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Wednesday 16 September 2020

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au Hot topic: The fire which destroyed this Rosebud beach box also damaged others. Gary Sissons

Beach box fire ‘deliberate’ POLICE believe a fire which destroyed a beach box at Rosebud early last Friday (11 September) may have been deliberately lit. Rosebud police said the 3am blaze at beach box number 80 near Adams Avenue, was being investigated by the arson squad. The fire which caused a gas bottle to explode also damaged boxes on either side, destroying the roof in one. Fire Rescue Victoria from Rosebud and CFA crews from Rosebud and Dromana took one hour and 40 minutes to bring the blaze under control. Witnesses said they saw a man on the median strip on Point Nepean Road after being woken by the explosion. He ran off in a westerly direction, they said. Police report “ongoing issues” with homeless people on the foreshore. Detective Senior Constable Pete Butland, of Somerville CIU, said the owner of the vacant beach box had been in a “constant battle” with squatters. “People were always taking property inside, such as furniture and even a gas heater,” he said. “They would cut off [the owner’s] padlock and put their own padlock on and then he would go down there, often with police, and replace their padlock. “Police were checking the box constantly.”

Pandemic’s violent complication Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au ELDER abuse, an insidious stablemate of family violence, is rampant on the Mornington Peninsula during these strained days of COVID-19. With Victoria’s second highest population of elderly people, the peninsula has the highest number of police callouts per capita for family violence in

metropolitan Melbourne. Data presented to Peninsula Health shows family violence presentations to emergency departments and inpatient settings have increased 88 per cent in the past year. Similarly, elder abuse presentations are up 59 per cent. Statistics suggests that at least 10 per cent of those living on the peninsula aged over 65 are at risk of, or are experiencing, elder abuse.

Peninsula Health’s head of social work Dr Meghan O’Brien said the referrals coming through had a “higher risk rating and severity compared to pre-COVID, and included stalking, sexual assault, head-butting, trauma to the head and strangulation”. She said about 70 per cent of older people experiencing elder abuse are women and that older people experiencing elder abuse are usually coping with

more than one form at any time, such as financial and psychological abuse. While the main perpetrators are adult sons and daughters followed by partners, many older people do not want to involve the police or take legal action. “The older person is more likely to be focused on supporting the perpetrator, perhaps their child, who may have factors such as financial stressors – gambling or unemployment – or

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mental health issues or a disability,” Dr O’Brien said. “Research has shown that they may not recognise [it] as family violence and may regard abusive behaviour as a normal part of their intimate partner or family relationships or part of ageing. Hospitals had an important role in reporting and preventing elder abuse as most older people trusted health professionals. Continued Page 5

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If you see a swarm - don’t panic! Swarming is a natural phenomenon. Before bees swarm they gorge on honey as a result swarms are usually quite docile and the bees unlikely to sting, unless provoked. Don’t spray the bees with insecticides or water. Bees live in a collective consciousness where in each bee feels the thoughts and actions of all other bees within the colony. Thus every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce. Swarming involves some of the bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location. The swarm with no young to look after embrace to keep warm. The queen is kept within. Swarming is considered very fortunate in most cultures.

SAVE THE BEES! If you see a swarm register it online with Swarm Patrol or call your local beekeeper. The colony will be collected and rehomed.

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Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020


NEWS DESK

Councils unite on homeless moves Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire is one of 13 councils representing two million residents in Melbourne’s east and south east lobbying for more social housing to “end homelessness”. Their focus was informed by research commissioned by Monash Council through the Council to Homeless Persons: ‘Making a Difference – effective local government responses to homelessness.’ It identified that the “single, most powerful way” councils can contribute to preventing and ending homelessness was to advocate for more social housing across Victoria. This housing is owned either by

the state government or not-for-profit community providers and rented to low income households at either 25 per cent (public housing) or 30 per cent (community housing) of their income. Those more recently affected include the “new vulnerable”: the people who have lost their jobs and homes as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, with many seeking crisis accommodation for the first time. The 13 councils, supported by Eastern Affordable Housing Alliance, Municipal Association of Victoria, Eastern Region Group of Councils and the Department of Health and Human Services, say they want more housing as the “first step towards addressing the often complex social and health needs of the region’s most vulnerable community members”.

Providing a safe home first, as part of a broader social housing framework, is the way to stem the increase in homelessness, they say. “Only with a home can the compounding set of circumstances leading to homelessness be properly addressed to enable better outcomes for vulnerable people facing extreme adversity.” Statistically, homelessness is more likely to affect the most vulnerable in our society, including women and children fleeing family violence, those with a disability, or living with a mental health condition, those living in poverty and marginalised groups. A charter to guide the campaign: the Regional Local Government Homelessness and Social Housing Charter 2020, came through a forum of CEOs and senior staff from all councils, initi-

ated by Monash Council in November. It was attended by housing providers, peak bodies and the state government. Homelessness advocate “Nova”, who has lived experience as a result of family violence, shared what was described as a “powerful and moving story” with forum attendees. The charter commits the groups to working together, and with state and federal governments and private partners, to deliver social housing and respond to homelessness in the east and south east and to identify land in their municipalities for social housing. The mayor Cr Sam Hearn said shire officers were often the first to respond to people experiencing homelessness. He said the COVID-19 crisis had further pushed vulnerable people into crisis, especially women and children ex-

periencing family violence, and those on low incomes. “A safe home is fundamental for recovery and safety,” Cr Hearn said. “Everyone deserves to have a roof over their head, a door they can lock and a place where they feel secure and safe. A place to call home. This is a fundamental and basic right.” He said: “All 13 councils are committed to working together to see change in social housing provision. Never has it been more important.” The other municipalities are Frankston, Casey, Cardinia, Greater Dandenong, Knox, Kingston, Manningham, Monash, Maroondah, Whitehorse, Yarra Ranges and Bayside. To see the campaign forum and hear homelessness advocate Nova’s story visit monash.vic.gov.au/homelessness

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OBLIVIOUS to restrictions onshore, a pod of about six dolphins provided entertainment for morning walkers at Mornington. Alan Dillon watched from the pier as the bottlenose dolphins leaped from the water, possibly as part of a ploy to catch fish. Mr Dillon said the dolphins appeared to be “in a frenzy at times” and thought it may also have been a training lesson for a younger spotted one among the group. While untouched by the restrictions facing those on land (except maybe seeing an increase in fish stocks due to a ban on fishing), the dol-

