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Wonders

WALWORTH COUNTY of

Published by Southern Lakes Newspapers LLC and The Beacon

Fall 2019


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WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019

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FALL 2019

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

Page 3

Girl power unplugged AREA GIRL SCOUT CAMP BUILDS SKILLS AND RELATIONSHIPS BY Lisa Smith CORRESPONDENT

week away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life… without electronics or television; instead, exploring nature, creating friendships, building independence and just plain having fun. This is the setting for Camp Alice Chester in East Troy. The overnight Girl Scout camp is set on 333 acres, where guests are surrounded by a hilly woodland backdrop of paths to hike. A lot of time is also spent cooling off, enjoying water sports and playing near the beautiful waterfront on Booth Lake. The overnight camping experience is open to girls in second through 12th grade. Activities and experiences are geared toward different grade levels, but the end results are the same. The campers come away with an appreciation of nature, selfconfidence, new skills and a greater sense of responsibility and independence. The camp is a safe place for them to be

themselves and make new friends; a place to try new things in a comfortable and encouraging atmosphere, camp officials said. Daily activities include crafts, canoeing, swimming, outdoor cooking, archery and group games. The girls also can participate in rock climbing, bike riding and horseback riding. Throughout the day campers have input as to what activities they want to do and how to do them – building their independence and decision making skills. When evening falls, after singing and talking around the campfire, campers sleep in the lodge, an A-frame cabin or platform tent with four to six other girls. Annika Schneider, 10, is a veteran of camp. She attended last year and has been at Alice Chester four weeks already this summer. She said she has loved every minute of it. Besides getting a break from her brothers at home, she shared a few of her favorite experiences this week.

Campers at Alice Chester Girl Scout Camp in East Troy gather at Booth Lake recently for some “counselor capers” to wrap up their week. The overnight campers participate in group activities and games daily during their stay, along with swimming, canoeing, crafts, outdoor cooking and more. LISA SMITH Wonders of Walworth County

“We swam in the lake like every day which was great because it was so hot,” Schneider said. “I even learned to paddle board.” Schneider met a new friend who will also be attending Silver Lake intermediate in the fall. “It’s nice to have a familiar face when you go to a new school,” Schneider said.

The

For girls considering an overnight camp, Schneider offered some thoughts. “Overnight camp is great. You make deeper connections with people because you get to sleep right by them – like a big sleepover every night!” she said.

Wonders of Walworth County

See GIRL SCOUT CAMP, Page 4

A publication of Southern Lakes Newspapers LLC and The Beacon 1102 Ann St., Delavan, WI 53115 • (262) 728-3411 GENERAL MANAGER: .....................................Sue Z. Lange EDITOR: .....................................................Tracy Ouellette CREATIVE/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR: ................Heidi Schulz PAGE DESIGNER: ...........................................Jen DeGroot ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: ......................Vicki Vanderwerff

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES: Call (262) 725-7701, ext. 134

On the cover Annika “Hershey” Schneider (left) and Josie “Sunshine” Mutz met at Camp Alice Chester and realized that both will be attending the same new school this year. One of the Girl Scout traditions is to choose a camp name.


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WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019

• Girl scout camp Training the counselors The camp counselors and staff consist of college students and educators from all over the world. They are chosen for their compassion, energy and leadership skills, according to camp officials. The counselors go through intensive training including being aware of youth development (the differences in respect to age) activity skills and safety procedures. The counselors become role models and the campers look to them for guidance and a safe person to share thoughts, feelings and problems with. Emily Gilmour runs a counselor in training program. Originally from Florida, Gilmore has been running camp here for the last seven years. The varying aspects of the training include team-building skills, stress test (all day/night with campers) to avoid burnout. “No matter where you work or go you will need these skills,” Gilmour said. “Most importantly, is asking for help when needed.” With an average ratio of two counselors to 10 campers, Gilmour stressed the need to reach out to others to avoid burnout. Fireside chats or “life talks” wrap up each day. Campers are encouraged to voice issues, concerns or problems they might be facing at camp or outside of camp. “These nightly talks are so important.” Gilmour said. “We want to empower them

LISA SMITH Wonders of Walworth County

Campers Ashlin Fahy, Lotus Johnson, Mia Kamps, Natalie Marmet and Leia Fisher gather for a picture outside their tent at Camp Alice Chester in East Troy.

