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Southern Peninsula

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Wednesday 22 July 2020

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au

Bus operators need assistance to stay on road

Rough road ahead: Bus tour operators Bernie and Chris O’Shannessy fear for the future of their industry. Picture: Yanni

A SIX-MONTH extension of the JobKeeper subsidy is “absolutely imperative for the survival of coach tour companies – a vital part of the Mornington Peninsula’s tourism industry”. Chris O’Shannessy, of O’Shannessy’s Quality Tours, based at Rye, said the tourism industry was “not alone in bearing the brunt of the economic crisis this pandemic has caused. But I would say without a doubt it is, along with the hospitality industry, one of the hardest hit. “Our two industries work hand in glove in support of each other.” Mr O’Shannessy said coach touring brought visitors to small, out-of-the-way towns, provided revenue for hospitality businesses, and made holidays possible for those with physical or mobility issues, or who could no longer drive themselves. “This is an entire industry that may close down completely, without a long term future strategy that includes ongoing support,” he said. “Our future survival lies in the hands of our government.” Mr O’Shannessy said his 35-year-old bus touring company was well known on the peninsula. The “mum-and-dad” company employs local people in the office, as well as tour directors from around the country. “We completed over 100 tours last year and brought fun and joy to the lives of many Australians, particularly seniors. “In March our operations were reduced dramatically due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our business has been in complete hibernation ever since.” Mr O’Shannessy stressed he was “not whingeing”. “We understand why it’s not pertinent to be on the road and we don’t expect to be so for a while, but we do need support for the longer term.” Stephen Taylor

Move to curb CEO’s ‘bonus’ powers Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire councillors want the state government to rein in the power of municipal chief executive officers to prevent bonuses being secretly given to staff. Under the current rules CEOs can grant bonuses to staff without telling councillors, residents or ratepayers. Council CEOs are the only council officers appointed and controlled by councillors. All other council staff are under the jurisdiction of the CEO. Cr David Gill told The News that the shire’s current CEO, John Baker, had not awarded any bonuses to staff.

However, a previous CEO who he declined to name, had provided bonuses to individual officers “of $40,000 and up to $60,000”. The 2019/20 budget shows staff costs comprise $82.1 million of the shire’s total expenses of $191.7m. “We all have the right to know how our rates and any other income is spent,” Cr Gill said. “A former CEO of the shire has apparently been able to pay huge bonuses without the knowledge of council. “I believe that the council of the time set up a mechanism to prevent bonus payments being paid without their knowledge, but that was seemingly ignored.”

Councillors at the 14 July meeting (held online) agreed with Cr Gill that the Local Government Minister Shaun Leane be asked to “review … the situation where chief executive officers of municipalities in Victoria have extraordinary powers to give confidential large yearly bonuses to selected staff … and is apparently entirely at their sole discretion”. Mr Leane was appointed local government minister in June following the sacking by the Premier Daniel Andrews of Adem Somyurek amid allegations of branch stacking and offensive language. The request was also made to Local Government Victoria and Victorian

Auditor-General’s Office and listed for adoption by other councils at the next state conference of the Municipal Association of Victoria. The shire’s letter to the minister will state that the powers given by the government to CEOs “lacks transparency and accountability and creates apprehension of outcomes that may not be in the community interest”. Comments made on the agenda by an unnamed officer said there were “mechanisms” already built into the system to stop the CEO telling council if any bonuses had been granted. “Therefore, it is the officer position that such oversight does not require any legislative or state policy change,

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with mechanisms to address the concerns raised presently available within the existing legislative and policy framework,” the unnamed officer stated.” The officer stated that council could ask to be told about any performancebased bonuses and if they had been appropriately assessed. The officer then stated that “council officers will be seeking clarity regarding what points of advocacy are to be raised and specifically what changes are sought” if councillors asked Mr Leane to curb the powers of CEOs. Councillors voted unanimously to approach Mr Leane, the auditor general and other municipalities.


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For more information, or to book on one of our fully inclusive tours call 1800 354 352 or visit oshannessys.com.au PAGE 2

Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

$2,175


NEWS DESK

Grainy narrative in tale of two beaches Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au SAND has become a precious and fought over commodity, and no more so than near some of Australia’s most expensive and exclusive real estate: Portsea. At one end of the town, near the iconic pier, sand has disappeared several times over the past decade, starting in 2009 when dredging of the South Channel changed its shape, causing a new, damaging swell to erode a part of the beach near the Portsea Hotel. With sand trucked in at great expense to taxpayers, the beach was restored, but not to its former glory, or permanently. A couple of years later the imported sand had gone, revealing an underlying reef and requiring expensive sandbags to protect further incursions by the sea. Mornington Peninsula Shire and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning are now looking at spending millions of dollars to build a rock groyne to capture sand dredged from the nearby seabed (“Rock groyne ‘key’ to $20m Portsea beach plan” The News 29/6/20). About 2.5 kilometres further west, sand has also become a valuable commodity, but this time it is a build up of the fine grains that are enabling an adjoining land owner to claim part of the beach, increasing both the size and worth of his property. Trucking magnate Lindsay Fox has successfully been down that track before, being given approval by the land titles office on Christmas Eve 2013 to extend his property boundary onto

A HELICOPTER partly obscured by hedges on the family compound of Lindsay Fox at Point King Beach, Portsea. Fox family companies have applied for ownership of an area covered by sand between the property and the high tide mark. Picture: Yanni

Point King Beach by about 45 metres. Mr Fox made his claim, based on an ancient law of England never tested in Australia, after a build-up of sand saw the high water mark move even further out to sea from his foreshore property boundary.

This interpretation of common law known as the “doctrine of accretion” enables boundaries to be varied if adjoining land is subject to “natural” rather than “artificial” change. In the six and a half years since Mr Fox was allowed to extend the bounda-

Mornington-based planner Watsons is seeking the boundary change application on behalf of Mr Fox’s family companies. In a separate move, Mr Fox is understood to be challenging planning regulations that, after being changed in 2014, limited the uses of the land within his extended boundary. Shire councillors last week ordered CEO John Baker to “urgently review” any applications to the Supreme Court by Mr Fox “or any related person against the Planning Minister [Richard Wynne]” or any applications made to the Titles Office relating to the boundaries of the Fox property at Point King. Mr Baker is to report his findings to council’s 11 August meeting. Meanwhile, debate still surrounds why sand can build up at one Portsea beach while disappearing from another. Channel deepening has scientific credibility, but some people still hold the belief that it is a natural occurrence. Whatever the reason, sand is proving a costly commodity for taxpayers and a possible financial windfall for others.

ry of his not insignificant holding near Point King, the sand has again built up and he is again seeking permission to move his boundary towards the receding high tide level. It has been estimated the “new” land involved covers 4700 square metres.

Waste water study up and running Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au WORK has started on a feasibility study into connecting the Mornington Peninsula’s hinterland to a permanent source of water from the Eastern Treatment Plant. The Bangholme plant discharges around 350 million litres of treated waste water a day into Bass Strait at Boags Rocks, near Gunnamatta. The scheme – long promoted by Mornington Peninsula Shire and peninsula MPs – would allow landowners to access the recycled water as it

makes its way down the length of the peninsula to the South Eastern Outfall. This renewable supply of treated water would ease pressures imposed on primary producers by climate change, boost food production and strengthen the region’s capabilities against bushfires. Flinders MP Greg Hunt arranged $300,000 from the federal government for a feasibility study into the scheme which has been added to with money from Mornington Peninsula Shire, South East Water and not-for-profit community group Hinterland Environmental Water Scheme.

“The economic sustainability and growth of the peninsula’s hinterland is limited by water availability,” the group’s Russell Joseph said. “We currently have farmers and firefighters relying on ground water, farm dams or carting water to a few water tanks. “This climate adaptive project would make the hinterland less vulnerable to bushfire and secure its economic future. It would further develop agricultural industries that are fully compatible with the green wedge policy.” The feasibility study, to be completed by mid-2021, will investigate the

long-term water needs of the hinterland community. It will explore the potential to increase agricultural production and take advantage of new horticultural opportunities by having drought-proof water supply. Other aims are to increase food production and create jobs; increase the fire-fighting capability; provide water for parks and reserves; reduce reliance on surface water and groundwater for irrigation, allowing these water sources to replenish and improve waterway health, and reduce the amount of waste water going out to sea. The mayor Cr Sam Hearn sees the

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020


NEWS DESK

‘Close peninsula’ call Awards for basketball ‘legend’ to stop virus spread Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au A SOMERS health expert has added her voice to calls the Mornington Peninsula should be excluded from the Greater Melbourne lockdown area to help beat COVID-19. “We need a checkpoint as they have at the border between Victoria and New South Wales to keep people out and stop the virus spreading,” virologist Sue King said. “The state government needs to put a stop to it.” Ms King is backing the mayor Cr Sam Hearn’s demand that the peninsula be designated a regional area so visitors simply cannot flock in from other suburbs and potentially bring infections with them (“Outsiders stay away - mayor” The News, 14/7/20). “This is a highly contagious, deadly disease and we have no idea how many infectious people there are on the peninsula and what suburbs they are in,” she said. “We need to know so we can lock down those suburbs immediately.” Ms King said the problem was exacerbated because people’s Medicare cards link them to their place of residence – not where they had been tested – so it was important for accurate COVID-19 tracing that people stay at their main homes. Ms King studied virology at university and worked in infectious diseases

Going viral: Virologist Sue King wants tougher restrictions on visitors. Picture: Supplied

at a medical school in the UK and is “very familiar with viruses”. She said people visiting the peninsula from inner Melbourne should be quarantined for two weeks – especially those coming from high-risk areas. “This virus is extraordinarily contagious and can last on plastic for seven days,” she said. “It is very stable and presents no symptoms in a significant number of people and is easily passed on – even when an infected person has no symptoms.”