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AN “ambitious” climate emergency plan has been adopted by Mornington Peninsula Shire Council one year after declaring a “climate emergency”. The Ensuring Our Future: Our Climate Emergency Response plan aims to guide the peninsula towards having no carbon emissions by 2040 through seven “summits” and 21 “action steps”. However, the shire says the outcome “can only be achieved by the community and the shire working together”. A 10-year program includes targets around leadership and governance, climate advocacy, zero carbon energy, resilient and adaptive community, sustainable transport and travel, sustainable land use and environmental restoration, circular economy and zero waste. The shire says it was the 34th council in Australia to declare a climate emergency - there are now 96 - while its plan is one of the first six developed and adopted by an Australian municipality. The mayor Cr Sam Hearn likened the seven “summits” to a “map to guide us away from the dangerous emergency situation and the kinds of impacts that should still be stark in our mind from last summer”. “The shire is ready to lead by example and show the way,” he said. “In August 2019, the shire declared a climate emergency. Since 2016, we’ve had a five-year plan for the shire’s operations to become carbon neutral, which we’re on track to achieve by 2021. “The need to act to stop climate change and cre-

ate a better future story is more urgent than ever.” The shire says it is “focused” on achieving the targets of the plan and has accelerated some projects based on the climate emergency declaration. This has resulted in environmentally sustainable design being included in the planning scheme, it says. Three recycled water projects are supporting agricultural growth and drought proof the peninsula. The Beyond Zero Waste Strategy was also adopted on 25 August 2020. As part of the plan the shire’s economic stimulus projects are being aligned to climate emergency objectives, including tree-lined footpaths. “Along the way, we have encountered a stark reminder that we are all connected and our current and future wellbeing is collective,” Cr Hearn said. “This year, the coronavirus pandemic brought home the fragility of our current systems and the vulnerability we have to existential threats. It has also revealed the value of local connectivity, [and] the immense power we have when we do act with a united purpose and move toward selfsustaining community. “Let’s turn that awareness into opportunity. We can each make climate-friendly choices to rebuild the economy, revitalise our community and restore nature. “The climate emergency plan looks ahead 20 years to a world in which the Mornington Peninsula community has transitioned to net zeroemissions. We know there is steep terrain ahead.” Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/climatechange

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GALLERY TALK Even though the MPRG is currently closed to the public, we are continuing to develop and share our podcasts, videos, collection, exhibitions, stories and children’s activities across all our online platforms. Public galleries across Victoria, including the MPRG, are currently closed. On Sunday 6 September, the Premier Daniel Andrews released the Victorian Government’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) Roadmap to reopening. Under this plan, galleries in metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria remain closed until 23 November. Our series of artist studio conversations have been really popular on MPRG TV, with lots of people tuning in each week. You can catch up on my recent interviews with master printmaker Raymond Arnold, Archibald Prize-winning artist Euan Macleod, virtual reality superstar Jess Johnson and leading contemporary artist Cameron Robbins who uses natural forces to create his works. MPRG is presenting a special online exhibition featuring new photographic based work by Tara Gilbee. Tara was an artist in residence at the Mornington

NEWS DESK

Peninsula Shire’s Police Point Artist in Residency program in 2018 and 2019. Using solargraphic and pinhole techniques, her powerful and haunting images capture a unique and other worldly perspective of Point Nepean. MPRG’s artist/educator Jill Anderson continues to inspire children with a series of online creative activities based on artists in MPRG’s collection, including create a Danie Mellor-inspired collage and paint a work on paper inspired by artists Rosie Weiss and GW Bot. Kids can also learn how to create a still life vanitas with artist and animator Jerome Rush. Finally, MPRG has launched a major collection publication featuring historical essays about the gallery and over 70 works reproduced from the Collection. This is available to order through our website. Stay safe, stay inspired and look out for each other.

Danny Lacy Artistic Director Senior Curator

www.mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington Ph 5950 1580

Keeping creative in school holidays HERE’S a way to keep the children occupied and creative during the school holidays – Saturday 19 September to Sunday 4 October – with a series of activities they can enjoy from home. The young ones can get artistic by crafting collages, creating indigenous animals and learning about their habitats, as well as creating watercolour and food dye artworks. Those keen to get crafty now can take part in the activities already online, so there’s no need to wait until the holidays. Artist/educator Jill Anderson has created a series of creative activities inspired by works from the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery. Children can create a Patrick Pound-inspired collage and learn about his artworks of collected photographs and objects. They can watch a virtual tour of Pound’s recent MPRG exhibition

and learn how to create a themed collage. Ms Anderson refers to Danie Mellor’s work ‘An unsettled vision’ and asks children to think deeper about our native wildlife and their habitats. Mellor won the 2008 National Works on Paper and is prominent in the MPRG collection. In this creative activity, children learn how to create their own collage work of a koala’s home. In another video, Ms Anderson talks about how nature inspires artists Rosie Weiss and GW Bott, both of whom feature in MPRG’s permanent collection. Children will learn how to discover and then borrow ideas to make their own artwork. They will gather interesting natural specimens from the garden or a park and learn to arrange and trace them with a permanent pen. They will learn how to create watercolours from marker

Taste what you’re missing Producers from across the Peninsula have been busy creating delicious new products for you to enjoy in the comfort of your own home. We’ve curated a collection of local cafes, restaurants, bakeries, breweries and bars who are proudly offering online ordering and contactless delivery services. Visit our website to buy online direct from the finest producers and growers across the Peninsula. Stock your pantry with fresh localproduce, and treat yourself to take-away tapas, or even wine tastings at home. Support the local businesses you love, and get a taste of what you’ve truly been missing.

visitmp.org PAGE 4

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020


Aged care COVID outbreak traced to staff member Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

A Patrick Pound-inspired collage, above left, and koala’s home. pens or food dye and paint a work on paper. Artist, musician and animator Jerome Rush has also created fun online tutorials for children. Learn how to create an observational collage using coloured paper and a fine liner pen, how to paint a portrait with decaf coffee or a crazy crocodile hand puppet. Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery is in the Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington. Email: mprg@mornpen.vic.gov.au

RESIDENTS and staff at the Village Glen Aged Care Residences, Mornington are this week expecting to be tested for COVID-19. If the Department of Health and Human Services does arrive, it will be for the “fourth or fifth time” since five deaths and 37 positive cases were recorded at the home in August. Chief operating officer Peter Nilsson said on Saturday (12 September) that while five residents had died “with COVID-19”, the home had been virus-free for 23 days. He said DHHS had been told that it was wrong to keep saying there were still active cases. He expected DHHS staff to test all staff and residents “for the fourth or fifth time” and, provided the tests prove negative, that by Wednesday the home would be declared virus free. “DHHS is wrong [to say there are active cases] and I have no idea where they got their information from,” he said. “It’s very frustrating.” Mr Nilsson said the virus was introduced to the home in Nepean Highway in early August by an asymptomatic staff member who began a shift without realising she was positive. “She only found out when her housemate tested positive and then she was checked and found to be positive. She immediately informed us and went home to self-isolate,” he said. “This is the industry’s greatest fear: not knowing if staff or residents are positive because there may be no outward signs. The only way of knowing is if people you are in contact with test positive. Most active cases emanate from asymptomatic cases.” Mr Nilsson said staff had been tested daily “ever since the virus has been with us” with an

emphasis on temperature checks, asking if they have a runny nose or sore throat, and if they know anyone with it. “If someone tests positive we are obligated to notify the DHHS which we did [on 5 August]. We isolated that person and then found more that tested positive. “The virus is so contagious that once staff selfisolate we trace all who they have been in contact with. “Of the 37 cases here, 16 staff and 21 residents tested positive. The five that died had COVID-19 but they may not have died from it.” Mr Nilsson said the average life expectancy in an aged care home was two years. “The residents are in the twilight of their lives and have multiple health issues,” he said. Village Glen, which has 92 beds and 77 residents, has had to replace 40 per cent of its staff to cover those self-isolating. Under its COVID-19 action plan all remaining staff must wear personal protective equipment and residents must stay in their rooms and among their cohorts to limit cross contamination. A staff m ember i s r equired t o r eport d aily at 2pm to DHHS. “On Friday we called DHHS and complained that the figures were wrong and that we didn’t have any active cases,” Mr Nilsson said. “They’ll take it on board but who knows their thought patterns. Mr Nilsson said that after being given the all clear “we will then instigate a whole range of measures, such as deep cleaning every room and every staff and resident area”. The virus has not appeared at Village Glen’s Rosebud aged care home where the situation is said to be “normal”.

