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B.A. Lehmann Enterpri Landscape & Law

~ formerly Antioch Report

SERVING THE VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH AND TREVOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 DISPLAY ADS (262) 877-2813

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147 E. Main Street, Twin Lakes, WI 53185 • Published By Southern Lakes Newspapers, LLC

CORRESPONDENT

On the second Tuesday of the month, people of all ages are seen filing into the Eide classroom at the Antioch Public Library, where they engage in a game of chess. The program, which begins around 6:30 p.m., runs about 90 minutes and includes cookies and juice at the 757 N. Main St. location. As chess competitors start to arrive, the participants raise their voices in excitement, sharing stories about their chess skills. Scot Henderson, standing in for regular teacher Alan Cargill, brings a wealth of experience, serving as one of the coaches for Antioch Community High School chess team. “The high school chess team qualified for the State Championship this year for the first time,” he said. The high school team, according to Henderson, has only been in existence for two SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Hi-Liter years. Above: Participants of all Considering the school’s ages engage in a game of chess program is relatively new, at the monthly program at AnHenderson said the team had tioch Public Library. Right: Lucas a respectable debut on the Wayne, 10, receives instruction state stage. from teacher Scot Henderson on Daniel Sanabria, the game of chess. Cookies and meanwhile, was one of the Chess is open to anyone 6 years first students to arrive and and older. Contact the library for came ready to play. more information. “I learned to play in Cub Scouts and thought it was fun. I thought the game looked really cool,” Sanabria said. “It takes a lot of skill.” GRG-5165_V7.qxp_Layout 1 4/6/18 11:54 AM Page 1 See LIBRARY, Page 8 His interest in chess was

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Antioch passes budget By Gail Peckler-Dziki CORRESPONDENT

The Antioch Village Board, aside from one trustee, approved the 2019 proposed budget at its April 9 regular meeting. Trustee Jerry Johnson, who is involved with a purchase of a property at the intersection of Park Avenue and Main Street, abstained from the vote. The property involves a proposed Rivalry Ale House, and if the purchase comes to fruition, a business group Johnson is affiliated with will look to rent several parking spaces from the village and apply for a potential $50,000 facade grant. Meanwhile, for the budget, the Antioch Village Administrator Jim Keim presented a preview of the proposed budget at the end of the March 28 Committee of the Whole meeting. He said that revenues are expected to be $13.1 million and expenditures are expected to be $12.9 million. Keim also reported 100 new residential development. He said retail revenue looked to be flat. The police pension price tag is estimated at $262,000, which includes a $36,000

See BUDGET, Page 6

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Library offers chess and savory sweets By Sandra Landen Machaj CORRESPONDENT

On the second Tuesday of the month, people of all ages are seen filing into the Eide classroom at the Antioch Public Library, where they engage in a game of chess. The program, which begins around 6:30 p.m., runs about 90 minutes and includes cookies and juice at the 757 N. Main St. location. As chess competitors start to arrive, the participants raise their voices in excitement, sharing stories about their chess skills. Scot Henderson, standing in for regular teacher Alan Cargill, brings a wealth of experience, serving as one of the coaches for Antioch Community High School chess team. “The high school chess team qualified for the State Championship this year for the first time,” he said. The high school team, according to Henderson, has only been in existence for two SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Hi-Liter years. Above: Participants of all Considering the school’s ages engage in a game of chess program is relatively new, at the monthly program at AnHenderson said the team had tioch Public Library. Right: Lucas a respectable debut on the Wayne, 10, receives instruction state stage. from teacher Scot Henderson on Daniel Sanabria, the game of chess. Cookies and meanwhile, was one of the Chess is open to anyone 6 years first students to arrive and and older. Contact the library for came ready to play. more information. “I learned to play in Cub Scouts and thought it was fun. I thought the game looked really cool,” Sanabria said. “It takes a lot of skill.” GRG-5165_V7.qxp_Layout 1 4/6/18 11:54 AM Page 1 See LIBRARY, Page 8 His interest in chess was

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Lindenhurst celebrates Earth Day

The Lindenhurst Park District and the Village of Lindenhurst Environmental Commission will hold an Earth Day celebration from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday throughout Lindenhurst. There will be a bag swap, shoe collection and book/ hanger/clothing/textile recycling. There also will be free food and refreshments at the Village Hall. The schedule of events is as follows: • The 5K fun run/walk will be at 9 a.m. The first 100 to register will receive a free

See EARTH DAY, Page 6

Village of Antioch Environmental Commission schedules annual EcoFair

The Village of Antioch Environmental Commission will host its annual EcoFair to honor Earth Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, at the Antioch Township Building, 1625 Deep Lake Road #B, Lake Villa. There will be speakers, vendors, games, food, prizes and interactive activities. Chamber members can receive free booth space to promote their eco-friendly business or practice. This free event is for people of all ages. For more information, email Anna at anna.andersen23@ gmail.com.

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Visit daily to receive one drawing entry card for our weekly drawing every Friday at 7pm. Two winners will each receive a $25 gift card!

VALID AT 3 LOCATIONS: 63 S ROUTE 12 • FOX LAKE 1720 N RICHMOND RD • MCHENRY 254 E ROLLINS RD, SUITE G2 • ROUND LAKE BEACH Valid through April 11–May 18, 2018. Offer excludes alcohol. Limit one offer per person for the duration of the promotion. Must be 21 years or older w/ valid ID and a member of our PLAY-SPIN-WIN club. Must present this advertisement at one of the Stella’s Place locations listed to redeem. Management reserves all rights. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537). 312481


B.A. Lehmann Enterpri Landscape & Law

~ formerly The Report

RICHMOND, SPRING GROVE, JOHNSBURG & RINGWOOD To subscribe call 262-728-3411

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 DISPLAY ADS (262) 877-2813

VOLUME 13 • NUMBER 20

CLASSIFIEDS (262) 728-3411

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147 E. Main Street, Twin Lakes, WI 53185 • Published By Southern Lakes Newspapers, LLC

CORRESPONDENT

On the second Tuesday of the month, people of all ages are seen filing into the Eide classroom at the Antioch Public Library, where they engage in a game of chess. The program, which begins around 6:30 p.m., runs about 90 minutes and includes cookies and juice at the 757 N. Main St. location. As chess competitors start to arrive, the participants raise their voices in excitement, sharing stories about their chess skills. Scot Henderson, standing in for regular teacher Alan Cargill, brings a wealth of experience, serving as one of the coaches for Antioch Community High School chess team. “The high school chess team qualified for the State Championship this year for the first time,” he said. The high school team, according to Henderson, has only been in existence for two SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Hi-Liter years. Above: Participants of all Considering the school’s ages engage in a game of chess program is relatively new, at the monthly program at AnHenderson said the team had tioch Public Library. Right: Lucas a respectable debut on the Wayne, 10, receives instruction state stage. from teacher Scot Henderson on Daniel Sanabria, the game of chess. Cookies and meanwhile, was one of the Chess is open to anyone 6 years first students to arrive and and older. Contact the library for came ready to play. more information. “I learned to play in Cub Scouts and thought it was fun. I thought the game looked really cool,” Sanabria said. “It takes a lot of skill.” GRG-5165_V7.qxp_Layout 1 4/6/18 11:54 AM Page 1 See LIBRARY, Page 8 His interest in chess was

ses, Inc.

n Maintenance

Let us do the wor k to make your ou tdoor areas beautiful & enjoyable Free Estimates

847-561-5

933 Annual/Perenni al Garden & Pla nting Bed Clean Up R enovations barb araannlehmann6

Library offers chess and savory sweets By Sandra Landen Machaj

Free!

5@gmail.com

312631

McHenry State’s Attorney institutes no-refusal policy New effort looks to deter drunken driving

Effective this week, multiple police departments, in collaboration with the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office will institute a new policy regarding suspected drunken drivers. For any suspected drunken driver who refuses a breathalyzer test, the State’s Attorney’s Office will seek a warrant for a blood draw, the agency said. “The days of drunk drivers refusing to blow thinking that they can beat a DUI charge are coming to an end,” said Patrick Kenneally, McHenry County State’s Attorney. “This new policy means that we’re going to ensure we have all the evidence we need to successfully prosecute drunk drivers every time.” If a warrant is granted, the suspect drunk driver will be transported to a nearby emergency room, where officials can obtain a blood draw. The policy, according to Kenneally, allows prosecutors to have the strongest possible evidence in court, and hold

See POLICY, Page 6

Visit us and present this ad to receive:

$15 IN OFFERS FOX LAKE • ROUND LAKE BEACH • McHENRY SL

OTS

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O TS

E V ID O PO

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$5 GIFT CARD & STAMP CARD

$5 FREE PLAY & $5 IN FOOD & BEVERAGE

Visit daily to receive one drawing entry card for our weekly drawing every Friday at 7pm. Two winners will each receive a $25 gift card!

VALID AT 3 LOCATIONS: 63 S ROUTE 12 • FOX LAKE 1720 N RICHMOND RD • MCHENRY 254 E ROLLINS RD, SUITE G2 • ROUND LAKE BEACH Valid through April 11–May 18, 2018. Offer excludes alcohol. Limit one offer per person for the duration of the promotion. Must be 21 years or older w/ valid ID and a member of our PLAY-SPIN-WIN club. Must present this advertisement at one of the Stella’s Place locations listed to redeem. Management reserves all rights. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537). 312481


The time is now to help

HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 2

Barnabas matching grant provides help, inspiration cover it. He is a large, tall man and they would pay only for a short twin bed with a foam mattress that is causing pressure sores on his heels and backside. Our maintenance man helped install grab bars for him so he can turn himself, but the bed is too small for him to roll all the way over. I know you have helped some of our tenants in the past. The help your organization provided was a godsend. We are hoping and praying you can help this gentleman, too. He has been through so much, and this would improve his health and well-being.

By

SAL DIMICELI Columnist

so much more will be provided thanks to the Barnabas donors and your matching funds. Our hope is that by the time warm weather arrives we will be sharing the final numbers with supporters. We humbly ask for your help in making this dream a reality. Dear W.C., I work at an apartment complex for disabled, low-income tenants. I am concerned for one of our tenants. He is a gentleman that is paralyzed from the waist down. He has been struggling to obtain a properly sized hospital bed and air mattress from Medicare, but they will not

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medical setbacks that complicated his difficult recovery. It took months of rehabilitation to get him to the point where he could get in and out of a wheelchair on his own and speak again. By the time he finally was discharged from the hospital, he had lost everything. He had been self-employed as a contractor, so he lost his business. His work truck had been repossessed. He was evicted from a previous rental due to inaccessibility and expenses. “My sister lives close by. She is my part-time caregiver. She helps me as much as she can. She found the low-income apartment for me and helped me get moved in. She has been helping me every step of the way. She is the only family I have. All the people I thought were my friends haven’t come to see me since I’ve gotten home from the hospital.” I asked about his bed situation and he confirmed what the apartment manager had said. It was too small and causing him additional medical problems due to the pressure sores. He is 6 feet 4 inches tall but did not weigh enough to qualify for a larger, wider bariatric bed. The extra width would allow him to roll over on his own so he didn’t need physical assistance every few hours to be moved to the center of the tiny bed, or even worse, risk falling out of the bed. That happened at the hospital, and he had suffered a broken leg. What this man physically endured over the past year was torturous to listen to, much less live with every day with substandard medical equipment. We always have had compassion for the handicapped. Ever since the organization began, when I used to visit lowincome homes for the handicapped, offering wheelchairs and clothing, my heart has been touched when I witnessed their human suffering. When they are denied basic needs that make their lives so much more comfortable, and often what I would consider medically necessary, I cannot sit back and watch.

