Southern Peninsula News 13 October 2020

Page 1

Southern Peninsula

PRE-ARRANGED FUNERALS Caring for local families for over 35 years

123 Jetty Rd, ROSEBUD Ph: 5986 8491 www.rosebudfunerals.com.au

An independent voice for the community

Your weekly community newspaper covering Safety Beach to Portsea For all advertising and editorial needs, call 03

FREE

Wednesday 14 October 2020

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au

Big screen crowd waits on Grand Final nod THE Saints won’t be marching in, but Dromana Drive-In’s Paul Whitaker, son Joshua Whitaker and wife Shelley are hopeful of being able to show the grand final on the big screen next week. Picture: Gary Sissons

Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au DROMANA Drive-In has scored two quick goals in getting permission from the AFL and Channel 7 to live telecast the AFL Grand Final. But the result won’t be known until owner-operators Paul and Shelley Whitaker get the nod from the state government to screen the event before an anticipated crowd of hundreds on Saturday 24 October. Following on from the successful Saints versus Bulldogs match at the drive-in last June, they said that to host the big game on Victorian soil “would be so important for many fans and even those watching for the first time”. “It’s been a team effort from both ends of the ground in trying to convince the government that the event will be safe, and then obtaining permission from the AFL,” Mr Whitaker said. The diehard Saints fan says he wrote to Premier Daniel Andrews, his ministers, other MPs, Opposition spokespeople and government departments. “You name it and I contacted them. But I didn’t get much reaction.” Continued Page 9

Deadline close for ‘most unusual’ poll Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au VOTERS just over one week to elect 11 councillors to run Mornington Peninsula Shire for the next four years. Social media has become an intense platform for debate in what is recognised as the most unusual municipal election ever because of the COVID-19 restrictions on campaigning. Ballot packs were mailed out to peninsula voters by the Victorian Electoral Commission last week and must be returned by 6pm Friday 23 October. Voting is compulsory for those listed on the state electoral role. Just five of the sitting councillors are seeking re-election and the results will

be announced Friday 13 November. The endorsement of candidates in all wards by the Tyabb airfield-based Peninsula Aero Club has led observers to claim that the club’s involvement is more conspiracy than coincidence. Candidates supporting the airfield’s allegations that it is being treated unfairly by the shire has seen at least five of them sign a petition calling on the state government to reject changes to planning regulations affecting the airfield (“Pro-airfield candidates want state to act” The News 6/10/20). The proposed changes followed investigations by a QC hired by the council into planning permits and businesses operating at the airfield and are scheduled to be hard by the Victorian

Civil Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) in April next year. In August, a video released on the internet featuring footage taken at the airfield was described by shire CEO John Baker as “clearly misrepresenting the council and some councillors”. He said the video was “deliberately designed to mislead and denigrate and is factually inaccurate” (“Video flies in face of poll rules” The News 31/8/20). The aero club’s online newsletter provided a link to the video under the heading “Council’s attitude to various matters a cleaver [sic] and amusing insight!”. In a message attached to the aero club’s endorsement of specific candidates in each ward, its president Jack

Vevers talks about the shire having “waged war” against the club and the airfield as well as harassing and attacking “farm gates, wineries and other small businesses”. A petition backed by two candidates calls on the shire to provide more bike and BMX facilities. The two candidates are both Mount Eliza residents, with one standing in Briars Ward and the other Red Hill Ward (“Bike jumps now an election issue” Page 7). The council election has also seen candidates peppered with questionnaires from community groups and organisations, including The News. The exchanges on social media have been described as brutal and cruel. Lawyers have been contacted over

one candidate’s comments about a rival in the Briars Ward whose 10-week-old daughter died in 2018. The information was allegedly leaked from a not-for-profit organisation. The organisation’s president has said the information about the child’s funeral arrangements was on the internet and “therefore in the public domain”. A Watson Ward candidate has told police his computer was hacked. His campaign was subsequently delayed by his efforts to firstly track down the source of the hack and then to await delivery of a new computer. Screen shots being taken to record particularly viscous and allegedly defamatory statements are may be used as evidence in post-election court cases.

scan to order

NOW OPEN

Takeaway & Home Delivery Menu Asian Fusion Hawker Street Food 2389 Point Nepean Road, Rye. Ph: 5910 0966

Opening hours: Wednesday to Saturday for Dinner from 5pm Friday to Sunday for Lunch from 12noon

www.limespice.com.au


NEWS DESK

Southern Peninsula

Bright Future for practical science lessons

Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000 Published weekly

Circulation: 22,870

Audit period: Apr 2014 - Sept 2014

Source: AMAA; CAB Total Distribution Audit for further information visit auditedmedia.org.au

Journalists: Stephen Taylor, Brodie Cowburn 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Ricky Thompson 0425 867 578 or ricky@mpnews.com.au Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production/Graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Craig MacKenzie, Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group, PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@mpnews.com.au Web: mpnews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 15 OCTOBER 2020 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: WEDNESDAY 20 OCTOBER 2020

An independent voice for the community We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

DECKING T/Pine 70x22 KD ACQ ........................... $2.70mt T/Pine 90x22 KD ACQ ........................... $3.50mt T/Pine 140x22 KD ACQ ......................... $6.25mt Merbau 70x19 Random ........................ $5.25mt Merbau 90x19 Random ........................ $6.50mt Merbau 140x22 Random .................... $13.95mt

FIBRE CEMENT SHEET UNDERLAY 1800x900 ............................................ $18.95ea

4.5MM

1800x900 ............................................ $13.50ea 1800x1200 .......................................... $18.00ea 2400x450 .............................................. $9.00ea 2400x600 .............................................$12.00ea 2400x900 ............................................ $18.00ea 2400x1200 .......................................... $24.00ea 3000x900 ............................................ $22.50ea 3000x1200 .......................................... $30.00ea

6.0MM

1800x1200 .......................................... $25.75ea 2400x900 ............................................ $25.75ea 2400x1200 .......................................... $34.25ea 3000x1200 .......................................... $42.75ea

BLUEBOARD

2400x900 ............................................ $31.00ea 2400x1200 .......................................... $41.25ea 2700x900 ............................................ $34.50ea 2700x1200 .......................................... $46.00ea 3000x900 ............................................ $38.00ea 3000x1200 .......................................... $50.75ea

BGC DURAFLOOR

2250x600x19 T&G.................................$85.00ea

CEMENT PRODUCTS

Concrete Mix 20kg .................................$7.75ea Rapid Set 20kg ...................................... $8.25ea Cement 20kg ......................................... $8.50ea

SHADOWCLAD GROOVED

Shadowclad 2.4x1.2x12mm .............. $130.50ea Shadowclad 2.7x1.2x12mm .............. $146.75ea Large quantities ......................................... P.O.A.

KDHW F17

90x35 ................................................... $6.85mt 90x45 ................................................... $9.00mt 140x45 ................................................$12.95mt 190x45 ............................................... $18.75mt 240x45 ............................................... $26.95mt 290x45 ............................................... $33.95mt

SMARTFRAME LVL15 H2S

90x42, 140x42, 190x42, 240x42, 290x42 CYPRESS

125x75 ............................................... $12.25mt 100x100 ............................................. $12.50mt 125x125 ............................................. $20.50mt 150x150 ............................................. $38.00mt 70x19 Blanks......................................... $2.50mt

TREATED PINE POLES 75-100x1.8mt ...................................... $6.75ea 75-100x2.4mt .................................... $10.50ea 75-100x3.0mt ..................................... $12.75ea 75-100x3.6mt ..................................... $16.50ea 100-125x1.8mt ..................................... $9.95ea 100-125x2.4mt ................................... $14.50ea 100-125x3.0mt ................................... $20.50ea 100-125x3.6mt ................................... $24.75ea 100-125x2.4mt Splits .......................... $11.75ea

OBHW F8 50x25 ................................................... $1.65mt 75x38 ................................................... $2.95mt 125x38 ................................................. $4.95mt

MDF CRAFTWOOD 2400x1200x3mm ................................ $11.00ea 2400x1200x6mm ................................ $18.00ea 2400x1200x9mm ................................ $24.00ea 2400x1200x12mm .............................. $27.00ea 2400x1200x16mm .............................. $33.00ea 2400x1200x18mm .............................. $36.00ea

PARTICLEBOARD

18mm 2400x450 ............................................ $13.50ea 2400x600 ............................................ $18.00ea 2400x1200 .......................................... $36.00ea

POLYESTER BATTS

R2.0 12pc $30.00 per bag R3.5 6pc $27.00 per bag

Southern Peninsula News

SOUTHERN BEECH 130X19 T&G E/M

FEATURE GRADE FLOORING

$7.50 mt

(approx. 300mt pack lots) MELAMINE - EDGED 16MM 2400x300 ............................................ $12.00ea 2400x450 ............................................ $18.00ea 2400x600 ............................................ $24.00ea 1800x450 ............................................ $13.50ea 1800x600 ............................................ $17.00ea 3600x450 ............................................ $27.00ea 3600x600 ............................................ $36.00ea Not Edged 2400x1200 .......................................... $40.00ea 2400x1200x3mm ................................ $18.00ea

PINE LINING 140x12 VJ/Regency .............................. $2.50mt 140x19 VJ/Floor.................................... $3.95mt

PINE DAR STD GRADE 42x19 ................................................... $1.25mt 70x19 ................................................... $1.75mt 90x19 ................................................... $2.25mt 120x19 ................................................. $2.65mt 140x19 ................................................. $3.00mt 190x19 ................................................. $4.50mt 240x19 ................................................. $6.75mt 290x19 ................................................. $8.50mt 140x12 ................................................. $2.15mt

For price and availability of all your buliding supply needs please call 14 October 2020

FLOORING SHEETS

FENCE EXTENSIONS

Yellow Tongue 3600x800mm ............... $42.50ea Plyfloor 2.4x1.2x15mm ........................ $66.50ea

2400x500 ............................................ $26.00ea

KDHW DAR SEL GRADE

2400x500 Woven ................................. $36.00ea

42x19 ................................................... $3.95mt 65x19 ................................................... $5.75mt 90x19 ................................................... $8.25mt 110x19 ................................................. $9.95mt 135x19 ............................................... $13.50mt 185x19 ............................................... $23.75mt

NOW IN STOCK!

ALL PRICES INCLUDE GST PAYMENT BY CASH OR CREDIT CARD ONLY E. & O.E.

PAGE 2

YEAR 12 biology student Taylen Black conducts a Gel electrophoresis process to analyse DNA. This technique is used in the real world to solve crimes in forensic science and even in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine.

SCIENTISTS play a crucial role at ExxonMobil Australia which is celebrating National Science Week. The company is keen to inspire future generations to think about maths and science as a career pathway. Since 2009, ExxonMobil Australia, through its subsidiaries Mobil and Esso, has inspired a new generation of engineers and scientists through its Bright Future grants program. Western Port Secondary College principal Chris Quinn said the school had used Bright Future grants to buy technology and equipment for senior biology lessons in which students learned how to analyse DNA. “Earlier this term our Year 12 biology students conducted Gel electrophoresis process to analyse DNA,” he said. “This technique is used in the real world to solve crimes in forensic science and even in the current race for a COVID-19 vaccine. “Students also filmed the process so that Year 9 forensic science students, who are participating in remote learning due to COVID-19, could share the experience. “All of this was made possible thanks to Bright Future grants … which enabled our students to have access to this high tech biological equipment along with webcams to support remote learning.” Esso Australia’s Long Island Point plant, which processes gas liquids and crude oil from Bass Strait for plants and refineries in Australia and overseas, is nearby to Western Port Secondary College. Plant manager David McCord said scientists and engineers were “critical for addressing the challenges of 21st century life”. “That is why we invest in education programs that focus on inspiring kids to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics,” he said. “From medicine to energy development to computing and engineering, we are supporting the development of a passionate and highly skilled workforce that will help solve problems and create new opportunities into the future.” The Bright Futures grants support a broad range of maths and science resources and projects: from buying iPads, smartboard software and robotics kits, to funding outdoor programs to teach students about sustainability, such as a seagrass study at Jawbone Marine Sanctuary, and a treeplanting project. Stephen Taylor

