant, “Does that cow of yours ever come home.” Berg replied. “You keep your stockwhip off her,” and commenced to use bad language. Then Berg got off his horse, tied it up, and running after the vehicle, jumped in at the back, and attacked Wilson. This statement was borne out by the evidence of Wilson and Smart. Wilson said he suffered from a weak heart, and was under medical treatment, when Berg attacked him. Constable Diaball said he visited Pearcedale in response to a telephone message. He found Wilson in a dazed condition. Defendant admitted the assault to the constable, but said Wilson had

used insulting words. Defendant gave evidence to the effect that he had received provocation. The Bench inflicted a fine of £3 with £3 9s costs in default one month. *** IT is important that ratepayers should note the fact that all rates must be paid before the 10th June, otherwise their names will be excluded from the annual voters rolls and they will not be eligible to vote at the August elections. *** OUR Special Correspondent at Tyabb writes: There was a large crowd of spectators present at the match between Tyabb Seconds and Moorooduc Seconds on the Tyabb Oval last Saturday afternoon. Both teams appeared to be very evenly matched up to the interval, when the scores showed the visitors in the lead by five points 19 to 14 points. After this stage the Maroons again out-played their opponents, and they finished the game easy winners, with 18 points to spare. The final scores were Tyabb Seconds, 7 goals 7 behinds; Moorooduc, 5 goals 1 behind. The most prominent players in the maroon uniform were – Scanlan, Slocombe, Longmuir, Les Cole, Lewis Cole, Storey, Morrow, Golding and Alan Hodgins. For the red and whites, Grierson Bros (3). Anderson Bros (3), George Lucas, T. Wagner and Connell did serviceable work. Lou. Hutchinson umpired the match in an impartial manner. Mooruoduc have already shown

splendid promise of being in the final matches on this, their first entrance in the Second Association. Their players played fine friendly football against the Tyabbites last Saturday afternoon. Up till half time the Moorooduc team played superior football to the maroons, and picked out and kicked to their comrades better. In the third and final quarters the red and whites did not seem able to go the fast pace set them by the maroons, particularly in the final term, when the home team kicked 4 goals 3 behinds to the visitors’ nil. However, Moorooduc kicked better than the home team for goals, as the scores show. Several easy shots by the maroon forwards went the wrong side of the tall posts; but this is all in the game. H. Russell (2), A. Noble (2); Scanlan, Morrow and Storey were the goal kickers for the maroons. Tyabb will meet the Somerville Stars tomorrow at Somerville. There will be a grand concert and dance in the Tyabb Hall to-night (Friday) to supplement the funds of the Tyabb club. Melbourne and local talent at usual prices. *** PLAYNE Steet, Frankston, is in a deplorable condition as a result of the recent rains. It is some satisfaction to know that the shire engineer was instructed to prepare plans and submit estimates for the forming of this important thoroughfare. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 27 May 1921

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 21


PUZZLE ZONE 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

ACROSS 1. Able to be read 4. Mild satire 7. Occupied by force 8. Dodge 9. Decimal (system) 12. Christmas season 15. Crushed underfoot 17. Radio crackle

18. Breakfasts or dinners 21. Enforced (payment) 22. Sneers 23. Watched over

DOWN 1. Sinew 2. Take no notice of 3. Swirl 4. Flank 5. Natural (of food) 6. Chimney duct 10. Recurrent pattern 11. Trudges

IN THE

WASHABLE MOULDS TO THE FOOT BREATHABLE 15 TIMES STRONGER THAN LEATHER

ULTRA LIGHTWEIGHT & FLEXIBLE

DUAL ARCH SUPPORT SYSTEM

*EXCLUDES ITEMS ALREADY MARKED DOWN. OFFER ENDS 30/6/21

THE ‘LARGEST’ SHOE STORE ON THE PENINSULA!

