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Small shovel start for big pool Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au SMALL shovelfuls of earth last week ceremoniously marked the start of construction work on the Rosebud Aquatic Centre. No hard hats or hi vis work wear was needed when the mayor, Cr David Gill was joined by Crs Kate Roper and Antonella Celi and Nepean MP Chris Brayne to break ground for the $42 million centre. Mr Brayne noted that the project’s “long history” almost equalled his own lifespan of 25 years. The turning of the sod follows the awarding last month to Port Melbourne-based Buxton Constructions of a $39.4 million contract to build the aquatic centre. Council also agreed to an undisclosed “contingency sum”. This month the shire is looking to hire “an expert facility operator” to manage the centre. Belgravia Leisure is paid by the shire to manage and operate the Pelican Park Recreation Centre in Hastings, Mornington’s Civic Reserve Recreation Centre, the Somerville Health & Fitness Studio, Crib Point Pool and Western Port Gymnastics at the Hastings Hub. The shire says that at the Rosebud Aquatic centre it will control such business functions as asset management, utilities, maintenance, fees and charges and employment of the centre manager. The building works at Rosebud being done by Buxton include an indoor 50-metre competition pool; learn-toswim pool; warm water program pool; aqua play/splash deck; wellness centre; and gymnasium. Other rooms include a cafe, school group and family change rooms. Cr Gill said the centre’s operator “work alongside” the shire “under a fee for service agreement”. “Council is looking for the best people to manage the facility, which is one of the biggest projects in the shire’s history,” he said. That aquatic centre will have “the maximum number of solar panels possible … whilst maintaining safe roof access and symmetry for aesthetic purposes”. The expanded solar system finally agreed to by council added an extra $423,000 to building costs. Mr Brayne said “all the praise for this project is owed to the council staff, councillors of multiple different council terms and the public who have watched this project’s long history with an unrivalled patience”. Making a start: David Gill, Antonella Celi, Kate Roper and Chris Brayne handling shovels at the site of the planned Rosebud Aquatic Centre. Picture: Supplied

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NEWS DESK

Camping discounts end after ‘strategic’ success DISCOUNT packages at some Mornington Peninsula foreshore camping grounds have been withdrawn because of their success. The mayor Cr David Gill said the cheaper packages for pre-and post-peak times were designed to “activate” Rye and Sorrento. “This activation has occurred and, to ensure both new and return campers have equal access to camping sites along the foreshore, [the discounts] have been discontinued,” he said. “For income reasons other discounts have continued in areas [such as Rosebud] that have lesser off-peak occupancy rates.” The mayor’s comments follow complaints from regular campers at Rye and Sorrento that they are being hit with site fee increases for next season while campers at Rosebud are not. (“Fee hikes make for unhappy campers” The News 10/7/19). Many families, some camping for long stays at

Rye over more than 50 years, feel they are being discriminated against by a restructuring of the fees and removal of before-and-after peak season packages. They say the fee restructure by the council equates to a 50 per cent increase. The mayor said the council was spending $7 million on the foreshore “with many improvements under way”. He said the council’s 201920 capital works budget included $550,000 for “reconfiguration works” of the Rye camping sites which will include power, water and fire service upgrades. But long-time camper Lee Conway said the capital works project would force many campers out of the Rye East camping ground. “Council is asking those campers to help fund a capital works project via increased fees for improvements which will not benefit them. How is this reasonable?” Mr Conway queried whether the council had

a strategy to “attract new campers based on increasing fees to a level where it is no longer affordable for many families to return”. “Is this how they want to turn over visitors?” he asked. “Do they prefer to attract people for short-term stays because they are slugging the repeat customers and making it unviable for families to stay for longer periods? “What is their strategy to manage a potential downturn in tourism numbers and income in the quieter pre-season and post-season periods? “Do they prefer that during October and November that these sites attract an influx of ‘schoolies’?” Mr Conway said a line item on page 57 of the council’s 2019-20 budget reading: “Foreshore camping fees off season – pre-package (return campers all locations) $300” had been dismissed

by shire officers as an “administrative error” when he queried it. “That would only be a $700 saving, but it might be the difference between someone going camping and not,” he said. The shire’s property and strategy manager Nathan Kearsley said the line was a “typo error” which should have read: All Rosebud locations. He said the cost of providing foreshore camping across Sorrento, Rye and Rosebud had a breakeven budgeted income this financial year of $3.25 million. “The overall net cost of maintaining foreshore reserves across the peninsula is in the vicinity of $7 million per annum,” he said. Cr Gill said discounted camping packages were still available for camping sites at Rosebud. “There has been no change to any of the off-peak weekly rates,” he said.

No time to waste in nurdle fight Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au A ST ANDREWS’ woman is on a mission to rid the beaches of tiny plastic waste particles called nurdles. Lyn Wedd said the minute pellets were washing down drains, over the beaches of Port Phillip and through the Heads and around to St Andrews ocean beach, near Rye. She wants to inspire the possibly uninformed plastics manufacturers and handlers of the nurdles to “clean up their act”. “To date, they’ve been getting away with it but, hopefully, new legislation will make them more accountable,” she said last week while cleaning a section of Mt Eliza’s foreshore at Canadian Bay. “We need legislation to stop nurdles. They’d fine me if I threw a water bottle into the sea, but plastics manufacturers can wash the raw pellets down drains and nothing happens to them. “And this is despite plastic being listed as a threat to our waterways in the state government’s environment protection policy.” Ms Wedd had a “lightbulb moment” five years ago when resting on the sand at a Mt Eliza beach. “The sun was shining on these gleaming little particles, which I initially thought were jewels,” she said. “I scooped up a handful and realised they were plastic.” The pollutants are now five years further into their march to colonise the environment – with experts

Beach cleaner: Lyn Wedd at Mt Eliza confronting a problem affecting beaches in and outside Port Phillip – tiny plastic waste particles known as nurdles. Picture: Gary Sissons

claiming plastic particles have entered every part of our food chain and even our bodies. A recent European study found the highest plastic concentrations in animals were in the gut, with the smallest micro-plastic particles capable of entering our blood streams, lymphatic systems and even our livers.

When Ms Wedd chanced on nurdle concentrations at St Andrews beach she contacted Port Phillip Baykeeper Neil Blake who exclaimed: “Please don’t tell me they are at your beach? That means they have escaped Port Phillip. It’s getting worse and worse.” When Ms Wedd visited Phillip Island with her surfer husband Brendan

she found similar concentrations there. “The beach was littered with them,” she said. “I thought: ‘That’s it, we must get [state government] legislation to get rid of them.” EPA southern metropolitan region environment protection officer Erin Carmelito said the plastic pellets were

defined as “waste” under the Environment Protection Act 1970 which “must be managed appropriately”. “Plastics manufacturers do, in fact, have the same obligations under the act as all commercial and industrial business,” she said. “The EPA requires businesses that produce, transport or use nurdles to keep them contained and under control; away from water and wind; and away from stormwater drains.” Pellets not properly managed and discharged into the environment can lead to charges of illegal dumping of industrial waste or creating an environmental hazard. New laws coming into effect on 1 July 2020 will give the EPA powers to require businesses to act before pollution occurs, rather than addressing harm after the fact, Ms Carmelito said. They must have measures in place to prevent waste being discharged, such as waste management plans, training, equipment maintenance, and spill capture and response. To report the washing waste of any sort into stormwater drains email the EPA or call 1300 372 842.

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NEWS DESK

Detecting anxiety in children Recycling to stay despite shutdown

A SEMINAR designed to enable parents and teachers to better recognise, manage and minimise the anxiety of their children will be held at Rosebud next month. Parenting expert, award-winning speaker and author Michael Grose and wellbeing expert and researcher Dr Jodi Richardson will host the Anxious Kids seminar at Rosebud Secondary College, 7- 9pm, Thursday 1 August. The pair are touring Australia to present their evidence-based approach to managing children’s anxiety. They will speak about tools and strategies for helping children as outlined in their book Anxious Kids. “Disturbingly, it takes 8.2 years on average between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis of an anxiety disorder,” Mr Grose said. “For a child experiencing anxiety, that can mean many years of learning difficulties, unhappiness and lost opportunities. We believe this is an unacceptable statistic.” Parents, teachers and other professionals who work with children play a critical role in helping children to recognise and manage their anxious feelings. The seminar is designed especially for them. Attendees will learn how to know if a child or teenager is experiencing anxiety, the origins of anxiety and how it impacts on children and teens, and how to respond constructively when a child or teen is anxious. They will receive tools to teach

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THERE will be no disruption to kerbside recycling collections for households on the Mornington Peninsula, despite a new ban on the shire’s waste recycler SKM Services last week. The ban came 48 hours after a fire at the company’s Laverton North site, Monday 8 July. It reportedly involved a conveyor belt surrounded by tonnes of recyclable and potentially flammable material. The mayor Cr David Gill said the shire would “continue to monitor the situation and keep in regular contact with SKM”. “Council continues to work with the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group on long-term solutions, including advocacy for urgent policy change in the recycling industry,” he said. “We reiterate our message that, as a community, we can’t become

complacent. It’s up to everyone to understand the waste they generate; how they can avoid generating it in the first place and how they can reduce their impact on our environment.” Tips to reduce waste include reducing packaging, not placing recyclable items in plastic bags (which go direct to landfill), upcycling or repairing items and buying second-hand. Shoppers should use reusable bags when shopping – not single-use plastics. Homeowners should compost food waste and join the shire’s Compost Challenge at: mornpen.vic.gov.au/ composting, the mayor said. At the beach take “three for the sea” by picking up three pieces of rubbish. The mayor said free recycling days were regularly held at the shire’s transfer stations.

Early training for seeing eye dogs

Kids in the frame: Speakers Michael Grose and Dr Jodi Richardson. Picture: Supplied

children to help regulate their anxiety, as well as which lifestyle factors they can use to minimise anxiety. Other tips cover why avoidance of anxiety-inducing events is not the an-

swer and what to do instead, and how to create a wellbeing plan for a child or young person. Tickets are available through the Parenting Ideas website.

VISION Australia’s seeing eye dogs are expected to have more than 40 puppies by the end of August which may one day become a partner to someone that is blind or has low vision. Once the pups are about 15 months old they will begin formal training at Kensington but, before that, their training begins all over Victoria. Puppy development trainer Claire Crewe says the Mornington Peninsula is a good place for the puppies to begin their training.

“The peninsula is a great area to be a puppy carer because it offers an array of different environments to train and expose your puppy to. Parks, beaches, shops, the has it all,” Ms Crewe said puppy caring involved looking after a puppy for up to a year. Food, equipment, veterinary bills and bedding is supplied by Seeing Eye Dogs. An information session about puppy caring will be held 10.30am Friday 19 July at Mornington Library in Vancouver Street.