(Continued from page 3) to solve their problems, not just give them an answer. We want to give them tools and resources to come up with solutions or ideas.” Gilmour has traveled around the United States setting up camps and training counselors. “Camp has changed my life and I can’t see myself doing anything else.” she said. “Camp was always a place I felt I could try something new and it would be OK if I wouldn’t succeed the first time. Camp lets kids relax and helps them to grow.” On a recent Friday afternoon, the girls were cleaning up their bunks, gathering their belongings and getting ready to go home. The campers had mixed emotions, happy to go home to see their families but sad to leave camp and their “sisters.” For some, this is their first camp experience, but it won’t be their last. Year after year, campers return. The impact of camp goes far beyond their adventures at Camp Alice Chester. The Girl Scout mission is to empower girls with the three C’s- Courage, Confidence and Character. These camps focus not only on the here and now, they help prepare these girls for the future. The campers are encouraged to apply what they’ve learned and experienced to the real world and to make a difference. Respect of nature, themselves and others are skills that will turn these young campers into strong leaders in our community and world. For more information about camp opportunities, and how to get involved or volunteer, call 1-800-565-4475 (between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., weekdays), visit gswise. org or send an email to customercare@ gswise.org.

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ustic R

FALL 2019

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

Page 5

FOR A REASON

Area’s rustic roads showcase autumn’s brilliance BY Sandra Landen CORRESPONDENT

Machaj

One of the best ways to catch the brilliant colors of autumn is a ride along one of the Rustic Roads in the Geneva Lakes Area. How many of us have traveled or even know where Snake Road, South Road, Cranberry Road or Back Road are located and where they lead? These less commonly known roads are a part of the Rustic Road System, which was created by the Wisconsin State Legislature in 1973 as a way to preserve some of the scenic, smaller, and less-traveled roads that represent the spirit of Wisconsin’s countryside.

Some history

The first Rustic Road, designated in 1975, was appropriately called Rustic Road 1, and is just north of Medford in the northwest quadrant of the state. Rustic Road 1 crosses through hills and valleys that were created by the last Wisconsin glacier nearly 12,000 years ago.

Since that first designation, the number of Rustic Roads has increased to more than 100. The roads cover a total of 665 miles and are found in 59 of the state’s 72 counties. They tend to be short from two miles to a maximum of 37 miles, but most in our area are approximately 6 to 10 miles in length. The roads are marked by brown and yellow signs with an outline of the state and the words Rustic Road. The route itself is designated by a number with an R in front to prevent it being confused with regular state highways. The distance the route covers is also listed.

What qualifies as rustic?

In order to qualify as a Rustic Road, there are criteria that must be met. It must have outstanding natural features along its borders such as rugged terrain, native vegetation, or wildlife. It must be a lightly traveled local access road. It cannot be scheduled for any major improvements, which would change its character. Rustic Roads may be dirt, gravel, or paved and are open to automobiles, motorcycles, bicyclists, and hikers looking for a scenic country ride or walk. Maximum speed limits are 45 miles per hour but local jurisdictions may lower them. Many are posted at 30 mph.

See RUSTIC, Page 6

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

Rustic Roads are marked with special brown signs with yellow printing. Each road has a designated number with an R prefacing it. Each road is relatively short and has the mileage listed at the beginning of the route.

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WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019

• Rustic

(Continued from page 5)

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation oversees the rustic roads program but the roads themselves remain under local jurisdiction. It is a partnership between the state and local authorities that focuses on preservation and promotion of these country roads. A special program for motorcyclists encourages them to travel the Rustic Roads. Those who complete a tour of 10 roads receive a patch. After completion of 25 roads a special state certificate is given. Participants must take a photograph in front of each Rustic Road sign, if riding alone a photograph of the motorcycle will suffice. The photos should be submitted at once and there is no time limit to complete the tour.

