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Seeking & equipping students from

every

corner

of

the

K i n g d o m to s erv e i n e v ery context

of

the

Kingdom

FALL 2013


A Letter from the President >

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@dannyakin >

Dear Southeastern family, >

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Recently I had lunch with pastor J.D. Greear. J.D.

tor in Theology and Special Advisor to the President for

leads the thriving Summit Church in Raleigh-Durham,

Diversity. He is already making a tremendous impact.

N.C. and is a two time graduate of SEBTS. He teaches

Edgar Aponte has begun his Ph.D. in Theology at South-

for us when he can and is a great friend to me person-

eastern and will serve as Director of Hispanic Leader-

ally and to our school. As we ate, the conversation

ship Development. Edgar is a former governmental rep-

turned to the challenge of achieving authentic ethnic

resentative from the Dominican Republic to the United

diversity in the local church and the Southern Baptist

States government. Both of these men bring great gifts

Convention. We both agreed that getting there is hard

and skills to their assignments. They also bring insights

work. We also agreed it is worthwhile work. Yet, we were

and perspectives that will help us move forward.

of one mind that this is something that, at this time,

Kingdom Diversity has been on my heart for a long

does not usually happen naturally. You must be inten-

time. It has become a burning passion in recent days

tional. It must be a priority.

that I know beyond a shadow of a doubt is from our Lord.

This fall Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

Southern Baptists have made significant progress when

launched what we are calling our Kingdom Diversity

it comes to ethnic diversity, but we still have a lot of work

Initiative. The goal is to intentionally build and celebrate

ahead of us. My prayer is Southeastern will be a healthy

a school that truly reflects the beautiful diversity of eth-

and helpful catalyst to encourage our churches in this

nic people groups and races that our God has created for

area. I believe this would please our Lord. I am con-

His own glory. To this end we have added two wonderful

vinced this is a good work we must do. We need your

men to our staff that come to us as gifts from God. Wal-

help. We covet your prayers. Join us in this God glorify-

ter Strickland, a former graduate, will serve as Instruc-

ing endeavor!

Daniel L. Akin President


Contents Fall 2013 >

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Fred Luter in Chapel: Southeastern Celebrates Kingdom Diversity with Fred Luter

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David Platt in Chapel: Platt Challenges Christians to be Faithful to the Gospel

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A Report of Vibrancy: Southeastern Board of Visitors and Board of Trustees Fall Visit

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Art Rainer: Southeastern’s New Vice President for Institutional Advancement

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Kingdom Diversity at Southeastern

Events

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Events from Around Southeastern

Books

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Stop Asking Jesus Into Your Heart: How to Know For Sure You Are Saved J.D. Greear

Southeastern Faculty Works

As You Go: Creating A Missional Culture of Gospel-Centered Students Alvin L. Reid

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The Problem of Evil: The Challenge to Essential Christian Beliefs Jeremy A. Evans Those Who Must Give an Account: A Study of Church Membership and Church Discipline | Edited by John S. Hammett & Benjamin L. Merkle

Topics

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Building a Church on Earth That Looks Like the Church in Heaven, Daniel Akin

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Southeastern Offers Its First Course on Black Theology, Walter Strickland

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Kingdom Diversity in Theological Higher Education, Bruce Ashford

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GTI: An Initiative for the Nations: A Focus on Diversity and Hispanic Leadership Development, John Ewart

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Spotlights

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The Center for Great Commission Studies Scott Hildreth, Director

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Alumni Development/Denominational Relations Jonathan Six, Director

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The College at Southeastern Jamie Dew, Dean of the College

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Distance Learning/EQUIP Jerry Lassetter, Director of Distance Learning Steven Wade, Director of Great Commission Equipping Network

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Financial Development Daniel Palmer, Director

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Fall 2013 Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Wake Forest, NC Daniel Akin President Bruce Ashford Provost Ryan Hutchinson Executive Vice President for Operations Art Rainer Vice President for Institutional Advancement

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Alumni Staff Jonathan Six, Director Rebecca Taylor Communications Staff Kenneth Bonnett, Director Ali Dixon Maria Estes Parker Griffin Sam Morris Bailey Shoemaker Ryan Thomas To inform us of address changes or if you would like to receive the magazine, please contact us at 919-761-2203 or e-mail alumni@sebts.edu.