TREATED PINE SLEEPERS 200x50

2.4 mt ................................................. $15.25ea 2.4 mt (Packs 50) ................................ $13.50ea 2.7 mt ................................................. $17.00ea 2.7 mt (Packs 50) ................................ $15.25ea 3.0 mt ................................................. $19.00ea 3.0 mt (Packs 50) ................................ $17.00ea 200x75 1.8 mt ................................................. $17.25ea 1.8 mt (Packs 30) ................................ $15.25ea 2.4 mt ................................................. $23.00ea 2.4 mt (Packs 30) ................................ $20.25ea 2.7 mt ................................................. $25.75ea 2.7 mt (Packs 30) ................................ $22.75ea 3.0 mt ................................................. $28.50ea 3.0 mt (Packs 30) ................................ $25.25ea 3.6 mt ................................................. $34.25ea 3.6 mt (Packs 30) ................................ $30.50ea 200x100 2.4 mt ................................................. $30.50ea 2.4 mt (Packs 25) ................................ $27.00ea 3.0 mt ................................................. $38.00ea 3.0 mt (Packs 25) ................................ $33.75ea

2400x500 Slat Type ............................. $30.00ea

TREATED PINE R/S 100x12 Paling....................................... $0.75mt 150x12 Paling....................................... $1.10mt 150x25 ................................................. $2.50mt 75x50 ................................................... $2.50mt

PRIMED MDF MOULDINGS

T/PINE F7/MGP10 – LASER CUT

S/Bevel 42x15 ...................................... $1.10mt S/Bevel 67x15 ...................................... $1.45mt S/Bevel 67x18 ...................................... $1.50mt L/ Tongue 67x18 ................................... $1.50mt L/ Tongue 92x18 ................................... $2.20mt L/ Tongue 140x18 ................................. $3.25mt B/nose 67x18 ....................................... $1.50mt B/nose 92x18 ....................................... $2.20mt

70x35 ................................................... $2.85mt

CYPRESS WINDSOR PICKETS 70x19 900mm ....................................... $2.40ea 70x19 1200mm ..................................... $3.05ea 70x19 1500mm ..................................... $3.80ea 70x19 1800mm ..................................... $4.40ea

PRIMED LOSP T/PINE 18x18 Quad/Fillet/DAR .......................... $1.65mt 42x18 DAR ............................................ $2.95mt 66x18 DAR ............................................ $3.95mt 90x18 DAR ............................................ $5.50mt 138x18 DAR .......................................... $8.00mt 185x18 DAR ........................................ $11.50mt 30x30 Int Stop ....................................... $3.35mt 57x30 Ext Stop ...................................... $5.75mt 42x42 DAR ............................................ $5.75mt 90x42 DAR F7 ..................................... $11.25mt 138x42 DAR F7 ................................... $16.75mt 185x42 DAR F7 ................................... $22.25mt 230x42 DAR F7 ................................... $34.00mt 280x42 DAR F7 ................................... $40.95mt

T/PINE SLEEPER SPECIAL

200 X 75 X 2.4mt

$20.25 each PACK LOTS ONLY

5981 0943 sales@dromanatimber.com.au

70x45 ................................................... $3.75mt 90x35 ................................................... $3.80mt 90x45 ................................................... $5.00mt 140x35 ................................................. $5.85mt 140x45 ................................................. $7.50mt 190x45 ................................................. $9.95mt 240x45 ............................................... $14.75mt 290x45 ............................................... $18.50mt

T/PINE FASCIA PRIMED 190x30 D&G... .................................... $12.25mt 230x30 D&G... .................................... $19.50mt

PINE MGP10 70x35 Long .......................................... $2.55mt 70x45 Long ...........................................$3.30mt 90x35 Studs ......................................... $2.40mt 90x35 Long .......................................... $2.60mt 90x45 Studs ......................................... $3.15mt 90x45 Long ...........................................$3.60mt

PINE MERCH 90x35 ................................................... $1.65mt 90x45 ................................................... $2.40mt

PINE F7/MGP10 – LASER CUT 140x45 ................................................. $5.95mt 190x45 ................................................. $8.55mt 240x45 ............................................... $12.25mt

GALV SLEEPER CHANNEL

‘H’ SECTION $44.00MT ‘C’ SECTION $26.75MT

1 Dalkeith Drive, Dromana Mon-Fri 7am-4pm Sat 7am-12noon

www.dromanatimber.com.au


The day a family’s world changed forever Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

The Farnsworth family getting on with life. Picture: Yanni when his airbag failed to open, while Luke’s and Lisa’s did. However, Lisa’s feet were crushed into the car’s firewall, trapping her. Sam received severe head, chest and abdominal injuries. Police said he possibly suffered cardiac arrest and praised the desperate work of passersby until emergency crews arrived. He was flown to The Royal Children’s Hospital by helicopter ambulance in a critical condition.

Lisa, then 46, was flown to the Royal Melbourne Hospital by another helicopter ambulance in a serious condition with chest, leg and pelvis injuries. Luke was taken by road to the Monash Medical Centre in a stable condition with chest, abdominal and leg injuries. The major collision unit was called in to investigate. Reflecting on the crash and its aftermath last week, Mr Farnsworth

older brothers. “Lisa still has a damaged left ankle that is requiring more surgery to fuse joints to, hopefully, rectify the ongoing pain and lack of strength and stability. “We are back as a family – a very different family though,” the 30-year CFA veteran said. “We still have a lifetime’s challenges in front of us but, with all of the love and support around us, we know we will get through it with you all by our sides. “We are lucky to live in the most amazing community and, from the bottom of our hearts, we cannot thank our community, friends and family enough.” Mr Farnsworth is bitter towards the driver of the other car. The now-50year-old from Melbourne has been charged on summons with reckless conduct endangering life. Last week the police informant in the case, Senior Constable Christopher Hurwood, of Somerville Highway Patrol, said procedural delays caused by COVID-19 had delayed the case since April. It is listed for mention at Dromana Magistrates’ Court on 12 November where the magistrate can decide whether if it should be heard at a higher court, such as the County Court. Senior Constable Hurwood said driving rules for overseas visitors were changed in October last year – eight months after the Farnsworth’s world came crashing down – and now require internationals to obtain an Australian licence before being allowed on the roads.

EN TR $ AN 0 CE FE E

NEIL Farnsworth was buying hardware at Red Hill South when he learned his wife and two of his sons had been involved in a horrific car crash on the Point Leo Road, about five minutes’ drive away, early in 2019. What followed was a cruel race against fate and destiny with generous help from a close-knit rural community – help which Mr Farnsworth admits he will never be able to repay but for which he is eternally grateful. “They are my saviours,” he says. The crash, about 4.30pm, Wednesday 13 February, turned family life on its head. Nothing would or could ever be the same again for the long-time Red Hill family. Even now, 20 months later, the heartache and stresses are apparent. Lisa Farnsworth had just picked up twins Sam and Luke,12, from the school bus when her Holden Calais collided head-on with an Audi Q7 being driven by a 49-year-old man holding an international licence (“Community helps out as boy fights for life after crash” The News 18/2/19.) Mr Farnsworth rushed to the horror scene: “I came around the corner and immediately started working on Sam with the help of a beautiful lady, an emergency nurse, who stopped to help.” The force of the collision at the crest of a hill “stopped the Calais in its tracks”, reducing both cars to a tangled mass of twisted metal. Both were written off. Sam’s injuries were exacerbated

said Sam was on life support in ICU for three months and 12 months in hospital overall. While in ICU, with the scope of his son’s injuries readily apparent, the earth-moving contractor admits he was steeling himself to be asked to make some “hard decisions”. “Then we saw his eyes flicker and we knew we had him,” he said. “We had to keep his mind positive.” The keen Tigers’ fans were spurred on by Richmond players who gave up their time to drop in to cheer the boy up, take selfies with him and “talk footy”. Josh Caddy had a tattoo of Sam on his leg. Friends and members of the family visited him at every opportunity and the Farnsworths are especially grateful to one generous benefactor who provided a car so they could make the daily trip to Melbourne. “After 10-and-a-half months in hospital, Sam came home on 23 December to his family where he belongs,” Mr Farnsworth said in a post to family and friends, signed Neil, Lisa, Billy, Nicholas, Jamie, Luke and Sam Farnsworth. “He is a much happier boy being back with his beloved cat Ollie in his own room and among his friends. He has made small improvements, needs 24-hour care, and he has carers to help with the load. The fact he is here is a miracle. “Luke is doing well, he is the best twin brother, always there for Sam when he needs him. Getting back to school after about three months on a part-time basis to finish grade 6. He is now doing year 7 at Dromana Secondary College with two of his

NEW MEMBE

RS WELCOM

36 Holes of Golf Daily Competitions Driving Range Access

E

6 Guest Passes* Free Lesson with Club Pro Member Discounts

GOLF MEMBERSHIPS

YOUNG MEMBERSHIPS

JUNIOR MEMBERSHIPS

CORPORATE MEMBERSHIPS

ENQUIRE

NOW!

PHONE: 03 5950 0800 EMAIL: marketing@rcc.golf Rosebud Country Club – 207 Boneo Road Rosebud www.rosebudcountryclub.com.au * For 7 day members only, please enquire for other categories.

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 3


Thank You

F R O M T H E F A R N S W O R T H F A M I LY The Red Hill CFA, turning out to an incident to one of their own members is always extra hard, we cannot thank you all enough for your professionalism and support on the day and still to this day. Dromana Rescue, Somerville Highway Patrol and Ambulance Victoria, air and road, their amazing work on the day and after was and has been amazing, with one of Sam’s mica’s visiting Sam in hospital and still in contact on a regular basis. Mick Holmes, for sleeping on our couch, always there for Neil and to support the boys when they were left to look after themselves in the week following the crash. The rest of the Holmes family, Pat, Merv, Julie, Adam, Bel, Aaron, Kerry etc. Sam Johnstone from Penfold Mazda, what an amazing gesture to donate a car to travel to Melbourne and back for as long as we needed, we don’t know how we would have done it without you, what a huge help you have been, your generosity is greatly appreciated. To all that donated their time and goods to create an amazing new bathroom so that Lisa and Sam had wheelchair access when they arrived home, and for preparing Sam’s bedroom. Sam Norris and Brynor Conscruction Matt Comer from Homestead Cabinets Reece Plumbing, Tootgarook Jimmy Stuart from Bass Straight Plumbing and Gas Fitting Beaumont Tiles Luke McGuiness from Peninsula Bathware Tait Timber, Somerville Greg LeFevre from Alternative Epoxy Coatings Ray Farnsworth from Peninsula Peninsula Electrical and Air Conditioning Solutions Drew from Chiaroscuro

Red Hill Junior Football Club, another amazing fundraising effort, with so many there to support not only us but the junior club as well. We felt so humbled for the amount of support shown that evening, from the organisers, to donations and the entertainment. Everyone looked to thoroughly enjoy the evening. The local community, we could not ask to live in a better place, everything was covered from washing, cleaning, mowing, wood collection, food, emotional support etc. Just a few mentions, Janine Cairns, Jamie Stuart, Shara Grahame, Pat Holmes, Sam Norris, Julie Redhouse, Tony & Marion Kitto (McDonalds, North & South bound) Justin & Nicole Underwood, Bel Holmes (for starting the Go Fund me) We have so many to thank, we know we have not mentioned most of you, but you are all thanked more than you’ll ever know. Red Hill Primary School, for their support to the students and their families and keeping in touch with Sam with emails and visits from teachers and plenty of students visiting also. Richmond Football Club, they have gone above and beyond for Sam, keeping his and the family’s spirits high with lots of visits from players to allowing us to attend a closed training session as a family. Royal Children’s Hospital, we have no words. The care you have given Luke and Sam, physios, OT’s, social workers, doctors and nurses. These are all people we could never thank enough. A quick update, after 10 and a half months in hospital, Sam finally came home on 23 December to his family where he belongs. He is a much happier boy being back with his beloved cat Ollie in his own room and among his friends. He has made small improvements, needing 24-hour care, he has carers to help with the load, but the fact he is here is a miracle.

Julian and Jill Barson, Rob Johnson, Rossco, Ray Farnsworth and Ash Andrews for the laundry modifications.

Luke is doing well, he is the best twin brother, always there for Sam when he needs him. Getting back to school after about three months on a part time basis to finish Grade 6. He is now doing Year 7 at Dromana Secondary College with two of his older brothers.

Red Hill Primary School, Cubs and Scouts for creating a massive crew on many occasions to help get us through the cherry season a huge effort for Julie Redhouse to co-ordinate.

Lisa still has a damaged left ankle that is requiring more surgery to fuse joints to hopefully rectify the ongoing pain and lack of strength and stability.

David Marshall and Sandi Turner from the Flinders Village Cafe and with the help of Neil Mitchell from 3AW and the businesses that donated both goods and their time for the fundraiser held by David, what an amazing effort.

We are back as a family, a very different family though. We still have a lifetime’s challenges in front of us but with all of the love and support around us, we know we will get through it with you all by our sides.

Red Hill General Store for feeding the massive amount of the volunteers.