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Southern Peninsula News 17 July 2019


NEWS DESK

Call to tax the tourists Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au TOURISM is being suggested as a way for Mornington Peninsula Shire to pay for the $56 million Rosebud aquatic centre. There seems no end to the peninsula’s popularity with tourists and visitors and, for one former council aspirant, charging for parking their vehicles is a cash cow waiting to be milked. Joe Lenzo wants to “make the whole of the shire a parking permit zone”, with free parking for residents and discounts for businesses. He says the shire would have “money to burn” if visitors paid parking fees and were relentlessly pursued and fined if they did not have a permit. He suggests installing parking metres or introducing an online parking permit system. Mr Lenzo says high parking fees in

Byron Bay, NSW and towns in Italy do not deter tourists. “You could have a two-lane mud track from Melbourne to the peninsula and you could not stop them for coming en masse. The argument that it would affect retail is wrong.” Campers should be allowed one vehicle a site, with permits being bought for more vehicles. Mr Lenzo suggests charging $10 for a 24-hour parking permit “which is a good deal when you compare to Byron Bay’s $4 an hour”. Discounts could be offered for weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual parking permits. The shire’s 2019/20 budget includes $683,000 for tourism marketing and net $577,000 income from parking. Mr Lenzo says under his plan, peninsula residents would have free parking (two vehicles to every rate notice) with landlords required to hand the permits over to tenants.

Hand held scanners could be used by contractors to check number plates for parking permits, and issue fines. The check could also identify stolen cars, stolen registration plates, unpaid fines and “persons of interest” to the police. These results could be used as a revenue-raiser with other municipalities giving the shire 25 per cent for identifying those who owed fines in excess of $5000 and impounding the vehicle until the penalties had been paid. Cracking down on vehicles overstaying the limit would free up space in supermarket parking areas often used by beachgoers. Mr Lenzo, who lives at Safety Beach and is well aware of the popularity of the peninsula’s beaches and available parking spaces, especially during summer, says he no longer wants to be a councillor. A frequent correspondent to the Letters section of this newspaper, he wants tourists to help overcome fi-

nancial headaches caused to the shire by state government-imposed rate capping. “If the shire would stop dickering around and tax the tourrisits [sic] as I have suggested in my many submissions on how to do it easily and without effort and high cost that would add $25 million a year to income, there would be no problem - money to burn,” he said. “Rosebud pool [could be] paid for with cash in the bank.” Mr Lenzo says the shire has never responded to or considered his submissions over the the past decade but he now “understands they are thinking of doing something which I am sure will be a half donkey result compared to my proposals”. Mr Lenzo’s premise is based on ratepayers not benefitting from tourists and, therefore, “should not pay their costs”. He said tourists were “only a big

problem for six weeks and then mainly on weekends, except for Christmas, but add a lot of costs [to the shire’s budget]”. “A true accounting of the caravan parks might show they are operating at a loss and resident ratepayers are paying the bill,” Mr Lenzo said. “The shire is getting ready to put in some costly parking system in Rosebud or Rye, like in parking garages that show how many empty spaces and I think blue lights if empty. “This not a benefit when the tourists are not here and residents will have to pay. “Why should resident ratepayers pay for all these costs that do not benefit them?” Mr Lenzo said deducting “the real cost” of tourism from the shire budget would mean the shire “would not have to raise rates for years”.

‘The best night’ for 50-year CFA veteran ‘Dad’s a champion’: CFA veteran Greg Salmon with son Jarrod and daughters Rebecca and Kylie at his medal presentation. Picture: Supplied

Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

IT’S hard to doubt Sorrento CFA veteran Greg Salmon when he says last week’s 50-year medal presentation was “one of the best nights I’ve ever had”. The long-time Sorrento resident was honoured at a dinner at Sorrento Sailing Couta Boat Club attended by 80 CFA members and guests, Friday 28 June. Long service awards were presented to seven Sorrento Urban Fire Brigade members, with Brigade Captain Michael Versteegen saying the “most impressive went to Greg Salmon, who received an award for 50 years continued and diligent service”. “Greg rose from firefighter, through lieutenant to captain of the fire brigade, and, since stepping down from the captaincy two decades ago, has continued to support the brigade, still turning out to fire and emergency calls and joining in community and fundraising events. “Greg’s input to and impact on the brigade over the past 50 years has been significant and, hopefully, will continue.” Mr Salmon grew up in the town, attended Sorrento Primary School and then Rosebud High School, and volunteered in 1969 while he was

working as a motor mechanic at the old Shell service station on Ocean Beach Road. “The two bosses there at the time were CFA members and they encouraged me to join,” he said. Unlike the servo which is long gone,

Mr Salmon stayed for the long-term and says he found his niche in the volunteer service where he mixes with a “great bunch of people”. Over the years he has received a strong of medals and awards, including the CFA Award and Medal,

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National Medal, Gold Star, Long Service Medal, various Certificates of Appreciation, Outstanding Service Awards, and a Sorrento Rotary Award. He looks back with satisfaction on his role in fighting many big fires, including blazes at Cann River, the

Dandenongs, and countless house and scrub fires. One that stands out was a fire at Portsea Village. “We were told it was the Portsea hotel but when we got there we saw it was at a unit in the village across the road which we had been using in previous practise runs,” he said. “Apparently a bloke had gone to sleep and his cigarette had caught fire to the place.” To celebrate Mr Salmon’s big night, his children Jarrod, Kylie and Rebecca organised a limousine to drive them. Unfortunately, his wife Francesca was unwell after an eye operation the day before and could not attend. Jarrod was full of praise for his father: “He is a champion and has given so much to the community over his lifetime so it was great to shine a spotlight on him even for a few minutes.” Despite his long period of service, Mr Salmon isn’t contemplating retiring anytime soon. “It’s something I would miss if I had to give it away,” he said. “I’ll be happy to stay on and do whatever I can.”

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Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

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NEWS DESK

Southern Peninsula

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly

Circulation: 22,870

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Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 18 JULY 2019 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 24 JULY 2019

Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

Crime spree and car chase ends on flat note

TWO thieves who went on a late night crime spree from Mt Martha to Portsea last week have been arrested – with one being bitten on the arm by a police dog. Detective Senior Sergeant Eddie Logonder, of Somerville CIU, said the Endeavour Hills men, aged 24 and 35, stole a Toyota Yaris from Mt Martha, 9.30pm, Sunday 7 July. Heading south, they allegedly broke into eight cars in Frimmell Way, Pt Nepean Road, Leyden Avenue and Driver Street, Portsea, and Kerferd Avenue and Rebecca Court, Sorrento, stealing cash, wallets, credit cards and a laptop before being disturbed by owners who called 000. Police rushed to intercept the men but lost them as they sped off. In the early hours of Monday 8 July the men allegedly entered a Rye house

through an unlocked door stealing the keys to a Mazda CX5 and Land Rover Discovery. Residents at the Elgan Avenue property slept while the men were inside the house but woke when they heard their cars starting up in the driveway and called police. The men allegedly drove the cars to the Rye BP service station where they were spotted by patrolling police who pulled in behind the Mazda, smashed the side window and ordered the driver out. He sped off followed by the man in the Discovery. Police were unable to catch the men but the Air Wing followed the cars along Peninsula Link at speeds up to 180kph. As they approached Keysborough police laid stop-sticks across Popes Road which shredded the Mazda’s tyres with the 24-year-old still at-

tempting to evade police by driving on the tyre rims. Going nowhere he jumped out and ran through properties in a bid to escape and was arrested hiding under a parked car in Chandler Road by members of the Dog Squad. He later received treatment for bite marks. The 35-year-old continued driving on partially deflated tyres before being forced to stop in Narre Warren, 5am, Monday 8 July. The men each face multiple counts of theft from eight cars and theft of three cars, as well as speeding, dangerous driving, and failing to stop at police direction. The older man was bailed and the younger man remanded in custody to appear at Frankston Magistrates’ Court at a date to be fixed. The Toyota Yaris stolen from Mt Martha was later recovered at Rye.

Armada readies for drink driver crackdown An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

A “SIGNIFICANT” increase in alcohol-related serious injuries and fatal collisions in Frankston and on the Mornington Peninsula over the past 12 months has triggered a police crackdown on drink drivers. Highway patrol and general police will saturate these areas as part of Operation Armada in an effort to detect and deter impaired drivers.

Operation Armada starts on Friday 19 July. Southern Metro Region Superintendent Adrian White said police would set up booze buses in strategic locations with officers conducting alcohol and drug tests “at every opportunity”. “Our intelligence is telling us that the types of people we predominantly detect for impaired driving are males

aged 19-44, and drivers leaving licenced venues,” Supt. White said. “Our data also shows that tradesmen are over-represented for this kind of offending, which is a real concern for us. “In the south east we’ve lost nearly twice the number of lives on the road compared to this time last year.

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Beach boxes under threat - Liberals

It’s better here: Dr Mustafa Isreb on the preferred site of the new Optus mobile phone tower. Picture: Yanni

LIBERAL MP for Mornington David Morris has accused the state Labor government of having a plan that will see beach boxes “ripped off our beaches”. While last week’s run of strong winds and waves appeared to be trying their best to undermine beach boxes at Mt Martha North, Mr Morris issued a news release saying the Draft Marine and Coast Policy report released by Environment Minister Lily D’Ambrosio, stated that bathing boxes were “to be removed/relocated as the opportunity arises”. “This is a dramatic departure from the former Liberal Nationals government’s plans to retain bathing boxes,” Mr Morris said. “Not only are these bathing boxes much loved, many are also heritage listed after being added to the Victorian heritage register by the Heritage Council of Victoria in July 2018. “This plan to remove Victoria’s iconic beach boxes would destroy not just an important part of Victoria’s built heritage, but also an important part of Victoria’s cultural heritage.” Mr Morris said the Premier Daniel Andrews should “immediately abandon this absurd plan to remove bathing boxes from Victoria’s beaches, and apologise for even contemplating such a ridiculous and out of touch move”.