Poverty is so much more difficult for the handicapped. They cannot help themselves. They cannot just get a job or aren’t lucky enough to have a wealthy relative who will support their care financially. It is up to us to care and share and provide necessities so they can live without pain and suffering. I learned the man’s sister handled most of his bill paying and other care. I called her to find out more about his financial needs, and she went over his expenses in detail. In addition to the physical care, she shopped and prepared his food, providing additional food when his funds were short, and drove him to all of his medical visits. The sister then mentioned the need for not only a larger bed but also one that would provide pressure relief and air circulation to prevent him from getting pressure ulcers. She emailed me several low air loss mattresses and hospital beds to show me what they were looking for. The cost of these beds is prohibitive for most people, but I was determined to provide this much-needed bed. I told her we would do our best to provide a bed and promised to contact her again after doing more research. With in-depth research by one of our volunteers, we found the exact model of electric hospital bed online that they had been dreaming of, and at a much-reduced price. We also found a brand new wider and longer low air loss mattress that would allow him to fit on the bed and roll over for necessary care and health. This also helped him be much more independent. I was so excited about helping this gentleman that I told one of our generous donors, who after finding out about the Barnabas matching grant offered to pay for the bed and mattress. I was so moved by such a generous offer to do God’s good works that I broke into tears, profusely thanking this donor and Barnabas for their support. And I thank all of you for helping those in desperate need. Our prayers were answered. This gentleman’s bed was scheduled for installation a few days after

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Dear readers, I asked the woman who wrote the letter how the tenants we had helped were doing and she updated me about their situations. Many had received beds, food, wheelchairs, car repairs, household necessities and toiletries over the past few years. I was happy to hear they were doing well and managing on their limited incomes. Our conversation turned to the gentleman she had recently written to us about. The apartment manager filled me in on what she could share, including personal information he had given her permission to disclose. “I think it would be best if you call him. He has quite a story to tell about how he ended up here.” I called, and after introducing ourselves, the man confirmed he was the paralyzed person who needed a hospital bed. We began what would be a long, heartbreaking conversation. The 45-year-old had been healthy and hardworking until the previous year. Then he suffered a heart attack at work. After being rushed to the hospital and undergoing emergency surgery, he suffered a stroke, which left him paralyzed and struggling to eat and speak. He endured several other

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We are blessed to have matching grant donors who have been supporting our good works for many years. One of them is Barnabas. The Barnabas donors have seen our charity work firsthand and been deeply touched. Their generosity to our poverty relief mission has allowed us to increase our assistance to more people in our communities. Barnabas has helped us serve hundreds of senior citizens, the handicapped, children and the working poor over the past 11 years. And we have been given a new matching grant challenge – $82,500, the biggest so far. This matching grant will allow us to make a real difference in the lives of our fellow creations suffering in poverty. Cars will be repaired, evictions halted, utilities connected, food shared and gas donated for jobs and medical visits. And

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Easter. He also received food and toiletries. We also provided the caring sister with gas gift cards to help pay for all of the driving she does for her brother. Please donate to our new Barnabas matching grant. It is a challenge we are happy to share with all of you.

Health and happiness, love and God bless everyone, Sal

Please help: Many are coming to us in desperation, and our fellow creations need our compassion. Together we make a big difference. Make checks payable to: Time Is Now to Help, P.O. Box 1, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. It is a federally recognized 501(c) 3 charitable organization licensed in Wisconsin and Illinois. Donors will receive a tax deductible, itemized thank you receipt showing how their funds provided assistance for the poverty stricken.

Special thank you: Richard H. Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust, Family Foundation, Barnabas Matching Grant donors, Clarence and Marilyn Schawk Family Foundation, Kunes Family Foundation, Hufcor Foundation, Elkcast Aluminum, Kenneth and Gwen Swanson, Lake Geneva Area Realty, Dick and Jean Honeyager, Alfred and Mildred Thorson, Gary and Hazel Schopp, Kenneth and Gwen Swanson, Martin Business, John Stensland and family, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schuberth, Al and Geri Hinton, Karin Collamore, Michael Glass, Jack Mallory, the Rev. Hugh Fullmer, James and Marilynn Dyer, Donald Lightfield, David and Shirley Heigl, June Davidsen, Thomas McCloud, Russo Drywall, Walter and Florence Strumpf, William and Lynn Koukal, Rita’s Wells Street Salon, Shari and James Loback, Susan Diderich, Patricia Jankowski, our anonymous donors and all of you who support Time Is Now donation boxes and the businesses that allow them. Anyone who would like a Time Is Now donation box in your business, call (262) 2497000. Prayer chain: The power of prayer and positive thoughts comes from the true healer, our Lord, answering our prayers. Please pray for healing for the Mike, Caroline, Susan, Sylvia, Richard, Jennifer, Jayden, Santina, Alex, Lily, Kaitlyn, Kynesha, Sheila, Adrian, Rhonda, Sal, Deda Lee and Marilyn. Visit timeisnowtohelp.org for more information.


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 3

Slices of life

Adventures in plastic storage often a losing battle It was going to be a busy day. I had a to-do list longer than a Minnesota winter or a Texas summer — take your pick. Of course, the kitchen was a mess. The best mornings always start out that way. Dishes were piled in the sink because after dinner the night before we’d discovered the dishwasher already was full and in need of a wash cycle. Oops. I was midway through unloading the dishwasher when the crisis du jour hit. It started with a blue plastic bowl, which naturally belonged in our plastic storage container cupboard. I opened said cupboard and attempted to shove the bowl inside, shove being the operative (albeit accurate) word.

By

JILL PERTLER Columnist

When I completed the cramming, two other containers spilled out. I tried to return the two spilled containers and three more fell to the floor. We were at an impasse. The situation required investigative expertise and organizational wizardry. I bent over to take a look-see into the cupboard and gazed directly at the dictionary definition of chaos. Bowls and lids intertwined and sat

kittywampus hither and yon. Clutter doesn’t even begin to describe the overall bedlam. It was a disaster in desperate need of relief efforts. The task jumped to number two on my to-do list. Number one was removing an errant spoon from the garbage disposal, but that’s a story for another day. What is it about plastic bowl storage that always makes the most orderly of order go so very wrong so very quickly? I organize this cupboard at least a couple times a year. While other kitchen implements mind their manners and stay put in their assigned confinements, the plastic storage containers party like it’s 1999. They swap lids and refuse to neatly nest according to size

and shape. They flip and flop like a gymnast with a severe caffeine buzz. They are disobedient children in need of some rigorous parenting. The utter lawlessness of the plastic storage cupboard defies logic. Like messy morning kitchens, pop-up ads, finger grease on your phone screen, mosquitoes, rubbery celery, hang nails and the airplane mode, it just is – like it or not. (Not.) Each time I reorganize the cupboard it is an adventure in volume. What comes out initially looks much more expansive than what I manage to wrestle back in. Welcome to the magic and mysterious world of plastic storage. And each time I tell myself that my wondrous and remarkable organization

is going to last. For sure. This time. Then all hell breaks loose and the pandemonium ensues. Lids consort with mismatched containers in acts that can only be described as debauchery. Neatly nested vessels roam to extraneous locations both illicit and incongruous. Square containers fraternize with the round with little thought to the big scheme of things. It is a world turned upside down. Rules are thrown out with the bathwater – or better put, lost lids. Their madness causes a personal angst within me. But today was a victory on my end. I pulled those bad boys (and girls) from underneath the darkness of their imaginary disco-balled

nightclub into the bright of day. I paired them according to size and shape. Under my tender tutelage they nested like spring songbirds. Anyone without a lid was banished to the cavity of the garbage can. And now they sit, waiting for nightfall, when their plastic party will begin anew and I will awake in the morning to find at least one without a lid and know I have been thwarted – again.

Jill Pertler is an awardwinning syndicated columnist, published playwright, author and member of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists. She invites readers to follow the Slices of Life page on Facebook.

Exploring new worlds Family finds their way through challenging maze of an autistic child

By Todd Mishler COPY EDITOR

Nick Bursh loves politics and philosophy. He watches games and cartoons on his iPad mini, using dozens of the characters in his wonderful drawings and paintings that dominate the refrigerator and numerous walls in his parents’ Fontana home. Dexter Johnson religiously researches biology and human anatomy. He wants to finish his associate degree at Gateway Technical College with hopes of working in the medical profession someday. He also enjoys music and playing the drums. An estimated 1 percent of American children ages 3 through 17 have been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Nick was a toddler, while Dexter was 18. The 11th annual World Autism Awareness Day was April 2, established to foster acceptance and understanding of the many struggles these individuals and their families face while celebrating the small but sometimes glorious victories along their challenging journeys. The Burshes and Johnsons can relate to the emotional and physical peaks and valleys of life with an ASD child.

Nick Bursh’s mother, Laura, helps him with his computerassisted typing in which he communicates. He wears headphones a lot to block out noises that often trigger negative responses related to his autism. SUBMITTED PHOTO Hi-Liter

Can you hear me now?

Illinois natives Laura and Dick Bursh spent 10 years in Sharon and have lived in Fontana the past 15 years. A pediatric psychiatrist diagnosed their son, now 30. At age 10, with the onset of puberty and increasingly dangerous behaviors, Laura and Dick reluctantly placed Nick in the foster care system. Later he lived in adult group homes in Walworth County and attended Lakeland School in Elkhorn at various times. But Nick moved back with his parents permanently in 2014. And while the family dynamics remain demanding, they’ve improved markedly. That’s because after being locked inside his body for 25 years, Nick finally “talked” with the outside world and let everybody get to know him. Labeled according to his behavior and lack of social and communication skills — one professional estimated his IQ at 34 — Nick is changing those perceptions while proving daily that he is so much more. That’s because his mother, parttime caregiver Theresa Larsen and two professional facilitators in Madison have helped Nick explore a whole new universe through computer-assisted learning. They place their hand under his right arm, and that prompts the magical thoughts to spew forth from Nick. He uses a pencil in his close-fisted hand

to draw while painstakingly but joyfully pointing with his forefinger or a pencil to type — and that allows others to “hear” what he has to say. And amazingly, his actual speech has increased and improved. “His thoughts come so fast that he’s always trying to catch up to them,” Laura said. “The greatest challenge is capturing them in the moment. He wants to communicate more than anything and keeps telling us, ‘I am in here.’” The Burshes have known that all along but didn’t know how to help him escape, having spent most of Nick’s life on waiting lists, trying to find support and answers for themselves and their son. “At one point somebody gave him an IQ of 34, and I’m like, ‘You people are full of it,’” Laura said. “I knew that I was the expert on my child because he was smart about things he was interested in and loved to do.” But now that the door has been opened, it will never close again. “The words started spilling out of him,” Laura said. “And his behavior changed dramatically. All of a sudden, he knew he was being accepted and that he would be heard. One of the first things he typed was, ‘I love you. Thanks for your support.’ “It’s been a long period of adjustments, but he’s been locked up in a misbehaving body, which are Nick’s words, for a long time.”

Certain noises and situations still trigger negative responses, and he suffers from headaches. But the Burshes know their son and their lives have changed forever. “People always see the behavior, and that’s what makes them uncomfortable,” Laura said. “But they don’t understand the reasons behind these behaviors or outbursts.” But with headphones, Nick can navigate the world because they enable him to filter out excess noise.

“There is so much love in these people,” Laura said. “I believe their brains are just wired differently than ours. In Nick, I see a different way of thinking, and that’s very cool. “You have to see the gifts of autism instead of the negatives,” she added. “They know what people think of them and what they look like … they cannot help having meltdowns sometimes.” And now Nick’s mantra is “Mom Love,” in which his writing focuses on inclusion, community and healing, and which was symbolized when he and For the past two years, Nick has Laura participated in a Women’s March in improved upon his talents once a week Walworth in late February. at Studio 84 in Whitewater, continuing “He’s always understood almost to grow at the nonprofit organization that everything, but for so long it was ‘poor specializes in the creative and vocational me,’” Laura said. “But now there are so development of people with disabilities. It’s another avenue in which Nick learns many things he can do that were buried. and is free from his silence. If five years ago you would have told me But then again, Nick has been where he is now … he’s teaching us and communicating for a long time through that’s something that should be explored his art, especially visible in collections of and embraced. I asked for a miracle, and I colored squares that nobody understood. got one.”
 That is, until family members Laura runs several online groups, deciphered that each color represented including an international mothers a letter of the alphabet — a form of the supporting autism forum. Contact her at neurological condition called graphemelbursh@gmail.com or on her Facebook based synesthesia — and the code was cracked. Still, it wasn’t until the facilitated page at Laura Granbur Bursh. typing that the real Nick began to blossom.

Nick’s colorful world


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 4

Dozens of departments respond to grass fire Priority was keeping it from homes

By Jason Arndt STAFF WRITER

A suspected burnt ember combined with unpredictable winds caused a three-alarm grass fire Saturday, April 7 in the Town of Burlington, where more than two dozen area departments responded with mutual aid, the town’s Deputy Fire Chief Mark Sekey said Monday. “It was accidental,” he said. “There was a burn area out there, it could have been embers from there, and with the wind gusts it may have gotten into the marsh area.” The fire was reported at around 2:30 p.m. in the 33600 block of Tatonka Drive, north of Yahnke Road and east of McHenry Street, where there are at least three homes. Sekey said some of the families evacuated while firefighters stood near the homes to protect against the possible spread of the blaze. “There were three houses that actually did evacuate,” he

said. “We did have to protect a few houses on the southeast side of Yahnke Road.” Meanwhile, as fire departments stood guard, other departments worked for more than three hours to extinguish the fire in the midst of unfavorable conditions and geographic barriers. The barriers, according to Sekey, included Spring Brook, a creek. “It was kind of hard to get access to the marsh area because of the water, there is a creek that runs right through there,” he said. Although Sekey did not have a precise estimate of how many acres burned, he believes it could be anywhere from 20 to 30, which created a challenge that required assistance from departments in four different counties. “We had 26 departments total that took the call and assisted us and that includes the Fire Belles for rehabilitation to keep us fed and hydrated,”

said Sekey, who estimates area departments were there until 5:52 p.m. “It was a large and widespread area.” In Racine County, the Town of Burlington received help from Rochester, Wind Lake, Union Grove-Yorkville, Kansasville, Tichigan along with the city of Burlington Fire Department and Rescue Squad. From Kenosha County, the villages of Salem Lakes and Twin Lakes, in addition to the towns of Wheatland, Randall and Paris responded. Walworth County agencies responding were the towns of Richmond, Lyons, Troy Center and Bloomfield. The cities of Lake Geneva and Elkhorn and the Village of East Troy also assisted. Coming from Waukesha County were Tess Corners, Big Bend, Mukwonago. “(We) would like to say thanks to everyone for helping us. It was a large incident for sure,” Sekey said.