Your tour guide

In recent years, I’ve visited four of the Rustic Roads in the Geneva Lakes Area. I began with R-29, then made my way to R-12, R-11, and R-36. Each of these is an interesting road, with a rural flavor even though they are just a few miles away from the businesses and busyness of Lake Geneva.

Rustic Road 29

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

Rustic Roads are marked with special brown signs with yellow printing. Each road has a designated number with an R prefacing it. Each road is relatively short and has the mileage listed at the beginning of the route.

R-29 is on Snake Road, an aptly named road as it twists and wiggles through the countryside. It is accessed in Lake Geneva off of Highway 50. Driving west through town, continue until you pass the visible edge of Geneva Lake and then watch the little side roads very carefully for the small street sign announcing Snake Road. It is easy to pass it as you look onto Snake Road, the Rustic Road sign R-29 is seen on the right side of the road. A paved road, R-29 is 2.7 miles stretching from the intersection of Snake Road with Highway 50 on the western edge of downtown Lake Geneva. It heads west to where it rejoins Highway 50 in the Town of Geneva. This loop of countryside is a place of natural beauty as the road twists and turns and the elevation changes. It is also the most populated of the four roads that I visited both for the houses on the side and the amount of traffic going through. While not a traffic jam, I did see eight to 10 cars and one motorcycle traveling this Rustic Road. The homes along the road are beautiful with well-landscaped lawns. Split rail fencing is found in some areas and, like all the Rustic Roads, the natural vegetation presents a beautiful sight. Once I rejoined Highway 50, I headed east through Lake Geneva with its busy

summertime visitors, passing through the construction area around Highway 12 and continuing to the east watching for the Rustic Road sign along Highway 50 warning of the need to turn.

Rustic Road 12

R-12 begins on Highway 50 with its intersection at Back Road and continues through Sheridan Springs Road, Spring Valley Road and Church Road taking you from Highway 50 to Highway 36 in the Town of Lyons. This Rustic Road is also paved and travels 5.7 miles. This route is somewhat like R-29 in that it squiggles through the countryside with many curves and turns. It is more open with views of rich green hills and valleys and pine and spruce plantations. White fences dot some of the countryside. Views of Kettle Moraine formations, pine and spruce plantations, a tamarack swamp and several ponds can be enjoyed as you travel this route. A beautiful spot to stop and stretch your legs and take in the view is at the White River County Park, which appears suddenly as you round a turn. The huge barn looms larger than life. It is a place to return to on a day with more time to wander the trails. R-12 ends in the quaint community of Lyons a typical small town in Wisconsin. Lyons is a great place to take a walk and enjoy the small-town flavor of the Wisconsin countryside. The ending of R-12 is near the R-11 Rustic Road and so it was easy to switch to R-11 as I continued on my journey.

Rustic Road 11

R-11 is similar to R-12 in that it links Highway 50 to Highway 36, but the routes are very different. The route is a rectangle as it travels along South Road, Spring Valley Road, Knob Hill Road and Steele Road over paved surfaces for a length of 10.3 miles. Like R-12, there are excellent views of Kettle Moraine topography. It passes through large wooded areas where one can view oak, maple and hickory trees and as well as open agricultural land. On my trip, I was unable to cover the Spring Valley Road section due to road construction. While driving the Steele Road portion of R-11, another decision had to be made. At the intersection with Berndt Road, R-36 joined R-11. Should I continue straight and finish the R-11 route or abandon it for a ride along R-36? The choice was simple, finish R-11 route then turn around and join R-36.

RUSTIC ELEGANCE 7377 Krueger Road, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 (262) 348-9900 hawksviewgolfclub.com

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

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With small hills and curves, this serenely wooded Rustic Road presents a quiet route from Highway 50 to Highway 36.