A WOMAN described as a “legend” in the Mornington Peninsula basketball community has been awarded The Jack Carter Memorial Award – Sports Administrator of the Year, for Basketball Victoria. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Mornington District Basketball Association general manager Samantha Browne had to accept the state-wide award in constrained circumstances. Instead of basking in the limelight at a glamorous event at Crown before 2000-plus attendees from hundreds of basketball associations, she had to settle for a Zoom video call presentation by association president Antony Hirst joined by committee members in their own homes. “Our association in the past few years has thrived due to Sam’s hard work, ability and resilience,” Mr Hirst said. “In these COVID-19 times our association is well placed in a sustainable position for long-term viability which would not have been achieved without her input and leadership.” Basketball Victoria was equally impressed: “Samantha’s work with Mornington has increased domestic participation numbers by over 700 and implemented player pathways and skill programs. Her work has also introduced policies and procedures to manage operations, streamlined internal processes and enhanced the member experience.” Ms Browne also received a Change Our Game Scholarship through Sport Victoria. The program helps women access professional learning and development opportunities to enhance skills in sport and recreation leader-

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Here’s to you: Samantha Browne receives The Jack Carter Memorial Award – Sports Administrator of the Year, for Basketball Victoria. Picture: Supplied

ship and management. Michelle Bolitho, who is on the committee of management of the Mornington and District Basketball Association, said: “Samantha is one of the few women in Victoria in a general manager role and is paving the way and leaning into the unique challenges that girls in sport face,

seeking solutions and innovation to improve attraction and retention – not just for basketball, but for all sports. “Sam is such a role model in our basketball community. She is the reason we are thriving and gaining recognition from the big city associations and we are just so super proud of her.” Stephen Taylor

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

PAGE 5


NEWS DESK

Southern Peninsula

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly

Circulation: 22,870

Audit period: Apr 2014 - Sept 2014

Source: AMAA; CAB Total Distribution Audit for further information visit auditedmedia.org.au

Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 23 JULY 2020 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 28 JULY 2020

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

Students assaulted while on bus TRANSIT police are investigating an assault on two students on a bus between Frankston and Mornington, 2.45pm, Wednesday 15 June. They would like to talk to a man and a woman, pictured, over the incident. Anyone with information is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000 and quote incident: 20220996.

Filling the breach MORNINGTON police station has stepped in to provide a much-needed service after Frankston police station’s counter service was shut down last week when an officer tested positive for coronavirus. Police say local area service delivery will “not be impacted” by the change of locations. Sergeant Jeremy Mishau, of Mornington police, said: “We are all clear; there are no cases here.” He said only two people would be allowed into the station at any one time. Those waiting outside will be asked to line up and take their turn. Contact tracing is under way at Frankston to establish how many officers came into contact with the infected officer during the past 14 days. It was expected that several others would go into self-isolation and be tested as a precaution. Department of Health and Human Services staff will try to find out how the officer became infected. Inquiries are being made to determine who the officer was in contact with while they were contagious. They may also need to be tested.

JPs on the job JUSTICES of the Peace also lost a convenient place-of-work when Frankston police station closed last week. “Unfortunately, we were only back at the station for a few weeks when they pulled the plug on us again owing to the COVID-19 epidemic,” Ian Lyons JP said. Many JPs on the Mornington Peninsula are working from home and can be contacted through Google – Find a JP, Victoria, or by calling 1300 365 567. They can take affidavits, as most other witnessing authorities, such as chemists, doctors and teachers are not authorised to witness this legal

document, Mr Lyons said. They also witness statutory declarations and national and international documents. Honorary Justices all work is free.

Lock to stop thefts POLICE say it is a myth that thieves are only interested in stealing luxury cars. They say modern, “mainstream” cars are frequently targeted. Keep your car’s keys out of sight and make sure you lock all doors and windows – especially at night – because seven out of every 10 cars are stolen using their own keys. Police and the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council have compiled information to show motorists how to prevent car thefts. Visit https://bit.ly/3h1JueU

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020


Rowdy response from weekend renters Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au NEIGHBOURS complaining about rowdy guests allegedly breaking COVID-19 restrictions at a Rye holiday rental house over the 11 and 12 July weekend said police told them they “couldn’t do anything” about it. Joanne Heath said she called Rosebud police twice when “up to 20 people” arrived at the Glen Drive property after stage three restrictions were imposed who were “definitely not from the same family”. The restrictions came into force from 11.59pm, Wednesday 8 July. “We reported it as a COVID-19 breach on the Friday night and I was told it would be looked into, but nothing was done,” Ms Heath said. “When I reported it on the Saturday they told me that the call I put in on Friday night was still in progress, but nothing was done. “I wasn’t happy as it had taken over 24 hours for them to even investigate this property. I rang Rosebud police again and was told COVID-19 breaches were out of their jurisdiction.” Ms Heath said police later told her the group was “all the one family”. “I was like: What, a mum and dad and 18 children?” Property owner Janine Carovale said the house was occupied on the weekend by four adults and five children which did not breach COVID-19 restrictions. She disputed that they were noisy. Neighbour Gary Mulcahy said he also called police and was told the

Noisy night: Frustrated neighbours Gary Mulcahy, Steven Heath, John Kahn, Joanne Heath and Katherine Kahn say weekend holiday renters can stretch the friendship. Picture: Yanni

same thing. “Rosebud police weren’t interested in our complaints until I mentioned noise,” he said. “Our complaints fell on deaf ears. “We shouldn’t have to live like this. “We were told we should go and speak to them. Well, I wouldn’t be go-

ing over to speak to them. They were all on the grog. You could end up getting attacked.” Ms Heath said the police turned up and asked those at the house to be quiet. Once the police left, they had started

screaming and swearing. “My parents, who are in the 70s, live downstairs. I told them to go in and lock the door and under no circumstances to open the door,” Ms Heath said. “My father was so worried he slept with a hammer for protection.

RCC_MembershipOfferA4 [VR3]_26-6-20_PRINT.indd 1

“During the night bottles were thrown at our house and in the morning we woke to glass all over the road, driveway and nature strip.” Ms Heath said she “can’t believe nothing can be done”. “We are in lockdown and so many local businesses are going to close and yet these holidaymakers are still coming and are allowed to come.” She said her family had experienced issues over the past five years with the property advertised online as a, “Huge 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom double storey house with tennis court and pool” costing $443 a night. “The calibre of the people is just horrendous,” she said, “but my concern at the moment is COVID-19.” Ms Carovale said neighbours’ complaints were often an overreaction and “may or may not be true”. “I’ve often been called down there to answer a complaint and found there’s nothing in it,” she said. “Sometimes there is and sometimes not.” Ms Carovale said she tried hard to satisfy competing interests. “That’s why we have a security company keeping an eye on things. “They went around and found nothing was wrong.” The shire’s environment protection manager John Rankine said current stage three COVID-19 restrictions do not permit holiday or overnight stays. Use of short stay properties or holiday homes could be reported to the Victoria Police Assistance Line 131 444. Rosebud police were contacted for comment.

Southern Peninsula News

PAGE 7

26/06/2020 12:21:20 PM

22 July 2020


NEWS DESK

Olympic hopefuls team up to train

Tourism support COMPENSATION for tourism accommodation operators who have suffered cancellations due to the lockdown of metropolitan COVID hotspots has been welcomed. A $5 million fund for regional businesses such as motels, caravan parks and holiday home operators from the state government will help cover lost revenue as a result of cancelled bookings. The mayor Cr Sam Hearn said: “I want to thank the Minister for Industry Support and Recovery Martin Pakula for ensuring Mornington Peninsula tourism businesses are included in the regional accommodation support fund. “We know our tourism businesses are struggling at the moment and we appreciate all the support they can get.” Cr Hearn said the negative economic impacts of COVID-19 were forecast to be greater for the peninsula than for Australia overall, with a predicted 21 per cent fall in gross regional product. “This is much worse than the 6.9 per cent drop forecast for Australia as a whole,” he said. “There has already been an 11 per cent drop in employment opportunities in the region, which foreshadows a bleak outlook. I look forward to continuing to work with the state government to support our community recovery efforts.”