TRACY CARPENTER GALLUP Hi-Liter

A line of flames roars in the background as this unit from the Town of Wheatland Fire Department pours water on a field in the Town of Burlington on April 7.

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Top: Firefighters from the Rochester Volunteer Fire Company use an ATV to check out the progress of the flames. Above: Firefighters from dozens of departments successfully kept the blaze away from area homes.


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 5

Where are the cameras? By Gail Peckler-Dziki CORRESPONDENT

Village of Antioch trustee Ed Macek is frustrated. His frustration stems from a delay in installing cameras. “We asked Jim Keim to get bids on cameras eleven month ago,” Macek said about the village administrator. “There are none and we have a $50,000 ‘guesstimate’ for the cost of cameras in the 2019 proposed budget.” During the March 28 Committee of the Whole meeting, where Keim explained the 2019 proposed budget, the village administrator put the approximate $50,000 in the budget and said he was in active conversation with technical experts regarding cameras. Macek, touting his public safety experience, believes the village needs advisement from a consultant. “I understand public safety and I know enough to know that we ought to have a consultant advise us about where cameras should go,” he said. Macek spent 18 months as an Antioch firefighter, and followed up with 10

years with the rescue squad, and served as Antioch police commissioner for eight years. Macek identified three places to install cameras: the pool, Camp Crayola and the village hall. Antioch Mayor Larry Hanson called Macek the purveyor of gloom and doom at the April 9 regular board meeting during a discussion about cameras. In a recent memo sent to the Antioch Village board of trustees and Keim, Huffman summarized several studies and articles, all of which he claimed said public video surveillance did little to prevent crime. Huffman’s concern appears to be that video surveillance will be misused. Yet, Antioch police cars do have dashboard cameras. In response to an email question from The Hi-Liter regarding Antioch police car camera use, Huffman said, “We use L3 Mobile Vision cameras for our squad cars,” “Currently have 11 cars equipped. Although we experience an occasional malfunction of a camera, we have no incidents of misuse.” In his report, Huffman did include possible benefits of the cameras. The presence of known cameras could discourage offenders. The fear of crime might be reduced. And information gathered by cameras could aid in po-

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lice investigations. Huffman was also concerned about the need for storage of data. He also expressed concern about violations of privacy because of the cameras. Macek, however, is con-

cerned about the safety of children and the protection of employees. “We don’t want anyone making unfounded allegations against any of our employees who work with children, either at Camp Crayola

or the pool.” He also expressed safety concerns for children. “We don’t want anyone picking up children that shouldn’t be or behaving in appropriately with the children in our care.”

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Southern Lakes Newspapers is seeking a person with the ability to create effective, eye-catching newspaper pages under deadline pressure at its Delavan-based headquarters. The right candidate should have a background in journalism and experience in copy editing and/or graphic design using InDesign and Photoshop. Strong proofreading skills and the ability to artfully trim copy are Burlington 1 required. Send cover letter, resume and What am o examples of work to you willin unt are School su g to p rvey to fo Ed Nadolski, editor in cus on tax ay? tolerance chief, at enadolski@ standardpress.com.

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Christine ATE CAUSES: a volun Hildebrandt and teer crew from park clean up Wilmo tain exem plify the t Mounsome local effort businessess of give back to ties throu to their communivolunteer gh monetary and donations.

– Section

Library offers break programspring s The Burlin gton

(800) 456-9476

Macek is frustrated that the village board is willing to spend $35,000 on a brass tree sculpture but seems to not attention to his concern about the safety of children and protection of village employees.

ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE

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Published weekly • Burlington, WI

Standard Press

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THURSD AY, MAR CH 22, 2018

Our 153rd

year • No. 13

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By Ed Nadol ski Public Library will EDITOR IN CHIEF special eventsbe offering these residents Instead during spring break: idents withof inundating distric maintenanchow much spend ing on e and/or • “Peep for repair information and t res- cilities Reverse upgrades they’d be of faengin Monday, -O-Rama” on facilities, or replacement of options in increm willin March Board memb eering Burlington school ents of $10 g to support Create a Dioram 26 at 10 a.m. District officia ing Area million, start- gen also said er Phil Ketter a from “peep and provid ls on Mond School $70 at $30 million and hato pursue he favore proach s” million. ed materi extending ay als. to to reversbecause it allowsd that ap• Spring Break that focuse a slimmed down agreed The low survey s on tax tolera e-engineer officials Crafts on Tuesday, cludes recomend of that range “That impro a school March 27, nce. district for kids of at 10 a.m. mended in- willin vement plan that say, ‘Hereallows the respon and maintenanc all ages. security gness of reflects dent to upgrades • Spring e ing to pay),’s the amount (we’re ities Essentially, voters to pay for the will- maintand the high end at all facil“Wonder” Break Movie, said Bill you guys figure survey respon it. would give includes enance and it Foster out,’” on Wedne will be shown , the School Percep a consultant security upgra as well as how much the district an dents The operaED NADOLSKI Standard the constr from grade idea of ker’s tions Inc., at 10 a.m. sday, March 28, they’d Press des tors paring the Popcorn is 5 to 8 middl uction of a new for school impro be willing to pay restaurant of B.J. Wentsurvey on who is preRegistration free. distric place on Mond vemen e cials behalf school to t. announced Karcher is required. would ts and of the ay • Steam The draft “At the end Middle School. re- draft a refere then have the optionoffi- ment at 230that the estab of the survey 29, at 10 on Thursday, March lishof the day, by Foster to Burlington, Milwa al that falls ndum spending a.m. presented want to know includes a proposAges 8 and and 11 a.m. is close ukee Ave., within that is what’s what we question tolerance,” d. The discus param your tax asking have fun up are invited to sion comes eter. Kevin Bird School Board with member year after three separa nearly commented. circuit board MakeyMakey te referenduma is required kits. Registration See SCHO and limite OL SURVEY, kids per sessio d to eight Page 2 n. For more register, call information or to (262) 763-7 623.

Go for the

SEEDS FOR

265052

Antioch trustee frustrated with delays

SPRI The Burlin gton Public NG: and the Wisco Librar Master Garde nsin Extension y ner Progra kick off a m will program onfree seed library p.m. at the Saturday at 1 Gardener library. Master Jennifer Yaris introduce will the progra assist partici m and their own pants in swapping or borrow seeds with others ing library. The seeds from the is at 166 E. Burlington Librar Jeffers on St. For y more inform 342-1130. ation, call 262-

Closed, but not forgotten Operators step

gold one, buddy

from B.J. We away ntker’s ski

By Ed Nadol

EDITOR

IN CHIEF

A locatio best-known n in one of Burlin tion for fine buildings and a gton’s to preven dining were not reputat ker’s restauthe closure of B.J.enough Wentrant The operat this week. DEATHS: in the histor ors of the restau death noticeThe following local 230 Milwa ic triangle tavernrant s appear inside • ALBER the decisi ukee Ave. annou at : T on • FRED K. MILLSON GOND restaurant’s midday Monday nced ER, 86 JAEGE on the Facebook R, 86 • JEANN post that stated E page • JOHN B. FRANCES LARSO permanently in red letters: with a N, 79 “We are • VIRGIN SHULZE, 93 closed IA A. VYVYA .” The annou • CHRISTINE N, 90 flood of commncement touche • DR. ROBER L. WEILER, 68 d off a page – mainly ents on the Faceb T C. WHEA TON, 88 ook from people the restau sad to see rant – Page 5 “Expenses close. were higher come for than ina long time couldn’t suppo and rt it anymo we just resentative re,” Patrick in respon of the restaurant a repse his wife, Last whispers ments. “We to the some of the wrote Jessie, looks some egg-g are comstudent athering on Satur In respon devastated.” organizatio advice into n at Burlin day during the representativ se to another post, the ear of annual Easte gton High e said the his the infant erator School. restaurant s – who r egg hunt son, opsponsored Emerson, while – will simply don’t own the building by the DRIVE step away. “There ED NADOLS N KI PHOTOS The landlo wasn’t anything Standard to sell. Press over,” the rd will most likely reply take BAY’S According reads. to tax record BurlingtonBACK: Form building is owned gymnastics er perstar son, of Burlin by Brian s, the suTorgeris still Bailey Fitzpatrick “The landlogton. flying aroun rd will most UW-Whitew some sort d for likely run of ater, venu(e weekend and this restaurant ) from there,” hawks will she and the Warlater Faceb representative wrote the ook ond straigcompete for a secThe restau post. “It will live in a on.” Also, checkht national title. in and Jean rant operators – Kevout the ference Kristen Willis Schuerman, Brad selections. all-conand , and Dean Pelzek – – Page 7 and September reopened the busineKathy of 2014 follow ss in INSIDE: closure. ing a brief College Messages news With thous seeking commleft by phone and Community ............. Page 2 ands sium floor, email of candy ................ ent from were not Letters.......... -filled eggs the operat Page 3 returned the DRIVE children and scattered for this story. prior to deadliors Wearing their famili Sports .......... .............. Page 4 N Easte around a r es egg forlor ......... ne press eager the gymn hunt at Pages 7-8 n exBusiness ion, this Burlington ly anticipate ................ Business the start a- ly waits his boy patientSectio Real Estate High Scho of bucke turn struggled ............ Sectio n 2 ol Satur While t with colorto fill his day. n2 ter eggs. ful Easto the newsmany people respon preciation online expressed ding of the restau an aprant, its menu ~ Serving See

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Students g Opposin g viewpoin ive real ci vics lesso ts expresse d at Walko n ut Day ga therin

B.J. WENT KER’S, Page 2

By Mike Ramczyk STAFF WRITE R All eyes schools Marchwere on local high 14 at 10 National Walkout a.m. honored Day, which the 17 victim 14 mass s of the Second Amen shooti school, ignite ng at a Florid Feb. dment were by door 21 . These students area schoo d a movement a high Their plan on Water among ls, where Street. took 17 minut local studen to bypasserswas to pass out literatu ger, to honor es, and sometimes ts re rights. They on Second Amen londment stayed out What was the 17 victims. ods (60 minut for two intended brance for as a remem class quietly es). They return peried to on politic the victims also On Tuesd after their walko touched al topics laws and , as gun dents were ay, Brandstetter ut.” Second Amen contro said were addres dment rightsl to be excusegiven parental permi stused. d ssion for Perhaps as ticipated. long as they chotomy the most promi parStudents nent was eviden Union High t at Water diStand In held signs that read Schoo ford Solidarity l, where one honored the Also, 17 with Parkla “We 17 minutes 17 victims outsid group pile on theflowers were placed nd.” BHS stude grass in honor in a other groupof silence. Howe e with victims. nts write ver, shooting , which of the 17 letter students, included anPrincipal more school’s in Florida, as well s to the familiesSUBMITTED PHOTO Standard along the took part in a gather courtyard. the follow Daniel Foster of as letter ing emailed s to Cong victims of the Press ing messa Amendmentstreet to defend mass ents. ge to distric ress March t parerature aboutRights and hand Second 14 in the “The distric out litprotecting own guns. tinue ongoin t hopes you the right to This group your child g conversation cons with stood along about steps Street for as a comm an hour before we can Water class. at school. unity to enhance take returning to Remind your Burlington safety Waterford report threate High Scho childr victims Brandstetter Superintendent ol stude of the timely manne ning information en to nts write SUBMITTED PHOTO in a and admin said law enforc Keith gress March mass shooting r to the proper Standard ities.” letters 14 in the Press in authorvisible for istration were presenement door 11 school’s Florida, as well to the families the courtyard. to of t as letter “We had entire demonstratioand ida studen show support for s to Con- Burlin the Florgton 21 studen ts who were n. schoo ts walk of the involved schools get killed in out stetter l shooting in Florid the minut hill and quiet for Led by the a,” Brand said. “They es and then returned toentire 17 Hernandez, senior Mariana were out “We had on top class.” Beltra rough a second ly 100 Burlin n students who High Schoo group of l students showed suppo 29 gathered gton rt for the in the

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HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 6

McHenry State’s Attorney institutes no-refusal policy New effort looks to deter drunken driving Effective this week, multiple police departments, in collaboration with the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office will institute a new policy regarding suspected drunken drivers. For any suspected drunken driver who refuses a breathalyzer test, the State’s Attorney’s Office will seek a warrant for a blood draw, the agency said. “The days of drunk drivers refusing to blow thinking that they can beat a DUI charge are coming to an end,” said Patrick Kenneally, McHenry County State’s Attorney. “This new policy means that we’re going to ensure we have all the evidence we need to

successfully prosecute drunk drivers every time.” If a warrant is granted, the suspect drunk driver will be transported to a nearby emergency room, where officials can obtain a blood draw. The policy, according to Kenneally, allows prosecutors to have the strongest possible evidence in court, and hold each suspect accountable. Woodstock Police Chief John Lieb believes the new policy will be a deterrent. “With the overall mission of public safety in mind, it is Woodstock Police Department’s perception that this initiative is certain to deter some who may contemplate driving after consuming too

much alcohol or are under the influence of other substances,” Lieb said. The policy will be aided by the electronic warrant system, launched in January of 2017. The electronic warrant system creates a streamlined process that police can follow to obtain a warrant without ever having to leave the police station. Specifically, the e-warrant system allows police to create search warrants online, send those warrants for review to a judge electronically, interact with the judge via video-conferencing, and ultimately obtain a warrant through a judge’s electronic signature.