Residents call for phone tower to be on hold CONCERNED Capel Sound residents are fighting a proposed Optus mobile phone tower on the northern side of Pt Nepean Road, opposite Violet Street. The residents prefer the tower to be 250 metres south on the foreshore reserve opposite 1781-1795 Pt Nepean Road. This would take it away from a bus stop used by school children, residential areas, and the Bay Trail – and mean less vegetation has to be removed in construction. Their main concern is the negative health impacts they fear low level radiation emissions have on human health. Phone towers can emit radiation up to 500 metres, with the most dangerous areas within 150 metres. The potentially harmful impacts of the impending 5G service are unknown, but what is known is that radiation is linked to cancer and other

health issues. At Mornington Peninsula Shire’s 25 June meeting Cr Antonella Celi successfully moved that the council write to Optus’s tower installer Metasite alerting it to the “concerns raised by the community” to the proposed siting of the tower and especially its deleterious health impacts. Cr Celi said it was “not unreasonable for residents to want the tower site moved – it’s still within Capel Sound”. “It’s not about not wanting it – it’s about getting the best location.” Capel Sound residents Guy and Karen Nicholls and Dr Mustafa Isreb met with Cr Celi’s fellow Seawinds ward councillors Frank Martin and Simon Brooks on Tuesday 25 June. “They are our community leaders and they

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came to us with an alternative site,” Cr Celi said. “They have sent their recommendation to Optus but have not yet heard back.” State and federal legislation prevents VCAT challenges to authorities such as Optus when siting mobile phone towers. The best avenues of protest are through the council with as much local political support as possible. Cr Celi approached Flinders MP Greg Hunt who said: “Locals have a right to make their views on the construction of new infrastructure in their community known. “I urge anyone wanting to make their views on the issue known to contact my office so that I can continue to make representations on their behalf.” Metasite and Optus were contacted for comment. Stephen Taylor

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Offer 1: 50% off your second item* off the recommended retail price on selected range of sofas and furniture & homewares. Offer available between 02/07/19 till 22/07/19 (inclusive). *50% off the recommended retail price of the second item to be of equal or lesser value only. OR Offer 2: Up to 50% off* the recommended retail price on a selected range of sofas displayed as Season special* sofas. Sale prices on these sofas are as marked in-store and online. *Both 1 and 2 offers exclude Introductory new offers, Hot Buys*, clearance, Guardsman warranties, purchases of gift cards, Glasshouse and Cira candles. OR Offer 3: Clearance* up to 50% off* the recommended retail price on a select range of furniture and homewares. Sale prices on these products are as marked in-store and online. Clearance* is discontinued products and run-out lines which are sold at a reduced price. Clearance* products are not available with any other offer or promotion. Clearance* products may not be available at all stores and are available whilst stock lasts. Warranty and Consumer Guarantees apply in accordance with the Australian Consumer Law.* All offers are not available in conjunction with any other offer. * ZIP Finance available for purchases with all offers on 6 months and 12 months (minimum spend of $1999 applies) plans with 0% interest free. Available in-store and online to approved applicants. Additional conditions apply*. Latitude finance not accepted on either offer. *See www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au/promotions for more information. Weekend Flash 2 day offer with Free metro / local delivery* in-store and online, 20 & 21 July inclusive. Applies to purchases in-store within Zone 1, local, and metro for of all store locations up to a delivery value of $99. Free delivery for online purchases within associated metro city parameters only (limited to ACT, Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney), ends 21.07.19, 11.59pm. *See www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au/promotions for more information.

OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON PH: 8560 1137, SHOWROOM D4, PENINSULA HOME, 1128-1132 NEPEAN HIGHWAY BENDIGO 5410 0644, ESSENDON 8560 1130, GEELONG 8560 1124, HOPPERS CROSSING 8560 1141, MORNINGTON 8560 1137, NARRE WARREN 8560 1160, NORTHLAND 8560 1170, NUNAWADING 9894 1566, RICHMOND 8560 1120

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 9


NEWS DESK

Police Point Artist in Residence Expression of Interest Emerging and established artists, writers, musicians and creatives are encouraged to apply for a 2020 residency at the historic Gatekeeper’s Cottage, Police Point Shire Park, Portsea, on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula.

For further information and to download the Expression of Interest (EOI) form, go to mornpen.vic.gov.au/artistinresidence Email enquiries and completed EOI’s to artsandculture@mornpen.vic.gov.au Applications close Friday 13 September 2019

Legacy’s ongoing help for ‘defence’ families MORNINGTON Peninsula Legacy is a charity providing services to 1400 widows and families on the Mornington Peninsula, in Frankston and north to Chelsea after the injury or death of a spouse or parent, during or after serving in the defence force. Barry Smith, president of the Mornington Peninsula Legacy Club, said that since 1923 the organisation had been “protecting the wellbeing of veterans' families… Our compassionate and vital assistance changes lives, with care, friendship and support and we are honoured to serve our families”. He said Legacy stood by defence force families “to ensure a child gets an education and a fair go, a widow is not disadvantaged and alone, and a family is not torn apart by the effects of past and ongoing conflicts”. “Legacy is the only organisation of its type in the world and relies on its volunteers and donations to carry out its work,” Mr Smith said. He said the work of Mornington Peninsula Legacy was based “on the principles of providing services within a compassionate and respectful environment based on the needs of individuals and families”. “In addition to our beneficiary programs, Legacy also engages young people in the community through education to acknowledge and commemorate the sacrifices of our brave service men and women and their families,” Mr Smith said. Legacy’s holds an annual Anzac commemoration ceremony for students at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance and its junior public speaking award encourages 12-14-year-old students to learn about Legacy’s values, “while developing their communication skills and confidence”. Legacy volunteers will be selling badges and appealing for public donations during Legacy Week, 31 August – 7 September or go to www. legacy.com.au/donate. Call Mornington Peninsula Legacy on 9708 8201.

School money MOOROODUC Primary School will get $192,400 from the state government towards building an outdoor “sensory playground” and buying new equipment. The money comes from the Inclusive Schools Fund to help government schools implement innovative projects that promote inclusive school environments.

Moving Earth PROFESSOR Peter Betts will speak about Earth moving “in mysterious ways” 2pm3.30pm Saturday 3 August at the Australian Garden Auditorium, Cranbourne Gardens, corner Ballarto Road and Botanic Drive Cranbourne. The 50-minute presentation will cover Prof Betts’s life from plumber’s son in East Gippsland to becoming an academic geologist, and why Earth sciences are significant for society. Prof Betts, professor of tectonics from Monash University’s School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, will illustrate how Earth scientists image the Earth and what this information tells us about the planet. He will conclude with a synopsis of Melbourne’s dynamic geology. Bookings: www.rbgfriendscranbourne.org.au, $20 Members, $25 non-members, $10 students.

Koalas the topic SENIOR lecturer in wildlife and conservation biology at Deakin University Dr Desley Whisson will talk on “Absent without leaf – Koalas on the Mornington Peninsula”, at a Mornington Peninsula Koala Conservation Group talk, 3pm Sunday 21 July. The venue is Main Ridge Community Hall, Main Ridge Road, Main Ridge (Melway 171 J12). All welcome. Admittance is free. Inquiries to Bernie Schedvin 5989 6408 or email berniesched@vic.chariot.net.au or Michelle Stacey, 0409 031 108 or admin@wildman.net.au

Don’t let tendon pain stop you in your tracks Up to 90% success rate# | Non invasive therapy Radial Shockwave therapy Clinically proven* to help these conditions: • Heel pain (plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinopathy)

• Rotator cuff tendinopathy with calcification

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• Shin splints and heel spurs

• Frozen shoulder

Call 5983 1021 or book online for your

Free Initial Assessment

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Back In Motion Balnarring 6/2-8 Russell Street backinmotion.com.au/balnarring PAGE 10

Southern Peninsula News 17 July 2019


Day Trips: Xmas in July - Sanctuary House Wed 24th Jul $70pp 2 course lunch & ent

Archibald Exhibition at TarraWarra Fri 4th Oct $78pp lunch included

Cirque Du Soleil - Kurios Sun 15th Mar 2020 $175pp

Matinees: Chicago (Dress Circle) Thur 2nd Jan 2020 $145pp light lunch included

Extended Trips: Beechworth Edinburgh Military Tattoo - Sydney (centreline seats) 2 - 6 September 16-18 October $1350pp ($320 s/s) $2050pp ($185 s/s) Fully Escorted Tours *Door to door pick up & return service

1300 274 880 (local call cost)

Info@daytripper.com.au | www.daytripper.com.au

Bras for all: Karen Fenn, Kerry Holgate and Siska Quirk have armfuls of old bras to donate to women in disadvantaged countries. Picture: Yanni

Did you know... you can view our papers online

The ‘uplifting’ bra project A PROBLEM for women in first world countries is what to do with old bras, while many women in third world countries can only dream of getting one. That’s part of the rationale behind the Uplift Project which donates used bras, including mastectomy and nursing bras, to underprivileged women in the South Pacific and Asia as well as rural Australia. The penny dropped for celebrant and Red Hill

Lions Club member Kerry Holgate when she saw the story on the TV news. “I thought it was such a good idea as everyone has a drawer full of old bras which usually end up in landfill. Yet, for women in disadvantaged communities, a bra is often unobtainable or unaffordable,” she said. “For many of these women, the bra they receive from us is the first they have ever owned.” Ms Holgate has joined forces with Tracey

Brown, owner of Curves, Rosebud, who has provided a drop-off point. “The response has been overwhelming,” Ms Brown said, with donors also chipping in to defray shipping costs. The current bra-drive at Curves will run until the end of July. Others wanting to organise a bradrive should visit upliftbras.org Stephen Taylor

www.mpnews.com.au

Rosebud Skin Cancer Centre STILL BULK BILLING

skin checks for pensioners, healthcare card holders, DVA & & over 75’s

EARSCOPE now available at Rosebud Skin Cancer Centre Book an appointment

Call 5986 1600

Experienced professional skin cancer doctors all awarded by the College of Skin Cancer. Dr Sally Shaw, Fellow SCCANZ and Dr Mary Tai Kie, Fellow SCCANZ.

1079 Point Nepean Road, Rosebud

Ph: 5986 1600 www.rosebudskincancercentre.com.au

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 11


SCHNAPPER POINT ˜ THE ROCKS MORNINGTON ˜ MORNINGTON PIER

MOTHERS BEACH

MORNINGTON FORESHORE RESERVE

˜ MORNINGTON GOLFING CLUB

CITY

H

IP ILL

BAY

TANTI CREEK

˜ POLICE STATION MORNINGTON CINEMA ˜ MORNINGTON SHIRE ˜ MORNINGTON LIBRARY ˜ ˜ TARGET

COUNTRY LY RK BA

ET TRE IN S MA

POR

T

P

ADE ESPLAN

EET STR

˜ MORNINGTON CENTRAL ˜ MORVEN MANOR RETIREMENT COMMUNITY ˜ POST OFFICE ˜ COLES

MORNINGTON BOWLS CLUB ˜

TALLIS PARK ˜ PENINSULA HOME SHOPPING CENTRE & ALDI SUPERMARKET

PHARMACY ˜

WILSON RESERVE

AN PE E N

AY W GH I H

MORNINGTON BUN GOW ER R PENINSULA OAD GRANGE

˜ INFORMATION CENTRE

NARAMBI RESERVE

FOSSIL BEACH

WETLANDS FLINDERS PARK

DE ANA ESPL

DALLAS BROOKS PARK

MOR NING TON -TYA BB R OAD

PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News 17 July 2019

RACECOURSE GRANGE AGED CARE

PENINSULA GRANGE ˜ AGED CARE ROA D

AN PE NE

AY W H G HI

RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

MORNINGTON RACECOURSE

RAC ECO URS E

ES PL AN AD E

˜ LILO CAFE

ALEXANDRA PARK

ET TRE IN S MA

FISHERMANS BEACH

˜ THE BAYS HOSPITAL

UE EN I AV NT TA

EET STR LY K R BA

WINERIES


Southern Peninsula

property

PREMIER POSITION PAGE 3

WEDNESDAY, 17 JULY 2019

SAFETY BEACH, DROMANA, McCRAE, ROSEBUD, CAPEL SOUND, RYE, BLAIRGOWRIE, SORRENTO, PORTSEA

Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au. Be seen everywhere.