FALL 2019

Future

Making connections

Because of Greg’s desire to work with one of the schools, Julia, who is the office and marketing manager at Wausau Homes, connected him with Eryca Card at the middle school, and from there the idea took off. “When Greg and Julia approached me, the Green Architecture unit was about to start, so the timing was perfect,” Card said. The Ingersolls met with the students – four boys and four girls – three mornings each week for an hour while school was

still in session. One of the students, Haley Hoekstra, said working on the project was fun. “It’s great knowing that when it’s finished, it’s going to a good cause. My dad does roofing and my grandpa, carpentry so I help them out once in awhile,” she said. Student Kaiden Porep agreed. “It’s been really fun building, cutting and putting it together,” Porep said. “I’m excited to see it when it’s done. It’s going to help a lot of people.” Recently, the students had completed all the portions of the project within their capabilities. Now, subcontractors are working on things that require a higher skill level and tools, according to Julia. She said this project highlights the possibilities of how businesses and schools can work together. “This has been a wonderful community partnership and shows the amazing opportunities our kids have at our middle school,” Julia said. Card, a science teacher at Elkhorn Area Middle School and the Project Lead the Way coordinator for students in 4K through eighth grades, said the playhouse project was a blessing. “We are always looking for ways to make our students’ learning more real-life, and to also partner with the community as we realize how important that is,” Card said. “Not only did this project do that, but it also allowed our students to serve the less fortunate in the community and to have a

Page 7

Above: After measuring where to cut, Suttman operates the saw under close supervision from Ingersoll. At left: From the left: (front) Ben Suttman, Kaiden Porep, (back) Haley Hoekstra, Greg Ingersoll, Brook Slinde, Lily Petrasek, Ben Holm, Mackenzie Begley and Travis Brogren stand on the base of the playhouse early on in the project.

Building a

t’s not quite an “If you build it, they will come” scenario, but close. An area company and a group of middle school students recently teamed up to build a playhouse. In the spring, Greg Ingersoll, of Wausau Homes Elkhorn, started working with a group of eight sixth-grade students at Elkhorn Area Middle School that are part of the Project Lead the Way Green Architecture class. Once the playhouse is finished – within the next two to three weeks – it will be donated to New Beginnings to be raffled off and raise funds for the domestic abuse shelter project. “It’s a pretty cool project. We were going to build the playhouse anyway as a donation to New Beginnings, but then Greg mentioned he’d really like to do a partnership with one of the schools on a building project,” Julia Ingersoll said.

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

STORY & PHOTOS HEATHER RUENZ • STAFF WRITER

Area company, students partner on playhouse project

specific purpose for their learning,” she added.

Leading the way

Card said the Green Architecture unit allows students to learn all about construction – from the land that is the best option, to environmental factors, to designing and creating houses from green materials. She said Greg was a phenomenal teacher. “He exuded patience, knowledge and an ‘I do, you watch. You do, I’ll watch. You do it on your own’ attitude with our students. It followed the way that PLTW releases projects to students through the APB approach to instruction,” Card said. APB is the activity-, project- and problem-based instructional design of PLTW that centers on hands-on, realworld activities, projects and problems that help students understand how the knowledge and skills they develop in the classroom may be applied in everyday life. PLTW, a nonprofit organization, provides a transformative learning experience for PreK-12 students and teachers. It empowers students to develop in-demand, transportable knowledge and skills through pathways in computer science, engineering and biomedical science. Card, who was named PLTW Educational Leader of the Year in February, has been instrumental in the Elkhorn Area School District’s efforts.

“Our adoption model is unique in that we have all strands – engineering, biomedical and computer science – started for 4 years to 12th grade. We implement it at the lower level,” Elkhorn Area District Administrator Jason Tadlock said. He said having all kids exposed to PLTW programming was his vision when he was first hired as the EASD administrator. “In order to maintain our well-being, we need to create, innovate and to design,” Tadlock said. He said the learning is open-ended, and students learn to design, modify and improve. “PLTW is an integration of different skills,” Tadlock said. “It is a reflection of a team effort.”

Far-reaching impact

According to Card, the playhouse project with the Ingersolls was also a team effort. “We are very grateful for the time that Wausau Homes put in with our students, mentoring them in the trade of construction,” Card said. “I look forward to working with them long into the future, as the impact it has on each of our students is far-reaching.” Julia said for Greg, it comes down to his desire to share his passion with young people. “He wants to make sure the next generation has an interest in carrying this on,” she said.