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6515-352ND Ave, P.O. 873 • New Munster, WI • 262.537.4407 RESTAURANT QUALITY FOODS MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Spring Savings are Here at Best Bargains from Wednesday April 18th-Tuesday May 1st SIZZLING SPRING GRILLING DEALS

Assorted Randolph Sausages 4 varieties .....................$2.99 Pork Baby Back Ribs ........................................................$2.99 Choice Top Sirloin Steaks................................................$5.99 Choice Boneless NY Strip................................................$8.49 Choice Bone In Ribeye ...................................................$8.99 Choice Boneless Ribeye .................................................$9.49

WISCONSIN CHEESE SPECIALS

American Sliced ..............................................................$1.99 Cranberry Cream Cheese .............................................$2.29 Beer Cheese Spread .......................................................$2.59 Horseradish Cheddar Sliced ..........................................$2.99 Colbyhorn Sliced .............................................................$3.49 Swiss Sliced .......................................................................$3.49

lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb

DELI - TAILGATING AND PARTY DEALS

BBQ Pulled Pork.................................................................$4.69lb Paul’s Italian Sliced Beef ..................................................$4.99lb 10 lb German Potato Salad................................................ $9.90 12” Cubed Cheese Tray .................................................... $16.95 10 lb Deli Potato Salad...................................................... $17.90 16” Vegetable Tray ............................................................. $25.95 16” Awesome Cheese and Meat Tray ............................. $28.95

RESTAURANT SPECIALS!

Slicing Turkey Breast (Frozen) 2 pc Sriracha Flavor ....... .99¢ lb 22/26 lb Bacon 15 lb Case .............................................$1.79 lb #131902 14/18 Sliced Thick Bacon 15 lb Case .............$2.09 lb #05478 Gourmet Breaded Onion Rings 4/3 lb................. $8.00 6/5lb Ranch Seasoned Wedge Fries............................... $12.95 6/5lb 4 ct Jumbo Seasoned Wedge Fries ...................... $12.95 3/8 Seashore Seasoned Fries 6/5lb................................. $13.50 Battered Preformed Onion Rings 12/2 lb Case ............. $14.00

Bark Thins

4.7 oz. 3 varieties

Divella Italian Tomatoes

Retail $3.99 With coupon

Retail $1.99 With coupon

$1.39

99¢

Try all three flavors for this price!!

Valid April 18th - May 1st

Great product for Spaghetti, chili or lasagna

Valid April 18th - May 1st

MEAT RAFFLE HEADQUARTERS

Specializing in custom cuts. Contact the Meat Department at

CALL: 262-537-2993 • TEXT: 262-321-4802 • EMAIL: Meatrafflehqbb@gmail.com CHECKS ACCEPTED • ATM AVAILABLE WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OR CORRECT PRINTING ERRORS. SM-CL1524615

www.BestBargainsInc.com

WE ACCEPT THE SNAP CARD AND MANUFACTURERS COUPONS (EXCLUDING INTERNET COUPONS)

313180

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The Spring Grove comedy show will be from 7 to 11 p.m. on Saturday at Lucky Bernie’s, 2450 N. Route 12, in Spring Grove. New Jersey native Johnny Watson will headline the show. T.M. Francis also will per-

PHOTO COURTESY OF CONNIE WURSTER Hi-Liter

Christine (Lindsey Yates-Badtke) questions Rhoda (Claire Haran) about something she may (or may not) have done to one of her classmates during a school outing.

‘Bad Seed’ opens first week in May at PM&L Theatre Maxwell Anderson’s “Bad Seed” will open at 8 p.m. on Friday, May 4, and run for three weekends until Sunday, May 20, at PM&L Theatre, 877 Main St. in Antioch. Regina Reynolds will direct the performance. “Bad Seed” tells the story of sweet, loving and smart 8-year-old Rhoda Penmark (Claire Haran), who is doted on and admired by her parents and elders.

But Rhoda has another face that starts to be revealed when one of her classmates mysteriously drowns at a picnic she attends, and everyone closest to her starts to feel uneasy. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and at 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $13 for students and seniors and $15 for adults. For more information, visit www. pmltheatre.com.

Community briefs Lindenhurst celebrates Earth Day

The Lindenhurst Park District and the Village of Lindenhurst Environmental Commission will hold an Earth Day celebration from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday throughout Lindenhurst. There will be a bag swap, shoe collection and book/hanger/clothing/textile recycling. There also will be free food and refreshments at the Village Hall. The schedule of events is as follows: • The 5K fun run/walk will be at 9 a.m. The first 100 to register will receive a free “GO LINDENHURST” T-shirt. • The one-mile Mini Monster Dash will be at 9:15 a.m. Participants are encouraged to

dress in their favorite “green” monster or favorite green apparel. Best costume will win a prize. This race is for children ages 11 and younger. • The villagewide cleanup will be from 9 to 11 a.m. • The exhibitor booths and tour will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Mother Nature’s bingo will be at 10 a.m. • Tree planting will be at 10:30 a.m. • Kite flying will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Slove Park next to the Village Hall • Kids’ Nut Hunt will be at 11:30 a.m. Registration for the races will be on-site from 8:15 to 8:45 a.m. at Millennium Park in Lindenhurst. For information, visit www. lindenhurstparks.org.

Village of Antioch Environmental Commission schedules annual EcoFair

The Village of Antioch Environmental Commission will host its annual EcoFair to honor Earth Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, at the Antioch Township Building, 1625 Deep Lake Road #B, Lake Villa. There will be speakers, vendors, games, food, prizes and interactive activities. Chamber members can receive free booth space to promote their eco-friendly business or practice. This free event is for people of all ages. For more information, email Anna at anna. andersen23@gmail.com.

Hikers find body of man missing since October Two teenage hikers found the body of a 70-year-old man on private property in a marsh area off County Highway H in the Town of Geneva at about 4:15 p.m. April 1. The body was identified as James Louis Demeuse, who was reported missing and endangered in the Town of

• Budget

Geneva on Oct. 20. According to a news release from the Town of Geneva Police Department, the body, which was decomposing, was transported to the Waukesha County Medical Examiner’s Office, where an autopsy was conducted. Evidence was transferred to the

Wisconsin Crime Laboratory in Milwaukee for positive identification purposes. Authorities have notified his next of kin. Law enforcement officials said they believe Demeuse’s death is an isolated incident that presents no public safety concerns, and foul play is not suspected.

(Continued from front page)

overall wage increase. A 1 percent cost living increase and possible 2 percent increase for merit-based raises were primary factors. Several new positions were included in the budget, including a technical coordinator, an executive assistant for Keim and a civilian code enforcer. The new positions, which were included in the 2019 budget, showed partial amounts of $53,000 for technical coordinator, $45,000 for the executive assistance and for the civilian code enforcer, $33,000. Another $50,000, which is a preliminary estimate, was put into the budget for a possible security camera purchase after the board requested Keim investigate costs several months ago. The review has not been completed. Village trustee Jay Jozwiak, meanwhile,

believes the village could be in a better position to add staff. “We did cut staff when times were tough, but now (that) things are better we need to increase the staff in the village hall,” Jozwiak said. Trustee Mary Dominiak agreed, but suggested that the new person and the rest of the staff be cross-trained to be able to fill in when someone is absent. Additionally, some trustees proposed allowing the civilian code enforcer to handle field evidence. The board also discussed retooling the Toft parking lot to make is more attractive, with better access for motorists. Trustee Scott Pierce, who attended remotely, suggested adding a playground somewhere in the Toft parking lot.


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 6

Antioch passes budget By Gail Peckler-Dziki CORRESPONDENT

The Antioch Village Board, aside from one trustee, approved the 2019 proposed budget at its April 9 regular meeting. Trustee Jerry Johnson, who is involved with a purchase of a property at the intersection of Park Avenue and Main Street, abstained from the vote. The property involves a proposed Rivalry Ale House, and if the purchase comes to fruition, a business group Johnson is affiliated with will look to rent several parking spaces from the village and apply for a potential $50,000 facade grant. Meanwhile, for the budget, the Antioch Village Administrator Jim Keim presented a preview of the proposed budget at the end of the March 28 Committee of the Whole meeting. He said that revenues are expected to be $13.1 million and expenditures are expected to be

$12.9 million. Keim also reported 100 new residential developments. He said retail revenue looked to be flat. The police pension price tag is estimated at $262,000, which includes a $36,000 overall wage increase. A 1 percent cost living increase and possible 2 percent increase for merit-based raises were primary factors. Several new positions were included in the budget, including a technical coordinator, an executive assistant for Keim and a civilian code enforcer. The new positions, which were included in the 2019 budget, showed partial amounts of $53,000 for technical coordinator, $45,000 for the executive assistance and for the civilian code enforcer, $33,000. Another $50,000, which is a preliminary estimate, was put into the budget for a possible security camera purchase after the board requested Keim in-

vestigate costs several months ago. The review has not been completed. Village trustee Jay Jozwiak, meanwhile, believes the village could be in a better position to add staff. “We did cut staff when times were tough, but now (that) things are better we need to increase the staff in the village hall,” Jozwiak said. Trustee Mary Dominiak agreed, but suggested that the new person and the rest of the staff be cross-trained to be able to fill in when someone is absent. Additionally, some trustees proposed allowing the civilian code enforcer to handle field evidence. The board also discussed retooling the Toft parking lot to make is more attractive, with better access for motorists. Trustee Scott Pierce, who attended remotely, suggested adding a playground somewhere in the Toft parking lot.

Lucky Bernie’s to host Spring Grove comedy show New Jersey native Johnny Watson will headline the show. T.M. Francis also will perform. The cost is $10 per tick-

et. Advance ticket purchases are recommended. For more information, visit www.rsgchamber.com.

LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS •

OPEN to the PUBLIC No Membership Fee Visit Our Cash & Carry Outlet Highway 50 & KD, 8 miles East of Lake Geneva

6515-352ND Ave, P.O. 873 • New Munster, WI • 262.537.4407 RESTAURANT QUALITY FOODS MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Spring Savings are Here at Best Bargains from Wednesday April 18th-Tuesday May 1st SIZZLING SPRING GRILLING DEALS

Assorted Randolph Sausages 4 varieties .....................$2.99 Pork Baby Back Ribs ........................................................$2.99 Choice Top Sirloin Steaks................................................$5.99 Choice Boneless NY Strip................................................$8.49 Choice Bone In Ribeye ...................................................$8.99 Choice Boneless Ribeye .................................................$9.49

WISCONSIN CHEESE SPECIALS

American Sliced ..............................................................$1.99 Cranberry Cream Cheese .............................................$2.29 Beer Cheese Spread .......................................................$2.59 Horseradish Cheddar Sliced ..........................................$2.99 Colbyhorn Sliced .............................................................$3.49 Swiss Sliced .......................................................................$3.49

lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb

DELI - TAILGATING AND PARTY DEALS

BBQ Pulled Pork.................................................................$4.69lb Paul’s Italian Sliced Beef ..................................................$4.99lb 10 lb German Potato Salad................................................ $9.90 12” Cubed Cheese Tray .................................................... $16.95 10 lb Deli Potato Salad...................................................... $17.90 16” Vegetable Tray ............................................................. $25.95 16” Awesome Cheese and Meat Tray ............................. $28.95

RESTAURANT SPECIALS!

Slicing Turkey Breast (Frozen) 2 pc Sriracha Flavor ....... .99¢ lb 22/26 lb Bacon 15 lb Case .............................................$1.79 lb #131902 14/18 Sliced Thick Bacon 15 lb Case .............$2.09 lb #05478 Gourmet Breaded Onion Rings 4/3 lb................. $8.00 6/5lb Ranch Seasoned Wedge Fries............................... $12.95 6/5lb 4 ct Jumbo Seasoned Wedge Fries ...................... $12.95 3/8 Seashore Seasoned Fries 6/5lb................................. $13.50 Battered Preformed Onion Rings 12/2 lb Case ............. $14.00

Bark Thins

4.7 oz. 3 varieties

Divella Italian Tomatoes

Retail $3.99 With coupon

Retail $1.99 With coupon

$1.39

99¢

Try all three flavors for this price!!