Capel Sound 18 The Helm

Rosebud 95 Foam Street

Hidden Hideaway In Tightly Held Locale.

Secluded Delight.

* Located in a sought after position on a low-maintenance 356m2 allotment * Built-in robes to both bedrooms * Open plan living and dining area with air-conditioning and a gas wall heater * Light filled kitchen * Single garage * Outdoor under cover entertaining overlooking fully fenced backyard

Set back from the street behind a shaded front garden is this delightful cottage on a 530sqm (approx.) lot. The home offers an open plan living and dining area with floor to ceiling windows allowing for plenty of natural light. The updated kitchen has a gas stove top, large pantry and great benchtop space, while the sleek bathroom is fully tiled and has a walk in shower and separate toilet. Master bedroom with WIR and a pretty sunroom could be a third bedroom.

2

1

FOR SALE PRICE GUIDE $451,000 - $489,500 INSPECT As advertised

1

3

Barry Plant Rosebud 5986 8880

nicholscrowder.com.au

mpnews.com.au

PRICE GUIDE $480,000 - $520,000 INSPECT As advertised

5 & 7 Beach Street, Dromana

Extraordinary Retail Investment

9775 1535

CONTACT Paul Cunnington 0457 047 962 Tullie Roberts 0432 281 566 Barry Plant Rosebud 5986 8880

For Lease

Thursday 8th August 2019 at 12noon on site 11 Thompson Street Frankston

Occupy by the Beach

Rental return of $126,798pa Net

The Bounty Shop has traded here for 30 years! * Commercial 1 Zone Land area: 658m2 *

1

FOR SALE

CONTACT Clare Black 0409 763 261 Craig Leo 0412 502 938

Auction

Excellent secure tenant on new lease

1

Building area: 720m2 * *approx.

Linda Ellis 0400 480 397 1 Colemans Road, Carrum Downs, 3201

5 Beach Street: Building area 172m2*

7 Beach Street: Building area 300m2*

Land area: 803m2*

Land area: 693m2*

Single level office/shop/medical

Two level office with amenities

Front and rear car parking

First floor boardroom/training room

Private office suites with staff amenity

Rear car parking

5925 6005 nicholscrowder.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

Jamie Stuart 0412 565 562 Tanya Scagliarini 0438 289 859 4/230 Main Street, Mornington VIC 3931 SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

TURN YOUR EVERYDAY INTO SOMETHING SPECIAL BUYERS seeking a seaside lifestyle in a boutique build will not be disappointed with this luxurious townhouse on the cusp of Main Street. Recently completed, the stunning double storey home is easy walking distance to the quaint shops and bustling cafes and restaurants of Main Street, with Mornington’s renowned beaches not far away. Designed by Little Brick Studio and displaying premium fixtures and fittings that set an excellent standard for creativity and style, the splendid interior showcases a lavish open plan design with high ceilings that greatly accentuate the sense of space to vast main living area. Creating an excellent flow, the design integrates the superb internal and external zones perfectly, and the lashings of natural light that spills through the glass sliding doors to fill the space is always a welcome natural addition. There are three bedrooms; the larger downstairs master bedroom is complete with ensuite and walk-in robe, whilst two more bedrooms upstairs both have built-in robes and share the main bathroom with freestanding bath. A spectacular kitchen is highlighted by Calcutta stone-topped benches, beautifully complemented by Smeg appliances that include an oven with 900-millimetre cook top and undermount range hood, plus a dishwasher. Adding to your everyday convenience there is a downstairs powder room and to keep things comfortable throughout the seasons there is ducted heating and split system air-conditioning. Externally, the property is equally impressive with two alfresco decks, and being at the front of the block, their is your own driveway leading up to a double garage with internal access. Boasting a 6 star energy rating, this sensational as new property affords buyers the flexibility of either a glamorous permanent residence or the perfect low-maintenance peninsula getaway.n

HOME ESSENTIALS

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

ADDRESS: 1/33 MacDonald Grove, MORNINGTON FOR SALE: $950,000 - $1,000,000 DESCRIPTION: 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car INSPECT: By Appointment AGENT: Joel Hood 0402 703 236, Joel Hood Property, 311 Main Street, Mornington, 5971 0300 mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 3


INTRODUCING

W AT E R F A L L G A R D E N S ROSEBU D

Photo is indicative only.

A boutique community of luxury, 2 & 3 bedroom single level homes. These residences, in the heart of an established neighbourhood in Rosebud, set the scene for a new enclave of luxurious living.

All homes feature:

• • • • •

Premium finishes including stone benchtops Quality appliances Master with WIR & ensuite 6 star energy rating Low maintenance living

Combining cosmopolitan inner-city styling with a sublime coastal setting, located opposite Bay Views Golf Course and only a short drive to Rosebud beach.

Development by:

From $539,000.

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N P L E AS E C O N TAC T:

Robert Bowman: 0417 173 103 robert@bowmanandcompany.com.au

Darren Sadler: 0448 947 622 darren.sadler@granger.com.au

69-77 Hove Road & 59 Fairway Grove, Rosebud

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


D L O S Making waves across the Peninsula

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 5


Darren Sadler

0448 947 622

Thinking of renting your home? n

n

12 properties leased in 6 weeks Less than 1% vacancy rate

Call Jess now to find out more

Jess Rollins

0433 215 257 Amanda Kaye

0408 888 607

Another fantastic result..

SOLD

114 Boneo Road, Capel Sound SOLD at auction 8% over reserve!

114 Boneo Road, Capel Sound

4

$446,000

2

An OIdie But A Goodie n n

Two residences on the block; each with two bedrooms and a bathroom Huge potential n Rental expectation: $250 per week

12 Barry Street, Tootgarook $690,000 - $740,000

3

2

Living In The ‘70’s n n

Showcasing and inviting 1970s charm n Three bedrooms plus study 767sqm (approx.) block n Carport plus huge 6-car garage

7

Amanda will guide you through the whole process with expert tips on presentation and readying your property for sale. Her negotiating skills produce fantastic results over and over again as she goes above and beyond for her vendors. We have plenty of buyers waiting, so if you are thinking of selling please call Amanda

Amanda Kaye 0408 888 607 granger.com.au

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 6


Steve Granger

0488 333 117

27 Somerset Place, Safety Beach $745,000 - $780,000

3

2

2

Set on Somerset - PRICED TO SELL Two living areas New carpet n Ducted heating n Double lock-up garage n 702m2 block (approx.) n n

Steve Granger

0488 333 117

granger.com.au

THINKING OF SELLING? Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au.

Be seen everywhere. mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 7


James Martin Licensed Estate Agent

mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 8


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Queensland can show the way on hiding towers I should like to draw everyone’s attention to how they circumvent the environmental blots of telecommunications towers in Queensland (“Towering ‘threat’ to green wedge” The News 9/7/19). Given that the authorities have responded to the need for better telecommunications on the Mornington Peninsula, why isn’t the spirit of a compromise reached? The banana benders secrete their towers under appropriate palm leaves and, on the Gold Coast, quite a few coconut trees are subtly wrapped around with recyclable polyurethane branches, trunks, leaves and fronds. Surely Mornington Peninsula Shire’s planners could encourage a sensible camouflaging to appease all stakeholders and show their genuine sustainability by insisting that recyclable material is used. Obviously, nuts aren’t appropriate at Shoreham, so perhaps some eucalyptus varieties could be used to disguise the tower. My experience with the Gold Coast towers was that you soon couldn’t tell the wood from the trees, or something like that. Granted that there is a cost but, really, it is up to all concerned to weigh the pros and cons and show an initiative to be the envy of the greenies and tree huggers. Ian Morrison, public officer, South Eastern Centre for Sustainability

‘Runaway’ warming Henry Broadbent (who I now regard as being a spokesperson for the climate change deniers of Australia) doesn’t make much sense in his contribution to the debate on human induced global warming (“Bad physics” Letters 10/7/19). He doesn’t seem to understand that the increase in atmospheric CO2 in our atmosphere is one of the major reasons heat is being trapped in our atmosphere and biosphere and eventually will

lead to runaway global warming. This global warming at an unprecedented speed in the earth’s history, combined with earth’s ever increasing population, will lead to the total destruction of animal and plant life and their ability to adjust to the new normal of a much hotter world. So let’s not pander to the likes of Mr Broadbent and get on with some meaningful global reductions in CO2 and other dangerous climate change inducing substances to at least give our planet’s life forms a chance of adjusting to the new normal over a little longer period. Our children and grandchildren will then have a little better chance of having a future. Rupert Steiner, Balnarring beach

Correction required I shouldn’t need to correct Peter Davis’s comment that the Peninsula Aero Club is “nonCASA regulated” to operate Tyabb airfield (“Airfield needs social licence to operate” Letters 2/7/19). It always has been under CASA regulations since the flying school started and, as a former secretary of the club, Mr Davis seems to have a convenient memory loss. Also, the need for a master plan cannot be completed until the noise survey is handed to the club by Mornington Peninsula Shire Council. Oh well, never let the truth get in the way of a good story. Peter Bernardi, immediate past president Peninsula Aero Club