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Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary seeks to glorify the Lord Jesus Christ by equipping students to serve the church and fulfill the Great Commission (Matt. 28:19-20). Southeastern is an institution of higher learning and a Cooperative Program ministry of the Southern Baptist Convention. Support comes through the gifts of the Cooperative Program and the individual friends of the seminary who provide assistance through wills, estates and trusts. The Great Commission Magazine of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (ISSN 2327-154X) is published by Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary P.O. Box 1889 Wake Forest, NC 27588 www.sebts.edu


Stories

Fred Luter in Chapel >

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See this and other chapel messages at sebts.edu/multimedia

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Southeastern Celebrates Kingdom Diversity with Fred Luter >

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A host of students, faculty, guests and friends of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary filled Binkley Chapel for Convocation and the first Kingdom Celebration event on campus on Aug. 20. The day launched Southeastern’s diversity initiative to exemplify, “Every tribe and language and people and nation” (Revelation 5:9) at the seminary and in the Church. Dr. Daniel Akin, president of Southeastern, welcomed new students and introduced the Convocation guest speaker, Rev. Fred Luter, president of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) and pastor of Franklin Avenue Baptist Church in New Orleans, La. Luter is also the first African-American President of the SBC. “My wife and I wept when he was announced as head of the Southern Baptist Convention,” Akin said. “He is a dear friend and I have so much respect for him.” The first chapel of the semester was marked with worship, prayer and conviction as Luter preached on Romans 1:16-17. The sermon focused on the transforming power of the Word of God because it is personal, powerful, practical and persistent. Luter encouraged students to look back at their own “Before Christ” (B.C.) days and asked, “What did it take to change you?” He reassured listeners that the Word of God is available to others regardless of their race, heritage or ethnicity. His words energized and challenged the audience to impact the world in these last days through their personal relationships

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with Jesus Christ. An intimate luncheon following Convocation featured a panel discussion with Luter and Akin moderated by Walter Strickland, special advisor to the president for diversity. The panel answered questions and listened to insights from local pastors on diversity. “Out of 45,000 Baptist churches with 60 million members, only 8 percent are African-American,” Luter said. “For an African-American to be elected President of the SBC unopposed is unheard of, God had to be in it.” Akin went on to share his heart for diversity at Southeastern. “Despite our intention we all have blind spots,” Akin said. “At chapel this fall, we will have five or six African-American preachers. I pray diversity would be second nature here at SEBTS.” “There is not a whole lot we can do about our past but there is a whole lot we can do about our future,” Luter continued. “I see walls coming down every day.” Luter last visited Southeastern in 1993 and the community is eager to embrace his presence and legacy in the future. Akin charged discussion participants to be intentional about moving forward. “Go out from this place and intentionally start building relationships, discipling others and trusting God to build up leaders in the church,” Akin said. “I am committed to this until I leave this place. By God’s grace, we will be much further down the road than we are today.”


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@plattdavid

David Platt in Chapel >

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Platt Challenges Christians to be Faithful to the Gospel >

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David Platt, pastor of The Church at Brook Hills in Birmingham, Ala., spoke to an overflowing chapel of students, faculty, staff and friends of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Platt said: “It is always an honor to be here, I praise God for what He is doing on this campus for the edification and exaltation of the Gospel among the nations.” “In one sense my heart is encouraged, particularly among younger evangelicals, as I sense opposition to injustice regarding the poor, orphaned and enslaved,” Platt said. “Yet at the same time, I am concerned by a lack of zeal on social issues that are just as, if not more important. These issues include abortion, sexual immorality and so called same sex marriage.” The aim of Platt’s sermon was to call the members and leaders of Christ’s church to a contrite, compassionate and courageous battle on the front lines of our culture with the gospel of Jesus Christ. Platt focused on the heart of his message from Genesis 1 through 3 and spoke about four biblical foundations and their cultural implications from the text. Found in Genesis 1, “God creates us as a demonstration of His glory. … Not natural selection but supernatural provision,” Platt said. This reveals that man is created in the image of God with the unique capacity to relate, know, walk and worship God. In Genesis 2, Platt said: “God designs us for the display of His gospel. Man and women were created with equal dignity, value and importance before God yet clearly designed with different roles. Both compliment