Valid April 18th - May 1st

Great product for Spaghetti, chili or lasagna

Valid April 18th - May 1st

MEAT RAFFLE HEADQUARTERS

Specializing in custom cuts. Contact the Meat Department at

CALL: 262-537-2993 • TEXT: 262-321-4802 • EMAIL: Meatrafflehqbb@gmail.com CHECKS ACCEPTED • ATM AVAILABLE WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OR CORRECT PRINTING ERRORS. SM-CL1524615

www.BestBargainsInc.com

WE ACCEPT THE SNAP CARD AND MANUFACTURERS COUPONS (EXCLUDING INTERNET COUPONS)

313180

• LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS

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The Spring Grove comedy show will be from 7 to 11 p.m. on Saturday at Lucky Bernie’s, 2450 N. Route 12, in Spring Grove.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CONNIE WURSTER Hi-Liter

Christine (Lindsey Yates-Badtke) questions Rhoda (Claire Haran) about something she may (or may not) have done to one of her classmates during a school outing.

‘Bad Seed’ opens first week in May at PM&L Theatre Maxwell Anderson’s “Bad Seed” will open at 8 p.m. on Friday, May 4, and run for three weekends until Sunday, May 20, at PM&L Theatre, 877 Main St. in Antioch. Regina Reynolds will direct the performance. “Bad Seed” tells the story of sweet, loving and smart 8-year-old Rhoda Penmark (Claire Haran), who is doted on and admired by her parents and elders.

But Rhoda has another face that starts to be revealed when one of her classmates mysteriously drowns at a picnic she attends, and everyone closest to her starts to feel uneasy. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and at 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $13 for students and seniors and $15 for adults. For more information, visit www. pmltheatre.com.

McHenry State’s Attorney institutes no-refusal policy New effort looks to deter drunken driving Effective this week, multiple police departments, in collaboration with the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office will institute a new policy regarding suspected drunken drivers. For any suspected drunken driver who refuses a breathalyzer test, the State’s Attorney’s Office will seek a warrant for a blood draw, the agency said. “The days of drunk drivers refusing to blow thinking that they can beat a DUI charge are coming to an end,” said Patrick Kenneally, McHenry County State’s Attorney. “This new policy means that we’re going to ensure we have all the evidence we need to successful-

ly prosecute drunk drivers every time.” If a warrant is granted, the suspect drunk driver will be transported to a nearby emergency room, where officials can obtain a blood draw. The policy, according to Kenneally, allows prosecutors to have the strongest possible evidence in court, and hold each suspect accountable. Woodstock Police Chief John Lieb believes the new policy will be a deterrent. “With the overall mission of public safety in mind, it is Woodstock Police Department’s perception that this initiative is certain to deter some who may contemplate driving after consuming too

much alcohol or are under the influence of other substances,” Lieb said. The policy will be aided by the electronic warrant system, launched in January of 2017. The electronic warrant system creates a streamlined process that police can follow to obtain a warrant without ever having to leave the police station. Specifically, the e-warrant system allows police to create search warrants online, send those warrants for review to a judge electronically, interact with the judge via video-conferencing, and ultimately obtain a warrant through a judge’s electronic signature.

McHenry High School to host Out of the Darkness campus walk The Out of the Darkness campus walk will be at 8 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at McHenry High School, west campus, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road in McHenry. Registration and check-in begins at 8 a.m. The walk begins at 9:15 a.m., and the raf-

• Earth Day

fle and pizza will be at 11 a.m. The campus walks are the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s signature student fundraising series, designed to engage youth and young adults in the fight to prevent suicide, the second leading cause of

death among people ages 15 to 24. Donations are used to fund research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy and support survivors of suicide loss. For information, visit mchenrycountyliving.com.

(Continued from front page)

“GO LINDENHURST” T-shirt. • The one-mile Mini Monster Dash will be at 9:15 a.m. Participants are encouraged to dress in their favorite “green” monster or favorite green apparel. Best costume will win a prize. This race is for children ages 11 and younger.

• The villagewide cleanup will be from 9 to 11 a.m. • The exhibitor booths and tour will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Mother Nature’s bingo will be at 10 a.m. • Tree planting will be at 10:30 a.m. • Kite flying will be from

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Slove Park next to the Village Hall • Kids’ Nut Hunt will be at 11:30 a.m. Registration for the races will be on-site from 8:15 to 8:45 a.m. at Millennium Park in Lindenhurst. For information, visit www.lindenhurstparks.org.


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 6

New wildlife watercolor exhibit on display until June The “Native Flora and Wildlife” watercolor exhibit will be open until Sunday, June 3, at Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Route 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood. “Native Flora and Wildlife” is a juried exhibit of nearly 30 vibrant watercolors, featuring a diverse array of local native species, including wildflowers, songbirds, butterflies, reptiles and birds of prey.

Members of the Lakes Region Watercolor Guild painted the works of art. The goal of developing a greater appreciation for the natural world and its efforts in conservation blend well with the guild’s purpose of enhancing, enriching and furthering work in watercolor to promote a better understanding of creative art and to make it available in the community. This project encouraged

members to focus on and learn about native local species while boosting spirits and stoking creativity. Opportunities to exhibit are welcomed by the group, to which members have enthusiastically responded, reflecting nature’s beauty in art and reminding everyone of the need for its protection. For information, go online to visitmchenrycounty. com.

Lindenhurst celebrates Earth Day

a prize. This race is for children ages 11 and younger. • The villagewide cleanup will be from 9 to 11 a.m. • The exhibitor booths and tour will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Mother Nature’s bingo will be at 10 a.m. • Tree planting will be at 10:30 a.m. • Kite flying will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Slove Park next to the Village Hall • Kids’ Nut Hunt will be at 11:30 a.m. Registration for the races will be on-site from 8:15 to 8:45 a.m. at Millennium Park in Lindenhurst. For information, visit www.lindenhurstparks.org.

LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS •

OPEN to the PUBLIC No Membership Fee Visit Our Cash & Carry Outlet Highway 50 & KD, 8 miles East of Lake Geneva

6515-352ND Ave, P.O. 873 • New Munster, WI • 262.537.4407 RESTAURANT QUALITY FOODS MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Spring Savings are Here at Best Bargains from Wednesday April 18th-Tuesday May 1st SIZZLING SPRING GRILLING DEALS

Assorted Randolph Sausages 4 varieties .....................$2.99 Pork Baby Back Ribs ........................................................$2.99 Choice Top Sirloin Steaks................................................$5.99 Choice Boneless NY Strip................................................$8.49 Choice Bone In Ribeye ...................................................$8.99 Choice Boneless Ribeye .................................................$9.49

WISCONSIN CHEESE SPECIALS

American Sliced ..............................................................$1.99 Cranberry Cream Cheese .............................................$2.29 Beer Cheese Spread .......................................................$2.59 Horseradish Cheddar Sliced ..........................................$2.99 Colbyhorn Sliced .............................................................$3.49 Swiss Sliced .......................................................................$3.49

lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb lb

DELI - TAILGATING AND PARTY DEALS

BBQ Pulled Pork.................................................................$4.69lb Paul’s Italian Sliced Beef ..................................................$4.99lb 10 lb German Potato Salad................................................ $9.90 12” Cubed Cheese Tray .................................................... $16.95 10 lb Deli Potato Salad...................................................... $17.90 16” Vegetable Tray ............................................................. $25.95 16” Awesome Cheese and Meat Tray ............................. $28.95

RESTAURANT SPECIALS!

Slicing Turkey Breast (Frozen) 2 pc Sriracha Flavor ....... .99¢ lb 22/26 lb Bacon 15 lb Case .............................................$1.79 lb #131902 14/18 Sliced Thick Bacon 15 lb Case .............$2.09 lb #05478 Gourmet Breaded Onion Rings 4/3 lb................. $8.00 6/5lb Ranch Seasoned Wedge Fries............................... $12.95 6/5lb 4 ct Jumbo Seasoned Wedge Fries ...................... $12.95 3/8 Seashore Seasoned Fries 6/5lb................................. $13.50 Battered Preformed Onion Rings 12/2 lb Case ............. $14.00

Bark Thins

4.7 oz. 3 varieties

Divella Italian Tomatoes

Retail $3.99 With coupon

Retail $1.99 With coupon

$1.39

99¢

Try all three flavors for this price!!

Valid April 18th - May 1st

Great product for Spaghetti, chili or lasagna

Valid April 18th - May 1st

MEAT RAFFLE HEADQUARTERS

Specializing in custom cuts. Contact the Meat Department at

CALL: 262-537-2993 • TEXT: 262-321-4802 • EMAIL: Meatrafflehqbb@gmail.com CHECKS ACCEPTED • ATM AVAILABLE WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OR CORRECT PRINTING ERRORS. SM-CL1524615

www.BestBargainsInc.com

WE ACCEPT THE SNAP CARD AND MANUFACTURERS COUPONS (EXCLUDING INTERNET COUPONS)

313180

• LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS

LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS • LOOK WHAT’S NEW AT BEST BARGAINS •

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The Lindenhurst Park District and the Village of Lindenhurst Environmental Commission will hold an Earth Day celebration from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday throughout Lindenhurst. There will be a bag swap, shoe collection and book/hanger/clothing/textile recycling. There also will be free food and refreshments at the Village Hall. The schedule of events is as follows: • The 5K fun run/walk will be at 9 a.m. The first 100 to register will receive a free “GO LINDENHURST” T-shirt. • The one-mile Mini Monster Dash will be at 9:15 a.m. Participants are encouraged to dress in their favorite “green” monster or favorite green apparel. Best costume will win

Confirmation retreat

SUBMITTED PHOTO Hi-Liter

The confirmation class of St. John’s in Hebron, lll., recently attended a retreat at Lutherdale Bible Camp in Elkhorn. From the left: Peyton Henken, Karen Gritmacker (teacher) and Haylee Schuler.

McHenry High School to host Out of the Darkness campus walk The Out of the Darkness campus walk will be at 8 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at McHenry High School, west campus, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road in McHenry. Registration and check-in begins at 8 a.m. The walk begins at 9:15 a.m., and the raffle and pizza will be at 11 a.m. The campus walks are the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s signature stu-

dent fundraising series, designed to engage youth and young adults in the fight to prevent suicide, the second leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 24. Donations are used to fund research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy and support survivors of suicide loss. For information, visit mchenrycountyliving.com.

Hikers find body of man missing since October Two teenage hikers found the body of a 70-year-old man on private property in a marsh area off County Highway H in the Town of Geneva at about 4:15 p.m. April 1. The body was identified as James Louis Demeuse, who was reported missing and endangered in the Town of

Geneva on Oct. 20. According to a news release from the Town of Geneva Police Department, the body, which was decomposing, was transported to the Waukesha County Medical Examiner’s Office, where an autopsy was conducted. Evidence was transferred to the

Wisconsin Crime Laboratory in Milwaukee for positive identification purposes. Authorities have notified his next of kin. Law enforcement officials said they believe Demeuse’s death is an isolated incident that presents no public safety concerns, and foul play is not suspected.

Upcoming happenings Lucky Bernie’s to host Spring Grove comedy show

The Spring Grove comedy show will be from 7 to 11 p.m. on Saturday at Lucky Bernie’s, 2450 N. Route 12, in Spring Grove. New Jersey native Johnny Watson will headline the show. T.M. Francis also will perform. The cost is $10 per ticket. Advance ticket purchases are recommended.

• Policy

For more information, visit 28, at the Antioch Township www.rsgchamber.com. Building, 1625 Deep Lake Road #B, Lake Villa. There will be speakers, Village of Antioch vendors, games, food, prizes and interactive activities. Environmental Chamber members can reCommission ceive free booth space to proschedules annual mote their eco-friendly business or practice. EcoFair The Village of Antioch This free event is for peoEnvironmental Commission ple of all ages. will host its annual EcoFair to For more information, honor Earth Day from 10 a.m. email Anna at anna.andersto 2 p.m. on Saturday, April en23@gmail.com.

(Continued from front page)

each suspect accountable. Woodstock Police Chief John Lieb believes the new policy will be a deterrent. “With the overall mission of public safety in mind, it is Woodstock Police Department’s perception that this initiative is certain to deter some who may contemplate driving after consuming too

much alcohol or are under the influence of other substances,” Lieb said. The policy will be aided by the electronic warrant system, launched in January of 2017. The electronic warrant system creates a streamlined process that police can follow to obtain a warrant without ever having to leave the police sta-

tion. Specifically, the e-warrant system allows police to create search warrants online, send those warrants for review to a judge electronically, interact with the judge via video-conferencing, and ultimately obtain a warrant through a judge’s electronic signature.