Dr Meghan O’Brien

Family violence Continued from Page 1 Dr O’Brien said the “true picture of what is occurring will probably not be visible or understood until after the pandemic”. “The restrictions have heightened the known risk factors – especially isolation – as well as financial stressors, depression, previous trauma history, dependency on family for care-giving, and pre-existing medical conditions,” she said. Telehealth calls – where the health professional does not visit them at home – make it difficult to engage with the older person, especially where the perpetrator is present but not be visible during the call. Similarly, fewer meetings where all the family and the older person are in the same room, make it harder for health professionals to gain an insight into the family’s dynamics. Seniors Rights Victoria provides information, support, advice and education to help prevent elder abuse and safeguard the rights, dignity and independence of older people. Services include: Helpline, 1300 368 821 (10am-5pm Monday to Friday) and Bayside Peninsula Orange Door, 1800 319 353.

Be a leader. Become a teacher. Become a teacher to lead us into the future, and inspire who comes next.

vic.gov.au/TeachTheFuture

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

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LOCKDOWN PICTURES A VARIETY of weathers inspired contributions to this week’s Lockdown pictures. Clockwise from left: Marilyn Davy saw the beauty of Port Phillip from the well-tended but unplayed Mornngton Golf Course; Alexandra Harrison saw the bright side of a rubbish bin; Jonte Field enjoyed a walk in the rain at The Briars, Mount Martha; while Helena Van der Haar was struck by the solitary, overgrown appearance of the Mornington steam train station in Bungower Road, Mornington, normally tended by an enthusiastic band of volunteers Readers are invited to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: lockdown@mpnews.com.au

ANY SYMPTOMS GET TESTED It’s important to get tested for coronavirus at the first sign of any symptom and stay home until you get your result. Getting tested means you keep yourself, your friends, family, workplace and your community safe. It’s not over yet.

Find out where to get tested visit vic.gov.au/CORONAVIRUS Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

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Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020


It’s the season to duck and weave head with a hat, helmet or umbrella – perhaps with a pair of “eyes” on the back. People should not harass or feed wildlife, Ms Dixon said. To report a swooping incident by any species of bird and mark its location on the swooping bird map visit wildlife.vic.gov.au/managingwildlife/swooping-birds Magpies and other native birds are protected in Victoria under the Wildlife Act 1975. Under the Act, it is an offence to kill, take, control or harm wildlife in Victoria.

MORNINGTON Peninsula residents are being warned that with spring in the air so too are swooping birds. The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning says it is the time native birds swoop humans (and their dogs) to defend their young for the six-eight weeks between when they hatch and when they leave the nest. Reports are already being received of birds, such as magpies and masked lapwings, swooping surprised passers-by. Senior wildlife management officer Rebecca Dixon said swooping happened every year during breeding season and was largely a defensive manoeuvre. For some species, including magpies, this is mainly carried out by males. “Being swooped by a territorial bird is no fun, but this is just normal bird behaviour,” Ms Dixon said. “The best way to avoid being swooped is to stay away from the area all together, although this isn't always possible. “If you do end up in an area where there is a swooping bird, try to protect your head and eyes and move quickly through the area without running.” Tips to avoid being swooped include avoiding known swooping hotspots and covering your

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More than half too long THE caption accompanying an artist’s impression showing the estimated size of the floating import gas terminal proposed to be anchored by AGL at Crib Point in last week’s edition of The News incorrectedly stated the vessel was nearly 3000 metres long. This was incorrect, the floating regasification storage unit (FRSU) is nearly 300 metres in length. The image shows the vessel in the Yarra River, Melbourne near Flinders Street Station.

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Moving to the old quarry Despite COVID-19, investigations have continued into moving our Hillview Quarry Drive operations at Dromana some 800–850 metres to the old pioneer quarry in Boundary Road. Because our approved stone reserves are running out, we have been scientifically assessing the challenges of re-locating from the existing operating quarry to the other quarry, which we call the Boundary Road quarry.

Hillview Community Reserve.

Boundary Road.

These scientific studies are well underway; draft baseline studies have been completed and nearly all have been reviewed by the government’s Technical Reference Group. This baseline work tells us, what are the current conditions of the site and surrounds. The next step is to assess what effects the move might have and some of this work has already started. In these studies, consideration is given to what impacts there might be on animals, plants and people; they are technical and very detailed. All of this work is part of an extensive government assessment which, after community consultation, the Minister for Planning will consider when deciding if the move can go ahead. This assessment is likely to take another year to complete. Over coming weeks summaries of the baseline studies will be publicly available, (some are already on our website). These will provide real facts about what is on the Boundary Road site now. Similarly, as the studies assessing the impacts of the move are completed and reviewed by the government’s Technical Reference Group, we will share summaries of those too. Due to the pandemic, our communication will be digital and we have been revising our website to improve your access. There you can find answers to the questions we have been asked to-date.

Collins Road.

Operations to shift 800–850m to old quarry. Hillview’s current quarry and workings to wind down.

Old Pioneer quarry and workings.

If you would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact our Boundary Road Project team using the details below.

Email us on: info@boundaryroad.com.au Call us on: 1300 407 690 Visit our website: www.boundaryroad.com.au

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

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Southern Peninsula

NEWS DESK

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Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 2020 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2020

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

HMAS Cerberus today is undergoing a $465.6 million redevlopment which will make much larger than when it was known as Flinders Naval Base. Picture: Supplied

Cerberus sets a course for next century HMAS Cerberus – the Royal Australian Navy’s oldest commissioned base – has celebrated its centenary. Known as the “cradle of the navy”, the 15 square kilometre base at Crib Point faces Hanns Inlet, between Sandy Point and Stony Point in Western Port, was bought in 1911 and formally commissioned as Flinders Naval Base on 1 September 1920. To commemorate the milestone, Commanding Officer Captain Mike Oborn and his senior leadership team this month unveiled a centenary plinth at the site of its original commissioning. Cerberus provides training for recruits from all three branches of the Australian Defence Force. About 1800 people are at the base at any time,

with about 6000 Navy, Army and Air Force personnel undergoing training annually. Defence Minister Senator Linda Reynolds said HMAS Cerberus had played a foundational role in the Australian Defence Force. “Our investment in the redevelopment of the base will deliver world class training to best prepare our forces of the future. I look forward to Cerberus continuing to play a role in the training of our defence forces for many years to come,” she said. Flinders MP Greg Hunt said that for 100 years, the base had trained cadets “who go on to serve our nation with pride and purpose as members of the Australian Defence Force”. “Each of these individuals plays an important

role in our local community.” The $465.6 million redevelopment of the base is scheduled to be completed by mid-2023. “This secures not only improved training for our next generation of cadets, but HMAS Cerberus’s legacy as an enduring part of the Australian Defence Force,” Mr Hunt said. The redevelopment of the base was announced in 2017 as part of the local industry capability plan pilot projects. It will include an engineering services upgrade, refurbishment of live-in accommodation and mess facilities, construction of a logistics precinct, new School of Survivability and Ship Safety, new Survival at Sea centre and upgraded physical training centre. Stephen Taylor

Aboriginal place names: let’s get it right Advertisement

This is the second in a series of articles in which Hugh Fraser will be writing about contemporary shire matters in the run-up to local government elections. Follow the work of Hugh on the council and in the community at hughfraser-morningtonpeninsula.com

THE name “Blacks Camp Reserve” in Somerville is a derogatory term and offensive to the traditional custodians of the Mornington Peninsula, so the shire has been advised. This is supported by non-Aboriginal local residents and reserve users. So in July, the council endorsed for public comment four possible Aboriginal names for the renaming of this shire-owned reserve.