Page 8

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019 357466

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Catching

Area man wins big in competitive fishing

the

limit

FALL 2019

The 2019 Bass Fishing League is a 24-division circuit devoted to weekend anglers, with 128 tournaments throughout the season, five qualifying events in each division. The top 45 boaters and co-anglers from each division, along with the five winners of the qualifying events, will advance to one of the six regional tournaments where they are competing to finish in the top six, which then qualifies them for one of the biggest-running championships in all of competitive bass fishing – the BFL AllAmerican. The BFL All-American will be held April 30-May 2 at Lake Hartwell in Anderson, South Carolina. For complete details, visit FLWFishing.com.

CORRESPONDENT

ishing wasn’t Joe Pollak’s first love as a child. It became his passion early in his adult life. “Growing up, I played baseball and basketball,” he said via email. “But as I grew older, I started bowling and did very well for quite a few years until my passion for fishing took over.” Now the 38-year-old Lake Geneva resident and 2000 Lake Geneva Badger High School graduate gets out on the lake and tries to fish year-round. And when it’s too cold to fish in Wisconsin during the winter, Pollak travels south to fish. He’s not a big fan of ice fishing. Ironically, the love of fishing doesn’t run in Pollak’s family. “My dad would take me out fishing, but we were never serious fishermen,” he recalled. Pollak was sitting in his friend’s brandnew bass boat one day and caught one bass. And since that day, he was hooked on the sport. “The competition in this sport is where it’s at,” he said. “To be able to say you were the best that day and catch them good is a feeling like no other.” Pollak competed in the T-H Marine FLW Bass Fishing League Tournament SUBMITTED PHOTO Wonders of Walworth County

Fishing League Worldwide is the world’s largest tournament fishing organization, providing anglers of all skill levels the opportunity to compete for millions in prize money in 2019 across five tournament circuits. Headquartered in Benton, Kentucky, with offices in Minneapolis, FLW and its partners conduct more than 290 bass-fishing tournaments annually around the world, including the United States, Canada, China, Italy, South Korea, Mexico, Nambia, Portugal, South Africa, Spain and Zimbabwe. FLW tournament fishing can be seen on the Emmy-nominated FLW television show while FLW Bass Fishing magazine delivers cutting-edge tips from top pros. For more information, visit FLWFishing.com and follow FLW on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Page 9

About the Bass Fishing League

By Troy Sparks

About Fishing League Worldwide

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

Above: Joe Pollak shows off his trophy for winning the T-H Marine FLW Bass Fishing League Great Lakes Division tournament after catching five bass weighing 15 pounds, 1 ounce. For his win, Pollak netted $4,586. Top: Pollak, of Lake Geneva, reels one in on an area lake. Pollak enjoys competitive fishing and has won several tournaments, including the T-H Marine FLW Bass Fishing League Great Lakes Division tournament on the Mississippi River at Prairie du Chien in August.

in Prairie du Chien on the Mississippi River in August. He won the Great Lakes Division tournament, catching five bass that weighed a combined total of 15 pounds and 1 ounce. He won $4,586 and beat the second-place finisher (Mike Brueggen, La Crosse, $1,793) by one ounce (15-0). “I was able to catch a limit fairly quick fishing between the middle and the north side of Pool No. 9 south of Lansing,” Pollak said in the Aug. 19 press release. “I had a bunch of spots that had schools of fish on them, probably a dozen or so points that were current-related.” Pollak fished in 1 to 5 feet of water, casting a 1/4-ounce white and chartreusecolored Dirty Jigs swimjig with a 4-inch white Zoom Paddle Tail swimbait trailer and used some reaction baits. He used the same baits to reel in 2 to 3 fish that put him over the top to win the tournament. This was Pollak’s second career win in BFL competition. According to Pollak, he thrives