BAYS I D E

SHOES

BAYSIDESHOES.COM.AU | 9785 1887 | 103 RAILWAY PARADE, SEAFORD PAGE 22

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

13. Drew out (response) 14. Diabolic 16. Profession 18. Cripple 19. Movie filming areas 20. Piquancy

Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 26 for solutions.

specialists HANDS

Bayside Shoes - still serving you through uncertain times DURING these uncertain Covid-19 pandemic times, Bayside Shoes has offered a range of options to enable its customers to obtain essential footwear. These include purchase by telephone, email or via its web site as well as personalized fitting if a medical or allied health professional has given a referral and they can set an appointment time at the business address. Working with medical and allied health professionals, Bayside Shoes staff offers a professional footwear fitting service with a compassionate understanding to the foot difficulties that their customers need help with. Bayside Shoes has always offered a professional shoe fitting service to ensure that you get the right shoe size fit and level of foot support that you need, as well as good advice that the footwear is suitable for you. Bayside Shoes offers a wide range of specialist footwear for men and women that can assist your foot problem while still looking good. An example of this is the Arcopedico ergonomic footwear that has been handmade in Portugal since 1966 and offers comfortable, soft and very light footwear with a removable inner sole that comes in a variety of styles and colours in shoes and boots. The ergonomic design is based on 3 main features: 1) Lytech techno elastic uppers that allows total foot freedom to the foot perimeter due to its

softness and self adjustability while offering 97% water resistance, 15 times stronger than leather and is breathable. 2) Anatomic footbed gives the plantar surface 100% body weight distribution, assuring correct body balance. 3) Twin arch support system gives specific support of the foot arch giving correct positioning of the spinal column reducing stress on your back. The Arcopedico (Lytech) shoes are very light weight and can be hand washed with liquid soap and warm water making them a perfect travel shoe. Bayside Shoes is located at 103 Railway Parade Seaford (cnr Clovelly Pde) & has wheel chair access with free and disability parking near its entrance. Store hours are 10am to 5pm Monday to Friday & 10am to 3.30pm Saturdays. Phone 9785 1887 or check out the website at www. baysideshoewarehouse.com.au


IN THE

specialists HANDS

Heel pain in the morning YOU’VE just started putting in the extra miles, walking or running to get fit, and suddenly putting weight on the base of the foot, near the heel makes it ache, and makes more training a painful prospect. That sharp pain in your heel can be a symptom of plantar fasciitis, a condition of the connective plantar fascia tissue in your foot, and traditionally very difficult to treat. Physiotherapist Josie Wilson says Plantar Fasciitis is an overuse injury that can feel as though you have a pebble in your shoe. At Back In Motion Balnarring, we have several solutions for this condition. Firstly, it is important to look at your whole lower limb biomechanics. As a result, we can work on your strength and flexibility in your leg and foot, prescribe orthotics, tape and teach taping, and use massage and ultrasound to reduce inflammation. We have a unique way of mobilizing your foot and teaching “foot core stability” to reduce pressure on the plantar fascia. Apart from the above solutions, there is a newer healing technology that is making a profound difference to Plantar fasciitis sufferers.

Practice owner and physiotherapist, Paul Rowson says shockwave therapy is often useful, because the Plantar fascia is a connective tissue, not a muscle. “It puts a significant shockwave through the tissues you apply it to,” Mr Rowson says. “It is a pressure wave which brings blood flow to the area. Tendons and connective tissue do not have much blood supply and can take a long time to heal. Shockwave artificially stimulates the healing of the tendon”. Shockwave therapy can also be used on Achilles tendonitis, tennis and golfer’s elbow, and rotator cuff tendon problems, and is usually most effective on long term chronic problems, rather than acute injuries. Both physios say that Shockwave is not the first line of treatment for injured patients. Physiotherapy and graded exercise are more likely in the first instance. For more stubborn conditions, shockwave has shown good results in other Back In Motion clinics. “The evidence at the moment suggests between three to five treatments are required, but most people should see an improvement within three sessions. It has a 90% success rate,”Ms Wilson says.

The Shockwave therapy is administered for a three-minute period to the affected area during consecutive weekly appointments. “It is a bit of an uncomfortable sensation,”Ms Wilson says, “like most physio hands-on treatments with a little discomfort during the treatment.” Mr Rowson says,” After each session, most people get a significant reduction of pain and symptoms. Long term it stimulates healing, short term it reduces pain.” “Probably the best thing is, the effects are long lasting. It stops a lot of people having more invasive things like surgery or injections. The treatment is considered safe, but can produce skin reddening or bruising, short term pain, and cannot be used on people taking blood thinning medications or with bleeding disorders.” “It is important to know that shock wave has a long-term effect. Most of the time you have good outcomes without having to do further treatment.” says Mr Rowson. Back in Motion is at 6/2-8 Russell Street, Balnarring. www.backinmotion.com.au/balnarring Pictured right: Physiotherapist, Josie Wilson. Photo: Yanni