By Bree Masters ATHLETES training for the rescheduled Tokyo Olympics are being confronted by an unforeseen obstacle: the six-week lockdown aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19. With their training options suddenly curtailed Mornington Peninsula Athletics Club sprinters Sophia Fighera and Matthew Rizzo have teamed up to help each other stay fit for Tokyo. Matthew Rizzo, 2017 Stawell Gift winner, said news of sporting facilities and gyms closing and outdoor exercise being restricted to two people, means his Olympic dream is at stake. “With gyms closing, it will mean that we will not be able to complete our gym sessions and may cause us to be behind the eight ball compared to athletes from other states once the restrictions are over,” Rizzo said. “I am currently in the process of modifying my training sessions and working out a revised training plan with my coach for the next six weeks, that will still allow me to take the path that I need to get me to the Olympic games next year.” Rizzo, 21, of Langwarrin said the lockdown would also have a big impact on training for many athletes around Victoria. “At first, I was disheartened about the news, however I am trying to stay positive, despite the new restrictions,” Rizzo said. “I’ve wanted to go to the Olympics since I was a young boy, so I’m willing to jump a few hurdles to achieve my ultimate goal of representing my country at the Games.” Training partner and fellow Olympic hopeful, Fighera, said training would be different without the moti-

In step: Matthew Rizzo, above, and fellow 2021 Olympic team hopeful Sophia Fighera are training together on the Mornington Peninsula in line with the latest coronavirus restrictions. Picture: Clay Nettlefold

vation and company of her peninsulabased Pride Performance squad. “Training without my squad will be very difficult, as we all push each other to be better and we have a lot of fun at training,” Fighera, runner-up in the 2019 Stawell Gift, said. “I am very lucky to still be able to train alongside my sister and have a little gym set up at home so I can still work on my strength.”

With the big goal of racing at the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games, 22-yearold Fighera said despite the restrictions, she will continue to focus on her ultimate goal of racing at the Games. “I will continue to push myself in every session and focus on both my small and big goals,” she said. “I will focus on working on my weakness and continuing to improve the small aspects in my training.”

Telstra off line THE Telstra store at Mornington Central shopping centre was temporarily closed on Thursday 16 July after a staff member contracted coronavirus. Spokesperson Matt Smithson told The News: “A staff member at one of our licensee stores, who worked Friday 10 July, tested positive to COVID-19.” Mr Smithson said the staff member was tested and did not attend the store again before calling in to report a positive diagnosis, 5pm, Wednesday 15 July. The store was closed on Thursday 16 July. “Staff members were being tested and have been provided help under the company’s employment assistance program,” Mr Smithson said at the time. “The store is currently being deep-cleaned over the next 48 hours and we look forward to welcoming customers back when it reopens.” Centre manager Andrew Gibson said in a letter to traders that Telstra was working with Department of Health and Human Services officers “and we are making contact with each of our retailers as a precautionary measure”. Contact tracing had been completed to identify anyone who could have come into contact with the ill staff member, Mr Gibson said. He said centre management had “increased our cleaning roster since learning of the case” with the focus on high public contact areas. “We have put every possible safeguard and precaution in place and we are working from there. “This will continue into the foreseeable future.”

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020


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Fans at home as players head north

Do you want to make a real and lasting difference for our community? Want to be part of a motivated team that, through fundraising efforts, contributes to a world-wide service organisation distributing funds to local, interstate and international recipients (especially young people). The Rotary Club of Rosebud Rye is seeking a special person who likes a varied and autonomous role where you take the lead responsibility for managing major fundraising operations – the Opportunity Shop (Rosebud Plaza) and the Rotary Opportunity Furniture Warehouse (Rosebud Industrial Estate). You’ll bring experience in managing a team environment from a hands-on perspective, with a dedication to safety and outstanding teamwork and communication skills. Core responsibilities include overseeing operational functions and processes - receiving, sorting, pricing and delivering goods; strategically displaying items to build appeal, creating and maintaining a positive customer focussed culture; building an ongoing volunteer base; rostering and managing leave; maintaining legislative recordkeeping and financial management. Working autonomously, you will be responsible for: • Building a customer service focus • Managing efficient space utilisation and showcasing to advantage • Managing a smooth functioning team, building capability • Managing work flows – rostering to ensure front of house service, making expected pick-up times, alternating displays to match seasonal appeal • Maintaining clear records and bookkeeping data as requested, including balancing daily takings • Maintaining positive communication, answering concerns and complaints • Fleet management

CARLTON great Ken Baxter, above, and family Blues “fan” Georgia, left.

FOOTY fans are rallying to fly the flag even as the Victorian AFL teams and their families head north to hopefully complete the season. Carlton supporter Dianne Baxter, of Bittern, says her dog Georgia is also a great fan of the Blues. Although she is probably more of a mascot than active club member, Ms DECKING T/Pine 70x22 KD ACQ ........................... $2.70mt T/Pine 90x22 KD ACQ ........................... $3.50mt T/Pine 140x22 KD ACQ ......................... $6.25mt Merbau 70x19 Random ........................ $5.25mt Merbau 90x19 Random ........................ $6.50mt Merbau 140x22 Random .................... $13.95mt

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“chased” by several VFL clubs, including Essendon and Richmond, while playing for Werribee. However, it was Carlton that eventually won the contest for the recruit who went on to play 153 games and score 365 goals for the Blues. Baxter played from 1938-1941 and 1945-1950. He was the club’s leading goal kicker in six of those years and played in the 1938, 1945 and 1947 Premierships. He was made a life member in 1946 and inducted into the

Baxter credits Georgia with having a fine Carlton pedigree. “Her 'grandfather' played in three winning Grand Finals, was the club's leading goal kicker six times and was inducted into the Carlton Hall of Fame. Georgia is definitely a true Blue,” she said. Ms Baxter’s father Ken was

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club’s hall of fame by then club president John Elliott on 9 May 1998. Dianne Baxter said her father’s decision to go with Carlton was sealed once he began dating her mother, Maisie, the cousin of the Blues’ then coach, Brighton Diggins. “Mum contacted Brighton who in turn contacted dad. The rest is history,” she said. Ken Baxter died at 41, while he and his then wife Maisie were living in Cheltenham and running a grocery store. Keith Platt

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

PAGE 9


NEWS DESK

A walk, a smile carry Elaine to 100 A MORNINGTON woman described by her daughter as “four foot 10 inches of positivity and happiness” toasted her centenary on Friday 3 July. But, due to coronavirus concerns, Elaine Hedgcock’s birthday was a trifle muted. “Unfortunately we couldn’t all be there, however, her four children, three of her 14 grandchildren, and four or her 27 great-grandchildren came separately during the day in rosters,” daughter Robyn Davies said. She also has two great-great grandchildren. “There were lots of phone calls and three overseas FaceTimes from grandchildren – Tim from Perth, Lara from San Francisco and Peter from Dubai. They were very teary as they could not be here.” Ms Davies said her mother’s advice to those wanting to live a long and happy life was to “walk and always smile”. Ms Hedgcock was born at home in South Melbourne and has happy memories of her childhood in Pascoe Vale South with her parents, sister and three brothers. She and husband Dave raised four children at West Preston where Ms Hedgcock worked at various parttime jobs in the local shops and later as a tea lady at Kodak, Coburg. After Dave died 20 years ago, she moved to the Mornington Peninsula to be closer to her family and lived on her own until she was 93. She now lives with Ms Davies in Green Island Avenue, Mount Martha, where her children visit her every day. “Mum was known as ‘The Grey-

Old and young: Elaine Hedgcock on her 100th birthday with great granddaughter Willow. Picture: Supplied

hound’ as she was always running everywhere,” Ms Davies recalled. “She has always loved animals and has had a dog all her life. “She walked every day and, even now, walks three times a day with her walker.” Ms Hedgcock also loves cooking the “best roast dinners” and is “happiest when surrounded by family”. “She has always had an optimistic outlook on life and is fun to be

around,” Ms Davies said. “She has never smoked or drank alcohol, and believes in being active and helping anybody out. “Mum always said she wanted to live to 100, and was thrilled to receive congratulatory letters from the Queen, Governor-General, Prime Minister, the premier and state MPs. “When the restrictions are over we will have a much bigger celebration, so she has to keep going.”

Virus effects spur move to peninsula By Danielle Collis MORNINGTON Peninsula real estate agents say an increasing number of Melbourne residents want to move to the Mornington Peninsula. Danckert Real Estate director Sam Danckert said the peninsula was no longer seen as “just a holiday home destination”, with 83 percent of buyer inquiries coming from people now residing within 20 kilometres of Melbourne. “It's been occurring over the past few years, but it’s happening at a greater rate than I've ever seen in over 15 years of working in real estate,” Mr Danckert said. He said the influx of residents was due to several key drivers. “The ability to work from home has reduced the need to live in Melbourne and opened up the possibility to live and work remotely from the peninsula,” he said. “The abundant space and relatively low population density has become even more valuable.” With restrictions on international travel, Mr Danckert said the peninsula has become a “staycation” destination and new residents would

support the local demand businesses require during quieter winter months. Tony Ladiges, of Stone Real Estate, said he had seen a 20 per cent increase in inquiries with most buyers being “sea changers” from the city. Mr Ladiges said peninsula properties were “good value for money”. “Also, just the genuine value for money in terms of what they sell for in the city, and what they can prospectively buy on the peninsula,” Mr Ladiges said. With the rise of coronavirus cases in metropolitan Melbourne, Mr Ladiges said the peninsula was seen as a “less volatile” place to live and a “hidden secret”. “I guess from a personal perspective, being born and bred and always lived on the Mornington Peninsula, but also experiencing living in other major cities in Australia, there's more to offer here than people recognise,” he said. “And I think people are starting to quickly appreciate all the benefits and the amenities that the peninsula offers.”