We are lucky enough to live in the most amazing community and from the bottom of our hearts we cannot thank our community, friends and family enough.

PAGE 4

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020


NEWS DESK

Budget help to probe Buruli APART from national issues, the federal budget contained few specific finance packages for the Mornington Peninsula. The largest was nearly $1.5 million for Stopping Buruli ulcer in Victoria, the flesh eating ulcer that in 2019 became prevalent on the southern peninsula. The budget also included $300,000 for “pedestrian safety upgrades” at Arthurs Seat. The Buruli money will support 22 research projects under Professor Tim Stinear at University of Melbourne. Buruli ulcer (BU) is described as a destructive skin and soft tissue infection that can cause permanent deformity. The National Health and Medical Research Council says the ulcer is caused by a bacteria carried in the guts of possums and spread by mosquitoes to people from areas contaminated by possum faeces. “A targeted intervention based on screening possum faeces followed by control of mosquitoes in areas where possums and mosquitoes are shown to carry the bacteria will be trialed here, giving public health officials a means to stop

this disease,” NHMRC media manager Thea Williams said. “Arthurs Seat is one of the most picturesque locations on the Mornington Peninsula, with 250,000 locals and tourists visiting the location each year,” Flinders MP Greg Hunt said. “Last year I met with representatives from the local community, the Mornington Peninsula Shire, Parks Victoria and the Arthurs Seat Eagle to discuss issues around road safety and the numerous close calls pedestrians have navigating the roads at the summit. The gondola ride’s CEO Tom Smith was quoted in a news release from Mr Hunt’s office as saying his company had been working with Parks Victoria, Victoria Police, the Department of Transport, the Mornington Peninsula Shire and local members of both state and federal parliaments “to continue to ensure that visitors to both the Eagle and the state park can safely enjoy all that is on offer within the summit precinct.” The Arthurs Seat Eagle is co-owned by businessman and former Australian of the Year Simon McKeon.

JP for life BOB Bolch, RIGHT, has been made a life member of the Royal Victorian Association of Honorary Justices. Mr Bolch was appointed as a JP in Queensland in February 1997and became a member of the Victorian branch of the RVAHJ and a member of the Mornington Peninsula branch in August 2004. He opened the document signing centre at Frankston Police station in August 2005. Since October 2008 Mr Bolch has organised four other signing centres on the peninsula. In conjunction with Victoria Police he set up The 100 Club, which recognises the volunteer work carried out by members at signing stations on the peninsula.

Mr Bolch’s other achievements since arriving in Victoria are receiving a Chief Commissioners citation for assistance to Victoria Police in 2013, and in 2017 received an OAM and was named Victorian Senior of the year. In 2018 he was elected chairperson of the RVAHJ’s peninsula branch.

ARTIST William Kelly and actor Martin Sheen discuss peace in the documentary “Can Art Stop a Bullet”. Picture: Supplied

Peace film online ‘one more time’ THE multi-award winning documentary “Can Art Stop a Bullet: William Kelly’s Big Picture” is having its final online screening on Thursday 29 October. Described as a peace documentary, the film follows Cheltenham-based artist William Kelly through various countries, recording his views on peace along with those of actor Martin Sheen, photographer Nick Ut (whose photo of a child fleeing napalm bombing is credited with adding impetus to ending the Vietnam War) and philosopher A C Grayling. The image of that young girl is also incorporated in Kelly’s 13-metre long “Peace and War/The Big Picture” banner, which hangs in the La Trobe Reading Room at the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne. The banner includes Kelly’s “visioning” of Picasso’s

Guernica. Its creators say “Can Art Stop a Bullet” is international, but was “born” locally, with director Mark Street living in Mentone, sound recordist David Muir, Mornington, online editor Alan Ryan, Mount Eliza and media producer Terry Cantwell, Mornington (“Film follows artist’s pursuit of peace” The News 9/6/20). The 90-minute documentary was one of the last films shown at Mornington Cinemas before it was closed due to the COVID-19 emergency. "Can Art Stop a Bullet?” will be streamed online via fanforcetv at 6pm Thursday 29 October as part of the City of Kingston's Seniors Festival. Tickets: $10 at fanforcetv.com/programs/kfhrcasab Keith Platt

Nominate a local hero

2021 Australia Day Local Awards The search is on to find Mornington Peninsula’s most dedicated, generous and community minded people.

Do you know someone whose contribution to our community deserves to be recognised? Acknowledge their contribution by nominating them for the 2021 Australia Day Local Awards.

Nominate for: • Citizen of the Year • Young Citizen of the Year • Community Event of the Year Nominations are open and close Friday 6 November 2020.

Nominate them now!

mornpen.vic.gov.au/ausdayawards 5950 1137

VOTE 1

Mechelle

CHEERS

For Council

NEPEAN WARD Proven Record of Advocacy Commitment to Community, Equity and the Environment. Authorised by M.A. Cheers P0 Box 384 Rye 3941

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 5


Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

Police looking out for flashers over summer MORNINGTON police are planning to step up patrols against flashers on the foreshore between Mount Eliza and Mount Martha this summer. Senior Sergeant Paul Edwards said the problem was “not of epidemic proportions, but it does rear its head from time to time and we want to stamp it out”. Senior Sergeant Edwards said flashers were known to frequent narrow and winding tracks and trails leading to and from beaches and near beach boxes. “It’s a seasonal thing and we will be mobilising police on foot and on bike patrols, especially near the Balcombe estuary,” he said. A Southbank man was arrested in that area last year and charged with 10 counts of willful and obscene exposure from September to November. His case, adjourned a number of times, will go before Melbourne Magistrates’ Court next month. Senior Sergeant Edwards said flashers usually targeted girls and young women who often just chose to avert their eyes and ignore it, rather than taking positive action. Sometimes they waited until they got home, hours later, before reporting the offence, making it hard for police to catch the suspect. “What we are asking is for victims to immediately call 000,” he said. “They should not approach the flasher but, if possible, observe them while making the call, taking note of their descriptions. “If they can take a picture of the offender on the phone that would be even better.” Senior Sergeant Edwards said flashers often did not have criminal histories, making them harder to detect.

Snake in the grass THE discovery of an illegal eastern corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) at Hastings has prompted police to ask if anyone has information about it or any other exotic species of reptile. The white snake was found in a backyard on Hodgins Road, between Marine Parade and Victoria Street, Sunday 13 September. Witnesses had reported numerous sightings of a white snake loose in the area several months before its capture. The albino-like reptile – an exotic pest – was probably kept as a pet before its escape. Police said it was illegal to import, keep, breed, trade or release the snakes in Victoria. They posed “one of the greatest threats to biodiversity as they have the potential to establish in Victoria and predate upon and spread disease to our native wildlife”. “As a result of illegal possession and trade, the eastern corn snake has been discovered in all states of Australia, having either escaped or being deliberately released.” Anyone with information about this snake or any other exotic species of reptile is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Erratic driving A GOLD coloured Honda Accord being driven south east on Frankston-Flinders Road, Somerville, was reportedly veering into oncoming traffic, 12.50pm, Tuesday 6 October. Police said an approaching driver had to take evasive action to avoid a collision between Hawkins Road and Eramosa Road East. Anyone who saw the incident, or has dashcam footage, is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Rosebud thefts TWO MacBook Air laptops, a motor-driven pushbike and car keys were stolen from a house in Jetty Road, Rosebud, 12-2.30pm, Tuesday 6 October. No one was home at the time. Anyone with CCTV in the Lawson Crescent/ Jetty Road area is urged to call Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000.

Tools stolen Tools valued at $1000 were stolen from a shed behind a house in Glenvue Road, Rye, possibly over the weekend 3-5 October. They included a chainsaw and angle grinder. A second lot of tools including an angle grinder, drill, spanners and wrenches were stolen from a warehouse in Thames Street, Rosebud, 4-6 October.

EVERYTHING WE’RE DOING IS MAKING A DIFFERENCE Thank you Victoria. As hard as this is, every sacrifice we’re making is making a difference. But we can’t stop now, or lose everything we’ve worked for. We will get through this together.

For details go to vic.gov.au/CORONAVIRUS Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

PAGE 6

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020


NEWS DESK

Bike jumps now an election issue Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au KIDS were out in the fresh air, using their initiative, having fun, and letting off steam last week on improvised bike ramps – but some people saw their antics as vandalism of a public park and leaving a mess for others to clean up afterwards. The two schools of thought have parents on one side happy to see their kids occupied outdoors and amazed that some of their neighbours could take an opposing view and report them. Police arrived at Mountain View playground in Mount Eliza last week and asked children playing on the jumps for their names, addresses and schools after a neighbour reported them. The police then kicked down their dirt jumps. The pros and cons of constructions in the informal playgrounds are being hotly debated on social media and have been turned into an issue of this month’s Mornington Peninsula Shire Council elections. Briars Ward candidate Julia McCarthy, whose kids play on the jumps, said she saw a neighbour of the park on Mountain View Road “swearing at kids as she was frustrated at the dirt bike ramps they were building”. “I was astonished anyone could feel this way as it has brought me such joy seeing the kids being kids at the parks – one of the silver linings of COVID. “Let’s support these kids to get some sanctioned areas or facilities they can use, and also some breathing space while so much is still shut down for

Digging in: Children wasted no time in trying to rebuild their bike jumps which were flattened by council workers using a bobcat at a reserve in Mountain View Road, Mount Eliza. Pictures: Yanni (main) and supplied (inset)

them. This physical and creative activity is awesome, not harmful.” Ms McCarthy, one of 15 candidates contesting Briars Ward, is coordinating a petition to the council calling for more bike and BMX facilities for kids. She said that with parental supervision “things like choosing inappropriate areas - close to trees, harming

plants, in pathways - and using bad language or being anti-social - the path from teenager to be an adult can be tough - could be kept to a minimum”. Other Mount Eliza residents Melissa Hay, Lauren Hall and Melissa Goffin (a candidate in Red Hill Ward) said they were amazed their children’s fun and games could become a contentious

Applications open Fire Management Contractors List 2020/21 Mornington Peninsula Shire invites applications from local contractors to be considered for placement on our Fire Management Contractors List. The Shire inspects private land for fire hazards in the lead-up to summer and during the Declared Fire Danger Period. Where a fire hazard is identified, landowners are sent a Fire Prevention Notice issued either under the Country Fire Authority Act 1958 or the Fire Rescue Victoria Act 1958 to

remove the fire hazard by a specified date. To assist owners with carrying out the work, the Shire includes a Fire Management Contractors List with each Fire Prevention Notice sent. The list will also be published on the Shire’s website.

issue. “Truly sad today to witness intolerance,” Ms Hay said. “What has this world come to?” Ms Goffin said she had “communicated our frustration, positive benefits and sadness on behalf of kids and community” to the shire. “Apparently [the council officers] were acting in

response to multiple complaints and public attention. I let them know that they’d likely rebuild.” Ms Hall asked: “What has happened to our society? Where has the hearts in people gone? Council have just flattened all the bike jumps at the park with bobcats and five council workers... “Those jumps have saved the mental health of so many kids and parents. Many friendships have been made through kids playing together... Let’s turn this around, people. Let’s bring back what makes happy memories for our kids. It’s up to us.” She urged people to sign the petition. Stevie Habib said the shire “should make a proper bike track there for the smaller kids and use the space in a good way”. The other side of the argument was put by the shire’s interim director place Jessica Wingad said: “We understand the energy, creativity and enjoyment of those involved with creating informal bike jumps and are currently investigating longer term options to respond to this need in a safe and collaborative way," she said. “The shire is also assessing the reserves and parks used without permission for the construction of these jumps. Informal bike jumps can pose an unacceptable risk to other park users and may damage bushland or public park areas and our policy is to remove them.”

THIS OCTOBER

VOTE 1

SARAH RACE FOR NEPEAN.

(Mornington Peninsula Shire)

Contractors may be requested to undertake works including slashing grass and undertaking weed and vegetation removal.