Don’t let tendon pain stop you in your tracks Up to 90% success rate# | Non invasive therapy Radial Shockwave therapy Clinically proven* to help these conditions: • Heel pain (plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinopathy)

• Rotator cuff tendinopathy with calcification

• Tennis & golfers elbow

• Hip bursitis

• Patella tendinopathy

• Shin splints and heel spurs

• Frozen shoulder

Call 5983 1021 or book online for your

Free Initial Assessment

# Am J Sports Med 2007; 35:972 * lnt J Surg 2015; 24:113-222 ^ Int J Surgery 2015; 24:207-9

Back In Motion Balnarring 6/2-8 Russell Street backinmotion.com.au/balnarring Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 23


THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

The Lowdown on the Lockdown Hearted By Stuart McCullough TO borrow the words of William Shakespeare: ‘Once more unto the breach, dear friends’. These words were attributed Henry the Fifth, who was attempting to inspire his soldiers prior to them storming Harfleur to get the last available rolls of toilet paper and beef mince. Or, to put it as Yogi Berra once so memorably did, ‘It’s de ja vu all over again’. Here we are, once more, in lockdown. It’s a little deflating, I know, but temporary. By now, though, we’re all kind of experts. Traditions have developed. Firstly, everyone sees the announcement coming a mile off. Despite this, nothing seems to prevent the customary panic buying the instant it becomes official. It seems that people drop whatever they’re doing the moment the news breaks before throwing the green bags in the back seat and hightailing it down to Coles, Woolies and Dan Murphys. Possibly not in that order. It’s as though we demand the right to lose our minds before lockdown kicks off. To be honest, I’m not sure who these people are. Surely they can’t be the same people who stuffed their trolleys with every spare bit of two-ply they could get their hands on in the first lockdown? They must still have mountains of the stuff from last time. Perhaps those who kept their nerve in previous lockdowns have decided to get the full pandemic experience and discover what it’s like to fight someone for a packet of pasta swirls and half a kilo of mince meat. The second part of the routine is that we have to dig out our masks again. For me, I like to pick a different theme

for my masks each time we have a lockdown. Last time, I went with ‘the Ned Kelly’. While fully Covidcompliant, I’ll admit now that it was a little uncomfortable, both for me and for everyone who saw me wearing

it. Something about seeing someone walking down the street with a metal bucket on their head makes other people nervous. Apparently. In addition to chaffing, it also drastically reduced my field of vision. Trying to buy fruit with

a Ned Kelly helmet on is an absolute nightmare; believe me. This time, I’m steering clear of bushrangers altogether. Instead, for this lockdown I’ve decided to make a mask that I like to refer to as ‘the Tuckerbag’. Based on the world’s most manifestly inadequate puppet and spokesperson for the supermarket chain ‘Tuckerbag’, my mask will both be a nostalgic celebration and a reminder that, once upon a time, shopping bags were made of truly recyclable paper rather than some kind of heavy duty plastic that probably has a half life that would rival plutonium. There’s a slight problem with the eyes. I’m pretty sure the original ‘Tucker’ had eyes that were stuck on. Stuck on eyes are no good for navigating the fruit and vegie section of the supermarket. It’s bound to lead to trouble. Worse still, in the event that I am actually able to find the supermarket while wearing ‘the Tuckerbag’ mask, there’s a very good chance I won’t be able to find my way back out again. The third part of the lockdown routine is the regular evaluation of exposure sites. This serves two purposes: to see how close the nearest exposure site is to where you live and, secondly, to look with awe and quiet admiration at the busy social lives of others. I do want to say that those who supply these details are performing an immeasurable public service. But when I look at the list, I am struck by the fact that I really don’t get out enough. If I’m being honest, it’s hard not to be a tiny bit, well, judgmental. In previous outbreaks, who among us didn’t read the list of exposure sites and see