It could be worse In reply to David and Katrina Chalke: me, disingenuous (“Tyabb airfield’s problems are very down to earth” Letters 9/7/19)? I was merely stating facts, but I did get one thing wrong in my last letter when I stated that PAC may have owned four aircraft; I have since learned that

it currently owns just one aircraft (“Shire is to blame” Letters 2/7/19). If the other 180 odd aircraft happen to be privately or company owned, so what? Just because they are has nothing to do with the PAC as long as their owners pay the required charges. This has always been the case, as it also is at every other airfield in Australia, whether privately or publicly owned. How individual aircraft owners use their aircraft is nobody else’s business. The Chalkes, along with the other protesters of the airfield, seem to think that Tyabb is their own private little patch. Well it ain’t, and as I have previously stated, the airfield was there long before they were and the fact that they chose to come there knowing full well of the airfield’s existence, does not give them any more right to be there than anyone else, including those at the airfield, so maybe they need to look at what they may be doing to disturb others. In any case, they are damned lucky that the airfield, as it is, is there and not something much larger. Back in the 1970s Lysaghts had plans for an 8000ft sealed runway beside its steel works at Hastings to fly executives and VIPs in and out using Learjets. These plans changed when the former Hastings Shire Council managed to convince the company to use Tyabb instead, with smaller prop driven aircraft. How would the protesters like to now have that in their back yards? Cam Care, Mornington

A truce, of sorts I appreciate the apology issued to me by Michael G Free (“Establishing credentials” Letters 3/7/19). Thank you Michael, it was an innocent assumption that can be made by anyone, so an apology was unnecessary. I was more interested in your fine list of community activities. I’m sure that you get great satisfaction, as I do, from doing something that benefits other people in your area and surrounds. I look forward to further jousts with you in this column. John Cain, McCrae

NBN fallout The NBN project cost jumped from the Liberal Party’s estimated $29.5 billion before the 2013 federal election to $46-56 billion afterwards. In 2016, the NBN Co said it was on target for $49 billion but, by late 2018, the estimated final cost was $51 billion - and still counting. Our ranking is far below economic greats like Bulgaria, Pakistan, Kenya, Thailand and some other un-notables. We now have people suggesting that this government should design and manage nuclear power plants. Based on a hyperbolically motivated nonsource: “there have been many secret meetings that have identified four sites for nuclear power plants and suitable contractors. They have already been given names Chernobyl #2,3,4 and 5”. Joe Lenzo, Safety Beach

Samanthas mixed up I write regarding your story “Blankets to cover sensory needs”. The participant in the work for the dole project at Hastings Community Hub, who grew in confidence and ability from partaking in creating delightful, sensory quilts for people with dementia and high support disability needs, was Samantha Hutteroth, not myself. Samantha Hutteroth worked tirelessly on many quilts and pillows that have been donated to Somercare, The Bays and Peninsula Health care centres over the past six months. She was very creative, often donating her own items to embellish the textiles with, for sensory stimulation. It was a privilege to meet and work with Samantha Hutteroth. Her work ethic and dedication to serving our community on the Hastings Community Contribution Project was exceptional. I only supervise the project and took great joy in delivering the items to residents at the local care centres. The work of Samantha Hutteroth is cause for us to celebrate the benefits of such projects as this, for all involved. Samantha Knowles, work for the dole supervisor, Advance, Hastings Community Hub

100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Councillors’ dispute - Crs. Hoare and Oates shake hands Compiled by Cameron McCullough THE stage was arranged at Seaford last Saturday night for a wordy warfare between Councillors Oates and Hoare. The subject of dispute was the pipe culvert in Station Street, across the much-abused Kananook Creek. Hostilities opened some weeks ago, when. Cr. Hoare took Cr. Oates to task through the columns of the “Standard.” Cr. Oates’ reply was a challenge to Cr. Hoare to meet him on the public platform at Seaford to debate the matter. Cr. Oates duly appeared at Seaford on the date arranged, and in the absence of Cr. Hoare, who had not advised him of his inability to be present, at the request of the meeting addressed the ratepayers. A vote of confidence in Cr. Oates was carried. On that occasion Mr. Howell, who was elected chairman, informed the meeting that he had heard that Cr. Hoare was ill, but had received no direct or official intimation from Cr. Hoare himself. The next act was a notification from Cr. Hoare to Cr. Oates inviting the latter to attend at Seaford on Saturday evening last. Contrary to expectations, the attendance of the public was not large, although several new faces were noticed. Cr. Hoare was early in attendance, and he was supported by Messrs. Wilson (erstwhile secretary of the Seaford Progress Association) and Bailey. Cr. Oates arrived on his grey horse several minutes after 8 o’clock. He

was late. He had been to the football match at Balnarring that day, and as one of the passengers of the stranded char-a-banc until a passing motor car picked him up and a delivered him in Frankston, safe, but wet through and very cold. Here he obtained a few biscuits, by way of dinner, and, procuring his trusty steed, set off for Seaford. The chief contestants met in no friendly spirit. Too much had been written and spoken prior to the meeting to allow any show of cordiality. It is, therefore, all the more noteworthy to record that, before the meeting was concluded, they had shaken hands in token of friendship restored. This happy result was brought about by the resolution moved by Mr. Matarana, and seconded by Mr. Wiltshire, to the effect that Crs. Oates and Hoare and Mr. Wilson be asked to shake hands, and manfully put all differences behind them. This was carried unanimously, and on the chairman putting the position to the contestants, Crs Oates and Hoare stepped forward, and, amid much applause clasped hands. Mr. Wilson and Cr. Oates did likewise. Everyone seemed pleased, and the chairman particularly so. He urged those present to let the dead past bury its dead, and remarked, incidentally, that Kananook Creek was bad enough at any time, without any special stirring up. (Laughter.) *** AN open court will be held at the Council Chambers, Somerville on Friday, 25th inst at 10.30 am to revise the voters lists and separate voters lists for

the Shire of Frankston and Hastings. *** MR William Armstrong, who has sold his property at Seaford has instructed Messrs Brody and Mason to sell his household furnishings, stock, implements etc. The sale will take place on the premises on Thursday, 7th August commencing at 12 noon. Full particulars appear in advertisement. *** REV E. Tonkin left last Friday, on a three weeks Home Mission Deputation Tour in the Northern part of Victoria. Mr George Sargent, who is on the permanent deputation staff will exchange with him for that time. Mr Sargent conducted the service in the Frankston Methodist Church last Sunday evening. *** THE Wattle Club held a most successful euchre party at Frankston last Thursday night. Mrs Burton (Burton and Law) presented a decorated cake for the lady’s prize and was won by Miss Jones. The Gents prize was won by Mr Hartland. The club would be glad to receive gifts suitable for prizes. *** MR J. Peebles recently disposed of his Model Dairy business to his soldier son and another returned man (Mr Strong) – now trading as Peebles and Strong. This transaction did not embrace the well-known dairy and produce shop at the top of Bay Street, Frankston. This week the announcement appears in our advertising columns

that Mr A. N. Challender, also a late member A.I.F., has purchased this department of the business. Mr Challender in soliciting a share of the liberal patronage bestowed on his predecessor and intends maintaining the high reputation already enjoyed by the establishment. He undertakes to keep the best of goods and charge very reasonable rates. Messrs Peebles and Strong, above referred to, have in addition to the Model Dairy bought out Mr Taylor of the Frankston Dairy and will in future connect their business on the promises of the latter. *** MISS Mackay, postmistress, at Frankston, has been granted three months sick leave. Miss Mackay is suffering from nervous breakdown, attributed to overwork. Her many friends will wish her a speedy recovery. *** HIS many friends were pleased to see Private Hammond back in Frankston the other day, and the hope has been expressed that he will reestablish the tailoring business he carried on so successfully in the town prior to the outbreak of war. Private Hammond had charge of the Frankston Brass Band in the pre-war days and under his able conductorship players took a keen interest in their work and their performances were rapidly reaching a point of marked excellence. Mr Hammond is an enthusiastic bandsman and if he decided to again reside in the district it would not be long before the Frankston Brass

Band was once again an institution of prominence. *** PRIVATE Alf. C. Berry, returned recently after 4½ years of active service abroad. Like many men who have travelled far and seen much, he was very modest in relating his share of the great battle in which he was in charge of a Lewis machine gun. He made very light of the hardships he endured, such as having been unable to speak for months, and working the whole time. He entertains a very high opinion of the English people for their methods and their fine qualities. The Belgians were so grateful to his battalion for their release that many offered their beds to the soldiers. Private Barry was severely wounded at Gallipoli and gassed in France. While practically an invalid he was in charge of the Correspondence Bureau of the Southern Command, England and Orderly-room Sergeant until the armistice was signed. He was passed for training as a Commissioned officer at Queen’s college when the armistice was signed, so the lad who went out in his 18th year just missed the coveted honor of a Commission. Private Berry speaks in warm admiration of the soldierly qualities which distinguish General Brand, and mentioned as a fact the first care of that officer was the welfare of his troops adding he always endeavoured to have a dry bed for his soldiers. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 19 July 1919

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 21


MELBOURNE MINI GARAGE

PAGE 22 Southern Peninsula News 17 July 20192 J19-3603-MP_Competition_MPNG_375x263_190619_F.indd

20/06/2019 11:26 AM


PUZZLE ZONE

ACROSS 1. Tycoons 5. ... & papa 7. Girl’s plaything 8. Fluid losses 9. Groaned 12. Funeral vehicles 15. Recently amended 19. Stinging insect

21. Ready to explode 22. Manufactured 23. Actor, ... Nolte 24. Re-evaluate

DOWN 1. Computer phone links 2. Synthetic fabric 3. Laid ceramic squares 4. Document fastener 5. More miserly 6. Valuable possessions 10. Corrosive substance 11. Let out (shriek)

12. Owned 13. Lowest female voice 14. Imminently 15. Irregular 16. Assail 17. Weirder 18. Says 19. ‘Laughing’ scavenger 20. Elevated walkways

Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 27 for solutions.

THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

The Bee Gee Paralysis Paradox By Stuart McCullough I WAS caught off guard. Or, at least, I hope I was; because little else could excuse my hopelessly inadequate response. In retrospect, the warning signs were all there – it was a party, there was a band and there was both a dance floor and a pretty significant expectation that guests would use it. The band even went so far as to play music of the danceable variety as opposed to – say – Nick Cave or Captain Beefheart covers. To borrow the words of the brothers Gibb; ‘You should be dancing, yeah (shang-anang!)’. I ought to have known better. Everything had been going so well up to that point. My wife and I had been invited to a party our neighbours were throwing and, in a twist, we’d actually turned up. There were drinks, nibbles and people. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that the evening had all the makings of a very successful event. At a certain point, some folks picked up musical instruments, began to play them and, amazingly, were playing the same song. I believe this type of synchronized approach to making music is often referred to as a ‘band’. They were very good. We weren’t the only ones enjoying their work. Other people were nodding, cheering and generally encouraging them; willing them to scale ever-greater musical heights. This, of course, is at complete odds with my own experience making music; where the world at large unites in begging me to stop. Perhaps this accounts for just how deeply surprised I was – it never occurred to me that such support was possible. My mouth was agape. This proved useful when, intermittently, I stuffed an olive or a pretzel in there but otherwise made me look more like the slack-jawed hillbilly I really am. I admit, my toes were tapping but, otherwise, I was completely immobile. It was as though someone had nailed my feet to the floor, not with a

regular run of the mill hammer, but a tradesman quality hydraulic nail gun that can send titanium nails inches deep into granite. If it’d been MC Hammer, I would have been all right. I was also holding a drink, which I pretty much consider to be the ultimate insurance policy against having to do anything active. Clutching a beverage is the definitive excuse against having to do something that may pose a threat to your drink. A child asks you to play a game? Only once I’ve finished my cup of tea. A friend asks you to run a half-marathon? No thanks, I’m half way through a glass of orange juice and I really want to savour the experience. It’s surprising how useful it is to have a drink nearby at all times. There are, however, limits.