Applications close 5pm Friday 30 October 2020 To apply and learn more visit: mornpen.vic.gov.au/fpn

For more information contact the Environment Protection Unit: 5950 1050

#JoinTheRace www.sarahracefornepean.com Authorised by S Race, Candidate for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council 2020 (Nepean Ward) PO Box 407, Rye, VIC, 3941

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 7


NEWS DESK

Hunger pains threaten Big Goose’s future Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au THE proprietor of the Big Goose animal petting farm Justin Orr says, with some irony, that he has never sought charity, but that’s exactly who came to help as he battled to supply food to his animals during the COVID-19 closure. Mount Martha mum Charity Cooper – who says Big Goose is the “saviour of sunny days and stay-athome parents all year long” – started a campaign to raise money to feed the animals during the stage four restrictions and surprised herself by generating $4300. The money went towards filling one of the farm’s silos with feed for the animals. “The Big Goose is the Saturday family outing we rely on and a staple for most of our kids down here. Bloody hell, it’s a staple to keep us sane,” she said. “The question my five-year-old has asked me most during COVID is, ‘When can we go to The Big Goose/’ ... I can't tell you how many times I have pushed that pram up that hill, holding another little hand beside me and into that gate, knowing I'll have four hours of peace while my children are entertained. “I’ll be damned if it’s not there at the end of lockdown when I can finally, finally, let the kids off the leash.” A grateful Mr Orr said the business with its 30 staff and 200 animals had missed out on obtaining government relief. He said he done all he could

PAGE 8

Southern Peninsula News

AT the Big Goose are: Carlos Sansberro with "Valentino" the bull; Kaye Dawkins with "Fluffy" the goat; Jo Barden with "Pixie" the goat; Brett Clarke with "Coober" the dingo; Justin Orr with "Hercules" the dog; and, Lachlan Townsend with "Olivia" the olive python. Picture: Yanni since March in the way of mortgage and bill deferrals as well as tucking into his superannuation to keep the business afloat. The budget didn’t provide any surety either and JobKeeper, for personal reasons, has only been paying him half the headline amount. As writ-large by Ms Cooper, the Mornington-Tyabb Road venue is a must-see for Mornington Peninsula youngsters who delight in petting its kangaroos, wallabies, emus, wombats, snakes, lizards, turtles, cattle, sheep, goats, camels, chickens, geese, turkeys,

14 October 2020

pheasants, deer – and even an ostrich. “We were lucky we already had 80 round bales of hay when COVID started and two big silos holding eight tonnes each, and Charity’s $4300 was enough to fill another silo,” Mr Orr said. “We’ve had other donations and they’ve all been tremendous support,” he said, adding that the pending drop in JobKeeper “would become an issue” as the shutdown dragged on. “We’ve been told we will need to have zero cases before we are allowed to reopen, while the playgrounds are

packed with kids,” he said. “We are on 60 acres [24 hectares] yet we are not allowed to have anyone. “We will probably not be allowed to open until Christmas and we’ve lost the September school holidays. On top of this the shire has closed the foreshore camping grounds so those people aren’t there [as a source of customers] either.” Mr Orr is confident the Big Goose, running six years, would survive despite the challenges because people are likely to want to make up for lost time when the shutdown ends. Indica-

tors show a resurgence in similar parks in NSW after restriction eased there. “We’re hanging in there,” he said. That’s good news for the hundreds of kids who enjoy getting up close and personal with the huge range of animals living there. Anyone wanting to help can contribute towards supplies of kangaroo food, guinea pig and rabbit pellets, golden yolk chicken feed, bird seed, oaten chaff, Lucerne chaff and hay. Visit thebiggoose.com.au for advice on donations.


Drive-in for GF

Picture: Yanni

Landslide threat: house evacuated HEAVY rainfalls forecasted late last week prompted Mornington Peninsula Shire to evacuate a house near The Esplanade, Mount Martha. This followed a warning to shire’s emergency management team that up to 50 millimetres of rain could fall from Wednesday “increasing concerns of a further [soil] collapse”. The Esplanade remained closed at the start of the last week following a landslide between Bradford and Ellerina Roads on Tuesday 29 September (“Landslip closes Esplanade” The News 6/10/20). “While there was no concern for the houses above the slip, there is concern a further collapse will cut access and utility services,” the shire said

in a statement. “As a result the municipal building surveyor determined it necessary to evacuate one home Wednesday afternoon and arrange alternative accommodation for the occupants.” The road was briefly opened last week after being cleared of an estimated 30 tonnes of soil and rock, with the shire planning to formally open it yesterday, Monday 12 October. “Geotechnical assessments of the slip area are under way to assess the cause and risk to road users of both the Esplanade and the associated service road,” the shire said. “The same assessments will form the basis of plans for long-term rectification works which are

estimated to take several months.” Further debris which slid down last week was contained in a bund constructed by VicRoads and did not reach the Esplanade. The landslides exposed Telstra lines running under the service road and the company was on site, Thursday 8 October, to assess the damage. No other services were exposed or impacted, they said. Workers set up a platform for a long reach excavator to enable works to continue, Friday 9 October. The service road remains closed and the road will be inspected daily. Details: visit mornpen. vic.gov.au/landsliderepairs Stephen Taylor

Continued from Page 1 Mr Whitaker then handballed over to Nepean MP Chris Brayne, who drilled the ball to sports minister Martin Pakula who, coming off the bench, tapped Marcus King from AFL Broadcasting on the shoulder and things began moving. After halftime, Mr Whitaker began working the wing with Heath Walker from AFL marketing and stirred up a bit of a fracas to get the crowd onside with cheering and writing letters of support. He said: “I’m not sure who set up the play, but the Premier took the final mark and, with the siren about to sound, has a shot at kicking the winning goal.” Mr Brayne is backing the plan: “Many people in the community have raised the Dromana Drive-In and the prospects of them holding a Grand Final event, particularly after [CEO] Gillon McLachlan’s comments earlier in the week expressing his support,” he said. “Subject to the data and public health advice, I think this is a really exciting opportunity to showcase the Mornington Peninsula nationally and bring the community together in a COVID Safe way, particularly given the huge mental health benefits of enjoying the footy” Mr Andrews has stated he intends announcing a possible easing of COVID-19 restrictions on Monday 19 October. Hopefully, this will include kicking the ball straight through the big sticks and giving the nod to the live telecast at Dromana Drive-in. That simple act would, almost certainly, give him the equivalent of a Brownlow Medal. Tickets for the big game at the Dromana Drive-In go on sale from Sunday 18 October. “If our event is cancelled due to restrictions not being relaxed, all monies will be refunded,” Mr Whitaker said.

Authorised by George Conrad of 21 Arthurs Avenue, McCrae Vic 3938

The abuse of older people is hard to talk about. Often, it’s committed by a family member. It could be a daughter, a son, or a loved one. Too many older people suffer in silence. Elder abuse is a form of family violence and it is unacceptable. What starts out small doesn’t always stay that way. Elder abuse is hard to picture, but it happens every day.

For further information and for independent advice, contact: Seniors Rights Victoria – 1300 368 821 1800 RESPECT – 1800 737 732 inTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence – 1800 755 988 Men’s Referral Service – 1300 766 491 If you are concerned for your immediate safety or that of someone else, please contact Triple Zero (000) for emergency services. For more information, please visit www.respectvictoria.vic.gov.au

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 9


NEWS DESK

New CEO to oversee Oberon ’s key projects be completed over the next 24 months” were finding permanent homes for the former HMAS Otama submarine (anchored off Crib Point) and the former pilot vessel Wyuna (anchored in Bell Bay, Tasmania). Mr Bryant said the association planned to bring the Wyuna to Victoria “later next year, with significant celebrations planned for her departure from Bell Bay and arrival in Melbourne”. “Otama and Wyuna will be preserved and placed on permanent display at Hastings Victoria, once facilities are completed,” Mr Bryant said. Mr Armstrong’s “maritime connections” included his marine engineer grandfather and uncle and his late father “an experienced deep sea merchant sailor”. “Neil loves ships, he photographs them and cruises regularly,” Mr Bryant said. A McCrae resident, Mr Armstrong would be CEO “in an honorary capacity” to help the association “consolidate its overall position”. NEIL Armstrong, above, has been appointed CEO for the next two years of the Western Port Oberon Association. A justice of the peace and a former Mornington Shire councillor and a board member of Metropolitan Ambulance Service and other nonprofit organisations Mr Armstrong was awarded an Order Of Australia Medal in 2019. Western Port Oberon Association president Max Bryant said Mr Armstrong had an “amazing background as an administrator and will bring a strong strategic focus to our current operations and long term plans”. He said the association’s “key projects to

VOTE 1

March close for bank THE demise of suburban bank branches is continuing with the Rosebud branch of the ANZ shutting its doors on 18 March 2021. The bank’s general manager for Victoria Michael Wake reeled off what have now become standard responses to bank branch closures (“ANZ withdraws from Mount Eliza” The News 28/9/20). “Every year we see 10 per cent less transactions at our branches because our customers no longer use them for everyday banking like they used to,” he said. “While branch activity has declined, we’ve seen a spike in demand for many of our non-

Food For all meeting FOOD For All’s annual meeting is this year being held via Zoom, 2pm, Wednesday 21 October. Those wanting to attend can contact Brian Allen at mail@foodforall.com.au and a Zoom link will be sent out the day before. The link will be active 10 minutes before the meeting. All invited.

Drivers wanted EXPERIENCED drivers are being sought to help supervise learner drivers as part of the Transport Accident Commission’s L2P Program on the southern Mornington Peninsula.

Nepean Ward

LITTER on the foreshore, in the street, and near shopping centres, will be the focus of the Big Peninsula Clean-up, Sunday 18 October. Participants will be able to pick up litter and log it into the Litter Stopper app apps.apple. com/au/app/litter-stopper/id1445816297 and list what they have collected. The data will be used to pressure the state government and councils to deal with single use plastics, and advocate for a container deposit scheme. To take part, gather your bags, safety gear, personal protective equipment, and anything else you’ll need, and head to your chosen cleanup site for an hour from 9am-12pm. Then, log the rubbish details in the app and share the experience on Instagram and Facebook with the hashtags #springcleanyourpatch #stopsingleuseplastics.

THE post-coronavirus financial fallout will make it tough for the next few years. As your independent Nepean Ward councillor since 2012, I offer continuity, experience and ability for the next four years.

You can follow my work on council and in the community at hughfraser-morningtonpeninsula.com

Our top priority is getting local businesses up and running while keeping residents Covidsafe. Our local economy has to reopen safely – and soon. Our cafes, restaurants and shops ought to be allowed to expand outdoors and agricultural producers assisted by allowing farm gate sales of all Mornington Peninsula agricultural produce.

HUGH FRASER

Clean-up Sunday

Continuity and Experience

Experienced

Southern Peninsula News

A CHILDREN First virtual gala will be hosted by Mornington Peninsula radio station RPP this year. Because of COVID-19 restrictions the station will use its TV sound stage and technology to host the event, 5-7pm, Saturday 17 October. Guests and attendees will participate on line. RPP presenter John Shoe OAM will MC the event as he has done in years past. This time he will be in a virtual world reaching out to an Australian and international audience. Children First Foundation is an Australian children’s charity that offers life changing surgery to disadvantaged children from the developing world. Details: childrenfirstfoundation.org.au

The program is paid for by the TAC and managed by the Department of Transport. Volunteers from across the peninsula have been assisting learner drivers who do not have access to a supervising driver or a vehicle since 2009. Mornington Peninsula Shire wants to recruit 10 mentors to help the learners achieve their 120 hours of driving as required for their test. An L2P mentor is described as someone who is “enthusiastic about contributing to the community and supporting young people by committing one to two hours per week to assist in supervised driving”. “We’re really proud to support our youth in any way we can. Getting your licence is such an integral part of gaining independence and stepping into adulthood,” the mayor Cr Sam Hearn said. “Having your licence leads to employment and educational opportunities that are fundamental to our young people.” Successful mentors will be trained and have all insurances covered by the shire when volunteering in the role. They must be fully licenced and over the age of 21. Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/l2pmentorapplication

Contact

I am not now and never have been a member of any political party, lobby or factional Nepean Ward township group. I am an independent, self-funded candidate and I have not solicited or received election donations. I live in Rye and represent all of Nepean Ward from Tootgarook to Portsea.

PAGE 10

Children First gala

Advertisement

Independent

for

branch roles, such as customer contact centres and the operations team which manages hardship and other inquiries. “The majority of our customers now prefer the convenience of doing their banking when it suits them. Our apps and call centres are convenient and we’ve also seen a number of passbook customers opting for debit cards recently to expand their banking options.” Mr Wake said the bank had written to customers to let them know about alternative banking methods, including online, telephone and mobile banking.

I know how the council and the community operate because of my work as a barrister, a former member of the Victorian Legal Services Board and its Financial and Investment Committee (2007–10), seven years on council’s Audit and Risk Committee, and working closely with the community, shire officers and councillors delivering these key initiatives: Key initiatives

My key initiatives over the past four years have been to bring in the Rye Township Plan and township height controls as well as $6.5 million of funding to implement the plan and rejuvenate Rye.