each other. … That through this [marriage] relationship it may show the world the relationship between Christ and the church,” said Platt. From Genesis 3, Platt shared how God judges us by His righteous law. “Questioning God’s Word leads to doubting God’s character,” Platt said. As mentioned in Romans 5, all have sinned, yet God seeks the guilty. The fourth foundation was: God pursues us with His redeeming love. “These four truths form the essence of the gospel,” Platt said. “Consider the massive ramifications of these truths applied to the battle fronts of our day,” Platt said. “So what do we do?” The first cultural implication based on first biblical foundation was on the topic of abortion. “We do not have a choice; we are constrained by the gospel to fight abortion as an assault on God’s creation and an affront to God’s glory. … We live in a country where 1 million babies are aborted each year. 3,000 everyday and one baby every 20 to 25 seconds. All over the world 130,000 abortions occur everyday. “I do not believe it is an overstatement to call abortion a modern holocaust. I believe that is an understatement, every month we surpass that number of people systematically slaughtered all over the world,” Platt said. “We must not hide from the reality of what is happening all around the country and all over the world.” “God is creating a person in His image in that womb. That gospel reality changes everything,” Platt said. “In reference to the second biblical truth, we flee sex-

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ual immorality in our lives. … We must do 1 Corinthi-

Lastly, “We must give our lives and lead our church-

Platt said. “We defend sexual complimentary in mar-

es to pursue people still unreached by God’s redeeming

riage for the sake of the gospel and the world.”

love. Surely the greatest injustice in our day without

“Today’s cultural climate creates a huge opportunity

question is that 6,000 people groups and two billion

for gospel witness through marriage,” Platt said. “God’s

people yet to even hear of God’s redeeming love,” Platt

design for marriage is far more breathtaking and sat-

said.

isfying than anything our culture will ever create.” Platt said: “The third cultural implication is that we

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while declaring the gospel of the living water.

ans 6:18, run from, not reason or rationalize with it,”

The service was held on Aug. 27 in Binkley Chapel on the Southeastern campus.

work for justice in the world as we speak about the

In closing Platt said: “Christ is worthy of glory from

Judge of the world. … We must reflect His character in

every single people group on the planet. There is a

a world that is filled with the weak and fatherless, the

battle that is raging in North America and among the

sick and needy, the impoverished and enslaved.” The

nations. I challenge you today to engage in the battle. …

calling in Micah 6:8 to do justice is modeled by giving

To engage the gospel on battlefronts across our culture

a cup of clean water or building a well with clean water

is to be faithful to the gospel in our day.”

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Watch all our chapel services live at sebts.edu/streaming >

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BOV Fall 2013

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A Report of Vibrancy: Southeastern Board of Visitors and Board of Trustees Fall Visit >

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In a series of meetings and events, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS) hosted its Board of Visitors (BOV) and the Board of Trustees (BOT) for its fall 2013 bi-annual meeting. Over 200 couples make up the BOV, which seeks to assist in fulfilling the mission of SEBTS, financially support the seminary, recruit new students and provide guidance and prayer for development programs. The BOT consists of 30 members charged with the control and governance of the school. The chief function of the BOT is to establish policy governing the seminary, approve the academic program of the seminary and make certain its quality meets the highest standards possible. The three days of events were held on the SEBTS campus. They started on Oct. 13 and ended on Oct. 15. On Sunday evening, the BOV worship gathering featured guest speaker Dr. M.O. Owens Jr., pastor emeritus of Parkwood Baptist Church in Gastonia, N.C. Owens, preached from 1 John. “Love, loyalty and truth are the three most important facts in life,” Owens said. “Truth is always the