Two are generic Aboriginal names – “earth” (Beek Beak) and “mountain” (Ngooraak). The two other names proposed are the clan names Burinyong Balug and Mayone Balug. In 2004 the council commissioned an archaeological investigation of the reserve, which found more than 200 artefacts and four Aboriginal sites later registered. An existing billabong, which fills after rain, was likely a water source. The importance of the site is undoubted.

The reserve, Blacks Camp Road and Blacks Camp Preschool are to be renamed, which has created interest from the preschool community, local Rotary club and Friends of Blacks Camp Reserve.

For nearly 200 years of European settlement in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, official government policy has been to name places using local names actually used by local Aboriginal people. Evocative Aboriginal place names such as Ballaarat,

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Wendouree, Warrenheip, Birrigurrah, Moorabool, Millewa, Tullamarine and Yarra (-Yarra) spring to mind. These are not “off the shelf” generic place names but names Aboriginal people used for their places.

The Aboriginal camp at Somerville has long gone except for its archeological remains. What is now thought to be the pejorative name “Blacks Camp Reserve” is to be changed.

Rosebud itself is named after a twomasted sailing ship wrecked on a sandbank off the fishing village of Banksia Point in 1855. Locals stripped timbers from the ship for their houses and used to say “I’m going up to the Rosebud”, which soon became the fishing village’s name. In 1939 The Argus newspaper referred to this wreck off “Wannaeue Beach”. And Wannaeue would be a fabulous new name for Rosebud or this shire.

“I recognize that a number of these monuments are extremely offensive to people for whom they have a meaning of repression and even extermination. The problem is that, if you remove them, you are removing the capacity for people to have an informed awareness of what has happened in the past and things that have changed since.”

So how much and how little has changed in 90 years? Reported in The Age newspaper of Saturday 13 June 2020, one of Australia’s leading historians, Stuart McIntyre, wrote about the recent removal of statues and other memorials in the United States and United Kingdom:

The southern Mornington Peninsula has many local and equally evocative place names used by the local Aboriginal people. Tootgarook swamp, Gunnamatta surf beach, Kangerong ward and Wannaeue Place, a tiny remnant of a local Aboriginal name in Rosebud, are examples.

The adoption of Aboriginal place names was official Victorian government policy as early as 1839.

Surveyor Robert Hoddle was instructed, “You will assign to each Parish a name, founded on the native appellations of any place or hill therein”. In the Grampians (also known as Gariwerd), for example, 28 of 30 parishes have Aboriginal names – see Eccleston G, Major Mitchell’s 1836 ‘Australian Felix’ Expedition: a re-evaluation (Monash Publications, 1992). So it is a disappointment not to find at least some intellectual rigour in management’s report to the council proposing names for Blacks Camp

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

Reserve. More research could be done to find a name that local Aboriginal people themselves once used for their important place at the reserve.

We ought not be careless about this and actually be mindful of what has been displaced and why. I am reminded of what Keith Hancock powerfully wrote 90 years ago about the “Invasion of Australia” in Australia (Australasian Publishing, 1930):

“[T]he British have imposed themselves upon it [Australia] with their barbed-wire and railways and commercial journalism and modern liberal ideas. Their advance resembles the forward-scattering of a horde, and sometimes, like the onrush of a horde, it has been devastating. The Australian Aborigines … fitted

themselves to the soil, modelling a complex civilization of intelligent artificiality, which yet was pathetically helpless when assailed by the acquisitive society of Europe.”

W Keith Hancock – fellow of All Souls College, Oxford but better known to Australians as Professor of Modern History at the University of Adelaide (and later knighted) – concluded:

“Yet sometimes the invading British did their wreckers’ work with the unnecessary brutality of stupid children. The Aboriginal race has always possessed enthusiastic friends but the friends have never agreed upon a consistent and practical policy for [their] preservation.”

Before we displace the descriptive name with generic names such as “Beek Beak” or “Ngooraak”, let’s apply at least some intellectual rigour to find a truly local name the Aboriginal clans would themselves have once used for their place. The naming process is open for community feedback until Monday 21 September 2020. Hugh Fraser is Nepean Ward councillor on Mornington Peninsula Shire Council and a candidate in the upcoming local government elections. Email: hwfraser@vicbar.com.au or mobile: 0418 379 335

Written and authorised by Hugh Fraser, 12 Michael Street, Rye 3941


Drop in numbers a positive sign THINGS seem a little lighter this week, with the reopening of children’s playgrounds, exercise times being extended to two hours and a later curfew (9pm-5am). On the Mornington Peninsula active cases of COVID-19 have dropped from 18 on Monday 7 September to four on Sunday 13 September. In Frankston, the drop has not been so dramatic, falling from 20 to 13 over seven days. Frankston Hospital was on Sunday reporting six active cases from a total 90 positive cases among staff and patients. Mornington Peninsula Shire has issued a reminder to parents that maternal and child health and immunisation services are available during the current lockdown. The shire is also planning for the lifting of restrictions by adopting a “parklets program” to increase the amount of footpath space that will be available to cafes, restaurants and shops. Applications from businesses to diversify will be processed within four business days and a reduction in some fees and charges. A 25-year-old Lancefield man and a 24-year-old Seaford woman have been fined for breaching COVID restrictions, 7 September. The pair were found in Arthurs Seat, by Somerville Highway Patrol police members, watching the sunset from their vehicle. On investigation police say they found the vehicle to have cancelled registration and incorrect number plates affixed. The male driver was also found to be unlicensed. The vehicle has been impounded for 30 days and the driver summonsed to appear in court for the related charges. The man and woman were also fined $1652 each for breaching directions issued by the Chief Health Officer. Keith Platt DECKING T/Pine 70x22 KD ACQ ........................... $2.70mt T/Pine 90x22 KD ACQ ........................... $3.50mt T/Pine 140x22 KD ACQ ......................... $6.25mt Merbau 70x19 Random ........................ $5.25mt Merbau 90x19 Random ........................ $6.50mt Merbau 140x22 Random .................... $13.95mt

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Postcode

Confirmed cases (ever)

Active cases (current)

Mornington

3931

60

3

Mount Martha

3934

27

0

Somerville

3912

16

0

Mount Eliza

3930

11

0

Rosebud, Boneo, Cape Schanck, Fingal Hastings, Tuerong

3939

10

0

3915

7

1

Flinders

3929

7

0

St Andrews Beach, Tootgarook, Rye Sorrento

3941

7

0

3943

7

0

Portsea

3944

7

0

Capel Sound

3940

6

0

Arthurs Seat, Dromana, Safety Beach Somers

3936

6

0

3927

4

0

Blairgowrie

3942

3

0

Bittern

3918

3

0

Baxter

3911

2

0

Crib Point

3919

2

0

Balnarring, Balnarring Beach, Merricks Beach, Merricks North Moorooduc

3926

2

0

3933

2

0

Tyabb

3913

2

0

Main Ridge

3928

1

1

Shoreham, Point Leo, Merricks

3916

0

0

HMAS Cerberus

3920

0

0

Red Hill, Red Hill South

3937

0

0

McCrae

3938

0

0

TOWN

CASES by postcode on the Mornington Peninsula as of Saturday 12 September show the location as the residential address provided when the case was notified and may not be where they were infected and may not be where the case currently resides.