14 October 2020

In Sorrento there is $5 million for Sorrento’s new ferry terminal traffic management and an additional $1.8 million earmarked for more Sorrento car parking. George Street has been completely made over with new tourism facilities, toilets and street mall ($1.85m). Blairgowrie now has the very popular Point Nepean Road footpath ($3m) from Hughes Road to Rye township. And in Tootgarook, much-need drainage and street work at Carmichael and Wilkinson streets will soon be underway ($800,000 contracted). Romney Park has been rejuvenated and has a new playground. The Portsea Surf Life Saving Club’s new clubrooms received a $1 million contribution from council. Into the future

Council must keep spending to assist the recovery of our Mornington Peninsula economy. The $25.5 million of ratepayers’ capital works money unspent at 30 June ($5.9 million for Nepean Ward) must be unlocked by the State Government.

Major shire-wide issues such as the Hillview Quarries expansion at Arthurs Seat, AGL’s plans for a gas import terminal at Crib Point, Tyabb airfield, green wedge protection, Portsea beach restoration, and achieving carbon neutrality by 2021 will challenge the new council.

The Peninsula is a fabulous place to live and work with its bays, ocean and beaches; its rolling, green wedge hinterland. It’s a privilege to live here and work for the community. It is a precious, delicate legacy to inherit, protect and pass on better to the next generation.

I welcome residents contacting me at hwfraser@vicbar.com.au or phone 0418 379 335.

Voting

Ballot packs containing voting material have been mailed to enrolled voters from Tuesday 6 October 2020. This is a postal election only. Your completed ballot pack must be in the mail or hand-delivered by 6pm Friday 23 October.

If electors are concerned about their inability to collect their mail, they can contact the Victorian Electoral Commission, Mornington Peninsula Shire Council Elections, Shop 13, 143 Point Nepean Road, Dromana VIC 3936, phone 8619 1909, vec.vic.gov.au, and the VEC will send replacement material to their “other” address.

Indication of preferences for Nepean Ward Please number every box 2

MULVANY, Simon

6

RACE, Sarah

3

NAUGHTON, Gary

5

BISSINGER, Susan

4

CHEERS, Mechelle

1

FRASER, Hugh

7

DAVIS, Mark

Written and authorised by Hugh Fraser, 12 Michael Street, Rye VIC 3941


MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT in the Mornington Peninsula Shire Elections 2020 The vision of the Committee for Mornington Peninsula (CfMP) is for a Peninsula where people can live, embrace the landscape and nature, contribute to the community, learn and earn within the region. We think local people should not be forced to leave our region to pursue employment, careers and business goals. The CfMP hopes you share this vision, and has invited all candidates in the upcoming Mornington Peninsula Shire Council election to provide information about themselves and answer key questions from the Committee that align with our policy pillars and priorities. To view candidate profiles online, please go to www.committeeformp.com.au/councilelections/ We ask that you consider the information and responses supplied by candidates and that extent to which they support and commit to the CfMP’s key strategic objectives:

CfMP aims to lift the prominence of the region in the plans and thinking of policy makers, governments and decision makers and to promote a wider and deeper understanding of the region, its sustainable potential and challenges. Our aim is to bring together community and business-minded people on the Peninsula, who are committed to this region, understand the challenges we face, can imagine new possibilities for our community, are optimistic about the future and share a passion to work collaboratively and constructively for better outcomes for the Peninsula. We hope the incoming Council will share this vision for our region and work collaboratively and positively to pursue these objectives. That’s why your vote is important in the upcoming election, and is the reason why we have sought to provide useful information that can assist voters in assessing candidates. Authorised S. Smit, 328 Main Street, Mornington 3931

• Securing ‘regional’ designation and access to commensurate support • Improving and developing infrastructure that supports economic activity and jobs • Availability of suitably-zoned land to support sustainable investment, growth and jobs • Ensuring access to training and education opportunities that support sustainable careers • Nurture a supportive and ‘business-friendly’ environment • Ensure ongoing CfMP viability, vitality and relevance

COMMITTEE FOR

MORNINGTON PENINSULA

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 11


LOCKDOWN PICTURES Readers’ Lockdown Pictures this week once again reflect what’s on show indoors and outdoors. Toni Ashurst’s dogs obeyed social distancing rules at the park Shane Broderick watched an approaching storm at Rosebud, while Brian Mitchelson looked into his archives to remind us of sunny days when rays are clearly seen from Rosebud pier. Jill Howard captured a flower with an eerily familiar shape that her grandson calls the “virus flower”. Below that is Glenys Slade’s proof of schnapper returning to Mornington and Joan Grall’s Just Joey rose. Joan Hamilton Snellgrove found a calmer Rosebud and Alex Wilson was happy to extend a feeding hand to a colourful backyard visitor. Penny Ritchie found a family of parrots setting up house at The Briars, Mount Martha. Arenka Giffet’s cat was keen to leave the house, while Linda Grey’s dog was more interested in her computer mouse. Readers are invited to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: lockdown@mpnews.com.au

A Better Home Care Package in the Mornington Peninsula At Southern Cross Care, we understand that your home is where your heart is. That’s why we are now providing Home Care Packages in the Mornington Peninsula to help you live Better for life, in your own home. Maintain your independence as we support you with household chores, personal care, transport, meals, health services and more. Plus our full-service approach means we take the worry and the work out of managing your Home Care Package. To find out more call 1800 852 772 or visit southerncrosscare.com.au ® Southern Cross Care (SA, NT & VIC) Inc.

PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020


Why move? Approved stone reserves at Hillview Quarries current operating site are running out. Hillview wants to recommence operations at the nearby old Pioneer quarry at Dromana to ensure the future of the philanthropic Ross Trust, and maintain the critical supply of materials to the Mornington Peninsula. Get real facts: www.boundaryroad.com.au

RING NOW TO ORDER! OR CLICK AND COLLECT DELIVERY AVAILABLE SOLIDTEKNICS AUS-IONTM ‘SATIN’Cookware is designed, developed and made in Australia from 100% Australian Made steel

Shop 3/26 McLaren Place Mornington OPEN 7 DAYS

Mon - Fri 9.00-5.30 Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4

03 5976 8868

www.denorhomewares.com.au Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 13


LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Compulsory pool registrations badly planned and confusing The compulsory badly advised, badly planned, confusing and incompetent new pool and spa registration fees smack of (state and council) revenue raising and could have been a simple less costly two-step process (“Shire starts search for pool inspectors” The News 6/10/20). But instead all pool owners must write in to council before 1 November and “register” by paying a $79 fee so that council can inform these registrants that they need to apply for a compliance certificate from a separate council authorised inspecting entity that will inspect and charge $300 - $395 (first inspection) and $150 to $165 for it to be renewed every four years. What is amazing is that I received this “notice/ request” from council (in the mail) demanding I register my pool and pay the $79 fee or risk a $330 fine. Council has all the relevant forms, applications, plans and permits “registered” for most, if not all, pools. My pool has been catalogued, recorded and, dare I say, registered (by any other name) within various council departments. Otherwise, how did council know to send me an addressed request to register? Council has my town planning pool application and building application for a pool and “registered” plans for a pool. Why is this not registration enough? What is amazing is that a final inspection of the pool/spa fencing barrier had to be registered, yet again, and approved prior to allowing it to be filled with water. I don’t begrudge paying rates or registration fees. I just loath incompetence and waste. Has anyone really thought this out? We should (often and continually) remind local and state governments that they are our paid elected representatives, not just a whip or oppressor. We should always voice unfair initiatives. Paul Georgeson, Dromana

Trust being lost Sadly, in the state of Victoria the police are starting to lose the respect and trust of the populous. I believe they have been over zealous in their methods, as instructed by command and government, inflicting unnecessarily harsh discipline on a largely compliant people and interfering in their human rights as installed by this same government. The citizens do not wish this, and I am sure the vast majority of the force don’t either. It is a bit like the proverbial fish, the state is rotting from the head. Peter Grey, Rye

Hepburn and Helen When I was just 10 years old, my father took my two brothers and me for a 10-day holiday in a little hotel in Hepburn Springs. The only guests were us and a Ms Stella Lamond and her daughter, Helen Reddy, who was also 10. My father and Ms Lamond got on very well at meals, breakfast, lunch and dinner and I became a good friend of Helen and the two of us walked and ran over Hepburn’s bush and springs all day, every day. Me in my jodhpurs and Helen in her cool jeans. I was a bit envious of those jeans because they were rare in Australia in 1952. We had great fun and felt like soulmates. Over the years I followed her fame and her music, but I never saw her again. When she died last week, I felt really sad. She was a lovely little girl and some woman. Mary Lane, Mornington

Social justice vote Southern Women’s Action Network (SWAN) would like to thank the more than 20 Mornington Peninsula Shire Council candidates who responded to our recent survey, thus demonstrating a genuine willingness to respond to community concerns. In addition to social justice issues, the candidates provided their reasons for standing for council and links to further information about themselves. The responses make interesting reading. It is evident from the responses to our survey that SWAN’s social justice concerns are shared

PAGE 14

Southern Peninsula News

passionately by many of the candidates: access to affordable housing, to adequate income/ income support, disability access, prevention of violence against women, reconciliation with First Nations people and humanitarian treatment of refugees and asylum seekers. Also evident was the commitment of many to the principles of access, equity and inclusion. A number of candidates expressed concern about services for young people and also vulnerable older people. Significantly, the majority of responses reflect a deep commitment to climate action, environment protection and prevention of over-development on the peninsula. Candidates unanimously rejected the idea that social justice issues are just state and federal responsibilities. All saw council as having a vital role in both advocacy and policy and program development at the local level. Responses are available at swanwomen.org. au/candidate-statements-mpsc-2020/ or can be mailed or emailed by calling 0404 811 422. Erica Churchill, SWAN facilitator, Bittern

Important election It is concerning that the current [Mornington Peninsula Shire Council] election process is being attempted to be influenced by a single entity. How many members of Peninsula Aero Club actually live in the shire (“Pro-airfield candidates want state to act” The News 6/10/20)? This is an important election and the number of new councillors that will be elected across the shire could lead to inexperienced decision making. As we come out of lockdown it will be vitally important that as many of the existing councillors are re-elected. It is going to be difficult enough without having one trick ponies influencing decisions Rod Kerley, Moorooduc

Testing time Candidates wanting transparency on Mornington Peninsula Shire Council is looking like thick cloud (“Candidate ‘stacking’ could lead to a chaotic shire” and “Local test” Letters 6/10/20). Local test homework in my Red Hill Ward leads to one candidate who doesn’t actually live in the ward, though advertising in The News and the address given would suggest that is the case. Len Minty (“Candidate stacking”) is correct in his assessment of “affiliation with other interests” can lead to “candidate stacking” and end in chaos in council. Why nominate in a ward you do not reside in? Campaigning on “complete transparency in council”, I feel this candidate’s campaign is in a thick grey cloud already. If this candidate is elected Red Hill Ward (the shire’s largest) will be represented by a councillor who doesn’t even reside in our community. Yet the Briars Ward will have three councillors and a councillor elected in Red Hill Ward, who actually resides in the Briars Ward. Vote on performance first, or at least someone who lives in your community. John Blogg, Somers

‘Fair’ proposals The planning scheme amendments proposed for Tyabb airfield by Mornington Peninsula Shire Council actually allow for big increases in aircraft movements and in aircraft noise above those experienced in 2018 and 2019 (“Pro-airfield candidates want state to act” The News 6/10/20). One significant restriction in the council proposal is a night-time curfew, but that should not cause the wheels to fall off the airfield. It would be only fair for night operations to be restricted to aircraft on an emergency given the runway is only 250 metres from the Tyabb general residential zone and more than 2650 people live within 1.5 kilometres of the runway. If this petition [signed by five council candidates] is successful, the effect would be to deny the vast majority of local residents a say in the limits on aircraft noise from Tyabb airfield, while giving a say to people from all over Victoria who signed the petition. The support for the petition by the five candi-

14 October 2020

dates also raises the serious issue whether they believe local residents should not have a say about the aircraft noise. The report that 12 candidates did not answer the question [included on a questionnaire from The News] about PAC membership is terrifying. If they are not prepared to answer a simple question, then perhaps they should not be trusted to be our councillors. Brewis Atkinson, Tyabb

No money for research, either. It all points to the government returning to exactly the same philosophy that existed before COVID-19 came along. That is total reliance on China, support for coal and gas, and support for only the wealthy. James McLoughlin, Balnarring