both ‘Dan Murphys’ and ‘Off Ya Tree’ and lift a knowing eyebrow? Or wonder at the kind of person who visits multiple K-Marts in a day instead of using the internet like the rest of us do? Yesterday, I saw that a shopping centre comfort station was listed as an exposure site for a ten-hour period. My thoughts immediately went to the person concerned, hoping that there were multiple trips involved as opposed to a single, catastrophic visit. My own lockdown traditions tend towards the idiosyncratic. I have taken to getting changed after work just so that it feels different. In old movies, they’d often talk about getting ‘changed for dinner’. It sounds kind of civilized. Last Tuesday, I ditched a pair of jeans and a flannel shirt to put on a tuxedo before mealtime. It was rissoles. In retrospect, I may have overdone it. I choose to look at the positives. I am now a certified black belt in ‘Microsoft Teams’. I also feel I know what to do when a lockdown is announced. I’m disappointed – but who isn’t? Nobody wants to be here and everybody wants things to get back to something like normal. Which they will. But I marvel at the ability of people to adapt, to look out for each other and to do what needs to be done. If the horror-show that is the last twelve months has taught us something, it’s that we can do anything when push comes to pandemic shove. Soon, lockdown will be a thing of the past and I can finally burn my Tuckerbag mask. The day can’t come soon enough. stuart@stuartmccullough.com

Advertise in the Southern Peninsula’s own newspaper

Call MPNG Classieds on 1300 666 808

PAGE 24

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021


networkclassifieds.com.au networkclassifieds.com.au Trades & Services

All Carpentry & Repairs

Doors, Locks, Fences, Gates, Decks, Pergolas NO JOB TOO SMALL - FREE QUOTES

V

Plumbing

KELLY’S GAS & PLUMBING

0447 007 178

Lic. 16546

Pre-Winter Gas Ducted Heater Service Specials

12469626-SN46-20

(Terms & Conditions Apply)

Call Jason 0439 042 540

Advertise with us and get better results

V

Gas Ducted . Changeovers . Split Systems . Ducted Refrig .

• Guttering Replacements • Downpipes • 20 Colours • Quality Workmanship • All Work Guaranteed • Old Guttering Taken Away • Free Quotes

ANDY 0414 477 121 V

Rubbish Removal

Same day service. No job too small

We do all the work

Concrete Products & Services

0414 566 273 V

Peter Sharp

&2%% 15/4%3 s $!93 ! 7%%+

-OB s 0H

Tiling

Massage Therapists

ADVERTISERS in this section are qualified practitioners and offer nonsexual services.

section of Network Classifieds.

Anyone advertising a puppy, dog, kitten or cat in Victoria for sale or re-homing will need a source number from the Pet Exchange Register and a microchip identification number. It is now an offence to advertise unless the source number and microchip identification number is included in the advertisement or notice. For further information, call 136 186 or visit animalwelfare.vic.gov.au

Professional

DISCRIMINATION IN ADVERTISING IS UNLAWFUL

The Victorian Equal Opportunity Act 1995 makes it unlawful for an advertiser to show any intention to discriminate on the basis of sex, pregnancy, race, age, marital status, political or religious belief or physical features, disability, lawful sexual activity/sexual orientation, HIV/AIDS status or on the basis of being associated with a person with one of the above characteristics, unless covered by an exception under the Act. As Network Classifieds could be legally liable if an unlawful advertisement is printed, Network Classifieds will not accept advertisements that appear to break the law. For more information about discrimination in advertising, contact your legal advisers or the Equal Opportunity Commission.

Motoring V

Caravans & Trailers

Buy, Rent & Sell in our

✮ Waterproofing & Silicon for Walls, Floors and Splashbacks ✮ Call Brett 0477 001 884

Trades & Services

Pets & Services

Employment

TILING AND BATHROOM RENO'S

12428296-ACM40-19

Specialising in: s 3LABS s &OOTINGS s 0AVING s $RIVEWAYS s #ROSSINGS s ,AYBACKS s )NDUSTRIAL &LOORS s 4ENNIS #OURTS s %XPOSED !GGREGATE

V

GUTTERING

By Horizon Plumbing Pty Ltd

GARY’S RUBBISH REMOVALS

PTY LTD

SN1090434-PJ37-13

V

10 year Guarantee. Call now for a FREE quote: 0405 817 173

Call: 0407 121 284

CONCRETE SPECIALISTS

One call, We do it all!