Expressions of Interest open

for the Australia Day Local Awards Selection Panel Each year Mornington Peninsula Shire celebrates the achievements and contributions of local community members through the Australia Day Local Awards. We’re seeking Expressions of Interest from local residents and/or business operators to become a member of the 2021 Australia Day Local Awards Selection Panel. The Panel is responsible for assessing and deliberating all nominations received and making recommendations to Council for winners of the Awards.

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR EOI Online: mornpen.vic.gov.au/haveyoursay Hard copy EOI forms are available upon request by phoning 1300 850 600 Email your form with the subject line ‘Selection Panel - Australia Day Local Awards EOI’ to: haveyoursay@mornpen.vic.gov.au Post: Mornington Peninsula Shire Council Attention: Christine Aslanidis Selection Panel - Australia Day Local Awards EOI Private Bag 1000 Rosebud 3939

EOI submissions are currently open and close Monday 3 August 2020.

PAGE 10

Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

Stitched up: Mornington Secondary College VCAL students Connor O’Neil, Max Walker and Kai Robinson are combining business with study by making protective face masks. Picture: Gary Sissons

No masking this business success PROTECTIVE face masks are now compulsory and students in the Mornington Secondary College VCAL class are being credited with making an astute business decision. They are making face masks to tackle COVID-19 under the name: STS – or Stop the Spread – as well as learning about running a business. Teacher Anne-Marie Burnet said the year 11 students had set themselves up in a “factory” divided into various departments, such as marketing, sales and production to make the washable cloth masks, and business is booming. Part of their marketing philosophy is showing younger teens that it’s cool to wear masks, with

plans to make them in school colours for the classroom. Ms Burnet said the students were taking their roles “very seriously”. “The students didn’t realise the size of the need,” she said. “So far they have made 150 with another 40 due by Monday morning 20 July. One woman ordered 14.” The turnaround time is 36 hours. The $6 masks in adults and children’s sizes are made of cotton in three layers. They are washable and can be folded to fit inside a pocket or purse. Order masks at: stop.the.spread3@gmail.com


MELBOURNE AND MITCHELL SHIRE STAY HOME Stay at Home restrictions are now in place for Melbourne and Mitchell Shire. There are only 4 reasons to leave home.

Shopping for food and supplies that you need

Care and caregiving

Exercise

Work and study if you can’t do it from home

And if you have symptoms, get tested For all current restrictions go to vic.gov.au/CORONAVIRUS

Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

PAGE 11


NEWS DESK

Tech ‘park’ to bring jobs and growth Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

Fit for purpose: Australian Ninja Warrior competitors Ashlin Herbert, Troy Cullen, Zak Stolz and Charlie Robbins, and Ashlin’s girlfriend Sarah Blackmore, train at Peninsula Gymnastics, Rosebud. Picture: Yanni

‘Warriors’ vie for an edge THE season return of Australian Ninja Warrior has a Mornington Peninsula flavour. The competitors include fan favourite Ashlin Herbert, of Mornington, alongside his mates Troy Cullen and Zak Stolz, of Rye, and last year’s winner Charlie Robbins, also of Rye. Joining the Channel 9 show is Herbert’s girlfriend Sarah Blackmore, also of Rye, who, after training with the boys for the past three years, decided to give the course a go. Fans believe there’s a good chance one of the peninsula’s team will take

out the title of Australia’s first Ninja Warrior. The show is being contested by 140 “everyday Aussies who just happen to be inspirational athletes” training hard to take on the obstacle course. Ninjas will compete head-to-head for the first time, and the fastest Ninja on the Power Tower will receive a time advantage going into the semifinals. There, the two fastest Ninjas each night will compete on a tougher Power Tower set-up, and the fastest Ninja will earn a rerun if he or she

splashes out in the grand finals. The competitor who goes farthest and fastest wins $100,000. A competitor who conquers the so-farunclimbable Mt Midoriyama in the fastest time will win $400,000 and claim the title of Australia’s first ever Ninja Warrior. The ninja warrior course is at the Melbourne Showgrounds. In a new, later program the best competitors from each state will team up to battle it out for $100,000 as Australian Ninja Warrior: State of Origin. Stephen Taylor

NAVIGATION technology company Sealite is the major player behind plans for a $540 million technology park at Somerville. The company says the proposed Mornington Peninsula Technology Park will activate projects and deliver jobs and growth as part of an “urgent pandemic recovery”. Backing for the plan is being sought from Mornington Peninsula Shire and the state government as part of the Building Victoria’s Recovery Taskforce. The shire claims the peninsula has “been hit harder than most areas of Victoria in terms of job losses and general economic downturn” (“Shire seeks $320m rescue package” The News 22/6/20). However, the shire has already earmarked land for a similar technology park on the outskirts of Hastings. Backers of the Somerville plan consider the shire’s proposal “to still be embryonic and not able to deliver results for some time” while their’s can be providing jobs within 12 months. Sealite, already based at Somerville, is set to be the Mornington Peninsula Technology Park’s anchor tenant. The company is a global leader in designing and manufacturing marine and aviation aids to navigation. It has plants and offices in Australia, Sin-

gapore, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as distributors servicing over 100 countries. CEO Chris Procter said the Somerville proposal had “extensive benefits for the local economy and the local community”. “The Mornington Peninsula Technology Park will deliver hundreds of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of economic growth, and we are ready to get started now,” he said. “There are some 700 direct and indirect jobs during construction, and around 1500 STEM-related jobs once the precinct is fully populated. This project represents $1.2 billion in economic value for the region and the Victorian economy. This is exactly the kind of project we believe the state government and the council would want to help us recover from the pandemic.” The proposed 50-hectare technology park on Bungower Road is on land designated for port related purposes. The masterplan shows low rise buildings; 50 per cent open space; 25 hectares with 250,000 square metres of floor space targeting high-tech businesses; and a redeveloped heritage precinct and active recreation facilities. Mr Procter said Sealite had “a pipeline” of prospective work worth more than $260 million. “We’re seeing particular growth in defence spending on the upgrade of port infrastructure and military airfields,” he said.

Climate changing penguins’ choice of food Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au SCIENTISTS are trying to find out if there is a link between climate change and the food of choice for little penguins. With rookeries at Phillip Island and on a breakwater near St Kilda, the penguins are frequently seen in Port Phillip and Western Port. Although it is estimated the penguins eat more than 100 tonnes of sardine each breeding season, their popularity with tourists earns more money for Victoria than all its commercial fisheries. Their diet has proved to be more varied than previously known and researchers say future-proofing their prey is essential for the penguins’ long-term survival. The waters of south-eastern Australia are regarded as a climate change hotspot, warming at four times the global average. Protecting the prey of little penguins may also benefit the health of the whole marine system, according to an Australian Research Council (ARC)-funded study led by Monash University and Phillip Island Nature Parks scientists. The study sets a new baseline for long-term monitoring of Bass Strait food webs. Scientists have developed a novel index to determine the availability of the little penguins’ prey availability from what they eat, how much and how hard they have to work hunting during their high-energy period of breeding. The researchers found that the penguins extracted around 1300 tonnes of biomass from their coastal ecosystem over two breeding seasons, including

PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

Picture: Yanni

219 tonnes of the commercially important sardine and 215 tonnes of red cod. “As marine environments are increasingly affected by human pressures and climate change, marine food webs are changing,” study author Dr 22 July 2020

Catherine Cavallo said. “If little penguins can maintain breeding by switching prey to match availability, they may be more resilient to these changes than specialist predators.”

Phillip Island Nature Park marine scientist, Associate Professor André Chiaradia said analysing the penguins’ diet “is a good way of monitoring how marine life is affected by climate change, pollution and other environ-

mental changes." This latest study follows research last year by a team which found that about one quarter of the little penguins’ diet consisted of jellyfish and salps – tiny tube-like animals not generally thought to be an important food source for penguins. Earlier research showed that penguins mostly consumed small fish – anchovies, sardines and immature reef fish. In the latest research Cavallo collected and used DNA to analyse penguin faeces. Previously, penguins were made to vomit up their dinner when they came back to shore, which only revealed the food that was the hardest to digest, such as fish bones or squid beaks. The DNA tests from about 400 penguins showed the more varied diet. However, the findings are unable to show whether penguins eat jellies and salps because there are fewer fish in Bass Strait, or whether it has always been part of their diet. “We know that penguins are opportunistic feeders,” Cavallo said. “They eat what's available, and can snack on more than one kind of food.” It was also known that jellyfish proliferate when oceans become more acidic – one of the effects of climate change. Jellies and salps are less nutritious than small fish and contain less protein. Cavallo says her research has established a more comprehensive baseline for the little penguin diet, but the question remains: are penguins filling up on junk food out of necessity?