‘Shocking’ maintenance

I couldn’t believe my ears when the Treasurer [Josh Frydenberg] was announcing the relaxing of financial lending rules. What is he thinking? I was always cynical of the Liberal/National government’s response to the very recent royal commission into banking and financial institutions. I didn’t think it was broad enough. Namely, credit card exorbitant interest rate charges and internet banking, didn’t get looked into. Easing the rules of lending will lead to more unscrupulous lending cowboys/girls to entice the vulnerable in our society to rack up debit that, more than likely, they cannot afford. I can just see another royal commission in the near future. I hope I am proven wrong but, given no one was jailed for all the atrocious and in some cases illegal practices, time will tell. Methinks unfettered greed will prevail. Denise Hassett, Mount Martha

Who is responsible for the shocking condition of Coolart Road north of Wonderland Avenue, Tuerong? Every time it is graded it becomes a bigger disaster: gutters clogged with debris and the water flowing over the road is breaking up the bitumen. Trevor Billson, Tuerong

Problem masks With the widespread use of facial masks during the ongoing lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic I have noticed with alarm the discarding of these masks increasing around parts of the Mornington Peninsula. This practice seems more prevalent around some of the shopping centres and on the footpaths of the main streets. I’m hoping this does not become another version of the long-term problem we have always had with the discarding cigarette butts, many of them ending up in beautiful Port Phillip. Maybe Mornington Peninsula Shire could promote an awareness campaign and nip in the bud a potential eyesore and pollution problem before it gets out of hand. Brian Boyd, Rye

Coalition decision It was the Kennett government that created Mornington Peninsula Shire in 1994 (“Mixed up politics” Letters 30/9). The shire was incorporated into the Melbourne metropolitan area at that time. I share the frustration with our current lockdown, but it must be remembered that it was a Coalition government that put us in this geographical quandary. Steve Weal, Blairgowrie

Metro peninsula It appears Edward O’Donohue, Liberal member of the Upper House in the Eastern Region, likes to spread misinformation. As part of a campaign with [Flinders MP] Greg Hunt he is circulating a letter referring to the decision by the Andrews government to classify Mornington Peninsula as metropolitan. In fact, it was under the government of Henry Bolte that the peninsula was made part of greater Melbourne, and that was continued when Jeff Kennett amalgamated the councils back in 1994 when the western part of the peninsula was added to the shires of Flinders and Mornington. What that means is that when COVID restrictions were applied to the whole of metropolitan Melbourne it included the peninsula. Comparisons with Geelong are irrelevant as it is a regional area. Better to compare with Yarra Valley which is facing the same dilemmas as the peninsula in lockdown. We need to carefully weigh up the pros and cons before we embark on a campaign to become a regional local government area rather than part of metro Melbourne. What would happen to our green wedges? Would we be forced to compete for funding with larger councils such as Bendigo or Geelong? It is not a decision to be made on the hop. Ed O’Donohue might serve his electorate better if he asked his federal counterparts why only one Victorian region was nominated for the $50 million Recovery for Regional Tourism Fund? Marg D’Arcy, Rye

Nothing changes I am disappointed in the [federal] budget. Once again, we see the LNP refusing to listen to the public and taking the wrong options in getting out of the recession and not trying to put Australia in a better place. Most of the tax cut money goes to people earning over $120,000 who will not spend it and so will not help the recovery. It appears the dole will revert to $40 a day next year and the unemployed can starve with the temporary visa holders who also got nothing. Better than tax cuts would have been investment in building more affordable housing and incentives to manufacture in Australia to lessen our reliance on an ever more belligerent China.

Landing fears

Chinese colony According to the Macquarie Dictionary treason means violation of allegiance to the state. China’s President Xi Jinping is arguably world enemy No1. Premier Daniel Andrews, having signed Victoria up to the Belt and Road strategy and now initiating a Chinese technological development centre in Melbourne, is quoted as saying that Victoria is China’s gateway to Australia. Say no more. Aussie Sadler, Mornington

Risk assessment Every so often one stops to examine one’s priorities. Seventy years following politics changes nothing. Highs, lows, crooks and the occasional honest joker. All right wing governments are only interested in four things: your vote, your spending, your taxes and their place in history. Possibly a fifth their bank balances? The Labor Party, slightly in our favour, has much the same interests. Today it’s COVID-19. Nobody really knows what’s ahead in 2021. Add in climate change (vital, particularly if you envisage sticking around till 2050, with Scott Morrison into his usual ducking and weaving alongside the prevaricating Anthony Albanese), Donald Trump and democracy itself, in America, England and here, a psychological nightmare for the future, where already some 0.1 per cent own 20 per cent of the world. Strangely, others say it’s all about the dangers of China. True for Tibetans no doubt, but not necessarily for Australia ahead of these other dangers. I’m too old to get to an emotional point of view. Just saying. Cliff Ellen, Rye

Different approaches Is this prime minister fair dinkum? He’s claiming international travellers from “safe” COVID-19 countries could bypass hotel quarantine. Has this bloke learnt nothing? The country may be COVID-19 safe, but are the travellers? Maybe Victorian Premier Dan Andrews should be running the country. He obviously believes in health before wealth. Andrews has out performed the PM consistently. He daily stands before the reporters for as long as the questions keep coming, even the inane ones. Whereas the PM gives edicts such as the one I’ve mentioned then goes on holidays complete with family to South Australia (a LNP state) does a photo op and then disappears. The cases are falling, so Andrews has got it right. Another three weeks and we’ll be able to have more movement out and about. All we need is for the knockers and the whingers as well as the LNP dirty tricks unit to give it a rest. Restaurant owners in Melbourne can’t have it both ways. They can’t be losing thousands of dollars during the lockdown and the curfew (which has now been lifted) to not making enough during the warmer seasons when things were normal to pay their staff normal award wages. Which is it? Prince or pauper? John Cain, McCrae


Southern Peninsula

property

WATCH COMMANDER PAGE 3 WEDNESDAY, 14th OCTOBER 2020

SAFETY BEACH, DROMANA, McCRAE, ROSEBUD, CAPEL SOUND, RYE, BLAIRGOWRIE, SORRENTO, PORTSEA

Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au. Be seen everywhere.


SOLD

SOLD

DURING LOCKDOWN

DURING LOCKDOWN

WE ARE NOW ABLE TO CONDUCT PROPERTY APPRAISALS- PRIVATE INSPECTIONS - VIRTUAL APPOINTMENTS

CONTACT OUR TEAM FOR MORE INFORMATION 5983 3038

SOLD

SOLD

DURING LOCKDOWN

DURING LOCKDOWN

2375 Point Nepean Road, Rye Ph: 5983 3038 mpnews.com.au

Wednesday, 14th October 2020

crowdersre.com.au SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 2


ON THE COVER

‘BRYLEIGH HOUSE’ - PREMIUM POSITION BY THE SHORE A PROPERTY of distinction, Bryeleigh House enjoys a splendid position that engages the panoramic views of the bay and peninsula hinterland, right across to the Bellarine Peninsula. Luxuriously appointed and offering a lifestyle measured in sunsets and sea breezes, this versatile property also provides a rental income through the short term rental of ‘Bryeleigh House Apartment’, a deluxe, fully-self contained three bedroom residence found at street level. The main section of the house takes full advantage of the uninterrupted vistas which are tranquilly visible from almost every room,

HOME ESSENTIALS

plus there are two fabulous entertaining decks extending out from the living areas that face the bay. A separate lounge takes pride of place when it comes to the spectacular outlook and a vast family room, resplendent with handsome hardwood floors, incorporates a comfortable dining area and elegant kitchen complete with marble benchtops, a Bosch pyrolytic oven with gas hotplates and a butlers pantry. In the north corner the master bedroom, which looks straight down to Arthurs Seat, comprises a large ensuite and walk-in robe whilst a second bedroom utilises a powder room and a

separate bathroom that has a spa bath. All three bedrooms in the downstairs zone each have an ensuite – two have a spa bath – and all share the comfortable lounge and a neat kitchen with dishwasher. From the road the home is privately set on an elevated 742 square metre block which has a wide frontage and there is plenty of off-street parking for boats and trailers in addition to the large double garage with internal access. Owned by the one family for 60 years, this is an almost once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to purchase this character-filled weatherboard home. n

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

UN

DE

R

CO

NT

RA CT

ADDRESS: 50 Mount Martha Road, MOUNT MARTHA FOR SALE: $2,400,000 - $2,640,000 DESCRIPTION: 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 2 car AGENT: Tony Ladiges 0414 905 873, Stone Real Estate, Suite 2/1a Main Street, Mornington, 5790 8000

Amazing Lifestyle Potential $800,000-$850,000 470 Browns Road RYE

Definition of Coastal Living Contact Agent 16 Maori Street RYE

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

L SO

3

3

2

Oceanside Escape $1,575,000-$1,650,000 6 Beryl Street RYE

4

2

3

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

SALLY JOHNSTONE 0417 577 194

D

Rare Opportunity

4

4 Blakiston Grove RYE SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

1

2

3 Location & Lifestyle $960,000-$1,000,000 17 Morris Street TOOTGAROOK

2

3

Downsize In Style $720,000 - $760,000 1/6 Banks Street McCrae

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

2

2

SAM CROWDER 0403 893 724

2375 Point Nepean Road, Rye Ph: 5983 3038 mpnews.com.au

4

crowdersre.com.au Wednesday, 14th October 2020

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 3


Jim Arvanitakis

Anastasia Arvanitakis

Brendan Adams

Jules Alexander

Director - OIEC

Licensed Estate Agent

Licensed Estate Agent

Licensed Estate Agent

0416 267 803

0414 267 830

0419 566 944

0401 255 555

SPRING SELLING - NOW OPEN! Book in your appointment today.

Louise Varigos

Joanne Avenell

Maz Dunez

Janice Cairns

SA for Jules Alexander

Licensed Estate Agent

Sales Consultant

Sales Consultant

0408 885 982

0419 358 312

0400 448 224

0456 424 872

If you are thinking of selling, RIGHT NOW is perfect. We would love the opportunity to appraise your home, and help in a seamless and stress-free manner.

Simpy call us today on 5985 0000 FACETIME

23

years servicing the Peninsula Community

shoreline.eview.com.au mpnews.com.au

Whatsapp

‘Selling with Safety.’

5985 0000 Wednesday, 14th October 2020

SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

Page 4


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Protest at Land Sale – Question of Subdivision Compiled by Cameron McCullough LAST Saturday afternoon, the land situate between the Prince of Wales Hotel and Mr Sage’s shop, Frankston, was offered for sale, on the site. The owner, Mr. Short, considers the situation admirably adapted for shop sites, and he subdivided the block into four allotments. The whole block has a frontage of 100 feet to Mornington Road, with a depth of 200 feet to Kananook Creek, where there is a three feet right-ofway along the bank of the stream. Mr Short has cut his block in two, reserving the rear portion – 100 x 100 ft – as a residential area for himself, his frontage being the creek. The front part, which has a rightof-way on both sides, be subdivided into three parts, each having frontage of 30 feet, and a depth of 100 feet. The auctioneer, Mr W. P. Mason, had completed reading the conditions of sale, when Mr J.D. Jennings stepped forwarded, and asked several questions relating to the survey. He received information confirming the fact that the three front allotments ran into a dead end, and that the only frontage possessed by the rear allotment – reserved by Mr Short – was the three feet right-of-way along the creek. Mr Jennings then entered a vigorous protest against the action of the Shire Council in permitting what he termed “the creation of a slum area” in such a favored locality. He contended in connection with the rear block that the granting of a frontage to a 3ft right-of-way was most improper, and he hoped the peo-

ple of Frankston would not be slow to disapprove of the whole thing. Mr Mason drew attention to the fact that the plans of sub-division bore the seal of the Shire Council and proceeded with the sale. The corner block, nearest the hotel, was first offered, the purchaser having the option of taking the other two. Bidding started at £10 per foot and increased by 5s bids to £10 15s, at which it was passed in. It is stated that the vendors reserve was something like £15 per foot. *** Local Soldiers Ignored AT the conclusion of the Soldiers’ Memorial committee meeting, Mr H. Vicars referred to the advertised fact that Lieutenants Parer and McIntosh were to be entertained at Frankston. As president of the local branch of the Returned Soldiers’ Association he could say that members deeply resented the manner in which they had been ignored in the matter. They were anxious to co-operate, but had never been consulted by the two or three individuals who had taken upon themselves the responsibility of acting on behalf of the people of Frankston. Cr Oates said the Council had written to Mr Parer senr., over a month ago concerning the matter of giving a public welcome to Lieut. Parer, and the Council was still waiting a reply. He promised that enquiry would be made. Mr Morrison took exception to the high price fixed for admission. In the past ls had been deemed sufficient