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MARKET-BASED PRICE

2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4X4 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, leather, moonroof & NAV, Lifetime Warranty #P1136A WAS $24,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $19,588 OR $369/MTH.*

CARS 2013 FORD FUSION SE 4cyl., auto, air, power all, moonroof, heated leather seats #18248A WAS $11,995.... MARKET BASED PRICE $9,295 OR $179/MTH.* 2016 DODGE DART SXT 4 cyl., auto, air, power all, leather, only 39,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty, Chrysler Certified #P1109 WAS $14,995 MARKET BASED PRICE $10,995 OR $189/MTH.* 2014 CHEVROLET CRUISE LT 4 cyl., auto, air, power all, remote start, only 38,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P1160 WAS $14,995 ..MARKET BASED PRICE $11,950 OR $189/MTH.* 2017 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED Auto, air, power all, leather, only 24,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P1163 WAS $23,995 MARKET BASED PRICE $20,450 OR $329/MTH.*

We have invested in sophisticated software that allows us to compare the prices of our vehicles with all other like vehicles for sale in the entire United States. This allows us to price our vehicles at an amount that will ensure our vehicles always represent the best value for our customers. We review this data weekly and reprice our vehicles as often as necessary to ensure they constantly represent the best value in the market place. 2016 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING LIMITED 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather seats, NAV, & much more, Lifetime Warranty #18254A WAS $27,995 ........................... MARKET BASED PRICE $24,895

TRUCKS 2002 GMC K2500 SC 4X4 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, 8 ft. Western plow #17486B WAS $10,995 ... MARKET BASED PRICE $7,950 OR $249/MTH.* 2007 GMC SIERRA 1500 EXT CAB 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, low miles #P1133A WAS $12,995.. MARKET BASED PRICE $10,390 OR $199/MTH.*

VANS

WE BUY VEHICLES

2016 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, power doors, power lift gate, low miles, Lifetime Warranty, Chrysler Certified #17259A WAS $19,995 . MARKET BASED PRICE $15,750 OR $259/MTH.* 2015 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather seats, DVD, low miles, Lifetime Warranty, Chrysler Certified #P1114 WAS $27,995 . MARKET BASED PRICE $20,390 OR $369/MTH.* 2016 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather, remote start, only 20,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P1128 WAS $24,995 MARKET BASED PRICE $20,995 OR $359/MTH.* 2015 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather, DVD, & more, only 22,000 miles, LIKE NEW, Lifetime Warranty #P1129 WAS $24,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $22,450 OR $379/MTH.* 2017 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING L 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather seats, and much more, low miles, Lifetime Warranty #P1165 WAS $26,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $24,250 OR $379/MTH.*

2015 KIA SOUL EXCLAIM Auto, air, power all, heated leather seats, moonroof, NAV & much more, low milage, Loads of Factory Warranty, Lifetime Warranty #18277A WAS $19,995 . MARKET BASED PRICE $16,796 OR $269/MTH.*

Call George Penzel at

(262) 763-2466

CONQUEST CASH

$750 REBATE on All Ford Certified Pre-Owned Vehicle Purchases for Customers That Now Own or are Leasing a NON-Ford Vehicle (See Salesperson for details)

2007 TOYOTA Fj CRUISER 4X4 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, great shape #18036B WAS $14,995.............................MARKET BASED PRICE $11,850

2015 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT XLT 7 PASS. 6cyl., auto, air, power all, low miles, Lifetime Warranty #27863A WAS $18,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $15,350 OR $239/MTH.* 2011 FORD F150 CREW CAB 4X4 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, Lifetime Warranty #P5241A WAS $23,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $21,350 OR $369/MTH.* 2013 DODGE RAM 1500 CREW CAB 4x4, 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, low miles, Lifetime Warranty #18096B WAS $26,995 MARKET BASED PRICE $22,850 OR $369/MTH.* 2015 RAM 1500 4X4 Auto, air, power all, trailer tow, MUST SEE, only 26,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #18106A WAS $27,995 MARKET BASED PRICE $24,495 OR $389/MTH.*

SUVS 2015 FORD ESCAPE SE AWD 4 cyl., auto, air, power all, low miles, Lifetime Warranty #P5285 WAS $21,995 . MARKET BASED PRICE $17,990 OR $299/MTH.* 2016 GMC TERRAIN SLE AWD Auto, air, power all, low miles, Lifetime Warranty #18198A WAS $21,995 .MARKET BASED PRICE $18,850 OR $289/MTH.* 2013 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4 6 cyl., air, power all, only 40,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty, Chrysler Certified #18139A WAS $24,995 . MARKET BASED PRICE $21,850 OR $379/MTH.* 2013 VOLKSWAGEN TOURING V6 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, air, power all, heated leather, moonroof, NAV, & much more, Lifetime Warranty #18236A WAS $31,995 ........................... MARKET BASED PRICE $27,290 2015 FORD EDGE SPORT AWD Auto, air, power all, leather, moonroof, NAV & much more, only 15,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P5269 WAS $30,995 .......................... MARKET BASED PRICE $28,390 2013 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4X4 Auto, air, loads of extras, only 28,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P1127 WAS $37,995 ...........................MARKET BASED PRICE $30,270 2015 CHEVROLET TAHOE LT 4X4 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, leather, moonroof, 2nd row buckets & much more, only 27,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #28118A WAS $45,995 .......................... MARKET BASED PRICE $40,395 2017 FORD EXPEDITION PLATINUM 4x4 6 cyl., power all, heated & cold seats, moonroof, power boards & much more, only 20,000 miles, Lifetime Warranty #P5254 WAS $56,995 .......................... MARKET BASED PRICE $48,495

2017 FORD F250 SUPER DUTY 4X4 XLT Diesel, 8 cyl., auto, air, power all, low miles #P5288 WAS $46,995 ......................... MARKET BASED PRICE $42,890*

For more information on these vehicles, call (262) 763-2466 local or (800) 824-1784 long distance

PLEASE VIEW OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT www.millermotorsales.com THESE ARE JUST A SAMPLE OF OUR PRE-OWNED INVENTORY.

CHRIS MILLER PRESIDENT

GEORGE PENZEL MANAGER

TRAVIS HARDER MANAGER

BOB HAISLER MANAGER

JIM KUPCZYK COM. ACCT. MGR.

RON GREINER

KEN HANS0N

SHEILA JOHN

LYN HENRIKSEN

LONNIE LEVANS

STEVE HALBACH

KENNY DANIELS

SCOTT LINDBLOOM

*EXCLUDES PRIOR SALES. 10% CASH OR TRADE EQUITY DOWN, PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE AND SERVICE FEE. OFFER GOOD THROUGH 4/24/18. SEE SALES PERSON FOR DETAILS. †ON MOST VEHICLES.

Miller Motors

Monday-Thursday *EXCLUDES PRIOR SALES. PRICES / OFFER GOOD THROUGH 1/10/2017. PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE AND SERVICE FEE. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. A FAmily TrAdiTion Since 1939 Saturday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 1196 Milwaukee Ave. (Hwy. 36 North) North, Burlington • (262) 763-2466 or (855) 223-7699

www.millermotorsales.com

RAM

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HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 8

• Library

SANDRA LANDEN MACHAJ Hi-Liter

Daniel Sanabria, 11, a chess player for three years, tries his skill against one of the adults attending with his sons.

(Continued from front page)

passed down to his 9-year-old sister. Now both children attend the library’s chess program. Cargill said playing the game offers benefits. “It is known through research that chess actually enhances intellectual development, spatial planning and organization. When kids play chess, grades tend to improve,” he said. Chess in the United States is played by rules of the U.S. Chess Federation, but there are a number of variant chess games that are available. These range from speed chess where the game is played in 10 minutes to 3-D Chess, or Plunder Chess. There are a number of chess clocks, which are used to control the time of the games, although none were in use this week. Chess clocks have two faces that count the time used by each player. For the person who prefers to play using technology, there are chess games available on electronic platforms, like an iPad or smartphone. There is still time to join the Cookies and Chess program, which is open to anyone 6 and older. Registration is required. To sign up, a form is available online at www. apld.info. For more information about the chess program, call 847-395-0874.

2018 VARSITY BASEBALL

GRANT BULLDOGS

LAKES EAGLES

SCHEDULE SCHEDULE vs. Grant ..........................AWAY vs. Grant ..........................HOME vs. Round Lake ...................AWAY vs. Round Lake ...................HOME vs. Round Lake ...................AWAY vs. Wheeling .....................HOME vs. Antioch Community .........HOME vs. Antioch Community .........AWAY vs. Antioch Community .........HOME vs. Grayslake Central ...........AWAY vs. Grayslake Central ...........HOME vs. Grayslake Central ...........AWAY vs. Wilmot-Union ................AWAY vs. Marian Central ...............HOME vs. TBD - Regionals .............HOME

TEAM ROSTER Michael Behrendt David Carrillo Steven Donaubauer Andrew Gaetano Joe Glassey Matt Grubb Steven Kelekian Payton Lockas Cameron May

SR JR SR JR JR SR SR JR SR

LaMONT Automotive Complete Auto Care

15 7 26 6 8 1 22 18

Logan McCann SR Quinn McQuade SR Jake Michaelis SR Logan Meuller JR Jeffrey Nielsen JR Edmondo Roncone Jr. SR Anthony Touhy SR Jason Volpe JR

WE BU Y USED & SELL JUNK AND CARS

PAT LaMONT, Owner 37541 N. Hwy. 59 • Lake Villa 847-587-1477 or 847-587-1482

278306

vs. Lakes Community HS .......... HOME vs. Lakes Community HS .......... AWAY vs. Deerfield ......................... AWAY vs. Hampshire ....................... HOME vs. Zion Benton ..................... HOME vs. McHenry (DH) ................... HOME vs. Grayslake North ................ HOME vs. Grayslake North ................ AWAY vs. Grayslake North ................ AWAY vs. Wauconda ....................... HOME vs. Wauconda ....................... AWAY vs. Wauconda ....................... HOME vs. Buffalo Grove (DH) ............. HOME SENIOR NIGHT vs. Grayslake Central .............. HOME vs. Grayslake Central .............. AWAY vs. Grayslake Central .............. HOME vs. Huntley (DH) .................... HOME

TEAM ROSTER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Danny Laughery Jacob Splitt Nolan Unger Carlos Martinez Jimmy Friel Valentin Cerna Tommy Gallimore Frank Plucinski Mike Lopez David Villan Jay Patel Steven Jackson Sean Rodriguez

14 15 16 17 21 22 24 25 31 33 34 42 44

Bryce Mandala Austin Vass Christian Nesterowicz Shawn Riley Mason Sekulich Joe Gorden Joey Califf Henry Kusiak Nick Malmberg Jimmy Taylor Nate Gladfelter Mikal Ashley Chase Maifield

Maravela’s

Banquets and Catering 147 S. Route 12 (1 mile North of Route 59) • Fox Lake, IL 60020

847-587-7007 www.dipstickfoxlake.com

GO BULLDOGS!

4 S. Washington St., Ingleside, IL

847-587-6100 www.maravelas.com

GOOD LUCK!

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9 11 13 12 25 20 5 19 23

May 14 - 4:30pm May 15 - 4:30pm May 17 - 4:30pm May 19 - 10:00am

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April 18 - 4:30pm April 20 - 4:30pm April 24 - 4:30pm April 25 - 4:30pm April 27 - 4:30pm April 28 - 10:00am May 1 - 4:30pm May 2 - 4:30pm May 4 - 4:30pm May 8 - 4:30pm May 9 - 4:30pm May 11 - 4:30pm May 12 - 10:00am May 19 - 10:00am May 21 - 4:30pm

April 18 - 4:30pm April 20 - 4:30pm April 21 - 10:00am April 25 - 4:30pm April 26 - 4:30pm April 28 - Noon April 30 - 4:30pm May 1 - 4:30pm May 3 - 4:30pm May 8 - 4:30pm May 9 - 4:30pm May 11 - 4:30pm May 12 - 10:00am

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HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 9

REAL ESTATE

Mobile Homes For Sale or Rent in a 55 & Older Community

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR RENT

For Sale by Owner

Wanted to Rent

OPPORTUNITY! Buy A profitable 10 room Motel. Separate home, 2 + car garage and a heated 40 x 60 pole barn on 3 acres. Crivitz, WI. $370,000. email: info@pinesmotelcrivitz.com or Call 715-854-7987!

MATURE, NONSMOKING FEMALE looking to rent a room in Antioch, 847-612-6155.

Looking for Affordable Independent Living?