on competition and beating the best fishermen in every tournament he enters. “Anyone can compete as long as they have confidence in what they are doing,” he said. Pollak’s routine before he begins every tournament includes putting a new line on his reels, tying his baits and making sure his hooks are the sharpest. Among the 20 poles Pollak uses in competitions, the favorite one is whichever fish is biting on his line. The equipment of preference for Pollak is the St. Croix Legend and Extreme rods with the Shimano Metanium reels. Pollak’s recent big win might magnify him to local celebrity status. However, things don’t always go his way in competitions. “Everyone struggles early on,” Pollak said. “Hell, I still struggle. Every day in the water you learn something, and if you don’t, you’re doing something wrong.” Pollak, who didn’t take fishing seriously until he was 23, recalled some of

his favorite places to fish in and outside of Wisconsin. “Without a doubt, the Mississippi River around La Crosse is an amazing place,” he said. “Some of the best fishing around. The wildlife you see every day; it’s just amazing out there.” Pollak said he saw some of the biggest fish when he competed in a tournament in Guntersville, Alabama. His early memory of fishing growing up was on a trip to Canada to catch walleye and northern pike, and he had a ball. He said the biggest fish that he ever caught was at Lake Guntersville. It weighed 6 1/2 pounds. During the season, Pollak spends at least five or more days a week in the water with Brad Wessling and Kyle Rabelhofer, his fishing buddies. Fishing doesn’t always dominate his free time when he’s not working. Recently, Pollak got engaged to the love of his life, Brenna Kujak. They plan to get married soon. Pollak’s fiancée and their children, Joseph and Savannah, keep things in perspective for him as he maintains a balanced life. One of Pollak’s favorite moments he shares with his son is when they’re eating bluegills, perch, northern and walleye together. He invites friends over for cookouts and cocktails when he’s not on the road traveling for tournaments. Pollak is usually away from the family and Lake Geneva for about a week during the season, traveling and preparing for competitions. The year-round resident said he gives fishing advice to kids as much as he can. Pollak said there’s more to accomplish in his competitive career before he settles down and fishes on a recreational basis. “You can never be satisfied in any sport in my opinion,” he said. “You have to strive to be the best. There’s always that next tournament that you want to win.”


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WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019

Love for the

The tall apple in front of the orchard alerts visitors of their arrival at the Apple Barn Orchard and Winery, W6384 Sugar Creek Road, Elkhorn. Pictured here are owners Steve and Judy Jacobson with two of their daughters.

of

Fruit SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

Whether fresh off the tree or bottled as fine wine, Apple Barn’s products are made to please BY Sandra Landen CORRESPONDENT

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

This area of the gift shop displays groceries. Included are wine jellies, pumpkin pie fillings, pancake mixes and breads to take home and create your own homemade treats the easy way.

Machaj

The month of September is a time when the tree leaves begin to turn from green to yellow and orange and apples begin to ripen. It is time for a trip out to your favorite apple orchard to enjoy the fruits of the season. The Apple Barn, in Elkhorn, has been a favorite of customers for many years. Six generations of the Jacobson family have made their home on this land and continue the family tradition of farming the land and caring for their fruit orchards. “The original family members arrived in this area from Oslo, Norway, in 1846,” the Apple Barn’s Judy Jacobson said. “Along with other members of the Norwegian community who settled here, they helped build the local church – still standing just down the road – and built a cheese factory. While involved in these community activities, they also began the hard work of turning this land into a productive farm.” Judy Jacobson and her husband, Steve, are the current generation of the family to successfully farm the land and operate the Apple Barn retail store.

They were successful and with each generation increased both the crops grown and the variety of apple trees in their orchards. The apple orchards matured and produced top quality apples. They have continued to be a full-time farm, planting more than 400 acres of field corn, soybeans and other crops in addition to the variety of fruit trees in the orchards.

The apple season

“Around the weekend of Sept. 28, we begin the Apple Fest season, which continues on weekends through October 19 and 20 dependent on weather,” Jacobson said. “During this time in addition to the apple varieties available in the Apple Barn for purchase, customers may enjoy, pick-your-own apples, on these weekends.” A trip out into the apple orchards is always a fun activity for families to share this outdoor experience. Here children who live in the city learn that apples grow on trees and not in the local supermarket. Each fall customers wait for their favorite varieties to ripen in anticipation of a fresh, tree-ripened apple.