same, factual, never changing, complete and beautiful in its glory and wonder.” A 100th birthday celebration was held in Owens’s honor after chapel. Monday included a BOV meeting with a Presidential Address, from Dr. Daniel Akin, president of SEBTS, a discussion panel on preaching and departmental reports. Akin shared current student enrolment numbers of almost 3,100, plans to increase the opportunity to take classes online and the progress of the Kingdom Diversity initiative. The panel discussion featured Akin, Bill Bowyer, lead pastor of Wake Cross Roads Baptist Church in Raleigh, N.C, Tony Merida, founding pastor of Imago Dei Church in Raleigh, N.C. and Owens. “The greatest need in the world is for good preaching to emerge,” Merida said. “We can’t settle for mediocrity in the pulpit.” Monday evening a campus wide BBQ dinner provided a time of fellowship with SEBTS students, faculty, staff and guests. On Tuesday, the BOT plenary session elected Art

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Rainer as the vice president for Institutional Advancement at SEBTS. The BOT were introduced to four new faculty members including: Edgar Aponte, director of Hispanic Leadership Development, Stephen Eccher, assistant professor of Church History and Reformation Studies and Walter Strickland, special advisor to the president for diversity. The trustees also elected Charles Quarrels, professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology, to the faculty. New members of the BOT are Melinda Delahoyde, Jeremy Dollar and Israel Kim. The installation of the Dr. Ed Young Sr. Chair of Preaching was held in conjunction with Southeastern’s chapel service. Akin presented the highest honor bestowed from Southeastern, the President’s Award, to Second Baptist Church, Houston, Texas. Young serves as the senior pastor of Second Baptist Church. His church has over 63,000 members with five locations and plans are underway for additional campuses. He is a graduate of SEBTS and a former President of the Southern Baptist Convention. Akin was chosen by the BOT to hold the new chair position. “I protested strongly against this because I don’t feel worthy,” Akin said. “I am honored, if there is a person I do look up to for a faithful pastor, it is Ed Young. I am humbled and I am grateful, until my last breath I will be true to the power and inerrancy of the

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Word of God.” Young focused his sermon on leadership qualities from the book of Nehemiah. He stated five essential characteristics of a great leader: having a vision, giving away the vision, discernment, tenacity and integrity. Young also stressed the importance of having salt, the prayer of your calling and pepper, which is passion. “If you step out and people follow you over time, you may have the gift of leadership,” Young said. “Success is being in the center of God’s will for your life. And celebrating it.” When asked why he hasn’t retired after 55 years in ministry, Young said: “As a servant leader, I just haven’t lost the wonder of it all.” An Ed Young Chair Installation luncheon was held after the service and featured an interview of Young with Akin. In order to reach the world, Young shared the importance of reaching children and through them, their parents. “You’ve got to demonstrate that you love their kids from when they are born all the way through,” Young said. “If you love kids you are going to build a church.” The fall meeting days challenged and energized the Southeastern community to move forward in fulfilling the Great Commission for King Jesus. As Owens stated in his sermon, “Truth brings people together in a way that nothing else will. …We preach that truth.”


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The Board of Visitors is a society of Great Commission Christians committed to equipping pastors who unapologetically proclaim God’s truth from the pulpit. Join them today. Celebrate forever. sebts.edu/bov | dpalmer@sebts.edu | 919.761.2352

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ART RAINER SOUTHEASTERN’S NEW VICE PRESIDENT FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

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Please join us in welcoming Art Rainer, Palm Beach, Fla. Mr. Rainer has co-authored Southeastern’s Vice President for Institutional two books, “Raising Dad” and “Simple Life”. He Advancement. Mr. Rainer is a graduate of the and his wife, Sarah, have a three-year-old son University of Kentucky with a Master of Busi- and a newborn. “My wife and I are excited to ness Administration and is a candidate for a join the Southeastern family,” said Mr. Rainer. Doctorate in Business Administration. He is “It is such a great honor and privilege to serve also working towards a Master of Arts in Bibli- this great institution. I look forward to coming cal Studies at SEBTS. Before moving to Wake alongside the Southeastern team as we train Forest, N.C., Mr. Rainer served as the adminis- and equip students to serve the church and fultrative pastor of First Baptist Church of West fill the Great Commission.”