charge to welcome home socials to returned soldiers. Mr McMurtrie: Did the Returned Soldiers’ make any move towards organising a welcome? Mr Vicars: We were waiting on the Council. Our branch is nearly 100 strong, and we expect to be consulted. *** “Digger’s” Doings – A Day at the Races and a trip to the seaside THE escapades of three “diggers” named Arthur Hall, Charles Newman and Stanley James (inmates of the Caulfield Military Hospital) occupied the attention of Messrs C, G. V. Williams (chairman), C. W. Grant, and W. J. Oates, J’s.P. at the Frankston Police Court on Monday last, when Newman and James were charged with stealing between £20 and £30 from their comrade, Hall. Detective Ethell, in outlining the case, said that on Saturday, Sept 25th Hall invited Newman to accompany him to the city, where Hall collected £22. They were joined later by James, and proceeded to the Moonee Valley races. They consumed a good deal of drink during the day, and finally found themselves at the Carrum Hotel, where they secured accommodation for the night. When Hall was awakened on Sunday morning, he found his companions of the previous day had taken their departure. He also discovered his empty wallet near the bed, but no trace of the £27 it had contained when he retired to rest. Hall informed the police, with the result that Newman and James were

interviewed at the Caulfield Hospital. At first they denied all knowledge of the money, but after being confronted with the motor driver, whom they engaged on the Sunday to take them to Mordialloc, and the manager of the Mordialloc Hotel, where they changed a £5 note, they made certain admissions to the police. Arthur Hall, a young soldier, with one arm, gave evidence detailing the day’s doings. He said he backed winners. He had 30/- on Pimpara at 7 to 1, and he gave James £1 to put on Earl Simon, and received £3 in return. After the races. He, with Newman and James, engaged a motor car and arrived at the Carrum Hotel at about 10 o’clock at night, where they went to bed. James did not undress. Witness had about £27 in his wallet, which he carried in the pocket of his jacket. The money consisted of four £5 notes and seven. £1 notes. Witness paid all the expenses of the trip. He thought Newman had about £11 on Saturday morning, when they set out for the races. James had no money. They all had drinks during the day, and were just “nice and merry” when they got to Carrum. Newman: You told us you got 7 to 2 Pimpara. Hall: No, 7 to 1. James denied the statement that he went to bed fully dressed. John Crosby, motor driver, and Raymond Broomhall manager Mordialloc Hotel, gave evidence relating to the doings of the accused on Sunday, Sept

26th. Constable McDonald read the statements made by Newman and James. They admitted having taken a couple of £5 notes, which, they said, they found lying on the floor near Hall’s bed at Carrum. The accused pleaded guilty, and asked to be dealt with at once. Newman: This would never have happened had we not been drinking. I had three year’s active service, and was never in trouble before. If you give us a chance, we will make amends, and pay back the money to Hall. James, who was on crutches, also promised amendment. Detective Ethell: It looks like a drunken spree! The Bench said that consideration would be given to what the men had suffered in the war. This trouble seemed to have resulted from their drunken condition. They would be sentenced to three months imprisonment, sentence to be suspended on them entering into a bond of £25 to be of good behavior for 12 months. *** A MEETING of the Peninsula’s Cricket Association was held at Hastings on Saturday last, when delegates were present from Tyabb, Hastings, Crib Point, French Island and the Naval Unit attached to the Flinders Naval Base. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 8 October 1920

WHAT'S NEW...

Achieving your best retirement lifestyle NOT every retirement community is created equal, as the expression goes. Aviva Communities Officer is simply your best retirement lifestyle and we understand what our homeowners are searching for. Aviva Communities is a team of people committed to providing the best solution that there is ,and we know how overwhelming researching to find that option can be. You want the best quality that your budget can provide, and we understand that. That is why at Aviva we believe in giving you control over your financial future and also flexibility in managing your ongoing costs while living at Aviva Communities Officer. We want you to enjoy your freed-up capital to enjoy the things you deserve to be doing without having to worry. You can achieve all of the below and more: Choose a weekly site fee adjusted annually or fix your weekly site fee for life Your weekly site fee is reviewed annually against CPI or every two years based on a market review If you would prefer to know what your weekly site fee will be not only on the year that you move into the community but also 10 years down the track, you can choose to fix your fee for the life of your residency – You will love this. No More power bills WOW – At Aviva Communities Officer we want our homeowners to stay cool in summer and warm in winter. To avoid ongoing bill creep and remove the stress that comes with rising utility

costs, you will not get a power or gas bill at Aviva (subject to fair use policy) Pay No Stamp duty Unlike freehold homes, you do not pay any stamp duty on the purchase of your home, again saving you thousands. Pay no council rates Because you lease the land on which your home sits, you no longer have to pay costly council rates each year, again more lifestyle for you to enjoy. A Fairer Deferred Management Fee A Deferred management fee is payable when you decide to move out of the community. Unlike other land lease communities that charge a Deferred management fee on the price at which you sell your home, at Aviva the deferred management fee is set on the price you paid for your home when you moved in. The benefits of this are if the value of your home increases, you get to keep all the capital gain You will know exactly the amount that your deferred management fee will be from day one. Our luxury lodge complex, bringing 5-star resort style living to Officer, will be open in the next few months and now is perfect timing to explore the home options near this stunning location. Our New Home specialist Andrew is available by phone 0455 245 438 or email mailto:andrewm@avivacommunities.com.au Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 19


PUZZLE ZONE 1

2

3

7

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

15

16

13

17

18

19

20

21

23

14

22

24

ACROSS 1. On the inside 5. Classic painting, ... Lisa 7. Blunt 8. Removing errors from 9. Ran after 12. Regards highly 15. Animal trainer 19. Overrun

21. Raiders 22. Silent 23. Repair 24. Scientific ideas DOWN 1. Charge with crime 2. Geography reference volume

3. Great fear 4. Surrenders 5. Confused state 6. Cherubs 10. Author unknown 11. Tea, ... Grey 12. Tip of grain 13. Change direction 14. Fencing blade

15. Balloon gas 16. Insist 17. Knowledgeable 18. Navigates 19. Matter of concern 20. Pelvis-to-knee bone

Puzzles supplied by Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd www.lovattspuzzles.com See page 22 for solutions.

THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Help! Corona virus Has Infected the Way We Speak By Stuart McCullough VERTICAL consumption. Had you asked me six months ago what ‘vertical consumption’ referred to, I’d have assumed it involved an ointment and a lie down. But, as it turns out, it refers to the act of eating and drinking while standing up. Why they don’t simply refer to it as ‘doing stuff whilst standing’ and went with ‘vertical consumption’ is beyond me. It’s unlikely to be a medical term. Not since the nation was collectively boxed around the ears with the term ‘programmatic specificity’ has something so simple been put in such a mind-bogglingly complex way. The long and short of it is that ‘vertical consumption’ is now permitted in South Australia. Good luck to them, I say. Which means that there are people standing up while eating and drinking as we speak. It’s not something I ever thought I’d be jealous of. Then again, it does strike me as somewhat reckless. Whose to say that, after all this time, people still remember how to eat and drink while standing up? I can see it now – dozens of people falling over as they attempt ‘vertical consumption’ for the first time in six months. People toppling off bar stools as they try to do too much, too soon, as gravity gets the better of them. I suspect when ‘vertical consumption’ is eventually re-introduced in Victoria, it will be gradual and accompanied by a seven-stage ‘vertical consumption’ roadmap that will take us to 2023 to complete. It will be time-limited too, with malingerers who stand too long either given a squirt from the bar-hose or, in less severe circumstances, dragged out by the riot squad and fed to the canine unit. I, however, will be ready. While the rest of you have been foolishly allowing your ‘vertical consumption memory muscle’ to wither, I have been practicing at home. I’d like to say that this has been to ensure that I’m ready to vertically consume at a moment’s notice, but mostly it’s to ensure my dog – who has started bullying me for food – doesn’t jump onto the table and eat my dinner.

PAGE 20

Southern Peninsula News

Restrictions have been in force for a long time here in Victoria. What if we forget the things we once took for granted? It’s been ages since I wore a necktie. There’s a chance that I won’t remember how and will have to resort to one of those elastic ones that are normally only worn by substitute teachers. Or, worse still, what if I can’t remember how to tie a tie, but can remember how to do a cravat and, as a result, have to attend work looking like a seventeenth-century Croatian soldier. (Fun fact: the cravat was invented by the Croatian army in the seventeenth century – who says defending sovereign territory and being

14 October 2020

fashionable are incompatible!) Dancing was banned in Queensland. For those of us who were lousy dancers to begin with and needed all the practice we could get, such prohibitions really mark the end of any hope we had of turning professional. You may consider that a good thing. But until you’ve seen me crump, you should reserve judgment. From 1 November, people can dance at weddings in the Sunshine State but capped to a maximum of forty people at a time. If this is a glimpse into the future, it means that there will soon be a new job at weddings – dance-floor wrangler.

The job of the dance-floor wrangler will be to ensure that the forty-person cap is complied with at all times and that people don’t get too close to each other. How this is to be enforced in an atmosphere of driving music and heightened spirits is anyone’s guess, but I’m pretty sure it’s likely to involve a cattle prod and a bucket of cold water. DJs across the country will need to revise their playlists; discarding the guaranteed floor fillers they’ve been relying on for years – forget ‘Uptown Funk’ by Mark Ronson, say good-bye to ‘Superstition’ by Stevie Wonder, so long ‘I Want to Dance with Somebody’ by Whitney Houston – and replace them with songs that will hopefully appeal to no more than forty people at a time. I have a sneaking suspicion that Wang Chung is about to be very popular at weddings. As for me, I think I’m getting used to it. Wearing a mask feels, if not like second nature, then probably third nature. There are some upsides too. Once I worried about whether I’d blown my nose properly. So long as facemasks remain mandatory, I don’t think I’ll have to bother with blowing my nose ever again. Ditto for yawning in public. I’ve become used to treating others with suspicion whenever I set foot outside my house. I marvel at the sheer unpredictability that comes with squirting hand-sanitizer. (Will it come out straight? Or will is shoot out at some unexpected angle and squirt the dog who’s about six feet away. Who can tell?) I’m a little tired of the whole ‘five kilometer radius’ thing, though. Most of the things I need fall within our ‘zone’, but I’m about eight hundred metres short of my preferred butcher. Perhaps we can move to a trading system where meterage can be sold on the free market and I can offset the additional distance with those days that I hardly travel at all. When that day finally comes that I can leave my territory, I’ll be so happy that I might just eat while standing up. Just don’t ask me to dance – I won’t remember how. stuart@stuartmccullough.com


networkclassiďŹ eds.com.au networkclassiďŹ eds.com.au General Classifieds

Trades & Services Air Conditioning

V

CONCRETE SPECIALISTS

Be cool this summer

Guttering

V

The Peninsula’s own gutter cleaning professionals. See website for details and pricing guide.

0418 172 044

1155688-CG39-14

CALL MARTIN

V

Handy Persons

12437177-ACM52-19

12370016-ACM44-17

All Carpentry & Repairs

Doors, Locks, Fences, Gates, Decks, Pergolas NO JOB TOO SMALL - FREE QUOTES

Phone Dave: 0421 07 3939 V

FREE COLOUR WITH EVERY JOB

12417522-RC20-19

0412 588 130

12353918-PB23-17

All types of concrete work done. Free quotes. Reasonable rates. Pensioners discounts. Small site cleans.

Experienced Concreter for: s $RIVEWAYS s 0ATIOS s 'ARAGE 3HEDS s (OUSE 3LABS s !LL 4YPES OF #ONCRETING s %XPOSED !GGREGATE s 0LAIN #OLOURED

Call Anthony for a free quote on 0423 808 691 "ASED ON THE -ORNINGTON PENINSULA hKEEP IT LOCAL USE A LOCALv

Fencing & Gates

Bayline Fencing s 0ALING s 0ICKETS s "RUSH 0ANELS s 'ATES &REE 1UOTES #ALL 4ONY

0403 866 624

Tree Lopping/Surgery

Mulch For Sale

Public Notices and Event

Thank You Day 23rd October

ClassiďŹ eds deadlines for Tuesday 27th October issue of the Southern Peninsula News as follows:

Melbourne Cup Day 3rd November ClassiďŹ eds deadlines for Tuesday 3 November issue of the Southern Peninsula News as follows: rd

s (OT 7ATER s "URST 0IPES s 4APS 4OILETS s (EATING s #ARBON -ONOXIDE 4ESTING s 0UMPS s "LOCKED $RAINS s 'AS &ITTING

THURSDAY 29th October at 5pm

** Same Day Plumbing Service **

0447 007 178

12415744-DJ16-19

Roofing

GUTTERING

By Horizon Plumbing Pty Ltd

• Guttering Replacements • Downpipes • 20 Colours • Quality Workmanship • All Work Guaranteed • Old Guttering Taken Away • Free Quotes

ANDY 0414 477 121

V

PLACE YOUR

LIC: 109028

www.orbitplumbing.com.au

V

Motoring

THURSDAY 22nd October at 1:00pm

ORBIT PLUMBING

Professional

The Victorian Equal Opportunity Act 1995 makes it unlawful for an advertiser to show any intention to discriminate on the basis of sex, pregnancy, race, age, marital status, political or religious belief or physical features, disability, lawful sexual activity/sexual orientation, HIV/AIDS status or on the basis of being associated with a person with one of the above characteristics, unless covered by an exception under the Act. As Network Classifieds could be legally liable if an unlawful advertisement is printed, Network Classifieds will not accept advertisements that appear to break the law. For more information about discrimination in advertising, contact your legal advisers or the Equal Opportunity Commission.