V

ADVERTISERS PLEASE NOTE

Roofing

đŏ ((ŏ(! 'ŏ.!, %./ŏđŏ ++"ŏ /$%*#ŏđŏ ++"ŏ %*0%*# đŏ (!4%ġ,+%*0%*#ŏđŏ % #!ŏ0%(!ŏ.!ġ ! %*# đŏ ((!5ŏ $ *#%*#ŏđŏ 100!.ŏ (! *%*#ŏ".+)ŏĸāĂĀ đŏ ((ŏ05,!/ŏ+"ŏ.++ü*#ŏ * ŏ .,!*0.5

Home Maintenance

CALL:

Adult Services

0478 647 138 � sharkeplumbing@outlook.com @sharkeplumbing

Roof Restoration Specialists

HEATING & COOLING www.fairbairns.com.au Est. 1982

• Home Maintenance • Trees Lopped • Rubbish Removal • Retaining Walls • Gutters • Fully Insured

V

SHAUN CLARKE

V

FAIRBAIRNS

PIC: 38148 REC: 17042 AU: 06212

LIC: 109028

ABN 22 623 865 704 | LIC NO 111537

5998 7796

12485978-JW11-21

s 7HIPPER SNIPPING s 7EEDING PRUNING s 'ARDEN CLEAN UPS s 'UTTER CLEANING s .O JOB TOO SMALL s &ULLY INSURED s &REE QUOTES

General Classifieds

SHARKE PLUMBING

Pensioner Discounts

J&T

THURSDAY 10th June at 5pm

12415744-DJ16-19

Hot winter specials

Lawn Mowing & Garden Maintenance

Classified deadlines for Southern Peninsula News as follows:

www.orbitplumbing.com.au

12423915-CG33-19

Small Jobs Welcome Andrew 0408 822 263 concretingab@gmail.com

colinkellygas@gmail.com

Garden Services

Queen’s Birthday 14th June Wednesday, 16th June issue of the

CARBON MONOXIDE TESTING

BLITZ YOUR GARDEN

V

Plasteringnpainting.com

Local & Friendly Plumber Daniel:

GAS APPLIANCE SERVICING

12495360-NG21-21

12396062-LB34-18

Call Keith 0432 480 865

Public Notices and Event

CLASSIFIEDS EARLY DEADLINES

** Same Day Plumbing Service **

Colin Kelly 0427 314 570

Call Gary 0407 877 960

Quality & reliable service Small repairs welcome Free quotes

s (OT 7ATER s "URST 0IPES s 4APS 4OILETS s (EATING s #ARBON -ONOXIDE 4ESTING s 0UMPS s "LOCKED $RAINS s 'AS &ITTING

Heating

V

V

Plasterers

ORBIT PLUMBING

Phone Dave: 0421 07 3939

Exposed Aggregate, Concrete Driveways, Pathways, Garage Floors, Paving and Retaining Walls.

� Regular lawn mowing � Complete garden cleanup � Weeding � Trimming � Clear sheds/houses � Small/medium trees removed � NDIS & Homecare packages

12370016-ACM44-17

-- Servicing the Peninsula --

General Notices

Lic#109028

PLASTERING & PAINTING

Phone Tim: 0412 315 798

ASK HANDYMAN DAVE

for an obligation free quote

V

12417889-FA21-19

Years of experience. Fully insured. Free Quotes. Rye and surrounding area.

AB Concreting & Landscaping

V

rosebudhotwaterplumber.com.au

Tim The Handyman 12497909-AV23-21

Don’t replace your old concrete – we can repair and reseal in any colour of your choice. • All types of concrete work done. • Reasonable rates. • Pensioner discounts. • Small site cleans. • FREE colour with Call now every job.

0497 154 490

Mulch For Sale

Ph Graham 0407 357 927

12497915-CG23-21

ROCKHARD CONCRETING AND SEALING SERVICES

0412 588 130

Handy Persons

V

UÊ/ÀiiÊEÊ-ÌÕ «Ê,i Û> UÊ Õ Ê ÃÕÀ> ViÊ ÛiÀ ÊUÊ7 `Ê ««iÀÉ Õ V }Ê-iÀÛ ViÊ Û> >L i

12423634-SN31-19

Concrete Products & Services

12468704-HL45-20

V

phone: Jordi on 0418 312 121 email: jordi@guttersuncluttered.com.au

Tree Lopping/Surgery

CHEAP CHEAP CHEAP

12337429-CG06-17

Russell 0418 338 648

45 years experience

CALL DANIEL

Vacuum Gutter Cleaning | Mornington Peninsula

12467040-JW44-20

Free quotes

EMERGENCY HOT WATER REPLACEMENT

12447720-LB18-20

12432016-CG47-19

s 0ROMPT SERVICE s 1UALITY WORKMANSHIP s 0ENSIONER DISCOUNTS s 3HOWER SCREENS

V

12468339-CG45-20

Bathroom Renovations

Hot Water 12487198-CG12-21

V

12403490-RA45-18

Guttering

V

12464927-SG42-20

Bathroom & Kitchens

12357430-DJ28-17

V

Place your ad in print and online www.networkclassifieds.com.au

SCENIC GALAXY Caravan 1999. 18ft. Single beds, shower/toilet combo, full oven, reverse cycle air conditioner. Very good condition. $19,000. Phone David 0414 832 079

Southern Peninsula News

Real Estate

section of Network Classifieds.