In a paper, rock, scissors universe, your spouse trumps pretty much everything. Especially a beverage. When my wife turned to me and asked if I wanted to dance, what I should have said was ‘but of course!’ Instead, I feebly pointed to my drink as though I was handcuffed to it, unable to rest it even for a moment, lest its safety should be compromised. It was completely ineffectual and I was in some serious trouble. Suddenly, my entire dancing life flashed before my eyes. Let me say that my people are not a dancing people. There was no dancing in our house as we grew up. Truth is, we struggle to clap in time. The only dancing that ever occurred was really for comedic effect. My father would do something that loosely resembled dancing when

listening to his all time favourite song – ‘Sink the Bismarck’. He’d lift his fists up and down as though pumping water from a sinking boat which, given the song, may well have been appropriate. Then there was my brother’s all-too brief career as a hip-hop dancer. After a few lessons at the Tyabb Town Hall with an instructor named ‘Maggot’ (which I deeply suspect was his real name), he briefly considered a career as a rap dancer. Ultimately, though, it’s tough going to do a backspin on gravel, even with a layer of high-quality cardboard on top. My own dancing career is far less storied than that of either my father or brother. Most of the time, I am painfully aware of my limitations as a dancer. They are, put simply, profound. However, under just the right circumstances, I can be persuaded to get, if not on the good foot, then on the not quite so good foot and shake my groove thing. Sadly, the right circumstance generally involves a skin-full of something other than lemon squash. I appreciate that this is less than ideal. I should have been prepared. In the instant I was asked, I ought to have put my drink to the side and followed her out to the dance floor, disco pistols at the ready. It makes me wonder what I’m afraid of. Embarrassment? If I perform the ‘Sink the Bismarck’ or attempt a backspin, maybe, but otherwise there’s nothing to be embarrassed about. Inadequacy? I have no plans to turn professional, so not being good enough isn’t a problem. Then what? Next time I’ll do better. There’ll be no hesitation. No resistance. No turning back. I’ll move like Jagger, albeit the post-heart surgery version. On this occasion, however, I couldn’t quite bring myself to dance. I was only saved when the band announced that, for the rest of the evening, they’d be playing an assortment of Nick Cave and Captain Beefheart covers. stuart@stuartmccullough.com Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 23


AWE-INSPIRING AUGUST AT FAC CUBE 37, Frankston Arts Centre’s versatile events and exhibition space, will be hosting a number of independent theatre pieces that will leave you in awe this August. Featuring the finest performers and a variety of shows to choose from – comedy, drama or dance – step out of your comfort zone for an out-of-the-box theatre experience at Cube 37. There’s no need to travel to the inner city to get your fill of thought-provoking and entertaining new shows. It’s right here in Frankston! First up will be The Travelling Sisters – Lucy Fox, Laura Trenerry and Ell Sachs – who are insane geniuses of sketch comedy. Combining physical comedy, contemporary clown and original music, the trio conjure up bizarre worlds of tragically charming characters. Next up is Swansong, the story of Occi Byrne, an illegitimate child of a single mother in the Catholic west of Ireland. This gripping drama will speak to anyone who has ever felt like and outsider, who has ever been denied a voice. A Room of One’s Own will celebrate the beautiful literacy and conceptual genius of Virginia Woolf, one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. Rounding off a month of fantastic theatre will be 100 Years of the History of Dance as Told by One Man in 60 Minutes with an Energetic Group Finale – yes, that’s the name of the show – in which Joseph Simons will recreate some of the most influential choreographic moments of the last century. Tickets are $30-$40 and can be booked online on thefac.com.au, over the phone on 03 9784 1060 or in person at Frankston Arts Centre. The best bit? Get a 10% discount when you purchase tickets to three or more shows from the Cube 37 2019 Season program.

6-12 YEARS

$21

REVOLTING RHYMES & DIRTY BEASTS Thursday 22 August, 11am & 6pm

CARUSO TO CARRERAS: THE GREAT TENORS Friday 16 August, 10.30am & 1.30pm

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Roy Best, one of Australia’s finest tenors, will perform classic hits from the likes of Pavarotti, Bocelli, Lanza, Domingo, Caruso and Carreras.

Tickets: 03 9784 1060 or thefac.com.au PAGE 24

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

Tickets: 03 9784 1060 | thefac.com.au


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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Pythons a game clear on top DIVISION ONE

By Brodie Cowburn DROMANA have picked up an impressive win over Sorrento in front of their home crowd on Saturday. Dromana have looked right at home in division one this season, but faced a tough test in Sorrento. Last year’s grand finalists came to Dromana Recreation Reserve looking to prove that they are a good chance of doing one better and winning the flag in 2019. Dromana at home has proved to be a tough test for all sides who visit this year, but Sorrento looked well and truly comfortable in the first quarter. A stunning six goals to zero start saw the Sharks race out to an early 41 point lead. Faced with a mountain of work, Dromana battled hard to claw their way back into the contest. They held Sorrento to just one behind in the second term, and closed the gap to two goals by the time the half time break rolled around. Sorrento had another tough time in the third quarter, and again failed to register a goal. Dromana cut the lead back to nine points going into the final term, and were able to ride their wave of momentum with a big last quarter. A five goals to one fourth quarter saw Dormana finally hit the lead, and put the Sharks away. Sorrento let a brilliant start slip, and will be disappointed to have not come away with the four points. The final score read Dromana 10.14 (74) to Sorrento 7.16 (58). Sam Fowler booted four goals for the Tigers. With Sorrento taking a loss, a win for

Pines would put them a game clear on top of the ladder. The Pythons played host to Bonbeach at Eric Bell Reserve on Saturday. Pines got off to a perfect start in front of their home crowd, starting brilliantly with a five goals to zero opening quarter. From there the Sharks struggled to bite back, and were playing catch up all afternoon. Bonbeach could do nothing to chip the lead back, and trailed by 49 points at three-quarter-time. They ended up losing to Pines 10.14 (74) to 5.8 (38). The Pythons had an even spread of goal kickers on the day, with eight players getting on the scoreboard. Guy Hendry was named as their best. At John Coburn Oval, Frankston YCW got the better of the Frankston Bombers in a scrappy affair. Both sides traded blows in an even first quarter, before the Stonecats ran away to a three goal lead by half time The Bombers clawed their way back in their third term, and trailed by just a point at three-quarter time. The Stonecats made the better of the difficult conditions in the last quarter though, and ran away with an 8.9 (57) to 6.5 (41) win. Ryley Hodson kicked two goals and was named among YCW’s best. The win helps the inconsistent Stonecats get their year back on track. They currently sit in fifth place, equal on points with Rosebud and a game behind Bonbeach in fourth. At Olympic Park, Rosebud struggled badly in tough conditions against Edithvale-Aspendale. They scored just one goal across the first three quarters of the match.

Pines prevail: Eight goal kickers contributed to the Pythons’ win over Bonbeach. Picture: Andrew Hurst

A better final quarter helped the Buds keep the scoreline respectable, but they could not do enough to make it close. The final score read Rosebud 3.5 (23) to Edithvale-Aspendale 6.5 (41). At Alexandra Park, Mornington’s hopes of avoiding relegation were

dealt a blow when they were defeated by Mt Eliza. The Redlegs started well and had the Bulldogs on the backfoot early. They led by 5 goals at the halftime break and were in control. Mornington scored just one goal in

the first half, and were much better in the second. Although the Bulldogs improved, they could not do enough to close the gap. Mt Eliza defeated Mornington 6.10 (46) to 9.13 (67). The Bulldogs remain rooted to the bottom of the ladder.

Hillmen held goalless by Bulls DIVISION TWO

By Brodie Cowburn THE top of the table clash between Red Hill and Karingal has ended triumphantly for the Bulls, as the Hillmen were held goalless in miserable conditions. Red Hill Recreation Reserve was pummelled by harsh conditions throughout the day, leaving players fighting through the mud all afternoon. The Bulls had their struggles too, and only managed two goals of their own in the first half. Karingal led by ten points at half time. Red Hill had only managed to register two behinds by the main break. After half time the scrappy contest continued, as Karingal extended their lead with another two goals. Red Hill were poor in the tough conditions, and when the final siren sounded they had failed to hit the scoreboard with a goal. The final score was Red Hill 0.3 (3) to Karingal 6.4 (40). On the road against Tyabb, Hastings worked hard and got a good victory. The Blues were boosted by the addition of Brendan Fevola, who kicked nine goals last weekend. The first half of the contest was tightly contested, with Hastings leading by less than a goal at each break of play, The margin blew out in the third quarter, and the Blues ran away with it. Despite good early efforts from the

PAGE 26

Southern Peninsula News

Yabbies, they eventually succumbed to defeat to Hastings 5.9 (39) to 9.12 (66). Luke Hewitt booted three goals for the Blues in a best on ground performance. Fevola chipped in with one. Chelsea, playing at home, let a final quarter lead slip and were defeated by Langwarrin. The Seagulls started poorly and were restricted to just one goal in the first half. The Kangaroos were not much better, and put three goals on the board before the main break. Chelsea were the better side in the third quarter and took a narrow two point lead into the final break. In tough conditions at home, they could not hold on and were eventually overrun by Langwarrin. The final siren sounded with Langwarrin up by seven. The final score was Chelsea 4.3 (27) to 4.10 (34). At Belvedere Reserve, Seaford struggled at home against Somerville. Somerville were inaccurate in the wet and kicked 3.8 in the first half, but still held a two goal lead at halftime. Seaford couldn’t capitalise on Somerville’s misfortune in front of goal. The Tigers eventually lost 3.8 (26) to 5.16 (46). Kane McKenzie was named as Somerville’s best. At RJ Rowley Reserve, Rye scored an easy win over Crib Point. The Magpies struggled in the wet and were restricted to just one goal in the first half. Rye were impressive all day, and secured all four points with a 12.16 (88) to 5.6 (36) win. Despite the win they 17 July 2019

still sit three games outside of a finals berth. At Glover Reserve, Pearcedale failed to get their second win of the year against Devon Meadows. Devon Meadows impressed from

the get go, and were easily in control with an eight goals to two first half. The final scoreboard read Devon Meadows 15.9 (99) to Pearcedale 6.7 (43). Joel Hillis was Devon Meadow’s best, booting seven goals.