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Tradies’ tools taken THREE offenders in a white Holden Commodore are being sought by detectives over a series of car break-ins at Hastings, Tuesday 8 September. Detective Senior Constable Nick Passmore, of Somerville CIU, said about half a dozen cars were broken into in Olivia Way about 2am. He said the offenders targeted tradies’ utes to steal mainly power tools, as well as wallets and other items. “The loss of their tools means the tradies are finding it hard to do their work,” Detective Passmore said. “It’s causing a huge disruption to their working lives.”

Hunt for burglar A MAN is being sought over an aggravated burglary at Hastings, Wednesday 2 September. Police say the man, right, entered a house on Elisa Place and assaulted the victim. He then demanded money before stealing the victim’s 2007 Mercedes sedan, registration BEQ 477. The man was wearing white/grey coloured pants, blue and white check shirt, and cap. He arrived in a maroon sedan with a missing hub cap on the rear passenger-side wheel. Anyone with information is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

On the run: The car police believe was used by a man seen running before entering a house in Elisa Place, Hastings.

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PINE LINING 140x12 VJ/Regency .............................. $2.50mt 140x19 VJ/Floor.................................... $3.95mt

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T/PINE FASCIA PRIMED 190x30 D&G... .................................... $12.25mt 230x30 D&G... .................................... $19.50mt

PINE MGP10 70x35 Long .......................................... $2.55mt 70x45 Long ...........................................$3.30mt 90x35 Studs ......................................... $2.40mt 90x35 Long .......................................... $2.60mt 90x45 Studs ......................................... $3.15mt 90x45 Long ...........................................$3.60mt

PINE MERCH 90x35 ................................................... $1.65mt 90x45 ................................................... $2.40mt

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Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

PAGE 9


WHAT’S NEW...

Covid-19’s final stretch - a message from Whole Medicine By Dr Michelle Woodhouse WHAT a time we are all living through! We all hope you are doing Ok. The team at Whole Medicine are remaining open for face to face appointments as we know how important these are. We have in place a Covid Safe Plan and have been activating all of the safety protocols since March. You are in safe hands. It is important not to let your health slide, Deaths from COVID-19 remain relatively small in Australia to date, but the overwhelming consensus in the medical literature is that the deaths occur more frequently in those that have a concurrent chronic disease, who smoke, who have high blood pressure (untreated) and who are obese. Not only that there is growing concern that by avoiding seeing your GP, early detection cancers and other diseases are not being as adequately treated as they normally are. It is important to look after your health, follow up your bloods and make sure you are seeing someone if you have any concerns. Please note you are allowed to attend medical appointments, even if they are further than 5km from your home. Please carry your mobile phone

HOTDOC appointment reminder with you as proof of your appointment. Our new Doctors Dr David Parsons It is so lovely having Dr David as part of our team, Dr David is available for all General Practice needs and is a great support for our community. As many of you know, Dr David is one of the most highly experienced skin cancer doctors on the Peninsula, and he is also a compassionate listener and caring heart. Dr David brings 30 + years of experience to GP and also has a post-grad diploma in palliative care medicine. Dr David works Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Dr Ana-Louise Martin We are getting “rave reviews” with having Dr Ana-Louise Martin in our team, she is a highly experienced psychiatrist with a warm heart and generous compassion. She is a wealth of knowledge to help support you during these trying times and beyond. Speak to your GP about a referral if you feel this may be a part of your healing journey.

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Back In Motion Balnarring 6/2-8 Russell Street backinmotion.com.au/balnarring PAGE 10

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020


Supporting our local businesses Our roadmap to a COVID-safe economic recovery on the Mornington Peninsula.

The Shire is working with local businesses, business groups and chambers of commerce to support them through the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic Financial relief

Promoting local businesses

Hardship Policy extended

Support Local campaign

Fast tracking temporary change of use applications for businesses

Procuring goods and services locally

Reduced/waived/deferred many business fees and charges

Helping food and retail businesses

Business concierge service

COVID-19 social distancing measures have made it difficult for restaurants, cafes and retailers to operate with reduced patrons and remain profitable. Extended footpath trading

Business workshops and mentoring

Parklets trial

Keeping businesses informed Business information Funding Finder website

Supporting the arts and recreation Our Active Peninsula website active.mornpen.vic.gov.au Arts and culture website artsandculture.mornpen.vic.gov.au

Creating jobs, building infrastructure Mornington Peninsula Shire was one of the first councils to announce a package of shovel ready projects to advocate to State and Federal Government for investment. If funded, the package will hugely aid the economic recovery of the Mornington Peninsula region by creating 4,771 jobs and delivering projects valued at $320.8 million. Council is already spending $50.9 on capital works in 2020–21 to boost our local economy.

The Shire will work with businesses to repurpose carparks outside shopfronts into additional outdoor dining space.

Funding economic recovery Funding program to chambers of commerce and business groups for community-led recovery

Contact us about how we can support your business through COVID-19. 5950 1000 business@mornpen.vic.gov.au mornpen.vic.gov.au/businessinfo mpbusiness.com.au Southern Peninsula News

16 September 2020

PAGE 11


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Scrutinise councillors and candidates before voting I did look forward to judgement day for Mornington Peninsula Shire councillors at the October election, but half of them have quit. As well as new candidates, the remnant incumbents seeking re-election need scrutiny. It is still in memory that some councillors converted their generous expenses accounts into junket holiday trips to China and Paris; that a councillor overspent the expense account by $11,000 but was forgiven the debt by other councillors and did not have to repay it; that another one used the account for a business course for personal benefit. The state government imposed a rates cap in an attempt to curtail unnecessary expenditure and slow the spiraling rates burden on citizens, but council thumbed its nose at this and imposed a levy, a “municipal charge” (later called a “waste services charge”) to make it legal. We now have two rates, one uncapped at $322, this year, ever rising, 13 per cent more than last year and well and truly negating my pensioner rates concession. All of this behaviour, unethical to me, will be described as accountants speak, but I choose to use plain talking. Not to forget that some council officers were given bonuses of $40,000 to $60,000, and a city office is maintained for their convenience. Considering the desperately lean times ahead, it will be hard to sort out all of the candidates, particularly if you don’t give any credence to social media, and I for one, will be relying on our local paper, The News, for an honest profile of the candidates. Perhaps the incumbent councillors seeking reelection could stand on their record. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

Unfair to a minority [Nepean Ward councillor] Hugh Fraser wants one small section of the community, in this case the hapless boat shed owners, under the control of the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council to pay for three so-called significant projects “(although they lack detail)”, he says. A licence fee and charges are now, to some constituents, more than they pay for their house in rates. Boat shed owners are apparently responsible for cuts to other projects which are already “shovel ready” he says, no details on these projects either by his own admission. This is how Hugh Fraser thinks. Will he find another group of people in the community to blame for a so-called loss of revenue? Why are boat shed owners targeted under the control of MPSC? Dromana boat shed owners do not pay a license fee of up to $1000 because they have a management committee, which is a fair reflection of the use of boat sheds. It is unfair to target one minority group of people in the shire. As boat shed owners, we are ratepayers. We vote for our councillors to be fair and to consider all constituents whether they reside in their ward or not. Judy Martin, McCrae