Financing Available

Beautifully remodeled homeS

lot 126 Brand new 14x70, 3 bedroom, 2 bath $48,099

REAL ESTATE AUCTION

lot 329 Brand new 16x80,

Sale / Rent LOT 102A 1-2 bedrooms, 1 bath $23,900/$750 lot 28 1 bedroom, 1 bath $23,900/$700 lot 35 1 bedroom, 1 bath $26,900/$775 lot 86 1-2 bedrooms, 1 bath $29,900/$800 lot 27 1 bedroom, 1 bath $19,900/$650

3 bedroom, 2 bath $55,000

FINANCING AVAILABLE

MAY 19 • MINOQUA, WI

Lovely Virgin Pines Condo. All being sold to highest bidder! Doctor passed away. See website for information: www.colrene.net

715-649-3453 St. Louis Auctions, LLC

313183

Prices are Negotiable

All located in:

Wheatland estates 32200 45th St., Burlington, WI

Contact Sarah at 262-694-6464

Call Sarah at 262-537-2314 See pictures at www.mhvillage.com

4303 75th Street, Kenosha, wi 53142 www.mhvillage.com

313083

City View

313084

2018 VARSITY BASEBALL

ANTIOCH SEQUOITS

RICHMOND-BURTON

ROCKETS SCHEDULE

vs. Marengo ......................... HOME vs. Grayslake Central (DH) ........ AWAY vs. Woodstock ....................... AWAY vs. Woodstock ....................... HOME vs. Woodstock ....................... AWAY vs. Burlington Central .............. AWAY vs. Burlington Central .............. HOME vs. Burlington Central .............. AWAY vs. Woodstock North ............... HOME vs. Woodstock North ............... AWAY vs. Woodstock North ............... AWAY vs. Sycamore ........................ AWAY vs. Wauconda ....................... HOME vs. Marian Central .................. AWAY vs. Wilmot ........................... AWAY

Brandon Bannon James Barnas Robert Copenharve Connon Donohoe Chase Duncan Matthew Eskuri Clayton Jarocki Kyle Klicker Alexander Kriz Jeffrey Lin Michael Navarro Hunter Northern Jacob Poppe

1 21 15 8 13 25 2

vs. Round Lake ...................... AWAY vs. Round Lake ...................... HOME vs. Woodstock North (DH) ......... HOME vs. Grayslake Central .............. HOME vs. Grayslake Central .............. AWAY vs. Grayslake Central .............. HOME vs. Hersey (DH) .................... AWAY vs. Lakes Community .............. AWAY vs. Lakes Community .............. HOME vs. Lakes Community .............. AWAY vs. Zion Benton (DH) ............... AWAY vs. Grayslake North ................ AWAY vs. Grayslake North ................ HOME vs. Grayslake North ................ AWAY vs. Wilmot (DH) ..................... AWAY

TEAM ROSTER

TEAM ROSTER 7 18 16 20 3 10 12 31 5 29 32 22 19

April 18 - 4:30pm April 20 - 4:30pm April 21 - 10:30am April 24 - 4:30pm April 25 - 4:30pm April 27 - 4:30pm April 28 - 10:00am May 1 - 4:30pm May 2 - 4:30pm May 4 - 4:30pm May 5 - 9:00am May 14 - 4:30pm May 15 - 4:30pm May 17 - 4:30pm May 19 - 10:00am

Jocob Rosing John Ruane Cole Slawitschka Luke Uhwat Sean Wallace Alex Watrous Dalton Wood

Ethan Almaria Austin Andrews Nick Baum Patrick Day Austin Delgado Jack Gillespie Peter Gross Eric Hart

ANITA SELF STORAGE

312959

Nature's feed 2440 Westward Dr., Unit C Spring Grove, IL 60081

• Safe & Secure • 676 Anita Ave., Antioch, IL

(815) 675-2008 www.naturesfeed.net

847-395-7770

GO SEQUOITS!

JR Johnson John Petty Sawyer Phillips Vince Roszkowiak CJ Scott Nicholas Sheren Sean Weiser Colin Wieska

278301

GO ROCKETS!

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April 19 - 4:30pm April 21 - 11:00am April 23 - 4:30pm April 24 - 4:30pm April 26 - 4:30pm April 30 - 4:30pm May 1 - 4:30pm May 3 - 4:30pm May 8 - 4:30pm May 9 - 4:30pm May 10 - 4:30pm May 14 - 4:30pm May 16 - 4:30pm May 17 - 4:30pm May 18 - 4:30pm

SCHEDULE

Supporting our ACHS teams for 2018!

Richmond, IL 815-678-6701

CREMATION • PRE-ARRANGEMENT & PRE-FINANCING PROUDLY SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1925

GO ROCKETS! Bruce A. Adams

10011 Main St. Richmond, IL 60071 (815) 678-7311

312960

www.ehornadams.com

312961

GO KETS CROP ROC PRODUCTION SERVICES

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HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 10

Former teacher gets three years Richmond was convicted of having sex with student

By Jason Arndt

STAFF WRITER

When deciding the fate of former Kenosha teacher Douglas Richmond, found guilty of sexually assaulting a student, Kenosha County Circuit Court Judge Jodi Meier was left with two different recommendations for the Burlington resident. While Richmond’s defense attorney Patrick Cafferty and assistant district attorney Andrew Burgoyne suggested probation, citing Richmond’s cooperation since he was charged, the pre-sentencing investigation wanted incarceration. Meier, taking three character letters into consideration and Richmond’s work and education history, went for incarceration Tuesday. She decided on a threeyear prison sentence, with two years extended supervision, because Richmond violated the trust between a

teacher and the community. Also, he will be ordered to register as a sex offender for Douglas life, and unRichmond dergo behavioral treatment. “It is a flagrant violation of the trust that is given to educators by parents and the community to teach our children in a safe and appropriate manner,” Meier said. “You sir, have crossed lines that should not even remotely approached.” Meier’s decision also hinged on Richmond’s repeated acts, which started in 2009, when he was physics teacher at Kenosha Tremper High School. According to the criminal complaint, Richmond, who was 34 years old at the time, had sexual intercourse with

a then-17-year-old student between October 2009 and June 2010. Richmond, according to the complaint, encouraged the Tremper High School student to meet him at the park and ride lot on Highway 11 at Interstate 94, and then drove her to Petrifying Springs Park in Kenosha, where he allegedly had sexual intercourse with her. “This offense was very calculated, you met with her at the park and ride in Racine to go undetected before riding around,” Meier said. “Then, you proceeded to another location at Petrifying Springs where you engaged in sexual intercourse.” Meier said following this initial incident, Richmond continued his calculated behavior, including sexual acts at the victim’s home in Kenosha and at his mother’s home in Burlington. “It wasn’t one decision,

it was many decisions,” she said. Meier’s sentence came after Cafferty argued for probation. Cafferty said Richmond has taken responsibility for his behavior and also continues to support his five children through his employment as a third shift press operator. “He was able to find work despite the fact that this was pending and it appears that he has a good relationship with his employer,” Cafferty said. “He has five children. He has responsibilities in terms of supporting his children.” Additionally, Cafferty told court officials, had Richmond not been a teacher, the charges would have been different, according to state law. “That is what makes this a felony. Had he not been in a position of trust, it would

FOR SALE

be a misdemeanor and the statute of limitations would have run out on this.” With Richmond convicted of a Class H felony, state law indicates there is not a mandatory prison sentence, Cafferty said. Richmond, Cafferty said, has already faced the consequences of his actions, including a destroyed reputation, lifetime registration as a sex offender, a divorce from his wife and limited opportunities to find employment. “He has lost most of his property, he lost his home,” Cafferty said. “He really has demonstrated that he is a different person at this time.” Richmond, who delivered a brief statement, said he felt remorseful and felt for his children. Richmond added he was afraid to break off the relationship with the student for fear she would report him to authorities.

Upcoming Pringle Nature Center events

Lawn & Garden

The following events take place at Pringle Nature Center, 9800 160th Ave., Bristol, SEARS CRAFTSMAN RIDING MOWER Automatic 42” cut, 6 unless otherwise stated. For heights. Kohler engine 15.5 OHV. $415. 262-642-3252. more information, call 262857-8008. POULAN PRO 2015 Riding Mower - as - is - Best Offer. 262-7635564.

William & Sandra Swantz Living Estate Auction

Sunday, April 22, 2018, 10:00 A.M. 4603 S. 108th St., Franksville, WI 53126

DIRECTIONS: Racine Cnty. Hwy 20 & N. Colony Ave Go N 1.4 miles or Cnty. K & 108th S 1.2 miles to property. Watch for signs. Check the WEBSITES: www. bobhagemannauctionreality.com or www.auctionzip.com ID #9051 for pictures & expanded list. Auction day phones: (262) 492-5125 & (262) 716-8421. Food service on site. Auctioneers Note: After many years of collecting & decorating with many antiques it’s time to downsize. The property is also for sale, not at auction. Call me for a showing. Antiques & Collectibles & Furniture: Blue wood Cabinet, Dining Room Tables, Dining room Chairs, Bookshelves, Bar Stools, Vintage Writing Desk, End Tables, Vintage School Desk and Chairs, Singer Sewing Table, Dressers, 6 Ice Cream Chairs W/Table, Armoire, Vintage office desk, Side Tables, Rocking Chairs, Sm. Water Fountain, Coal Buckets, Wood Bushel Baskets, Barbed Wire Trellis, Chicken Décor + Basket, Large Buck Saw, Old Bicycles & Frames, Kerosene Lanterns, 3 Croquet Sets, Vintage Cupola, Rope Bed, Vintage High Head Board Twin Bed, Vintage High Chairs, Enamel Table Top, Canning Jars, Milk Crates, Pictures, Old Glass Bottles, Enamel Ware, Large Display Cart, Barn Scale, Milk Cans, Steel Head & Foot Board, Wooden Picnic table & Chairs, Copper Wash Tub, Roll Top Desk, Large Storage Cabinet, Old Panel Doors, old Short Wooden Ladders, Decorative Sign Holder, Steel Chairs. Housewares: Glassware, Clay Jugs, Vintage Mason Jars, Kitchenware, 10 gal. Jugs, Blue and Black Camping Dishes, Clay Plant Pots. Dishes: Blue Garland Havilland and Currier & Ives., Collection of over 100 pieces of Fire King Sapphire Blue Glassware from the 1940’s., (I’ll need a reserve on these; would like to sell the whole collection), Two antique trunks, Antique Oak dining table with five leaves and six matching chairs, Six foot long wainscot cabinet, Upholstered chair, Two antique commodes, East Lake headboard for full size bed, East Lake three drawer dresser with mirror, Five drawer antique Highboy dresser, Vintage white iron crib, Two vintage folding sewing tables, Five antique side tables, Antique round clock, Two glass door display cabinets, Small piece of fretwork, Old dress form, Three vintage wood ironing boards, Four captain’s chairs, Vintage Coffee grinder, Old quilts, feed sacks, aprons, linens, and baskets, Newly caned antique chairs. Gas 4 Burner Stove. Specialty Item: EZ Go Gas Golf Cart, 10Ft Al. Brake, EZ Siding Saw, Al Plank Building: Sm Chicken Coop. Tools: Crane, Air tanks, Compressor Simplicity Tracker, Hoist Arch for lifting engine, Large Barn Fan, Aluminum Shelves with clamps, Siding Cutter, Aluminum Brake, Metal Ladders, Rotors, Table saw, Standing belt grinder, Yard Tools, Cement Saw, Jigsaw, Nail Gun, Drills, Hammers, Harris Sm Bottle Touch & Cart, Mapp Gas Touch, Drywall tools, Masonry Tools, 10 5ft Scaffold Rings W/Braces Wheels,20# LP Tank W/Rose Bud, Sledge Hammers, 4ft Clamps, Electric Cords, Conduit Bender, Chains, Delta Planer, Husqvarna Chop Saw, Husqvarna 20in Chain Saw, Spendt Brass Polisher, Bostitch Compound 12in Miter W/Stand, Al. Truck Tool Box, Tarps, Roll Aire Gas Air Compressor, Bench Grinder, Craftsman Table Saw, Diamond Blades, Steel Blades, Bottle Jacks, Ext, Fiberglass Paint Pole, Ext fiberglass Tree Pole Saw, Plumb Fittings, Step & Ext Ladders, Al. Ladder Jacks, Engine Running Stand, Generac 605 Hp Pressure Washer. Lawn & Garden: Simplicity 9020 60in Mower, 1 Bottom Plow, Rototiller, ExMark Lawnmower is remove from auction, Snow blowers. Field Sprayer, Bird Bath, Old Wagons, Wood Benches, Lawn Furniture, 2 Wire Gates, Gas Cans, Shovels, Rakes, Hoes, Picks, Post Pounder, Grass Seeder, Rear Tine Rototiller, Front Tine Rototiller, 3pt Tree Seedling Planter, Garden Art, Roll Barb Wire, Lawn Sprayer Cart, Lg Concrete Lawn Roller, Apple Picking Ladder, Concrete Bird Bath, 1 Bottom Plow. Misc.: Metal Tricycle, Wooden Sled, Yard Ornaments, Old Red Wagons, Paintings, and Signs, Steel Cash Box, & MUCH MORE. TERMS: No Buyers Fee on Cash or Good Check payments with proper I.D. 4% Convenience fee on credit card payments. All sales are final and to be sold “AS IS” with no guarantees expressed or implied. Not responsible in case of accident or for items after sold. Wisconsin Registered Auctioneer: Bob Hagemann, Mike Welch No. 509 & 136. 28421 Rowntree Road, Burlington, WI 53105 PHONE: (262) 492-5125 FAX: (262) 534-5066 WEB: www.bobhagemannauctionrealty.com EMAIL: hagemannauctions@tds.net Antique • Farm • Real Estate • Consignment • Household • Estates Auctions Your so called junk is worth money!