2 June 2021

PAGE 25


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

FV thumbs-up for local clubs SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FOOTBALL Victoria CEO Kimon Taliadoros remains hopeful that the state’s seven-day lockdown has no lasting effect on local clubs but acknowledges that 2020 has taken its toll. Last Thursday’s seven-day lockdown announcement forced FV to suspend all football activity during that period. “The unknown for all of us is obviously the extent of the lockdown,” Taliadoros said. “While that impacts on our fixtures if it only lasts for seven days then we face a less complicated scenario than if it is extended for another week or longer. “If the number of games required to be played becomes an issue then it possibly means midweek fixtures.” FV’s competitions department already has contacted clubs directing them to switch any Friday night fixtures this week to Saturday and local outfit Frankston Pines has obliged. Taliadoros stepped down as FV president earlier this year to take on the CEO’s role and has been heartened by the sport’s ability to bounce back from last season’s shutdown. “If we use 2019 as our baseline and obviously that’s pre-pandemic, the game was in pretty good shape,” he said. “Most clubs had seen participation growing with an increased focus on both women and girls and also on facilities. “Going into 2020 our numbers were really encouraging and what we’ve found now, say mid-May prior to this current lockdown, is that our numbers had almost fully recovered to the 2019 levels. “What that says to us is that the football economy has rebounded strongly. “Most clubs are back into their regular operating rhythm but some more than others. “It’s a bit patchy as some clubs are still carrying the legacy of 2020 but the good news for them is that football as we know it has returned and demand is strong. “Historically (player) registrations continue to increase up until about June so we would say, subject to this lockdown, that the game is in a very healthy state.”

needs improvement. “I’ve had a follow-up with the guys from Somerville and we need to get these local presidents together to get some extra leverage (with council). “Clubs need to get together if they are to give themselves a chance of realising their aspirations. “Patience, strategy and collaboration are key and we’ve shown that with other LGAs.” In other news the only local side left in the FFA Cup is Langwarrin which has reached the last 16 of the Victorian section of the national competition. Langy was due to play its away tie against fellow NPL2 side Moreland Zebras this week but the tie has been re-arranged for Friday 11 June at CB Smith Reserve at 8pm. Langy and the Zebras are currently in midtable positions on the league ladder with 14 points each.

NEXT WEEK’S GAMES (Pending restrictions)

Top trio: Football Victoria CEO Kimon Taliadoros flanked by Somerville Eagles president Luke Mulder (right) and Baxter counterpart Bray Hodgkinson. Picture: Darryl Kennedy

Despite such optimism Taliadoros points out that there are two areas of the game that haven’t responded as well as others and more work needs to be done. “The first area is club volunteers. “We’ve found across the board, as have other sports, that volunteers haven’t returned in the same numbers which means there’s more to do for less people which is a strain on clubs. “And the administrative and logistical challenges clubs face during lockdown are significant having to reach every player and coach while dealing with the expectations of parents.” The second area of concern has been the lower numbers of match officials who have returned to the sport following the 2020 shutdown. The impact on the local game has been felt most at State 4 and State 5 levels where it is not uncommon for one referee to officiate at both reserves and senior levels on matchday while having to use club linesmen as

Did you know... you can view our papers online

Sudoku and crossword solutions L

E G

I I

G

T

E

www.mpnews.com.au 2 June 2021

N

V

L A

R

N R

I

S

P O O

F

D

I

R

L

D

G

U

D

E

E

Y C

A M P

L

T

E

U

L

S

A

N

E

I

I

T

N

S

G U

A

E

T

I

D

E L I

C T

A

T

I

C

T

E

T

D

E

E A

C I

R

A

X

D

C

D

M E

K

E

O E

A N

T

S

V

P

C

S

L

E

Y

E

M O C Southern Peninsula News

B

O

M E

T

I G

A

PAGE 26

more accessible, especially for boys. “I don’t think we’ve been able to achieve that on the girls’ side at the moment so that’s a challenge. “Certainly it appears to me that there is tremendous ambition among the leading clubs as far as their facilities are concerned and their desire to play at the highest level. “I also see, however, a contrast in support from the two councils in the region so there is work to be done with the clubs and councils there to continue to support the growth of clubs with aspirations. “And by aspirations I don’t just mean playing at the highest level but in providing a fantastic environment for kids to come and play football and enjoy their local community.” Taliadoros’ recent visit to Tyabb Recreation Reserve highlighted a major facility problem faced by Somerville Eagles who have to deal with a cricket pitch encroaching on the playing arena and a pitch surface that