Parking needed Rye, with its beach and pier, is one of the loveliest places on the Mornington Peninsula, but the shabby foreshore doesn’t match the beauty of the bay vista. For years now the community has flagged the foreshore as a priority for attention. As chair of Rye Community Group Alliance (RCGA) I have worked hard to get this to happen with Mornington Peninsula Shire being told many times that a “foreshore for all” was the basic principle for any changes. Hence, the all-inclusive picnic tables and disability access ramp and the Parks Victoria new accessible lower landing. Why, in the draft foreshore plan is parking removed from the beach and pier? If this plan goes ahead the closest car space (on Point Nepean Road) will be a minimum of 150 metres – easy if you are able bodied, but certainly not if you have a mobility issue, or you are lugging diving,

PAGE 12

fishing or family picnic gear. This area is the heart of Rye, it is why people come here. Given the proximity of the huge boat trailer car park there is no logical reason for not retaining a linear car park on the western side. The $6.5 million isn’t going to come Rye’s way again, so it is vital as a community we make sure the shire gets it right for local communities, not just for tourists. Mechelle Cheers, Rye

Region required There is a very vital thing the state government MP for Nepean [Chris Brayne] should be doing to help Mornington Peninsula Shire residents and businesses and for their future benefit: It is to start the process in the Legislative Assembly to remove the shire from the Melbourne area and return it to being a region. There are many aspects to this which he is no doubt aware of, as our MP. The fact we have to be in stage four restrictions at present is only one very significant consequence of having been put into Melbourne Metro. Glenn Whipp, Sorrento

Coming through Several times recently when walking on a shared track (for bicycles and walkers) I have been frightened by a cyclist coming up behind me at speed and passing without any warning. This may happen more frequently now because of the increase of people cycling and walking. On talking to other cyclists about this problem it seems that they don’t realise that it’s frightening to the walker. Some of the bikes do not have a bell fitted; one of them had a horn, which was great. Please, would bike riders give walkers ahead of them an audible warning? Ring their bell, hoot their horn, click their device or sing so people are not discouraged from walking? Any other ideas or suggestions would be welcome. Liz Sarrailhe, Balnarring

Missing details Brewis Atkinson fails to clarify that there is a daily movement cap on take offs and landings at Tyabb Airport for aircraft weighing more than 2041 kg at take-off (“Umpire to decide” Letters 2/9/20). He also fails to mention that take offs and landings at night are permitted except for aircraft weighing more than 2041kg at take-off. The exception to this is that Mornington Peninsula Shire Council has authorised aircraft which are used for emergencies or any government response, regardless of size and weight, to use the airport at any time. The clever and misleading wording used by Mr Atkinson in his letter reminiscent of his “survey”. In that survey he asked hypothetical questions which elicited a negative response. I once made the comment to Mr Atkinson that had he asked for a response to one of his questions he offered me as an example, I would have given him the same negative answer too. On 1 September VCAT (Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal) handed down its most recent decision regarding Tyabb airport operations. As in the previous tribunals and panels, the decision was in favour of the airport (“More turbulence ahead despite aero club’s win” The News 9/9/20). I wonder how many more “umpire’s decisions” it will take to satisfy Mr Atkinson. Or will he not accept the umpire decision at all? Jack Vevers, president Peninsula Aero Club

Kick in guts decision The VCAT (Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal) decision to allow aircraft to take off and land at Tyabb [airfield] on Sundays from 9.30am to 10.30am, despite this having been prohibited by the permits controlling operations at the airfield, is the result of three main co-existing circumstances (“More turbulence ahead despite aero club’s win” The News 9/9/20): The “[Peninsula Aero Club] has been breaching the ‘church hour’ condition for in excess of

Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

15 years” (VCAT reasons, paragraph 46). During the 15-years immediately before the VCAT proceeding commenced, the council did not give the PAC any written direction that the operations cease (VCAT reasons, paragraphs 50, 59). The All Saints Church has not existed since 1978 (VCAT reasons, paragraph 47). For residents who have justifiably complained about excessive noise from “church hour” aircraft operations to PAC and council, this VCAT decision is a kick in the guts. Had the council acted on those complaints during the 15-year period and taken steps to ensure the relevant condition was met, the VCAT decision may well have been different. However, this decision does not change the use of the land from being an “authorised landing ground” nor does it imply that if there were breaches of any other permit conditions for 15 years or more, they would be approved by VCAT in future. Based on my extensive door knocking and conversations in the local area, most residents want the council to work as strongly as possible to establish effective controls that protect our right to enjoy where we live without excessive aircraft noise. I encourage all Somerville, Hastings and Tyabb residents who want better controls on aircraft noise to select very carefully who they vote for at the upcoming council elections. Brewis Atkinson, Tyabb

Pilot responsibilities Following the claim by the Peninsula Aero Club to the Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal that pilots unable to land before 9.30am on Sundays could be forced into a holding pattern if the “church hour” permit was enforced, we again need to ask where do the facts lay in the airfield saga (“More turbulence ahead despite aero club’s win” The News 9/9/20). CASA regulations are clear that a pilot must, before a flight away from the vicinity of an aerodrome, make a careful study of many factors including the condition of the aerodrome to be used and, prior to operating at any non-controlled aerodrome, which Tyabb is, pilots should satisfy themselves that it is suitable for their operation by reference to ERSA or by contacting the aerodrome operator. In the case of Tyabb, according to its entry in the relevant air services publication ERSA (ERSA is the reference publication pilots use to obtain information about an aerodrome and generally have it available at all times) it is the responsibility of visiting pilots to obtain landing permission prior to arriving. This permission is not available over the radio. Pilots would be informed of any curfew when ringing to seek that permission. Furthermore, the ERSA allows for any such curfew details to be published in its information section for that airfield. This issue would only apply to less than a handful of visiting aircraft, if any, on most Sundays during the disputed hour as the majority, if not all of the operations that take place during this hour, are Tyabb-based aircraft, the pilots of which would be well aware of the local rules. One by one the already inadequate airfield controls are being stripped away. Peter Davis, Tyabb

A better way Michael Davey wants critics of [Premier] Dan Andrews to “explain in detail what you would have done differently” (“Andrews maligned” Letters 9/9/20). This would only be possible if the editor would allow us all four columns to reply, but I will try to trim it down. At the national cabinet on the 27 March I would have taken note of the other seven premiers and chief ministers who intended to chair meetings of their health ministers, chief health officers, police commissioners, Australian Defence Force and hospitality and transport representatives, rather than leave it to some middle tier public servants to set up hotel quarantine. Once told that one quarter of infected people could not be found at home, I would have immediately closed the one hour exercise loophole and upped the frequency of home checks, not wait another two weeks to do so. When offered tech support in May to help with contact tracing I wouldn’t have knocked it back only to then install the same system in September. I think I may have come up with a bit better system for recording contact tracing than a

pencil and a note pad and doctors reporting by fax. I certainly wouldn’t have spent from May till September getting angry with anybody who suggested the NSW contact tracing was superior to ours and then send a delegation to NSW to try to learn more from them. Too much was left to public servants who didn’t seem accountable to ministers and, after all the witnesses so far, the inquiry is yet to ascertain what minister was in charge. Michael G Free, Mount Martha