A Word from Mr. Rainer This past October, Southeastern’s Board of

great eagerness that we do our part. This fac-

Trustees gave me the great honor and privi-

ulty, staff and students are not comfortable

lege of serving this incredible institution.

with letting their moment in time pass with-

Southeastern is a very special place. It is a

out making a significant dent in the fulfill-

place where one will simultaneously feel in-

ment of Jesus’ command. Southeastern is a

credibly comfortable, as if one was at home,

place where strategic thinking and thorough

and surprisingly uncomfortable, as if one was

training meet for the sake of the Great Com-

compelled to leave. I have never felt more at

mission. It is a place where one can be com-

home more quickly than here at Southeastern.

fortable and uncomfortable at the same time.

The Christ-like hospitality of the men and women of Southeastern is without compari-

It is easy to serve men and women at a place like Southeastern Baptist Theological Semi-

son. When someone arrives to Wake Forest,

nary. It is also a joy to contribute to Southeast-

they are immediately grafted into the semi-

ern. There are few investments that create

nary family. My family is no different. We are

such a substantial return. Southeastern trains

grateful and proud to be a part of this incred-

and equips disciples who will train and equip

ible, Christ-honoring school. However, in this midst of this comfort, there is discomfort. While the faculty, staff, and student’s love for one another is strong,

disciples who will train and equip disciples. The return is immeasurable. Southeastern is a place of comfort, but it is filled with men and women who are uncom-

their love for Jesus and His command to fulfill

fortable. Our school is a special place. I am

the Great Commission is stronger. It is this

thankful for the opportunity to join and be a

greater love and passion that creates uneasi-

member of the Southeastern family. I look for-

ness among the Southeastern family.

ward locking arms with you as we fulfill the

We have been given a mission and it is with

Art Rainer Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Great Commission.

@artrainer sebts.edu

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Seeking & equipping students from

every

corner

of

the

K i n g d o m to s erv e i n e v ery context

of

the

Kingdom

Story by Ali Dixon | Photos by Maria Estes

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Stories

S

outheastern Baptist Theological Seminary

a Great Commission seminary, moving in this

(SEBTS) has recently taken intentional

direction is really an easy decision and one I

steps toward ethnic diversity by hosting a

Kingdom Celebration Day and hiring two new faculty members: Walter Strickland, special

wish we had made many years before now.” Strickland, an African-American, is a twotime graduate of SEBTS. He desires for the

advisor to the president for diversity, and Ed-

seminary to capture a theological and biblical

gar Aponte, director of Hispanic leadership

conviction of ethnic diversity ultimately root-

development.

ed in Scripture.

President of the Southern Baptist Conven-

“This will lead to a school that is more popu-

tion’s Executive Committee Frank Page has

lated with different ethnicities, but that is not

taken considerable time to invest toward eth-

the ultimate goal—it is a by-product,” Strick-

nic diversity within the Southern Baptist Con-

land said. “The ultimate goal is to fulfill

vention (SBC). Page has formed advisory

Christ’s Great Commission by equipping stu-

councils with African-American and Hispan-

dents to take the gospel to all nations.”

ic leaders. He believes that true relationships

In his new role, Strickland advises the pres-

with other ethnic leaders are fundamental to

ident and his cabinet on matters related to

both unity and evangelism.

ethnic relations and institutional diversity. He

Acknowledging Page’s action for diversity, Dr. Daniel Akin, president of SEBTS, desires

also creates strategies for curricula and courses at SEBTS.

to serve the church by building an institution

Aponte, himself Hispanic, provides direc-

that reflects the body of Christ in heaven, as

tion and administration for Hispanic leader-

all nations worship King Jesus.