Southern Peninsula

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MORE TO THE STORY PAGE 3 WEDNESDAY, 22nd JULY 2020

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W AT E R F A L L G A R D E N S ROSEBU D

Photo is indicative only.

A boutique community of luxury, 2 & 3 bedroom single level homes. These residences, in the heart of an established neighbourhood in Rosebud, set the scene for a new enclave of luxurious living. Combining cosmopolitan

All homes feature:

• • • • •

Premium finishes including stone benchtops Quality appliances Master with WIR & ensuite 6 star energy rating Low maintenance living

inner-city styling with a sublime coastal setting, located opposite Bay Views Golf Course and only a short drive to Rosebud beach.

PRICED FROM $534,500 - $659,000

D i s p l a y s u i t e at 6 1 F a i r w a y G r o v e , R o s e b u d Open By Appointment

Development by:

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N P L E AS E C O N TAC T:

Robert Bowman: 0417 173 103 robert@bowmanandcompany.com.au

Darren Sadler: 0448 947 622 darren.sadler@granger.com.au

71-77 Hove Road & 61 Fairway Grove, Rosebud

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 22nd July 2020

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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ON THE COVER

SPECTACULAR CHARM AND CHARACTER IN MOUNT ELIZA AT rest in the arc of an exceptionally peaceful court, this elegant Woodlands home luxuriates in tranquil leafy surrounds where a view of Port Phillip Bay can be enjoyed from the kitchen and formal lounge. Beautifully set on a superb 2830 square metre block, adorned with a small orchard and raised vegetable beds, this charming home is pure magic and will enchant buyers with its eye catching Federation tones and soothing gardens. The lovely weatherboard facade is complemented by a variety of neat hedge rows and a garden path leads you up to the splendid verandah and large formal entry. The pleasant colour scheme seen from the front continues throughout the handsome formal lounge which has a gas fireplace and magnificent sash timber windows that perfectly frame the gardens. It is the vast open plan family zone that ultimately grabs and holds your attention with swathes of natural light gleaming off the Victorian Ash timber floors and a sparkling outlook to the in ground pool and entertaining area. A neat kitchen has stone bench tops and plenty of storage space, and appliances include a dishwasher and a Miele oven with induction cook top. There is a comfortable dining area and through the lounge room is a separate study. To the east wing are three bedrooms; the stylish master bedroom has a fabulous ensuite and large walk-in robe, with two more bedrooms, both with built-in robes sharing an equally well-appointed main bathroom. Over to the west wing is an excellent guest bedroom with powder room. Externally, the property continues to impress with the private pool area ready and waiting for summer fun and the vast swathes of lawns and gardens that will entertain children and pets with a variety of places to climb and explore. From the street a paved driveway leads up to a fantastic three car carport and double garage with attached sheds and green house.n

HOME ESSENTIALS

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ADDRESS: 6 Moorna Court, MOUNT ELIZA FOR SALE: $1,380,000 - $1,480,000 DESCRIPTION: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car INSPECT: By Appointment AGENT: Sue Monaghan 0400 481 862, Stone Real Estate, Suite 2/1a Main Street, Mornington, 5970 8000

“The difference between a good price and a great price is a great estate agent”

FRANKSTON SOUTH 22 Maberley Crescent $850,000 - $935,000 open to view private inspections by appointment ● Character filled family home in the heart of leafy Frankston South ● Beautifully presented split level solid brick family home is freshly painted ● New carpets throughout and offers easy living

BED

4

BATH

2

CAR

Kate Billson | 0417 514 045 Jarrod Carman | 0423 144 102

2

eview.com.au Why list with one, when you can list with all Office: Mornington, 311 Main Street| 5971 0300

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 22nd July 2020

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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‘a lifestyle village for the over 50’s’ 249 High Street, Hastings, 3915 www.peninsulaparklands.com.au

NEW

$210,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Large lounge & dining area Galley kitchen with upright stove Two large bedroom both w/BIR’s Separate laundry and bathroom

$220,000 u u u u

Bed

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Car

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1

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Kitchen with great bench space Lounge room with air-conditioning Renovated bathroom and laundry Rear verandah, single carport

$230,000 u u u u

Bed

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Car

2

1

1

Fantastic open plan Kitchen plus separate dining area Lounge with air-conditioning Single garage with roll-a-door

SOLD

$235,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

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$250,000

u Kitchen/diner with bay window Lounge and main bedroom both with air-con u u Separate bathroom and laundry u Front & rear verandahs, lock-up storage

Bed

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Car

2

1

1

Huge lounge with new carpet Both bedrooms have BIR’s Kitchen with great bench space Veranda and a single carport

$260,000 u u u u

u u u u

Bed

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Car

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Fantastic open floor plan Huge kitchen and dining area Lounge room with air-conditioning Single garage with auto roller door

$290,000 u u u u

Bath

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2

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Fantastic floor plan Huge kitchen & dining area Large lounge with air-conditioning European laundry

SOLD

NEW

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Bed

Bed

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Car

2

1

1

Two bedrooms with BIR’s Large lounge with raked ceiling Spacious kitchen/dining area Garden shed, single garage

$325,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Study

Car

2

1

1

1

Open plan living Kitchen with great bench space Lounge room with raked ceilings 2.2 K/W solar system has been installed

To arrange your site inspection contact David Nelli 0403 111 234 or at the office on 5979 2700 Email: david@peninsulaparklands.com.au mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 22nd July 2020

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

AGL’s gas import plan needs assurances about insurances AGL has produced a very comprehensive qualitative environment effects statement tabling the risks of the proposed development on the biophysical/environmental consequence and the socio-economic consequence of the proposed gas Import Jetty and pipeline project in Western Port, on each step of the development and applying a rating on each step from negligible to severe (“Late entry adds pressure to gas plan” The News 7/7/20). What is missing from the documentation is the important de-tail of the liability by AGL and AGL’s commitment, in the event of an accident, to cover the costs of compensation to the state government, the affected councils and the residents if there is a serious leakage either from a tanker in Western Port or from the land pipeline. A leakage could be caused by human error, a natural disaster such as an earth-quake, tsunami or a once in a lifetime storm. The effects of such an ecological disaster depending on the scope, may not only kill all the marine plants and animals, it would be the end of the tourist trade, the end of swimming, fishing and beach activities. The value of surrounding proper-ties would plunge. The recent oil spill in the Arctic is just one such event. Approval cannot be granted to the project unless this ques-tion is properly addressed. Details must include the details of the insurance companies willing to carry the risk, the disaster management plan and details of compensation. Meg Paul, Merricks Beach

Beach should be public The state government and Lands Council must not allow bil-lionaire Lindsay Fox to acquire 75 metres of sand to the water’s edge at Portsea. I would like to know how much is Mr Fox paying to extend his Portsea compound? What’s next? Making an application based on the common law, “the doctrine of accretion”, to extend his sand out to the South Channel? Maybe it would be renamed Fox Channel. Where is it going to end? Lynette Stewart, Toorak

Mixed languages The topic of the new aquatic centre [being built at Rosebud] rumbles on and on but, as far as I can tell, we have not yet heard from any native speaker as to what it might have been called 400 or more years ago (“Yawa favoured as pool centre name” The News 22/6/20). I understand that there were some 80 Aboriginal tongues spoken in what is currently known as Victoria, so surely some of them would be relevant In the meantime, pending such advice, it is worth remember-ing that the official language of this country is English, which is also the first language of the overwhelming majority of people who live on the Mornington Peninsula - or whatever it should now be called. In the interests of clarity for all, there is much

to be said for Rosebud Aquatic Centre but, as has previously been sug-gested, this could easily be supplemented with an appropri-ate Aboriginal name or word. Ron Simpson, Mornington

Unfair charge I am very surprised to learn that Mornington Peninsula Shire Council voted unanimously to maintain the Hastings promotional scheme and associated Hastings special charge promotional fund for an additional seven years as another cost burden to struggling businesses to pay in the town. The report compiled by senior economic development officer Sally McLennan refers to “signed informal support forms” which are not subject to authentication by the general public or business owners to be affected by the cost. The support form circulated by the Westernport Chamber of Commerce & Industry omits to mention that there are doz-ens of businesses within the boundary of the Hastings special charge zone that will never directly pay the cost as an outgoing under their lease while other businesses will, so there is no level playing field for local Hastings businesses. The support form also neglects to clarify that it is the owner of the property that will bear the charge, unless the lease agreement in place allows for reimbursement by the ten-ant/business owner. Landlords of vacant shops will be stuck with the cost. For what and why if there is no business in the premises to promote in the first place? I envisage a groundswell of opposition for the renewal of the Hastings special charge and anticipate the abolishment rather than renewal of same in the near future. The shire should budget for all facets of promotional ex-penditure, including business activity districts on the Morn-ington Peninsula. We certainly should not be sniping unsus-pecting businesses during these unprecedented tough times to top up their coffers. Paul Abel, Mount Eliza