Question of health The three musketeers, [Prime Minister Scott] Morrison, [Treasurer] Frydenberg and [Health Minister and Flinders MP Greg] Hunt are putting the boot into [Premier] Dan Andrews again, wanting him to open Victoria’s borders so their voting bloc, big business, can start making money again. Firstly, they haven’t realised Victoria’s borders have never been closed. All other state borders have been closed to us. Secondly, I’m disgusted that these people and in particular Greg Hunt, are putting wealth before health. They criticise Andrews at every opportunity, but it’s Dan Andrews that fronts the media every day and answers questions, even the inane garbage asked by some reporters. Dan even had to explain the birds and bees to one reporter known for feeble stupid attempts at “gotcha” questions. What do we get from the musketeers? Not much. Just orchestrated questions from tame reporters. We discovered Scomo has built a cubby and the rest of the time he’s duck shoving the blame elsewhere. The federal government is pathetic. John Cain, McCrae

Lives saved It is so wrong to suggest we let nature take its course with COVID-19 (“Let nature prevail” Letters 9/9/20). He makes the mistake so many do of saying that the deaths, particular under 60s, have been in such few numbers that we should not worry too much about it. What he and all those who rail against the restrictions fail to recognise is that without the restrictions our death toll would be higher, not just from coronavirus but from a whole range of other causes. Letting the virus have free rein would mean our health care system, including intensive care units, would be overrun, so people who are injured in car accidents, who have heart attacks or other traumatic illnesses would have to fight for access to healthcare with those who have caught COVID-19. It is the lockdowns that are stopping us from that. We are now learning that contracting the virus leaves many younger people with sever long term health impacts. People in aged care are not in heaven’s waiting room. They are grandparents, mothers, fathers, sisters and brothers who are eminently capable of enjoying life and giving love and comfort to those close to them. Marg D’Arcy, Rye

MPs all quiet Just where are our state MPs on the Mornington Peninsula? They are silent during the lockdown while their constituents are suffering under [Premier] Daniel Andrews. Businesses are going to the wall, students are suffering from never ending home schooling. Bars, restaurants and cafes are closed, yet across the bay in Geelong they are on stage three lockdown. They are not part of greater Melbourne. However, the Mornington Peninsula, which is far more rural and considerably far larger in size, is included in Greater Melbourne. Not a word from our local MPs voicing their concern about the blatant discrepancy. No seats to be won on the peninsula for Labor, but Dan is not going to upset the marginal seats over in Geelong. These local members may not succeed in changing anything on the peninsula, but at least they could be seen to be trying and visible, not hiding in their offices still drawing their recently inflated salary and waiting out the time for their pensions. Dean Fletcher, Mount Martha Editor: There are three Legislative Assembly electorates on the Mornington Peninsula: Mornington, held by Liberal David Morris; Hastings, Liberal Neale Burgess; and Nepean, Labor Chris Brayne.


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ACROSS 1. More despondent 5. Shark blades 7. Very dry 8. Spanish dance style 9. Slimmer 12. Concentrated solution 15. Babble 19. Conceitedly

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Southern Peninsula News

16 September 2020

PAGE 13


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Railway Commissioners visit to Frankston Compiled by Cameron McCullough ON Wednesday last the Railways Commissioners arrived at Frankston by special train on their annual tour of inspection. They were met at the station by Cr F. H. Wells, and Mr H. Vicars, President of the Frankston Progress Association, and the secretary, Mr W. C, Young. Cr Wells reminded the Commissioners of the necessity for a sub-way or some other method to connect Wells Street with Cranbourne Road, and specially referred to the notice recently posted in the vicinity warning the public that trespassers at that point would be prosecuted. This, he contended, was contrary to a previous promise given that the public would be allowed to cross the line at their own risk. Mr Norman, chairman, after consulting the plans prepared in connection with improvements about to be made at the Frankston Railway Station, stated that provision had been made for a sub-way at the Wells St entrance. In the meantime, he allowed it to be inferred that the custom of the public in crossing the line would not be interfered with. Cr Wells also urged that the goods shed be opened at 8am instead of 8.30 as at present. Mr Norman replied that to do that would involve the appointment of an additional porter, and he thought that as these sheds were open continuously from 8.30am to 5pm the public were very well served. Additional Morning Tram Promised Mr Vicars asked for an improved

railway service, and suggested that trains at present running as far as to Carrum should be extended to Frankston. Mr Norman replied that the line to Frankston would be electrified within 12 months, when the service would be much improved. He could not recommend additional trains in the afternoon or evening, but was of the opinion that an additional train could be provided between 9.30am and 12.30pm. He believed it was necessary. The Commissioners were heartily thanked, after which they left for Mornington and Stony Point. *** WHEN I grow up to be a man I’ll smoke cigars! like Uncle Dan, And flirt with girls, and own a car, And wear long pants! like my papa, And when the winter days are damp, I’ll have goloshes an a gamp. But coughs and colds I’ll not endure, I’ll Just take Woods’ Great Peppermint Cure. *** The Morwell Scheme Letter To the Editor. Sir, Your interesting article in “The Standard” August 20th, dealing with the immense value of the Morwell coal as a source of cheap power, does great credit to your paper. Although the Lawson Ministry deserve praise for actually setting the work in hand, there is no excuse for the years of dallying with this great venture. However, it can be surmised that it has taken every minute of the thirty

nEw homEs unIt DEvElopmEnts

years you mention to overcome the powerful influence of the interests in the various tinpot and expensive electric plants, which are spread about Melbourne, and it’s safe to conclude that at last National Progress is to receive consideration over Vested Interests. The figures you give are very instructive, proving beyond doubt the immense value of the Morwell scheme to Victoria’s industrial life, for we have the whole of the essentials of a great producing and manufacturing State, except cheap power, and we have only to watch the papers to see that the State’s who are advancing most are those making the greatest use of natural power resources. It is impossible to know at present the intention of the commissioners as to the way they intend to use the power for generating purposes, or whether fullest use is to be made of this gift of Providence. Without doubt, coal is intended to be used by man for other purposes than simply burning it to produce heat, and I appeal to your readers to interest themselves in the matter of obtaining from the Morwell coal, not only cheap coal, but also the increased industrial benefits to be derived by the proper utilisation of the wealth of the byproducts contained in the coal. I am, &c. CLAVIS. Seaford, August 25th. *** A MEETING of the Frankston Football Accident Committee was held on Monday evening last. Miss Dolly Gregory presided. Mrs C. Dalman, Miss Gamble, and Mr E.

youR DEsIgn oR ouRs

K. McComb were also present. Recommendations were received from the Football Club for the payment of small amounts to various players who had been temporarily disabled, and the sum of £4 was passed to meet same. An account for £10 10s for medical fees in connection with the serious accident to Mr McGinisker, early in the season, was also passed for payment. *** Council Deadlock. Following the unsuccessful attempt to hold the ordinary monthly, meeting of the shire council at Frankston last week, owing to the absence of a quorum, the Frankston and Seaford Riding councillors immediately waited on the Minister of Public Works, in Melbourne. As the result of the interview, the councillors of the ridings named forthwith made a “call” of the council for Monday, 13th September, at Frankston, at 10.30am. Notices to the above effect were posted to all the councillors on Friday, 3rd inst., with the intimation that any councillor failing to attend would be liable to a penalty of £20. In accordance with a previous adjournment, councillors of the Frankston and Seaford Ridings met yesterday at Frankston, but the East and Centre Riding representatives did not attend, and a further adjourned until the “call” meeting at Frankston on Monday next was made. It is stated that after receiving the “call” notice referred to the Centre Riding councillors issued a similar summons, requesting councillors to

attend at Somerville on the same day as the Frankston date but half an hour earlier. Frankston councillors are not treating this document seriously. Fortified by the advice received on their recent visit to the Minister, they state they are confident that their position is correct. *** FRANKSTON was visited this week by Sgt A. T. Leadbeater who will oppose the Hon A. Downward for the Mornington seat in the Legislative Assembly, the expectation being that the general elections for the State will take place on 14th Oct. Sgt Leadbeater saw active service in the great war as a member of the 9th Light Horse, and on his return to Australia resumed his avocation as a farmer and agriculturalist. Mr Leadbeater will stand as a Nationalist and supporter of the Lawson Government. *** LAST Sunday night or early Monday morning a burglary was committed at the Peninsula Motor Garage Frankston. The thieves departed with a quantity of motor car accessories. Senr. Constable Bray, in company with city detectives last week arrested at Langwarrrin two young men who are suspected of being implicated in recent robberies in the district. They will appear at the Frankston Court on Monday morning next. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 10 September 1920