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Despite Richmond’s remorse, Meier believed his behavior fit a pattern, and needed time behind bars to protect society. “I do find this behavior was predatory and calculating and you’re in need of rehabilitative treatment that can best be received in a confined setting,” she said. Richmond faces a similar charge in Racine County, where he is scheduled to appear for a plea hearing on April 30. In Racine County, Richmond allegedly had a sexual encounter with a student who attended Kenosha Indian Trail High School. The now 21-year-old girl said she had sex with Richmond on “probably” two occasions in 2009 or 2010 when she was 14 or 15 years old – once at his home on State Street in Burlington while his wife was out of town, according to the complaint.

Notice

CLASSIFIED IN-COLUMN ADS cannot be credited or refunded after the ad has been placed. Ads canceled before deadline will be removed from the paper as a service to our customers, but no credit or refund will be issued to your account.

Summer program registration

Pringle Nature Center will accept registration for summer programs for children. Wanted to Buy Children ages 9 to 12 can BASEBALL & SPORTS CARDS COLLECTIONS Pre-1975 & post 1995 preferred, also buying Classic Rock Album Collections. 847- participate in Junior Naturalist, children ages 6 to 8 can 243-7570. participate in Observation CASH PAID FOR diamond +/ - 3 carat & larger, old mine cut, Europe- and Creation and children an cut, antique platinum and estate jewelry, 847-881-6214. ages 4 to 5 can participate in Little Naturalists.

Nature Storytime

Tools, Antiques, Appliances, Housewares, Music, Games & Sports, Collectibles, Real Estate Auction Saturday, April 21, 2018, 10:00 A.M. 1426 Washington Ave., Racine, WI 53403

DIRECTIONS: Racine Cnty. I94 & Washington Ave (Hwy 20) East about 8 miles to Property Watch for signs. Check the WEBSITES: www.bobhagemannauctionreality.com or www.auctionzip.com ID #9051 for pictures & expanded list. Auction day phones: (262) 492-5125 & (262) 716-8421. Food service on site. Auctioneers Note: This will be a very large multi-ring Auction, Four rooms full of items this is an indoor auction. Look at the pictures because words alone cannot describe everything please keep checking back for more update as setup is continuous going on. Starting at 10:00 1 ring with Furniture/signs/ more, 2nd ring Collectibles & more, 3rd ring Jewelry, 4th ring lower level tools & more. Parking in back & side. Real Estate at noon: Commercial Building (Great history formerly the Majestic Theater plus apartments & 2 store fronts units). Real Estate at 1:00: Commercial Building (Tavern w/flat above) this information is third party and not verified by Bob see web for details. Furniture: Couches, Dining room chairs, Shelving, Tables, Office Desks, Dressers, Headboards, Dart Cabinet, Daybed Frame, Metal Bed Frames. Appliances: Kenmore Top loading washer, Stoves, Dryers, Phones, Milk Shake Machines, Refrigerators, Vacuum, Kitchen Sink. Housewares: Lamps, Lamp shades, Hurricane Lamp Chimneys, Crystal glasses, Glass wares, Vintage Clocks, Grandfather Clocks, Chandelier, Cookie Jars, Mugs, Napkin Holders, coffee pots, China Sets, typewriters, antique adding machine, Printers, Shredders, File Cabinets, Projectors. Music’s: Pianos, Organ, Sheet Music, Records (45, 33.5, 75 Lps), Radios, Headers, Stereos, Turn Tables, C assets. Games and Sports: Bows, Quiver w/ Arrows, Billiard table, Billiard Cues, Billiard Balls, Billiard Triangles, Board Games, Puzzles, Harley Davidson Model, Vintage Roller Skates, Bikes. Collectibles: Pocket Knives, Novelty Lighters, Jewelry, Vases, Music Boxes, Signs and Paintings, Books, VHS and DVDs. Model Paints. Tools: Hammers, Screwdrivers, Pliers, Craftsman Crescent Wrenches, Staple Guns, Heat Guns, Wood Plane, Drill bits, Bolt Cutters, Pry bar, Bike Repair tools, Files, Measuring Tape, Pipes, Screw in Hooks, Socket Wrenches, & MUCH MORE. TERMS: No Buyers Fee on Cash or Good Check payments with proper I.D. 4% Convenience fee on credit card payments. All sales are final and to be sold “AS IS” with no guarantees expressed or implied. Not responsible in case of accident or for items after sold. Wisconsin Registered Auctioneer: Bob Hagemann, Tim Slack, CAI, Riley Kahl, Jenny Gehl No. 509, 32, 736, 2849.

28421 Rowntree Road, Burlington, WI 53105 PHONE: (262) 492-5125 FAX: (262) 534-5066 WEB: www.bobhagemannauctionrealty.com EMAIL: hagemannauctions@tds.net Antique • Farm • Real Estate • Consignment • Household • Estates Auctions Your so called is worth money!

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Nature Storytime will be from 9:30 to 10 a.m. on Thursday. The story will be “Ten Seeds” by Ruth Brown. This event is for children age 5 and younger accompanied by an adult.

Brownie Girl Scout Senses Badge

have the opportunity to earn their “Senses” badge from 9:30 to 11:15 a.m. on Saturday. Preregistration and payment is required by Thursday. The cost is $4 per person.

Webelos Into the Woods Badge

Webelos have the opportunity to earn their “Into the Woods” badge from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Attendees must arrive by 12:45 p.m. to check in. Preregistration is $4 per person and is required by Thursday.

Invasive Species Workday

The Invasive species workday will be from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 28. Undesirable non-native, invasive plants are removed manually and native plants returned to the habitat. Attendees should bring their own work gloves, tools will be provided.

Brownie Girl Scouts will Beginning

Geocaching

Learn the basics of geocaching from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 28. There will be a short informational session at 1 p.m. before attendees head out to search for the caches. Attendees can bring their Moving Sale own GPS or check out one of the nature center’s. The cost 108 DAVIDSON DR., BURLINGTON April 19, 20 & 21 8-3pm. An- is $5 for the general public.

GARAGE SALES

tiques, tools, household goods.

Union Grove Garage Sales 1027 NEW STREET April 20th, 9-4 pm Saturday April 21st 9-2pm. Rummage & Bake Sale, clothing & misc. items.

Waterford Garage Sales

LEGAL NOTICE LIEN SALE

Anita Self Storage 676 Anita Antioch, Illinois 60002

Mark Antonczyk- Unit #67 Misc. 416 FOX RIVER HILLS DRIVE April 19, 20 & 21, 8am-4 pm. Please view on StorageTreaFour lounge chairs, computer sures.com Opening bids start desk, telescope, lawn furniture, April 27, 2018 yard tools, collectibles and antiques, puzzles, model trains “ (Published in Hi-Liter HO & O”, coffee table, apartment Richmond•Spring size kitchen set w/two chairs, viGrove•Johnsburg Report nyl records 33 1/3 size & much April 18 & 25, 2018 more. WNAXLP - 313009)


LifeStyle

HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 11

Playing baseball internationally allowed me to see baseball was more than just America’s Pastime.”

Blessed by Baseball

Daryl Maday

After Daryl Maday graduated from Westosha Central, he pitched at the University of Arkansas.

SUBMITTED PHOTO Hi-Liter

Area man receives enlightenment on minor league journey

ike everyone else entering professional BY Jason Arndt STAFF WRITER baseball, Daryl Maday wanted to reach the Major League level when the San Francisco Giants drafted him in 2006. However, reaching that goal is a daunting task consisting of 15-hour bus rides, red-eye flights and passing through each level of affiliated baseball. Maday, 32, the winning pitcher in the state quarterfinal for Westosha Central, which won the title in 2002, spent seven seasons trying to make that leap. Although Maday, who grew up in Bristol, did not meet the goal like thousands of other players, he ended his career with a new outlook on life and has no regrets. “Being part of a group that even gets a chance to pursue their baseball dreams through professional baseball is a blessing, it truly is,” he said. “But it is not easy. Does playing professional baseball for a living seem awesome? Yes it is. But it’s more than that.”

From the start

Coming off his senior season at Westosha Central, the Milwaukee Brewers selected Maday in the 43rd round. But he opted to attend the University of Arkansas. “It was an easy decision to attend college and be a Razorback; their program and facilities were and still are among the best in the country,” he said. In 2006, he received the call from the Giants, who selected him with their 30thround pick. Through his seven seasons, Maday’s journey took him to Salem, Ore.; Norwich, Conn.; San Jose, Calif.; Augusta, Ga.; Richmond, Va.; and Fresno, Calif. “I don’t think you ever know what to expect entering professional baseball,” he said. “Obviously, the end goal is to make it to the major leagues and play as long as possible. “I came up short, but those seven years with the Giants family were incredible.” He said the incredible experiences included having future Major League Baseball players Buster Posey and Madison

Bumgarner as teammates. When he arrived to Fresno in 2010, playing there for parts of the next three years, Maday was one promotion away from achieving his goal. “I’ve had my fair share of opportunities to make it to the big leagues,” said Maday, who put the daunting task in perspective. “The reality is that there are new guys every year fighting for the same jobs and the same positions.” As players grow older, their window of opportunity diminishes, considering teams draft about 50 players annually. Among the 51 players the Giants picked in 2006, just seven played at least one MLB game. Tim Lincecum, a four-time All-Star and the team’s first-round pick, is the only player of the seven still active.

Going international

After seven years with the Giants, Maday wasn’t sure what was next until he learned of an opportunity to play in the Venezuelan Winter League in 2013-14. Playing in Venezuela, where national reports note the country is dealing with an economic crisis worse than the Great Depression in the United States during the 1930s, brought him enlightenment. “Playing baseball internationally allowed me to see baseball was more than just America’s Pastime,” he said. “It’s a way of life, it’s a way to stand out and it’s a way to get out of negative circumstances like in Venezuela.” In spite of the circumstances, Maday said Venezuela was a beautiful country with a passionate fan base, which gave him a new appreciation for life in the United States. “It’s beautiful country with passionate fans, but it made me definitely appreciate all the normal, everyday freedoms and luxuries that we have in the U.S.” His next stop was South Korea, where he tossed a no-hitter against a military team and later served as a coach. “Korea was a place that I truly enjoyed,” he said. “I never would have even thought to visit it if it weren’t for baseball. Their fan base is on a whole other level. Both experiences made me grow as a baseball player and as a person.”

JASON ARNDT Hi-Liter

Daryl Maday puts the finishing touches on a turkey he completed at Back Country Taxidermy Studio, where he serves as part owner.

Hanging them up As he approached his 30s, and with a throwing arm that had lost some zip, Maday returned to Western Kenosha County to start a family and pursue a new career. Maday, who married his girlfriend from high school, Julie, is the father of 2-year-old Wyatt and has another child on the way. “My family is here, my friends are here,” he said. “Home is home. Kenosha County is where I’m from. My wife and I have a house, a son and another son on the way.” Maday, whose parents, Steve and Alice, still live in Bristol, also has a brother, Steve Jr., 37, and sister, Holly, 34. If not for his parents and supportive wife, Maday’s minor league journey would have been tougher. Struggles include some financial shortcomings, which became a national topic of discussion with reports stating most minor league players earn a salary below minimum wage. Starting wage, according to several

sources, could be as low as $1,100 a month for a five-month season. “It’s a financial and a mental struggle; luckily I had such an amazing support group,” Maday said. Maday said his wife offered continuous support during his pursuit of reaching The Show. “The patience it took to be her, it’s indescribable.” While the Madays started a family of their own, he transitioned into a new career as part owner of Back Country Taxidermy Studio in Paddock Lake. “It’s less than five miles from where I grew up and less than a mile from Westosha Central,” he said. “Life is good. I can’t wait to watch my boys grow up and make their own paths in Southeast Wisconsin.” However, baseball is still a part of his life; he serves as pitching director for Puma Baseball Academy in Kenosha. “It’s been fun getting back in the game on the instruction side,” he said. “Now I just try to pass on the things that I learned through my experiences.”


HI-LITER • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018 • 12

We Care About You In your time of need, Hillcrest Nursing Center is here to help. Dear Joel, at you gave to my th re ca e th r fo u yo k an I just want to th tient in answering pa d an nd ki so e er w l al Mother. You the difficult time ng ri du d ha e w ns tio es qu the many fter extensive research A . om M r fo e m ho a ng of findi ched you with oa pr ap e w s, ie lit ci fa l ra and visiting seve illcrest. You were H to g in m co om M of ty the possibili have a genuine heart and to ed em se d an nd ki e, iv informat resident was treated with h ac E s. or ni se r fo n io ss compa es were willing to rs nu he T . ss ne er nd te d respect, love an the best plan of care. ith w up e m ca e w er th ge listen and to put into words how much ly al re t n’ ca ..I n. ai ag u Thank yo You truly are t. es cr ill H at om M ng vi we appreciated ha here on Earth. od G of t ar he d an s nd ha the Sincerely,

L ezli H ughes

To speak with Joel, or for information about Hillcrest Nursing Center, please call anytime.

Compassionate, Trusted Rehab To Get You Home Again

847-886-5959 Hillcrest Nursing Center Family Owned and Operated for Over 40 Years 1740 North Circuit Drive, Round Lake Beach

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