Melbournians ‘out’ I am in total accord with Mornington Peninsula Shire mayor Sam Hearn when he encourages Melbournians to stay at home. We don’t want another Aspen fiasco (“Outsiders stay away mayor” The News 15/7/20). We know (as we were shown on past news coverages) of people who openly admitted to leaving their Melbourne residence and moving into their peninsula holiday home and even changing the address shown on their driver’s licence and with the shire. Will they become permanent residents? Probably not. It’s reassuring to see the police putting up “checkpoint Charlie’s” to stop any others that have the same ideas from coming in. A few have slipped in as locals who I’ve spoken with have said that some of the holiday

homes in their streets are occupied. Perhaps a door knock by authorities is required to weed them out? At the moment, we are free from infec-tion let’s keep it that way. John Cain, McCrae

The mayor Cr Sam Hearn also got it wrong. I’m not sure how this approach would make one iota of difference (“Outsiders stay away mayor” The News 15/7/20). Joe Lenzo, Safety Beach

Government at fault

Spending dilemma

I find it quite amusing that bountiful praise is heaped on Premier [Daniel] Andrews “on the fine job he is doing to protect us all despite his detractors” (“Opposition leader should keep quiet unless he can be helpful” and “Confident in An-drews” Letters 14/7/20). It might be news to the authors of both letters that it is widely recognised that the current out-break of COVID-19 is a result of the mismanagement by the Victorian government and their authorities of the hotel quar-antine fiasco. Bill Holmes, Sorrento

As aged pensioners, my wife and I are thankfully in receipt of the $1500 cash bonus, which is intended to stimulate the Australian economy. We could go out and buy a new appliance or two, but every-thing is made in China. If we buy a TV, vacuum, phone, computer, electric blanket, shirt or shoes, most of the money will go to China, stimulate the communist Chinese economy and provide jobs for the Chinese people. US President Donald Trump would have an apocalyptic fit if he knew that the Australian government was spending billions helping the Chinese economy thus. We can’t go out and gift the money to a publican who owns poker machines, we are not allowed out to support inconsequential tourism or hospitality businesses which may be here today and gone tomorrow and nobody would notice. One of the few local substantial businesses employing a lot of local residents is the steel mill at Hastings. I should support it by buying a heap of corrugated iron roofing and build a garage, with cement, steel and lights, but I did that many years ago, when the old Mornington Shire issued me with a building permit for my plan, including advice and an inspection, all for $10, as one of their services for ratepayers. Now, wouldn’t that stimulate the economy? So, I really can’t spend that money patriotically or productively. What a quandary, it could drive a man to drink. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

No bias needed Victorian [Liberal leader] Michael O’Brien and his cohort Tim Smith have absolutely nothing constructive to say in our fight against a virus which has no political bias (“Opposition leader should keep quiet unless he can be helpful” Letters 14/7/20). In contrast, Prime Minister Scott Morrison and [Health Minister and Flinders MP] Greg Hunt have been helpful and supportive in Victoria’s ongoing plight. [The Premier] Daniel Andrews has worked tirelessly in the midst of constant negativity and criticism. If we are all in this together, we must accept the re-strictions and lockdowns if we ever want things to re-turn to normal again. Diane Utber, Dromana

Petition ‘off base’ It’s not surprising that Liberal Hastings MP Neale Burgess is promoting a petition to exclude the Mornington Peninsula from the current COVID-19 lockdown that states “zero active cases on the Mornington Peninsula’’. This statement itself shows how far off base they are. Active cases are reported where people live not where they tested positive. This means our good friends from Toorak can come down and test positive in Rosebud and the peninsula is “COVID-19 free”. Even if hundreds of Toorakans are running around af-ter testing positive and passing it on to us, the peninsula is “COVID-19 free”. The petition organisers claim to have “shown since the first lockdown here on the Mornington Peninsula we can suc-cessfully operate with appropriate social distancing” but have obviously forgotten the Portsea cluster during stage one. And how this thick as two short planks claim makes any sense at all is mystifying: “Including us actually allows easy access to the rest of metropolitan Melbourne into the Morn-ington Peninsula and potentially promoting the spread of the virus excluding us would keep us safer” (like the stage one Portsea cluster?). Does this make any sense? Do they even know the lockdown rules? There are only four reasons that you can leave home: to shop for food and essential goods or services; to provide care for compassionate reasons or to seek medical treat-ment; to exercise or for outdoor recreation; for work or study if you can’t do it from home.

Refugees’ anniversary This week (19 July) marks seven years of detention for many refugees and asylum seekers who came by boat after July 2013. They came to Australia seeking safety from homes and countries where they were at risk of suffering persecution. Many came as children or young people and are now adults. They are locked in detention centres and many thousands more in community detention or on temporary visas unable to settle permanently. More than 60 men are now in detention at the Mantra Hotel in Preston, waiting for up to one year for urgent medical attention. More than 100 more men are in detention in Brisbane. These people have endured severe detention for up to seven years with resulting long term poor physical and mental health. Now that we know what weeks of uncertainty and COVID-19 isolation feels like it is hard to imagine experiencing this for seven years. Is this the way a decent government fulfils its duty of care to people seeking asylum? Why is the Australian government keeping desperate people in endless isolation and hopelessness? And to what end? What cost? How much longer? As a way of recognising this unhappy anniversary, Grandmothers for Refugees encourages Australians to say or do something positive however small, in defence of refugees. Ann Renkin, Shoreham

Did you know... you can view our papers online

www.mpnews.com.au Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

PAGE 17


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Complaints against Cr. W. J Oates - allegations unsustained Compiled by Cameron McCullough MR. Murphy, dairyman, had made certain complaints to the Frankston branch of the Returned Soldiers’ Association to the effect that Cr Oates was interfering in his business which has since been purchased by Mr Barber. The branch invited Mr Barber to make a written complaint, but he did not do so, and made a verbal statement, which was taken down in writing. It was decided to acquaint Cr Oates with the nature of the complaints made, and Mr Barber was informed that he must substantiate his charges at this meeting. Cr Oates was supplied with a copy of the complaint as follows: (1) Using your position and knowledge, whilst a member of the Local Repatriation Committee, to obtain and canvas Mr Barber’s customers, whilst negotiations were in progress for completing the purchase of Mr Murphy’s business by Mr Barber through the Repatriation Department. (2) Sending out circulars and business cards notifying Mr Murphy’s customers that he, Mr Murphy, had sold his business, and asking that you should be favored with their patronage. (3) Having entered into an agreement (verbal) with Mr Barber that the price of milk be 8½d per qt and advertising same in the local paper, you have in several instances without Mr Barber’s sanction or knowledge (at the time of serving such customers) sold milk to them at a reduced price, viz 7½d per qt. The Chairman then read the signed statement made by Mr Barber on which the complaints were based, and in which Mr Barber also described

how he got certain information from a friend in the Repatriation Department. The Chairman – You have heard the complaints read, Mr Barber, are they correct ? Mr Barber – Yes ! He added that he had been unable to obtain a copy of the circular sent out by Cr Oates, but had been given permission to mention that Mrs Garrood had received one. This lady also stated that Cr Oates had waited on her before he (Mr Barber) took over from Mr Murphy and solicited her custom. The Chairman – But we must bare proofs of your statements. If you can prove these charges against Cr Oates, we will know how to deal with him, but if not its up to you to make amends. Mr Barber said he had no proofs. Dr Maxwell said they could not act on a mere statement. Members of the branch were anxious to stick to a returned man, but they could not endorse Mr Barber’s’ complaints without supporting evidence. Cr Oates thought Mrs Garrood should have been present. They had only a mere statement. Mr Barber – Mrs Garrood’s statement is as good as yours! Dr Maxwell (warmly) – But she is not here! You are making fools of us! The Chairman said that definite proof must be adduced. Mr Barber – I have tried to get it. The Chairman – Are you willing to withdraw? Mr Barber – No, I will take the case to the Repatriation Department. Mr Murphy said that when Mr Barber complained to him that Cr Oates was canvassing his customers the

speaker interviewed them, and asked them to support Mr Barber, who was a returned soldier, and had paid £275 for the business. After he had sold the business to Mr Barber, several customers stated that they had received letters and cards from Mr Oates asking for custom. The Chairman – Was that while the sale of the business was being negotiated and in the hands of the Repatriation Committee? Mr Murphy – I don’t know that the business was ever referred to the local Repatriation Committee. Cr Oates claimed the right to cross examine. He said he was charged in the first place with “using his position and knowledge.” The returned men present and the public generally expected Mr Barber to prove that allegation. Did he (the speaker) go to returned soldiers and say “Give me your custom – I am president of the Repatriation Executive and will see that you are dealt with alright?” The Chairman thought the meaning was that Cr Oates’ knowledge was obtained as a member of the Repatriation Committee to the detriment of Mr Barber’s business. Cr Oates thought Mr Barber should explain. Mr Barber – You knew that the business was for sale, and you said to my customers, “If Murphy is selling will you give me first turn.” Cr Oates – Will you withdraw that now ? Mr. Barber – No, I will withdraw nothing! Cr Oates – I will let that stand over for the present.