Mud bath: Red Hill had a miserable day in the wet, going down to Karingal without posting a major score in four quarters. Picture: Andrew Hurst


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS scoreboard

Major milestone for ‘Green Machine’ SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie RECORD-breaking Somerville Eagles playercoach David Greening reached a remarkable landmark last weekend when he passed the 1000goal career milestone. His first goal in senior competition was for Isle of Wight club Brading Town as a 15-year-old in September 1996 and he’s been scoring for fun ever since. He arrived in Melbourne in February 2010 and has been the main man up front for Latrobe University, Seaford United, Casey Comets, Rosebud Heart and now Somerville and his scoring feats in senior Victorian ranks are legendary. He returned from suspension on Saturday and started on the bench in Somerville’s 4-1 home win over Pakenham United in their State 5 clash at Somerville Secondary College. It took a while for the Eagles to get going but after Carlo Cardoso, Eric Manhanong and Nathan Grimshaw forced Pakenham keeper Harry Webber into a string of fine saves, the deadlock was broken in the 43rd minute when the in-form Callum Richardson deflected Manhanong’s inswinging corner into goal. The Eagles flew out of the blocks in the second half and doubled their lead in the 47th minute when fine play from Grimshaw and Joel Wade set up Richardson for a tap-in. Pakenham hit back in the 75th minute with a superb free-kick from Edvin Trakosevic. Greening had replaced Charlie Conrath in the 68th minute and the historic moment in this contest came in the 81st minute when the man dubbed “The Green Machine” finished in his customary clinical style after a superb pass from Manhanong. Fellow substitute Louis Griffiths grabbed his first senior goal of 2019 when he finished from close range in the 87th minute. Greening reflected on his achievement later that evening when he posted on the club’s facebook page. “When I left the UK over 10 years ago I never thought that reaching 1000 goals was possible especially when I found out I’d be playing 22game seasons as opposed to more than 50 games a season that I’d been used to but I’ve managed to get there eventually and it’s a very special moment for me,” Greening said. Curiously though when the moment came none of the Somerville players celebrated with him as they were unaware of the goal’s significance and Greening was booked for lifting up his shirt during his goal celebration. “I know I haven’t always been my manager’s cup of tea and opposition supporters and players alike always let me know about it but thanks for the banter and bruises over the years as that’s always driven me on.” Greening’s next goal for Somerville will be his 50th for the club and 300th in Australia. He is chasing what is believed to be an unprecedented 10th straight league Golden Boot award but faces stiff competition from White Star Dandenong ace Christopher L’Enclume and Rannesh Krishnan of title challenger Old Mentonians.

days. Teenagers Aiden McKenna and Noah Green (ex-Langwarrin) made their full senior debuts. The seniors’ bench included 15-year-old Daniel Taylor, 16-year-old Adam Ford and 17-yearold Kam Ismail while Ryan Petrucci from the under-15s played a full game in the reserves. “Given the circumstances we did remarkably well against the best side in the competition,” Pines senior coach Kevin “Squizzy” Taylor said. In State 4 South news Seaford United had its biggest loss of the season when going down 4-0 away to Endeavour United last weekend. Harry McCartney reports that the game was switched to an artificial pitch and Seaford never came to terms with the surface turning in its worst display of 2019. Endeavour was 2-0 up after seven minutes thanks to Daniel Milne and Cooper Andrews and in the first 10 minutes of the second half an Ifeoluwa Ogidan brace put the home side out of reach. Meanwhile Baxter had to settle for a point away from home when it drew 1-1 with Dingley Stars last Saturday. Baxter was the better side in the first half with Nico Juric having a 25-metre shot cleared off the line while Lawrence Komba and Lewis Gibson also went close. Baxter keeper James Foster was much more active in the second period and pulled off some great saves. Komba should have opened the scoring in the 70th minute when he was put through only to be denied by superb goalkeeping from Dingley’s Josh Green. In the 81st minute Dingley fashioned an excellent move down the right and a pinpoint cross was headed home by Dallas McNeil. Baxter hit back five minutes later when substitute Jordan Fernandes was brought down inside the area from a corner and Juric converted from the spot. In the end Baxter left Chadwick Reserve thinking that it should have claimed all three points. As we went to press NPL2 outfit Langwarrin was due to clash with Bulleen on Monday night. The Lawton Park club received good news recently when two of its under-15s, Jack McDonald and Kyle Eichenberger, made it through to the second stage of trials at Melbourne Victory beginning on 1 August. This weekend’s games: FRIDAY, 8.30pm: Doncaster Rovers v Peninsula Strikers (Anderson Park), Frankston Pines v Brighton (Monterey Reserve). SATURDAY, 3pm: Langwarrin v Springvale White Eagles (Lawton Park), Mornington v Caulfield Utd Cobras (Dallas Brooks Park), Middle Park v Skye Utd (Albert Park Field 16), Baxter v Endeavour Utd (Baxter Park), Seaford Utd v FC Noble Hurricanes (North Seaford Reserve), Aspendale Stingrays v White Star Dandenong (Jack Grut Reserve), Tullamarine v Somerville Eagles (Melrose Drive Reserve).

Goals galore: The man who can’t stop scoring, Somerville Eagles’ player-coach David Greening. Picture: John Punshon

“To be honest I think my chances of winning it again were lost in the five games I’ve missed this season but I’m proud to have won that honour 15 times all up as I won it six times in the UK.” In NPLW news US import Jennifer Lum made her debut for Southern in its 9-0 loss to Grand Final aspirant Bulleen at the Veneto Club on Sunday evening. Southern keeper Celia Kelsall and defender Erin Clout had fine games for the visitors while Margot Rabbine scored four goals in the opening 34 minutes. Southern’s under-19s lost 2-0 while the under16s went down 3-2 with Rhys McKenna scoring twice for Southern. The under-14s lost 4-0. Southern’s junior program has received a huge thumbs-up with news that Alex Jones from the under-16s has been selected for Victoria’s under-14 metro squad and will compete in the national championships at Coff’s Harbour this week. She’ll be joined by two other Southern products, midfielder Alessandra Davis (under-14s) and winger Candy Kilderry (under-15s), who are now part of the NTC program. Last weekend’s wild weather played havoc with the match schedule of four local clubs. The Mazenod v Mornington, Skye United v Elwood and the Aspendale Stingrays v Rosebud

Sudoku and crossword solutions

matches were all called off. The reserves match went ahead at Jack Grut Reserve on Saturday but was eventually called off after 85 minutes. There was a break in play due to a hailstorm and when the referee finally called a halt the Stingrays led Rosebud 14-0. Aspendale’s scorers were Ben Garside Weinert (5), John Athanassiou (3), Luiz Dobre (2), Justin Lampert (2), James Macnab and Lachlan Cetinich. In State 2 South-East news a Ryan Maylin goal in the 63rd minute was enough to give champion elect Boroondara-Carey Eagles all three points against Peninsula Strikers in a physical encounter at Carey Sports Complex last weekend. Boroondara’s Brennan Joaquin was sent off in the 67th minute after receiving a second yellow card and five of his teammates were booked. Strikers threw everything at the home side after the send-off but couldn’t finish their chances. “I wasn’t disappointed with the effort but dissatisfied that we didn’t at least walk away with a point,” Strikers’ gaffer Danny Verdun said. In State 3 South-East news Frankston Pines lost 3-0 away to league leader Collingwood City last Friday night. Pines had gone into the senior and reserves games with 19 players unavailable due to injury, illness, work commitments, a wedding and holi-

ROUND 16 S U N D AY J U LY 2 1

F R A N KSTO N V S CO L L I N G W O O D P L AY E D AT S KY B US STA D I U M AT 2 . 0 0 P M

ROUND 17

FRANKSTON FOOTBALL CLUB

S AT U R D AY J U LY 2 7

F R A N KSTO N VS W E R R I B E E P L AY E D AT AVA LO N A I R P O RT O VA L AT 2 . 0 0 P M

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 27


$21,999

$6,999

drive away

1 1 0 p/w

$

$6,999

drive away

3 5 p/w

HILUX EXTRA CAB 4X4

$8,499

$14,999

drive away

3 5 p/w

4 5 p/w

AWD TERRITORY GHIA 2013 FOCUS AUTO RANGER 4X4 XLT 3.2

2005 ford territory ghia AWD wagon finished in black with grey leather int ford focus trend Automatic full service history 5 door hatchback with air 2014ford ranger dual cab 4x4 automatic XLT 3.2 turbo diesel one front side head air bags roll over protection abs cruise traction control EBD con power windows abs multiple air bags traction EBD voice recognition owner full good history side steps nudge bar tow pack roof racks tinted brake assist power windows climate control alloy’s 1pu8sw Bluetooth audio cruise control aux usb inputs alloy’s zru964 glass rear hard lid $33999

$6,999

drive away

MAZDA 3 AUTO

7 5 p/w

2008 mazda 3 neo sport automatic air con power steering abs power 2007 holden astra CDX automatic 5 door hatch air conditioned power windows cruise control alloy wheels $8499 ywt136 steering front and side and head air bags electric windows power steering tinted glass factory alloy’s $6999 wrz743

$8,499

5 5 p/w

$

$

2000 mercedes –benze S 500 L top of the range comfort and style featuring amg wheels sunroof rear glass folding blind rear electric seats cooled and heated seats factory sat nav multiple air bags electric stability brake assist traction control abs cruise control park sensors climate control auto levelling suspension tinted glass service books only 140,000km. 1hg3xg

Ford TS territory SZ auto 7 seater multiple air bags cruise control abs brakes ebd traction control power windows $13999 zxi894

2010 kia grand carnival premium diesel 8 seater full leather multiple air bags rear dvd power side doors abs traction cruise power windows climate control service books $10999 xst901

$8,499

$9,999

$8,499

drive away

drive away

5 5 p/w

4 5 p/w

drive away

5 0 p/w

4 5 p/w

$

$

drive away

MERCEDES S500 LWB 2013 TERRITORY 7 SEATER DIESEL GRAND CARNIVAL

$10,499

drive away

$10,999

drive away

7 0 p/w

$

ASTRA AUTO CDX

$13,999

drive away

$

$

drive away

$

$

LEXUS RX330

$31,999

drive away

6 0 p/w

3 5 p/w

$

2012 toyota hilux tray 5 speed manual 4x4 SR 4 seats air con abs air 2003 lexus rx330 suv awd automatic climate control leather int bags cruise bluetooth audio tinted glass tow hitch bull bar with winch sunroof sat nav touch screen abs cruise traction control multiple air engineered lift kit factory snorkel alloy wheels side steps books zcr025 bags tints alloy’s tow pack $6999 1px3ns