ship development initiatives. He serves under

Southeastern Seminary’s mission statement

John Ewart, associate vice president for Glob-

is: “To glorify the Lord Jesus Christ by equip-

al Theological Initiatives. Aponte builds rela-

ping students to serve the Church and fulfill

tionships with local and national Hispanic

the Great Commission.”

ministries to expand the Hispanic student

“Ethnic diversity is hardwired into the Great Commission,” Akin said. “If we are to truly be

population at Southeastern. Aponte, with the support of Akin, helped

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Attendees dialogue with Daniel Akin and Fred Luter at the Kingdom Celebration luncheon.

launch the first 9Marks at Southeastern en

a preview of that day.

Español event. The conference equipped

Ed Stetzer, president of LifeWay Research

Christian leaders to build healthy churches

and LifeWay’s Missiologist in Residence,

and was held on Southeastern’s campus on

shared on the blog “Between the Times” that

Sept. 25 with approximately 50 pastors and

Southern Baptists need to begin making in-

church members in attendance.

tentional decisions to attract, reach and train

“Southeastern is here to serve the Spanish-

younger generations and welcome ethnic di-

speaking church … and

versity to Southern

we want pastors to see

Baptist church fami-

us as their ally in serving them as they work to fulfill the Great Commission,” Aponte said. “My prayer is that we will bring glory to Christ by training and equipping current and future Christian leaders among the Hispan-

“Diversity is not peripheral or optional for the Gospel, it is the core of what the Gospel is.” Dr. norman peart

ic community in the United States and throughout Latin America.”

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lies. “[ When

Sout her n

Baptists] build a physically diverse but spiritually unified community, this presses us forward together for a c om mon

m i s sion,”

Setzer said. “That common mission is the proclamation of the

Gospel to all nations.”

Provost of Southeastern Bruce Ashford

Akin is working to ensure that Stetzer’s

stated that Scripture affirms the importance

ideas become reality. “Southern Baptists still

of diversity. Ashford said that God’s purposes

have a long way to go, but these ethnic rela-

in history culminate in winning for Himself

tions positions at Southeastern are strategic

worshippers from every tribe, tongue, people

in assisting us in better understanding and

and nation. Ashford’s desire is for SEBTS to be

serving ethnic communities and the students


Stories

A multi-ethnic choir leads attendees in spirit-filled worship at the Kingdom Celebration event.

sent our way,” Akin said. “These newly ap-

and an opportunity to celebrate what Christ

pointed positions at Southeastern are only a

can do through His believers.

first step, but one I believe is in the right direc-

Strickland moderated the guest panel fea-

tion. It is never too late to start doing the right

turing Akin, Aponte, Rev. James White, pas-

thing, and this is clearly the right thing to do.”

tor of Christ our King Community Church in

On Aug. 20, SEBTS hosted the first King-

Raleigh, N.C. and Dr. Norman Peart, pastor of

dom Celebration Day with special guest Fred

Grace Bible Fellowship in Cary, N.C.

Luter, the first AfricanAmerican president of the Southern Baptist C onvent ion.

Luter

preached at Convocation and later sat with Akin on a luncheon panel moderated by Strickland to discuss diversity challenges with local pastors. The events were held on

A kin

“It is never too late to start doing the right thing, and this is clearly the right thing to do.” Dr. daniel akin

Southeastern’s cam-

emphasized

the impor tance of building churches on earth that model the Church in heaven and working hard to be part of the movement that brings believers f rom

ever y

t r ibe,

tongue and nation together. White encouraged the audience to be will-

pus in Binkley Chapel and the Hall of Presi-

ing to be learners, to engage in conversation

dents.

and to be aware of historical contexts.