FALL 2019

“The first varieties available for sale are the Paula Reds, the Zestars, and the MacIntosh varieties, usually beginning to ripen in the middle of September,” Jacobson said. “In late September other varieties begin to ripen and we begin the pick-your-own season for those who enjoy this out of doors activity.” Fall also calls for apple cider. Many enjoy cold apple cider while the weather is still warm and then a switch to the hot, spiced apple cider when the weather cools down. The pressing of apples begins in the fall and continues through January. To enjoy along with the fall ciders, visitors are encouraged to try the apple cider donuts made fresh at Apple Barn. “They are made by us on a daily basis,” Jacobson said. “Ours are special because they are made with straight apple cider, not diluted cider as some recipes call for.”

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

Page 11

Large school groups frequently visit Apple Barn during the week so they have chosen not to offer wine tasting when school groups are present. If no school groups are scheduled to be at the Apple Barn, a wine tasting may possibly be arranged for that day.

Wine for all tastes

With 13 varieties of wine currently being bottled and sold on site, there are some that seem to be more popular with customers. People often say they don’t like wines other than grape wines because they are too sweet. Autumn gold is one of the apple wines that is very popular with many customers that may change their minds. It is a dry wine that can be enjoyed by those who do favor sweet wines. The Spiced Apple Harvest wine is a favorite fall wine. It is also recommended for holidays. Fermented with natural spices, it offers a unique flavor. Many drink it warmed in cold weather. New task for old barn Honey Crisp apples are a favorite of many customers The Apple Barn retail store and Winery is a series so it is not surprising that Honey Crisp Apple Harvest of buildings that have been on the farm for many years wine made with only Honey Crisp apples is enjoyed by and have been repurposed for the winery. The wine is so many. It is a semi-sweet wine. actually made in the farm’s old milking barn. Connected “The honey crisp apples that are sold on site are the to the milking barn is the gift shop area, which was the large and shiny apples that everyone loves,” Jacobson old granary. Connected to the gift shop area is the winesaid. “For wine making, the apples considered a No. 2 tasting room, which was repurposed from the original grade are used. The number 2 grade apples are just as machine shop for the farm. tasty but are not as attractive to the customers because Today that building has a whole new look. A they are not big and shiny. However, they taste just as large tasting bar covers one side of the room with good and when juiced for the wine, no one remembers skylights and unique chandeliers hanging above it. The what they looked like before they were juiced. They do chandeliers have, instead of crystals, inverted wine make a very tasty wine.” glasses hanging in their place to light up the bar along In addition to apples, the farm also grows pears but with large skylights. you will never see any for sale in the store. A few tables to enjoy your wine tasting are scattered “We don’t have a large number of pear trees so we throughout the tasting room. Over several of the tables use the pears they produce to make our pear wine,” are the unique light fixtures that are part of the wine Jacobson said. “The pear wine has won the Grand décor, which permeates this room. This chandelier is Champion Award at the County Fair. It is something composed of wine bottles. special.” The tasting room is the place to begin if you haven’t The Apple Barn is at W6384 Sugar Creek Rd., tried any of the fruit wines produced at Apple Barn. Elkhorn. The Apple Barn is open Tuesday through They offer wine tasting on the weekends, but suggest Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 11 people call before coming during the week for 1a wine to 5PM p.m. For more information, call 262-728-3266 Southern Lakes Ad_winter16.pdf 10/14/2016 a.m. 1:48:20 tasting. or visit www.applebarnorchardandwinery.com.

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Wonders of Walworth County

When the red apples begin to peek out between the green leaves of the apple tree, it is a sign that fall is here and apple season has arrived.

Enjoy Chicago’s Original Gino’s East Pizza in Downtown Lake Geneva Choose between our famous Deep Dish or Thin Crust pizza Enjoy our variety of appetizers, salads, and pasta entrees Dine in with spectacular lake view, or delivery to your room Open for lunch at 11am

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Page 12

WONDERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY

FALL 2019

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Wonders of Walworth County for Fall 2019  

Wonders of Walworth County for Fall 2019