assistants. “We know from our conversations with other sports and with Sport and Rec Victoria that netball, football and basketball have also experienced a shortage of match officials and our numbers haven’t rebounded to the same extent as other parts of the game.” Taliadoros has been to two local games in recent weeks, a Frankston Pines home match and the recent local derby between Somerville Eagles and Baxter. He liked what he saw. “Every time I’ve been to a game on the peninsula there’s always been a positive and enjoyable atmosphere which to me is what football is all about – enjoying the matchday and from my experiences this year that’s certainly been the case. “In terms of the peninsula what I can probably say is that from 2019 there seems to be a greater level of interest in NPL programs becoming

R D

E

D

Saturday 5 June, 3pm: North Geelong v Langwarrin – Elcho Park Mornington v Eltham Redbacks – Dallas Brooks Park Peninsula Strikers v Berwick City – Centenary Park Skye Utd v Doncaster Rovers – Skye Recreation Reserve Seaford Utd v Sandown Lions – North Seaford Reserve Dingley Stars v Baxter – Keeley Park Dandenong South v Chelsea – Tatterson Park Noble Park Utd v Somerville Eagles – Parkfield Reserve Aspendale v Pakenham Utd – Jack Grut Reserve Endeavour Hills v Mount Martha – Power Reserve Saturday 5 June, 7pm: Frankston Pines v Bayside Argonauts – Carrum Downs Recreation Reserve Saturday 5 June, 8.30pm: Rosebud v Casey Panthers – Olympic Park


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Strategic Phil breaks one-year drought HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou DAVID Bridoake’s consistent gelding Strategic Phil picked up a “bonus” win at Caulfield on Saturday as he gears up for the $125,000 Swan Hill Cup in a fortnight. Breaking a one-year drought, Strategic Phil relished the solid tempo at Caulfield to win the $125,000 BM84 by one-length over the Chris Waller-trained Relucent. Strategic Phil’s performance (1:35.00) on the firm track (Good 3) was just over half-of-a-second outside the track record which was set by Field Of Omagh (1:34.28) in 2006. Adding further credit to the run, his time was the seventh fastest over the Caulfield mile in the past 15 years. Assistant trainer Matt Jenkins was thrilled to land the spoils with his main target still to come. “It’s been a little while between drinks for him but he had been racing really well without winning,” Jenkins said post-race. “He’s in at the right time of year. We freshened him up to bring him back for the wet tracks. The Swan Hill Cup could be on the cards next and David [Brideoake] picked this race out along the way as a stepping stone so what he’s done today has been a bonus.” Despite seemingly handling Saturday’s firm surface, Jenkins hinted that the gelding is generally better suited to a track with more give in the ground. “We won’t head to Swan Hill if it’s too firm,” he said. “There’s a race the day before over 1800m at Sandown which could be wet. We’ll just head to the softer ground and whatever comes up more suitable for him.” The five-year-old son of Strategic has now won six races from his 30 starts and just shy of $300,000 in prize money.

Bonus win: The David Brideoake-trained Strategic Phil wins at Caulfield on Saturday 29 May before heading to the Swan Hill Cup. Picture: Supplied

THINKING OF SELLING? Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au.

Be seen everywhere. Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021

PAGE 27


#1 Gutter Guard Company in Melbourne and Mornington Peninsula

No More Cleaning Gutters

25% OFF!

WINTER SPECIAL -

FREE GUTTER CLEAN WITH EVERY INSTALLATION

• Gutters stay clean - no more cleaning • No more mud in your gutters • No more vermin or birds in your roof • Save money and cleaning time • Protect your most valued investment • 30 year guarantee - your home, your building We Have You Covered!

*Valid Until 11/06/21 Conditions apply PAGE 28

Southern Peninsula News

2 June 2021


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.