$11,999

drive away

$

$

drive away

4 5 p/w

$

AUTO COROLLA ACCENT MONDEO WAGON TDCI FORESTER PREMIUM NISSAN X-TRIAL ST

MAZDA 6 LUXURY

2009 toyota corolla automatic 5 door hatch air conditioned power 2012 ford mondeo wagon turbo diesel finished in midnight sky 2008 subaru forester premium AWD full leather int power sunroof 2010 automatic nissan x-trail my10 T31 4wd wagon abs traction 2009 mazda 6 luxury sport turbo diesel 6 speed manual leather int windows abs brakes air bags power steering aux input automatic with abs cruise traction control multiple air bags park multiple air bags abs cruise traction EBD power windows alloy wheels control cruise power windows front and side air bags rear dvd tow climate control abs cruise traction control multiple air bags alloy’s service books $8499 yjw859 sensors tow pack roof racks low km with full history zdu913 $8499 sn 8976 pack tinted glass roof racks books ybu297 $8499 wyb081

$7,999

$7,499

drive away

3 5 p/w

$8,999

drive away

4 5 p/w

4 0 p/w

$

$7,499

drive away

4 0 p/w

$

$

$7,499

$7,999

drive away

3 0 p/w

4 0 p/w

$

$

2 0 p/w

CITROEN C3

Toyota commuter multi seat 5 speed 2.4 lt manual air conditioned 2008 citroen C4 Picasso turbo diesel 7 seater wagon good history 2003 CITROEN c3 5door automatic hatch back finished in black power steering tinted glass new Pirelli tyres drives very well sn8122 multiple air bags climate control abs traction cruise park sensors with grey int trim air conditioned power steering electric windows power windows alloy’s cd stacker reg ywc487 front and side air bags clean car reg xx0819

$5,999

drive away

drive away

$

$

TERRITORY 7 SEAT LPG AUTO FOCUS LOW KS TOYOTA COMMUTER CITROEN C4 HDI 7 SEATER

Ford territory dual fuel gas injection system 7 seater automatic finished 2007 ford focus LS automatic sedan air conditioned power windows in black with tinted glass tow hitch alloy’s abs brakes air bags service books power steering central locking $7499 wck107 cruise control $7999 reg uau 677

$3,999

drive away

drive away

3 0 p/w

4 0 p/w

MONDEO WAGON ONE OWNER VX SERIES 2 CERATO AUTO HATCH AUTO OUTLANDER

R E N TA C A R

drive away

$

$

2010 ford mondeo station wagon automatic air con cruise control abs 2002 holden commodore vx series 2 one owner with full service history 2009 kia cerato 5 door hatchback only 130,000 k’s with good service 2005 mitsubishi outlander LS automatic awd 2.4 lt air con power font side and curtain air bags traction control only 114,000 km automatic air conditioned power steering air bag history automatic cruise control power windows air con power steering steering abs electric windows air bags $5999 tum342 EBD roof racks tinted glass $7499 1bw7sg tinted glass tow pack new Pirelli tyres $5999 rvt841 finished in black $7999 wvo537

Affordable

$17,999

$5,999

drive away

CARS from

/day 0 3 $

AVAN SPORTLINER Avan sportliner 2012 two berth fridge cooker antenna point dinette very clean

S N A V & UTES from

$ 3 5 /day

SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS. WINDSCREENS / FITTED BATTERIES FROM $90 PAGE 28

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019


MORNINGTON MAZDA

- MID YEAR -

DEMO SALE *

$ $ $ , $ e v Sa

$3,000 Minim

um Trade in

^

y t n a r r a W r a e 7Y

+

2 Year 40,000km Extended Mornington Mazda Warranty*

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

Enquire now

LMCT 4180

SAME DAY FINANCE

* 2 year 40,000km extended Mornington Mazda warranty excludes BT-50 range >Registered and roadworthy vehicles

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED FOR 25 YEARS

Ph 5975 1 1 1 1

MAKE YOURS A

www.morningtonmazda.com.au Cnr Nepean Hwy & Main St Mornington 3931 Mid yaer Demo sale 2019 Full page.indd 1

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 20195/7/19 PAGE 3:2129 pm


MID-YEAR

CLEARANCE

SALE Tucson Active X $30,490 drive away

ONE ONLY

SN: 320299788

ONE ONLY

ONE ONLY

Accent Sport $15,990 drive away

SN: 320309095

m o r n i n g t o n hy u n d a i . c o m . a u

Kona Active WITH SMART SENSE SAFETY $27,490 drive away

SN: 320307940

992 NEPEAN HWY, MORNINGTON 3931

Pics for illustration purposes only. See Mornington Hyundai for details. LMCT 11270

PAGE 30

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

8770 1260


MORNINGTON

18MY Pajero Sport GLS Auto

Sterling Silver, 700kms, BAL765. Was $51,990 DRIVE AWAY Now $44,980 DRIVE AWAY*

! D L SO

19MY ASX ES 2WD Auto

White, 8085kms, 1OX3CO. Was $25,490 DRIVE AWAY Now $23,488 DRIVE AWAY*

18MY Triton GLS 4x4 Dual Cab Auto

Sterling Silver, 3844kms, BAY431. Was $42,490 DRIVE AWAY Now $38,990 DRIVE AWAY*

"Black Leather Seats"

"Top of the Range"

18MY ASX XLS 2WD Auto

Sterling Silver, 4985kms, 1ON5YG. Was $34,990 DRIVE AWAY Now $28,980 DRIVE AWAY*

! o o t l a c o l e We’r

Join us on:

LMCT 10467

17MY Lancer BLACK EDITION Auto

Titanium Grey, 2000kms, 1PO2QN. Was $22,990 DRIVE AWAY Now $18,785 DRIVE AWAY*

18MY ASX ES 2WD Auto

Sterling Silver, 5085kms, 1ON5ZD. Was $27,990 DRIVE AWAY Now $25,650 DRIVE AWAY*

MORNINGTON MITSUBISHI 41 TYABB ROAD, MORNINGTON MORNINGTONMITSUBISHI.COM.AU | 5975 5188

*Participating Mitsubishi dealers. Limited stocks. Mitsubishi reserves the right to extend or modify these offers. See participating dealer for full terms and conditions. Private Buyers and ABN Buyers. Excludes Government, Rental & National Fleet Buyers.

GO YOUR OWN WAY $

55,490

WAS

DRIVE AWAY*

$

55,550

NOW

$

DRIVE AWAY

48,990

DRIVE AWAY*

MU-X TOUR MATE 4X4 LS-T 7 SEAT AUTO

D-MAX 4X4 SX CREW CAB UTE AUTO

• OBSIDIAN GREY • GENUINE ALLOY BULL BAR • GENUINE WEATHERSHIELDS • GENUINE BONNET PROTECTOR • GENUINE HEAVY DUTY TOW BAR • GENUINE CARPET MAT SET S/N 61830

• COSMIC BLACK • BLACK STEEL BULL BAR • REAR STEP BAR • BLACK WHEELS • ALL TERRAIN TYRES • CRUISE CONTROL • 7” TOUCHSCREEN AUDIO DISPLAY • REVERSING CAMERA S/N 61768

LIMITED EDITION

$

54,990

WAS

DRIVE AWAY*

D-MAX X-RUNNER 4X4 LS-T AUTO • SAT NAV • REVERSING CAMERA • 18" ALLOY WHEELS • UNDER RAIL TUB LINER • UNIQUE STYLING • LEATHER INTERIOR^

$

NOW

40,895 $

DRIVE AWAY

36,980

DRIVE AWAY*

D-MAX 4X4 SX SINGLE CAB HIGH-RIDE AUTO • SPLASH WHITE • GENUINE HEAVY DUTY ALLOY TRAY • REAR LADDER RACK AND STEP S/N 61791

HURRY TO MORNINGTON ISUZU UTE TODAY

41 Tyabb Rd, Mornington | PH: 5975 5188 www.morningtonisuzuute.com.au LMCT 10467 *Terms and Conditions may apply. ^Seats have leather touches or accents, but are not wholly leather.

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

PAGE 31


D R A C T GIF

! A Z N A N O B

T F I G RD* CA

50" STREAM YOUR FAVOURITE CONTENT

G IF T CA R D * *V IA RE DE MP TIO

3

6 STAR ENERGY RATING

50

$

$

O

N

UP TO

300

U PROD D E T EC N SEL

CTS

YEAR

WARRANTY

50" 4K Ultra HD Smart LED LCD TV 725927

$

637 75

$

G IF T CA R D * *V IA RE DE MP TIO

DESIGNED TO FIT A 90CM CAVITY

N

100

$

G IF T CA R D *

SLEEK FLAT DOOR DESIGN

*V IA RE DE MP TIO

6

FLAME FAILURE DEVICE

975

$

$

7kg Heat Pump Dryer 724762

200

100

$

$

G IF T C A R D * *V IA RE DE MP TIO

G IF T C A R D * *V IA RE DE MP TIO

N

N

$

N

1795

90cm Dual Fuel Freestanding Cooker 663848

UP TO

200

CASHBACK $

2099

$

1395

605L French Door Refrigerator

519L Bottom Mount Refrigerator

699487

664733

759298

SAVE $350 Bradman Double Mattress Firm

649

$ Calgary

BONUS

Moby 3 Seater plus 2 Seater Sofa Pair in Denim 740812

100

GIFT CARD* *BY REDEMPTIO N

1199

$

1099

$

SAVE $300 Oxford Queen Mattress Firm

1499

$

716851

SAVE $390 Ascot Venice 4 Piece Modular Lounge in Shale 724152 Ottoman in Shale $499 724154

2199

$

FOUNDS BETTA HOME LIVING

1367 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud | PH: 5981 2344 founds@my.betta.com.au

PAGE 32

Southern Peninsula News

17 July 2019

Electric Lift Chair in Black Leather 760113

Trafalgar

$

$

1399

Queen Mattress Firm

2199

d an R epe Pt N d an R epe Pt N Rosebud

Boneo Rd

=

$

Electric Lift Chair in Bodhi Lagoon 760101

733400

Port Phillip Plaza

716833

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

16 July 2019  

Southern Peninsula News 16 July 2019

16 July 2019  

Southern Peninsula News 16 July 2019

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