Referring to the next charge, Cr Oates said it was complained, that he obtained and canvassed Mr Barber’s customers. He asked would Mr Barher give names? Mr Barber – No, I refuse. Cr Oates (excitedly) – That is no good to me. You have mentioned one lady’s name. “I don’t know her. I have never met her in my life. I am not going to put up with anymore of this business. I have been humiliated by men who have only been in the district a few weeks, and I am going to have these scandals exposed. Cr Oates – When were these customers supposed to have been canvassed ? Mr Barber – I can’t give the exact date, but it was sometime between 1st and 22nd April. Cr Oates – I will give you some information. It was not until May 7th that the Frankston Repatriation Committee was advised that Mr Murphy’s business was for sale. We appointed Mr Johnson and the secretary, Mr Barrett, to value it. When they interviewed Mr Murphy on the following Wednesday, Mr Murphy told them the business was sold and that Mr Barber was taking possession on Friday. Cr Oates, continuing, said that Mr Barber had been asked to produce a copy of the circular he, the speaker, was said to have sent out, but he had failed to do so, and for a very good reason. He had never issued a circular, but simply distributed the ordinary business cards. (Cr Oates here produced the cards in question.) Cr Oates, to Mr. Barber – How many customers do you say were lost from the time Mr Murphy’s started to sell

his business until you took over? Mr Barber – About half a dozen. Cr Oates – I thought it must be 100. Did you ever say it was 40? Mr. Barber – No. Cr Oates said he was still waiting to hear the charge justified that he had used his position to benefit his business. Mr Barber said he would withdraw the word position. The Chairman said that Mr Barhad brought no proof whatever in support of any of his charges, This branch finds that Mr Barber’s charges against Cr Oates are not proved The Chairman, in formally conveying the decision to Cr Oates, said he was very sorry that the matter had come before the branch. The branch was out to right the wrongs of soldiers, but complaints must be backed by evidence. Mr Barber had brought no proofs. Cr. Oates, in reply, said he was sure all present understood his feelings. He had been placed in a humiliating position. It was not necessary for him to detail the work he had done in the interests of the Returned Soldiers. All he had done he had done grudgingly, and his heart was still with the returned men. Cr Oates said he thought Mr Barber ought to apologise? Mr Barber – I withdraw altogether, after hearing Cr Oates, and apologise for what I have done and said. Cr Oates – I accept. (Great applause). *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 16 July 1920

WHAT’S NEW...

Music theatre stars Raise the Curtain to support local theatre companies

Principal Theatre Partner

‘THE show must go on’ is a phrase many in the performing arts industry have long adhered to, until COVID-19. Whilst some states are beginning to open up their venues, theatres in Victoria still sit dark and empty as performers, stage crew, staff and audiences wait at home for their time to shine again. Like so many arts workers, Nick Rees has been affected by the temporary dimming of the lights in Australian theatre. With the aim of supporting artists and local theatre groups, Rees was inspired to produce Raise the Curtain featuring an incredible cast of names from the music theatre industry to assist both the artists and the local theatre companies who have had productions postponed or cancelled in 2020. “Seeing how much the arts industry has been effected and how long it’s going to take to recover from all this really made me want to dig deep and not only help out those in the professional arts industry but also the local amateur companies,” explains Rees. “A lot of people who are working behind the scenes on the event are from the local companies down on the peninsula so it’s great to have their involvement.” Hosted by Jimmy Rees (ABC’s Giggle & Hoot), Raise the Curtain is a music theatre production not-to-be missed featuring pop, rock and music theatre classics. Performers include Bella Paige (The Voice runner-up 2018), Euan Doidge (Priscilla: Queen of the Dessert), Kala Gare (Six the Musical), Simon Gleeson (Les Misérables), Samm Hagen (Legally Blonde), Nigel Huckle (The Ten Tenors), Joseph Naim (Beautiful: The Carole King Story), Nat O’Donnell (Mamma Mia!), and Angela Scundi (Thoroughly Modern Millie). From adversity comes great opportunity and the Frankston Arts Centre have embraced digital opportunities to open up pathways for performers and artists to connect with audiences. As the

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

fourth event in their digital series, the FAC are proud to partner with NR Productions for this exciting fundraising event. Raise the Curtain will be livestreamed from the Frankston Arts Centre on Thursday 30 July, 7.30pm. Tickets are priced at whatever you can afford, with all ticket sales distributed amongst artists on the night, along with local companies PLOS Musical Productions and Panorama Theatre Company. More info at thefac.com.au.au.

Nick Rees (above) and Jimmy Rees.


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ACROSS 1. Three-sided object 5. Countless 7. Jumping parasite 8. Bedtime drink 9. Live coals 12. Lopped off 15. Caretaker 19. Generous gift

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21. Of Middle Ages 22. Tibet’s Dalai ... 23. Challenge 24. Spruces (up)

DOWN 1. Chewy confectionery 2. Degrade 3. Chromosome units 4. Locomotive 5. Full-grown 6. Barked shrilly 10. Cereal husks 11. Split

12. Title of respect 13. Blocking vote 14. Destroy 15. Wedged forcibly 16. Set fire to 17. Mediterranean fruit 18. Detour round 19. Lightweight timber 20. In darkness

Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 21 for solutions.

THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Masks – Part of Victoria’s heritage since 1880 By Stuart McCullough THE news of mandatory mask wearing has taken me completely by surprise. Knowing that I'll be fined $200 for not wearing a mask after Wednesday has made me regret continuing to panic buy toilet paper when everybody else was probably panic buying face masks. How could I have got panic buying so wrong? Now masks are going to be compulsory, the chances of getting one of those officiallooking blue ones that Anthony Edwards used to wear on ‘ER’ are slim to none. Which means I’ll need to make my own. Luckily, I am incredibly practical by nature and willing to face the challenge head on (no pun intended). Using Google and whatever I could find around the house, I managed to create a prototype that is so fit for purpose it could do a three minute mile. If I’m being honest, the overall effect is less ‘pandemic’ and more ‘bushranger’. But also, a fitting nod to our unique Victorian heritage. I'm going to call it the 'Ned Kelly pandemic mask'. As I write, I am wearing the 'Ned Kelly pandemic mask'. That’s despite the fact that I’m currently indoors. It’s sturdy, although a little on the heavy side, which makes entering and exiting a vehicle kind of a challenge. But, boy, do I feel safe. In the same way that Australia has invented everything useful in the past hundred years, including wine casks, the Hills Hoist and grunge music, we also invented the first full-functioning pandemic mask. Ned Kelly was an outlaw and a surprisingly early adopter of the face covering. Like many of us, Ned made his mask at home. It’s as good a model as any – not only

will it assist to protect you from coronavirus, you can also get your mail delivered to it. But I'm not going to bore you with a full history of Ned and the Kelly Gang. Everybody knows the story. Well, perhaps a quick recap for those that have only arrived here in the last 140 years.... Ned had decided to get together with a few of his friends in Glenrowan for a houseparty at the local inn they had hired out on Airbnb. Well above the number of people allowed in a single dwelling under Level Three Restrictions (especially considering they had 62 hostages), the constabulary were sent in to slap Ned with a $1652 fine. Ned would have none of it, and from there it all went pear-shaped. Unfortunately for Ned, and contrary to modern epidemiology, the thing that would eventually take him down would end up embedded in his legs, and not in his upper nasal passage. If only the police had been firing airborne virus particles and not lead bullets, Ned would still be with us today. Ned Kelly was convicted for the crimes of murder, armed robbery, and the excessive hoarding of toilet paper. Some things never change. Although things didn’t work out for Ned, we can all enjoy the fruits of his labour. Ned Kelly - bushranger, early adopter and Victoria's first mask wearer. Thanks Ned. As for me, if anybody would like to swap some masks for some toilet paper, please let me know. stuart@stuartmccullough.com

Prototype: Authors home-made pandemic mask. Picture: Supplied Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

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22 July 2020

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s4ERM o 275 Main Street Mornington - 30 years; O%DWARD3TREET 3OMERVILLEnYEARS O"ESGROVE3TREET 2OSEBUDnYEARS s2ENTALPERANNUMnPAYABLEONDEMAND Written submissions regarding this proposal will be considered by Council or a Committee of #OUNCIL INACCORDANCEWITH3ECTIONOFTHE!CT IFRECEIVEDWITHINTHEPRESCRIBEDTIME !#OMMITTEEMEETINGTOHEARSUBMISSIONSWILLBESCHEDULEDIFONEORMOREPERSONSREQUESTTO BEHEARDINSUPPORTOFTHEIRSUBMISSION!SUBMISSIONMUST