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Southern Peninsula News

16 September 2020

PAGE 17


scoreboard FV releases refunds policy SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie THE long-awaited announcement of Football Victoria’s refunds policy was made late last week. The policy was prefaced by a reference to a recent Australian Sports Foundation survey on the severe economic impact of the pandemic. It estimated the total financial loss to Australia’s 70,000 community sports clubs to be around $1.6 billion which jeopardises the survival of many. FV hasn’t been immune to the impact of having its competitions disrupted by suspension and eventual cancellation. The federation stood down most of its staff from March and all of its staff from August. It has been formulating a refund policy for weeks now and this process has taken much longer than clubs expected with most local clubs being forced to offer refunds well in advance of an official FV announcement. However, not all Australian jurisdictions were tardy in announcing a refunds policy. For example, Football Queensland announced its policy in March and Football West released its policy in May. Albeit that these policies have since been tweaked their early release enabled clubs to make informed refund decisions and it can be argued that they were better-placed than their Victorian counterparts to deal with refund requests from players and parents. FV’s policy essentially deals with player registration fees and team entry fees but it includes the revelation that Football Federation Australia has decided to retain 95 per cent of National Player Registration fees. FFA’s 5 per cent refund equates to 70 cents for every registered junior player in Australia and $1.65 for every registered senior player. “That’s ridiculous,” was the blunt response from Langwarrin president Tanya Wallace. “And this has a knock-on effect for Football Victoria and in turn the clubs. “I don’t think that keeping 95 per cent of those fees is fair. “What about the state federations that do all the work?” Langwarrin is an NPL2 club and holds both senior and junior NPL licences. It doesn’t pay player registration fees

Money matters: Football Victoria’s player registration and team entry refunds for community club seniors and juniors. Tables: Supplied

for seniors, under-20s and under-18s as part of its senior licencing agreement but it pays a $20,000 team entry fee to cover all three squads. FV is refunding 45 per cent of the team entry fee for NPL2 clubs and Wallace is surprised by the amount. “I emailed Football Victoria and told them I couldn’t understand how their refund for NPL2 and 3 was at 45 per cent because as far as I was concerned their only outlay for that league was match balls,” she said. “We’d only paid two-thirds of the team entry fee and I don’t get how they can take $14,000 off us and only give 45 per cent back. “That amounts to $6300 for balls as there were no competition fees incurred because there were no matches. “We had to pay for referees ourselves for any practice matches so what are we paying for here? “The brand? The name? “Makes no sense to me.” When it comes to NPL senior and

junior fees FV openly discriminates in favour of women and girls who have for some time now been the focus of the federation’s attempts to grow the game through participant numbers. The refund policy highlights this disparity. NPL senior men pay a team entry fee of $25,000, NPL 2 and 3 senior men pay $20,000 and NPLW senior women pay $11,000. The team entry fee refund percentage for NPL men in all three levels of competition is 45 per cent while the refund for NPLW is 75 per cent. Junior NPL boys pay player registration fees while junior NPL girls do not. When it comes to junior NPL team entry fee refunds again there is no gender parity as the boys will receive a 45 per cent refund while the girls receive 75 per cent. Yet the state body can’t be accused of masking a policy weighted in favour of female participation as it points to this discrimination in its policy announce-

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Southern Peninsula News 16 September 2020

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ment. “Fortunately, FV has received substantial support from the Commonwealth and Victorian governments throughout this period, including JobKeeper and the Survival Package Fund respectively. These packages have subsidised our ongoing operations, return to play activities and allowed FV to make strategic decisions in relation to this policy – for example, the increased level of refunds to support football for women and girls.” Most local clubs fall into the category of community clubs and they will receive a 70 per cent refund of senior men’s and women’s player registration fees. Men’s State League clubs can expect a 60 per cent refund on team entry fees (which are different for different leagues) while Women’s Victorian Premier League clubs receive a 100 per cent refund. Team entry fees for women’s State League clubs have been waived.

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And now the process of refunding players and parents gathers pace but not before some difficult decisions are made. Tanya Wallace best sums up the juggling act facing club administrators with her parting comment on this issue. “The whole thing is an absolute nightmare. “You try and look after the families at your club as well as protecting the future of your club and giving these families something to come back to. “It’s not easy.” If there’s been anything positive to emerge from the season that never was it is the enhanced status of FV’s southern region club ambassador Greg Hurvitz. Throughout the sport’s shutdown FV has trod a rocky path in terms of public relations. However Hurvitz has received wide acclaim from local clubs for his role in fielding their concerns and for doing his best to keep them informed.


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Frost breaks through for black-type victory HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou MORNINGTON-based trainer Rachael Frost landed her first blacktype race at Flemington on Saturday 12 September with her inform gelding, Travimyfriend. The eight-year-old son of Tavistock had relished the wet tracks of late to pick up a win and second placing at Caulfield in his three prior runs, but demonstrated on Saturday that he’s not just a mudlark. With the rain setting in later than expected at Flemington, Travimyfriend did what he had never done before and saluted on a good surface for the first time in his career. Ridden by Dean Yendall, the gelding sat at the rear of the field before launching late in the straight to pick up the heavily-supported Western Australian visitor, Windstorm, and claim a three-quarters-of-a-length victory in the Listed The Sofitel Handicap (1400m). Trainer Rachael Frost was glad to see Travimyfriend back-up his solid jumpout the week prior. “He might’ve ran last the other day in a jumpout against Pippie but he worked through the line really good and it ticked him over nicely for this,” Frost said post-race. “All of his stakes performances had been on good tracks, it’s only his wins that haven’t been. It was just as long as there was a bit of give in the ground today. “He’s a neat old horse and it’s my first winner here so it’s great.”

Jockey Dean Yendall said it was a great effort by the gelding to overcome a couple of setbacks. “It unfolded straight away when he got a fair old bump out of the barriers and he was back where I had never been on him before,” Yendalls said. “I just followed the race and they went at a really solid tempo and he actually travelled really nicely.

He put the writing on the wall last time when he ran a good race up against Showmanship so I knew he wasn’t hopeless but I was just hoping this rain would come earlier so it would’ve been a genuine soft when he did go around, but he adapted to that.” “He wanted to lay in a little bit under pressure with the whip in the

left hand it helped him find the line straight and it probably got him the win. It was a great effort by him and a great effort for Rachael to get him to go again.” The victory sent Travimyfriend’s prizemoney past the $450,000 mark and brought up his seventh career win from 50 starts.

Black-type: Rachael Frost’s Travimyfriend wins the Listed The Sofitel at Flemington on Saturday 12 September. Picture: Supplied

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16 September 2020

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