In the evening students, pastors and local

Aponte further developed these ideas. “We

church members came together to worship,

should push ourselves to be with people we are

pray and listen to a panel discussion on king-

not comfortable with and pray that God will

dom diversity. Ashford introduced the event

bring different people to us,” Aponte said. “Also,

as a demonstration of multi-colored splendor

forgive where there has been offenses and

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where we offended others, ask for forgiveness.”

initiative has been observing how the school’s

Peart went on to explain the centrality of

Great Commission focus has prepared us to

diversity to the good news. “Diversity is not

make widespread changes so that our semi-

peripheral or optional for the Gospel, it is the

nary family and our churches will look more

core of what the Gospel is,” he said. Peart also

like the kingdom of heaven.

encouraged the audience to persevere and be

“There is a temptation to host a series of

patient as they work towards diversity in the

large public events to demonstrate the prog-

church.

ress of the kingdom diversity initiative, but

As the Southeastern team embarks on the

much of the work that will pay long-term div-

diversity initative, Strickland shared peronsal

idend for the campus and for the kingdom is

highlights and challenges that may lie ahead.

going to be done in the boardroom and in the

“My greatest delight of the kingdom diversity

classroom,” Strickland said.

Walter R. Strickland II serves as Instructor of Theology and Special Advisor the President for Diversity at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Walter was born in Chicago and raised in Southern California, and his passion is for people from every culture to fully embody the gospel of Jesus Christ in their context. Walter holds a Bachelor of Arts from Cedarville University, a Master of Divinity and Master of Theology from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, and is pursuing a Doctorate in Theology from the University of Aberdeen (Scotland). Walter and his lovely wife Stephanie live in Wake Forest, N.C. and have a daughter named Hope Eyanna who is waiting to meet them in glory, and a second daughter named Kendra Keziah.

Edgar R. Aponte serves as Director of Hispanic Leadership Development and Instructor of Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Edgar was born and raised in the Dominican Republic. The Lord saved him while he was serving his country in Washington, D.C. The Lord then used the testimony of his local church to call him to the ministry. He is passionate about God, His glory and Missions. This is evident by his burden for gospel preaching ministries in the Spanishspeaking world. Before coming to Southeastern, Edgar served as Minister Counselor in the Embassy of Dominican Republic to the US. Before that he worked in banking and finance. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration, a graduate degree in Corporate Finance, a Master Business Administration and a Master of Divinity in Christian Ministry; and is currently working on his Doctorate in Systematic Theology at SEBTS. He is married to Sara and is the father of two children.

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sebts.edu

To learn more about Southeastern’s Kingdom Diversity Initiative visit sebts.edu/kingdom_diversity.


Stories

Thank you

to our sponsors for a successful 7th annual

Join us for the 8th annual Southeastern Classic Fall 2014 sebts.edu/classic

Title Sponsor

For Your Turn-Key Architectural and Engineering Design Solutions

Major Sponsors Lifeway, Power Secure, Robling Medical, Inc., Captrust, BB&T Home Morgage, Southern Piping Company, BB&T, McGladrey, Focus Design Builders, Wells Fargo, Service Master Clean, Candlewood Suites and Charles Boyd of Henderson

To become a sponsor, contact Daniel Palmer, Director of Financial Development at dpalmer@sebts.edu or 919.761.2352

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19


Events

1Kingdom Celebration Day 2Rosaria Butterfield Lectures 39Marks en Español Kingdom Celebration Day on Aug. 20 launched a diversity initiative of Southeastern to exemplify, “Every tribe and language and people and nation” (Rev. 5:9) at the seminary and in the church. Binkley Chapel was filled to hear Rev. Fred Luter, president of the SBC, speak. Following the service, a luncheon for local pastors featured a panel discussion with Luter and Dr. Danny Akin and was moderated by Walter Strickland, special advisor to the president for diversity. In the evening, there was a time of worship, prayer and panel discussion focused on kingdom diversity. Strickland moderated the evening panel that included area pastors Norman Peart and James White and SEBTS leaders Akin and Edgar Aponte.