Submissions received, including the name of the submitter, may be published on Council’s website and may form part of the public record of the relevant Council and Committee MEETINGS0ERSONALCONTACTDETAILSANDANYOFFENSIVE DEFAMATORYORTHIRDPARTYPERSONAL INFORMATIONWILLNOTBEPUBLISHED9OUMAYACCESSPERSONALINFORMATIONYOUHAVEPROVIDEDTO THE3HIREATANYTIMEANDMAKECORRECTIONS&URTHERDETAILSOFOUR0RIVACY0OLICYCANBEFOUNDAT MORNPENVICGOVAUPRIVACY If you have any concerns about the use and disclosure of your personal information please CONTACTTHE'OVERNANCETEAMATPRIVACY MORNPENVICGOVAU4HISNOTICEANDAPLANOFTHE PROPOSEDLEASEAREACANALSOBEVIEWEDONTHE3HIRESWEBSITEATWWWMORNPENVICGOVAU !NYQUERIESCANBEDIRECTEDTO'REG#OLLINS 4EAM,EADER0ROPERTY/PERATIONSON   *OHN"AKER CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Anyone advertising a puppy, dog, kitten or cat in Victoria for sale or re-homing will need a source number from the Pet Exchange Register and a microchip identiďŹ cation number. It is now an offence to advertise unless the source number and microchip identiďŹ cation number is included in the advertisement or notice. For further information, call 136 186 or visit animalwelfare.vic.gov.au

The Mornington Peninsula Shire hereby gives notice under Section 190 of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act) of its intention to enter into various leases with United Energy Distribution Pty Limited on the proposed lease terms outlined below:

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PROPOSAL TO UPGRADE TELSTRA MOBILE PHONE BASE STATION AT 745 Truemans Rd FINGAL VIC 3939 (www.rfnsa.com.au/3941004)

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Medical/Nursing

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1. The proposed facility above consists of the installation of 5G technology including the installation of three (3) new 5G antennas; ancillary items such as radio units; twin mounted ampliďŹ ers; breakout boxes; cabling; and in shelter works.

ICU/PICU nurses wanted for home care in Balnarring, Bittern and Mornington. Minimum of 2 years ICU/PICU experience. Must be ventilation and tracheostomy competent.

2. Telstra regards the proposed installation as a Low-impact Facility under the Telecommunications (Low-impact Facilities) Determination 2018 based on the description above. 3. In accordance with Section 7 of C564:2018 Mobile Phone Base Station Deployment Code, we invite you to provide feedback about the proposal. Further information and/or comments should be directed to: Stefan Kaldis town planner for Visionstream (on behalf of Telstra), 1300 745 210, Stefan.Kaldis@visionstream.com.au by 7/8/20.

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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FV shuts down senior season SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FOOTBALL Victoria early last week placed a full stop next to the 2020 season for senior teams in the metropolitan region. However the state body clings to the hope that junior competition at both NPL and community club levels can resume in September pending state government approval. The anticipated end to the 2020 season was first announced in an email to clubs and followed up the next day with an official media release whose main points were: – Senior metropolitan competitions (NPL and community) will not proceed or resume as fixtured – Junior NPL and community club competitions are planned to resume in a modified form in September (subject to government restrictions) – Modified football competitions to be developed with clubs for September onwards in various forms and locations (subject to government restrictions) – A FV 2020 fee policy, based on cost apportionment principles, is being finalised. All three local clubs with junior NPL licences – Langwarrin, Mornington and Peninsula Strikers – are likely to participate in whatever may remain of the 2020 season. However neither Mornington nor Strikers will compete at community junior level this year. Langy hopes to but if a modified junior season starts up as scheduled it will coincide with the redevelopment of the top pitch at Lawton Reserve. “It’s going to be a logistical nightmare but we will absolutely make it work,” Langwarrin president Tanya Wallace said. A major electrical upgrade at Lawton Park was completed last week but in September the top pitch will be ripped up and completely resurfaced with new drainage, new irrigation, levelling of the new pitch, upgrade of coaching boxes, new fencing, new gates at the second entrance off Barrett’s Road and a new high fence behind the goals at the clubroom end of the pitch. Mornington is in talks with FV and Mornington Peninsula Shire Council about arranging an abbreviated junior season for local community clubs. The Dallas Brooks Reserve outfit has

Pines’ plans: A recent bird’s-eye view of Monterey Reserve which Frankston Pines hopes will become a training and playing hub in coming months. Picture: Steven Gray, Football Chaos

held talks with Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Somerville, Rosebud, Rosebud Heart and Westernport. “It’s early days yet but the signs are promising,” Mornington president Matt Cameron said. “We’re hoping to put together a sixto eight-week junior competition and we’re still working through the details with Greg (Hurvitz, local FV club ambassador). “The clubs prefer to stay within the local area rather than travelling to other municipalities. “We are all working together which is fantastic the way we’ve been able to do that over this period. “We’ll talk to the council about getting extended times on grounds and if we can run into summer that’s probably what we’ll try and do.” Mornington is now dealing with the issue of refunding player fees to parents. “We probably will look at a rollover to next season,” Cameron said. “If we can arrange some sort of season with the local clubs that will go some way to dealing with the issue but we haven’t had a lot of requests for re-

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fering our grounds to accommodate clubs who can’t use their own grounds because of cricket,” Pines president Lee Davies said. This ties in with Pines telling FV of its keenness to again host a Go Sevens tournament which it did during the last off-season. “We thought if clubs don’t have anywhere to train they could come and train here and they’d be more likely to play in a tournament,” Davies added. Pines have looked at the possibility of organising their own tournament but Davies isn’t comfortable with the idea. “I think the main local tournament is the Wallace Cup and I think that has to be respected. “I don’t like the idea of us having a tournament that takes anything away from that. “If we host anything at all it will be run by Football Victoria because we would never compete with the Wallace Cup. “We can still go ahead with the Sevens plan though.”

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recharging all our members and now we’ve decided to provide full refunds. “We’ve been able to do that because we’ve managed our payments and registrations really carefully. “A number of parents have offered their fees back as a donation and that has been absolutely fantastic.” While Strikers will take part in any modified reboot of the junior NPL season they are prepared for the possibility that too may be scrapped by FV. “Our main objective for our NPL program was to make it as accessible as possible for anyone who tried out with us,” Harrington added. “We set up a model to charge what it cost us and we committed to that plan for this year. “Our aim still is to still run the best quality and the best value-for-money NPL program in Victoria but if the NPL season ends up being called off we have the ability to refund unspent monies to our families.” Meanwhile Frankston Pines has again raised the prospect of turning Monterey Reserve into a local training and playing hub over the next few months. “We’ve spoken to council about of-

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funds to be honest, maybe around 10 or so from the 400 kids we’ve got. “We sent out an email a couple of weeks ago when the season got put off again and quite a few people have said they don’t expect anything back as the club has been working harder than ever having to set up twice only to have things called off each time.” Strikers also called off the season for its community junior clubs and junior president Matt Harrington believes the club has acted in the best interest of parents. “We’ve made a difficult decision not to compete in any Football Victoria community competitions this year as we felt it would be too cost-prohibitive for families,” he said. “We worked very hard at putting the COVID-19 return to training and playing conditions in place for our NPL program but found that providing the same diligence for our 20-plus community teams significantly more challenging. “After the last restart we reduced our (community) fees by between 25 and 60 per cent depending on the age group then went through the process of

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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Rawiller claims Rising Star Series HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou IN form apprentice jockey Campbell Rawiller was crowned this season’s RMBL Investments Rising Stars Series champion at Flemington on Saturday 18 July. The Mornington-based apprentice jockey had an unassailable lead heading into the final event of the Series, but still managed to claim second aboard the Grahame Begg-trained Beauty Bolt and collect a further six points to add to his total. Rawiller, who has ridden 73 winners since debuting in September, finished 10 points clear of Teo Nugent and a further 19 points ahead of Lewis German who claimed third. The 19-year-olds victory emulated the success of his aunty, Stacey Rawiller, who claimed the 2009/10 Rising Stars Series with 72 points. Campbell Rawiller said it was a massive thrill to be able to follow in the footsteps of his Aunty and claim the apprentices’ prize. “Being able to step up against great apprentices like Teo, Michael Poy and Thomas Stockdale and try to get the challenge was really thrilling,” Rawiller said. “It’s definitely a big credit to my manager, Liam Prior, who has done a lot of work to get this. It’s been a great opportunity to have a goal to work towards and try to win it and thankfully it’s all worked out.” Rawiller joins other past winners of the Rising Stars Series which includes Melbourne Cupwinning jockey Blake Shinn and multiple Group 1-winning jockeys Craig Newitt and Nick Hall. With another goal checked off the list, Rawiller’s next focus is to outride his provincial claim which he’s seven winners off succeeding. He’s currently riding at a 14% strike rate from his past 50 rides.

Rising star: Campbell Rawiller takes out the Rising Stars Series for the 2019/20 season. Picture: Supplied

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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020


Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

PAGE 23


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Southern Peninsula News

22 July 2020

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

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