CLASSIFIEDS EARLY DEADLINES

Plumbing

For more information contact Patrik on 041 094 2230 or email patrik@intensivecareathome.com

DISCRIMINATION IN ADVERTISING IS UNLAWFUL

Ph Graham 0407 357 927

V

Call Mel: 0407 121 284

Local & Friendly Plumber Daniel:

V

UĂŠ/Ă€iiĂŠEĂŠ-ĂŒĂ•Â“ÂŤĂŠ,iÂ“ÂœĂ›>Â? UĂŠ Ă•Â?Â?ĂŠ Â˜ĂƒĂ•Ă€>˜ViĂŠ ÂœĂ›iĂ€ ĂŠUĂŠ7œœ`ĂŠ Â…ÂˆÂŤÂŤiÀÉ Ă•Â?V…ˆ˜}ĂŠ-iĂ€Ă›ÂˆViĂŠ Ă›>ˆÂ?>LÂ?i

General Notices

s (OME -AINTENANCE s 4REES ,OPPED s 2UBBISH 2EMOVAL s 2ETAINING 7ALLS s 'UTTERS s &ULLY )NSURED

V

REGISTERED NURSES ICU/PICU nurses wanted for home care in Bittern and Mornington/Mount Martha. Minimum of 2 years ICU/PICU experience. Must be ventilation and tracheostomy competent.

CHEAP CHEAP CHEAP

Home Maintenance

Anyone advertising a puppy, dog, kitten or cat in Victoria for sale or re-homing will need a source number from the Pet Exchange Register and a microchip identiďŹ cation number. It is now an offence to advertise unless the source number and microchip identiďŹ cation number is included in the advertisement or notice. For further information, call 136 186 or visit animalwelfare.vic.gov.au

Medical/Nursing

12462634-SN39-20

Concrete Products & Services

ROCKHARD CONCRETING SERVICES

1209702-LB49-15

V

V

10 year Guarantee. Call now for a FREE quote: 0405 817 173

GuttersUncluttered.com.au

-- Servicing the Peninsula --

DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME

V

Est. 2010

ASK HANDYMAN DAVE

Carpenters

PERGOLAS & DECKS

V

CALL JORDI: 0418 312 121

Motor Vehicles

HOLDEN CRUZE Sedan. Immaculate. 4 cyl. Unleaded. Auto. 89,000kms. Dark red. Log books. 4 new tyres with RWC. REG XLH-987. $11,000 NEG. Rye area. Phone: 0457 539 873.

Professional Services

Advertise with us and get better results

12400498-CG38-18

9850 6611

Roof Restoration Specialists

One call, We do it all!

Ä‘Ĺ? ((Ĺ?(! 'Ĺ?.!, %./Ĺ?Ä‘Ĺ? ++"Ĺ? /$%*#Ĺ?Ä‘Ĺ? ++"Ĺ? %*0%*# Ä‘Ĺ? (!4%ÄĄ,+%*0%*#Ĺ?Ä‘Ĺ? % #!Ĺ?0%(!Ĺ?.!ÄĄ ! %*# Ä‘Ĺ? ((!5Ĺ? $ *#%*#Ĺ?Ä‘Ĺ? 100!.Ĺ? (! *%*#Ĺ?".+)Ĺ?Ä¸Ä Ä‚Ä€ Ä‘Ĺ? ((Ĺ?05,!/Ĺ?+"Ĺ?.++Ăź*#Ĺ? * Ĺ? .,!*0.5

12434465-NG49-19

CAMPIS.COM.AU

12446933-SN17-20

Since 1972

12337429-CG06-17

Builders & Building Services

ADVERTISERS PLEASE NOTE

Employment

Roofing 12447720-LB18-20

V

12464686-NG42-20

12461765-NG39-20

-OB s 0H

Pets & Services

12423634-SN31-19

&2%% 15/4%3 s $!93 ! 7%%+

5998 7796

V

PTY LTD

12428296-ACM40-19

See website for details

RENOVATIONS DBU3721 EXTENSIONS s NEW BUILDS

V

ADVERTISERS, in this section are qualified practitioners and offer non-sexual services.

Specialising in: s 3LABS s &OOTINGS s 0AVING s $RIVEWAYS s #ROSSINGS s ,AYBACKS s )NDUSTRIAL &LOORS s 4ENNIS #OURTS s %XPOSED !GGREGATE

www.fairbairns.com.au V

Massage Therapists

Peter Sharp

Pensioner Discounts

• Air Conditioning Get ready • Split Systems for Summer!! • Evaporative Evaporative Cooler & Split Cooling System Service Specials REC 17042 PIC 38148 AU 06212

V

Concrete Products & Services

12464927-SG42-20

V

ZZZ QHWZRUNFODVVL´HGV FRP DX

CALL:

Place Your ClassiďŹ ed Ads Online Your advert will appear in print and online! Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 21


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

FV canvasses NPL restructure SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FOOTBALL Victoria held secret online meetings two weeks ago with senior and junior licence holders to discuss restructuring the state’s NPL setup. The game’s governing body held a zoom meeting with NPL1 clubs on Monday 28 September, with NPL2 and NPL3 clubs the following evening then met online with junior NPL clubs on Wednesday 30 September. The opening address at the meeting with NPL2 and NPL3 clubs was made by FV director Sezar Jakupi with the federation’s Football Strategy Manager Emilio Amanatidis and NPL Competitions Manager Hakan Dogan participating. At all three meetings clubs were told not to discuss the proposals put forward or the discussion that took place. The rationale behind the federation’s attempts to shroud these meetings in secrecy is unclear. Attendees were always going to report back to club committees who in turn would inform coaching staff so the thread of confidentiality was severely frayed. The meetings canvassed major changes to under-18 and under-20 competitions, the possible axing of the under-16s and allowing clubs to field two under-13s but reducing that age group to small-sided competition. NPL2 and NPL3 clubs were told that if they reached the last 32 of the 2021 FFA Cup they would have to compete under the constraints of the Player Points System despite the PPS not applying during their respective league seasons. It also was confirmed that NPL clubs would retain their respective league status next year and that promotion and relegation would again be in play. Last week NPL senior and junior licence holders voted on these changes and it is expected that the federation will inform clubs of the outcome this week. Proposals put to the vote included replacing the under-18s and under-20s with under-19 and under-21 competitions and introducing a finals series for 19s and 21s. Clubs were told that they would be allowed to include three under-23 players not listed on their senior roster

Meet the convener: Football Victoria director Sezar Jakupi (right) pictured with Oakleigh Cannons stars Joe Guest (far left) and Harry White at last year’s club presentation night. Picture: Peter Psarros

as part of their new under-21 squad. But the most controversial proposal involved how the new under-19 competition would be run. While remaining part of a club’s senior NPL licence FV suggested that it should be run over 33 matches with the first 11 matches amounting to grading games as is the case presently with junior NPL teams. Currently the under-18s are aligned with club seniors and under-20s in terms of fixtures but the FV proposal would regionalise a new under-19s competition during the grading phase. Once grading is completed clubs would be placed in separate under-19 leagues which would not mirror the senior and under-21 setup. One of the youth coaches involved at NPL level thought the under-19 proposal was doomed to failure. “It’s going to be a really, really hard sell,” he said. “The idea that the 18s will simply

move on to the 19s is ridiculous. “These kids will want to play senior football or at least be involved at senior level but this disenfranchises them by cutting them off from the seniors. “They might still come under the senior licence but they won’t feel part of the senior club having a completely different set of fixtures. “It’s a car crash. “I don’t understand how clubs are going to sell that to a player – you’re doing your VCE and you’re going to be playing more games than the seniors and 21s and against different teams. “It won’t work mate. “They restructured then didn’t even give it a season to find out how it turned out. “There was bugger all consultation with clubs no matter what FV might say and none of the clubs I’ve spoken to saw this coming in fact they were completely blindsided by this one.”

Did you know... you can view our papers online

Sudoku and crossword solutions N

L

E M E

N D

A

A

L

D

E

D

D

L

L

E

E M S

R

D U

L

S

E

L

I

C H

A

T

N

A

E

O

R

A

U

P

N D

L

R

R

E

H

A

E

S

T

F

E

E

E

X

I

L

M

P

S

E

S

M U

U

U

N

M E 14 October 2020

A

U

R D

T

U

Southern Peninsula News

M O N

I

N W A

I

PAGE 22

Y

I N I

www.mpnews.com.au

The proposed changes to junior NPL competitions also took clubs by surprise and it’s believed that none of the three local licence holders – Langwarrin, Mornington and Peninsula Strikers – were happy with either of the two options presented by FV. Option 1 was to run under-13, under-14, under-15 and under-17 competitions with the under-13s fielding two teams per club and reverting to smallsided (nine players per team) games with no results recorded and therefore no tables produced. This was how the now extinct NPL under-12s were organised. Option 2 was to scrap the under-13s and run under-14, under-15, under-16 and under-17 competitions. Despite opposition to these options during the junior NPL meeting the options eventually put to clubs were never amended and remained as presented to licence holders from the outset. When told of what took place at the

V

A

D

E

N

R

N D

T

R H

N

E O R

N G

S S

T E

T

E R

I

E

S

junior meeting one of the club administrators responded with disdain. “They are about to ruin football,” the administrator said. “There’s a clause in the licence which virtually says Football Victoria can do what they want when they want so why they bother with these meetings beats me. “We’re going to add in the 17s age group no matter what but if it’s 16s and 17s I can tell you right now that clubs on this side of town (south) won’t have enough elite kids to get up 16s and 17s. “My gut feeling is that the other side of town is driving this. “The system wasn’t broken in the first place but it was flawed because there are too many clubs draining the talent pool. “I mean when you get a club like Dandy Thunder that has trouble fielding an under-16 side what more do you need to know?”


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

scoreboard

Freedman bypasses Derby with maturing colt HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou PINECLIFF, Mount Eliza-based trainers Anthony and Sam Freedman remain adamant on bypassing the VRC Derby with promising colt Ain’tnodeeldun despite claiming the Listed Hill Smith Stakes (1800m) at Morphettville on Saturday. Co-trainer Anthony Freedman believes the $2million VRC Derby (2500m) on Saturday 31 October will come up too soon for the improving Dundeel three-year-old. “He still has some maturing to do so I don’t want to give him a gut buster in the Derby,” Anthony Freedman said on the Freedman Racing website. “I think he will be a better horse in the autumn so we will give him a light spring and lift the bar in the autumn with him.” Ain’tnodeeldun broke his maiden status in dominant fashion at Sale (1615m) two starts ago to win by five lengths, before proving too classy for his rivals on Saturday. Ain’tnodeeldun, who jumped as the $1.65 favourite for the race, settled towards the rear of the field before hitting the front with 150m to go and held off the late charge from Victoria Quay to win by three-quarters of a length. Freedman believes the colt will benefit from the experience interstate. “He was well-ridden today, but he was left in front a long way from home which probably isn’t the way to ride him,” Freedman said. “Dom Tourneur was of the opinion he had a lot more left to give, which is what I wanted to hear. He is still learning the game and I believe the trip away would have done him the world of good. He should come back a more mature horse.” With the Derby off the table, Freedman will instead aim Ain’tnodeeldun towards the Listed TCL TV Stakes (1800m) for three-year-olds on Melbourne Cup day.

Up-and-comer: Anthony and Sam Freedman’s three-year-old colt Ain’tnodeeldun wins the Listed Hill Smith Stakes (1800m) at Morphettville. Picture: Supplied

Advertise in the Southern Peninsula’s own newspaper

Call MPNG Classieds on 1300 666 808

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020

PAGE 23


PAGE 24

Southern Peninsula News

14 October 2020


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.