The Center for Faith and Culture at SEBTS welcomed Dr. Rosaria Butterfield from Durham, N.C. to the campus on Sept. 6. Butterfield is the author of “The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert: An English Professor’s Journey into Christian Faith.” She converted to Christianity in 1999 while she was working at Syracuse University in the English Department and Women Studies Program. Butterfield lectured on “Sanctified Sexuality” at a Southeastern faculty and Ph.D. student luncheon. In the evening, approximately 350 attendees gathered at Wake Forest Baptist Church for Butterfield’s lecture on “Sexuality, Identity, and the Doctrine of Repentance: My Train Wreck Conversion.”

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In the spirit of innovation and a vision to serve God’s kingdom, Southeastern launched the first 9Marks at Southeastern in Spanish. The conference was held on Southeastern’s campus on Sept. 25. Over 50 people attended the conference and four men drove from Houston, Texas to attend. The conference featured four speakers: Ryan Tow nsend, Edgar Aponte, Juan Sanchez and Miguel Nuñez. Southeastern hopes to host and grow the event next year. Aponte said: “At Southeastern we are a servant to SBC churches, but we also want to reach beyond that as a resource to help foster diversity within the church and our denominational environment.”

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Events

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49Marks at Southeastern

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5Southeastern Classic

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6Noah’s Flood

Close to 1,000 pastors, students and

One hundred twenty-eight players

The Center for Faith and Culture at

local church members gathered for the

making up a total of 32 teams trans-

SEBTS hosted the Noah’s Flood and the

fifth annual 9Marks at Southeastern

ported by 64 golf carts and supported

Age of the Earth conference on Oct. 25

Conference on Sept. 27 and 28. Evan-

by 18 SEBTS volunteers made up the

at Wake Forest Baptist Church. The day-

gelism was the theme of the conference

participants of the Seventh Annual

long conference gave Southeastern stu-

and featured six speakers and panel

Southeastern Classic Golf Tournament.

dents, faculty and guests the opportu-

discussions including Danny Akin,

Held on Sept. 23, the official second

nity to hear a dialogue between four

Thabiti Anyabwile, Mark Dever, John

day of fall, crisp temperatures, cerule-

scientists who affirm the inspiration

Folmar, J.D. Greear and Peter Williams.

an blue skies and the first signs of

and inerrancy of Scripture but disagree

9Marks’s mission is to: “Equip church

leaves changing color set the scene for

on how to relate the Genesis account of

leaders with a biblical vision and prac-

those coming to celebrate the initia-

creation with the scientific evidence

tical resources for displaying God’s

tives of SEBTS. The tournament was

about the age of the earth. Four SEBTS

glory to the nations through healthy

marked by a spirit of sweet fellowship

Old Testament professors also shared

churches.” Dever said: “One of the

among the guests and pristine playing

their interpretations of Genesis 1 in a

things that marks a healthy church is

conditions at TPC Wakefield Plantation

panel discussion, and over 200 people

healthy evangelism.”

in Raleigh, N.C.

attended the event.

sebts.edu


Events

A decorated member of the U.S. Army’s most elite fighting corps, Jeff Struecker was prominently featured in the national best-seller Black Hawk Down, later made into a major motion picture.

Get the Stories

sebts.edu/multimedia

Married to Dawn with 5 children, on staff at Calvary Baptist Church, Columbus, GA

MEET JEFF

STRUECKER Advanced Degree Student

sebts.edu

sebts.edu

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Books

Southeastern Faculty Works

Stop Asking Jesus Into Your Heart: How to Know For Sure You Are Saved J.D. Greear “If there were a “Guinness Book of World Records” record for the ‘amount of times having asked Jesus into your heart,’ I’m pretty sure I would hold it,” says pastor and author, J.D. Greear. In “Stop Asking Jesus Into Your Heart,” Greear seeks to answer the question: “How can anyone know, beyond all doubt, that they are saved?” Throughout the book Greear focuses on his personal experiences as a believer and as a pastor on the topic of assurance of salvation. Greear addresses difficult questions about genuine faith, true repentance and the reliability of scripture. The book provides practical application for young adults and beyond.

As You Go: Creating A Missional Culture of Gospel-Centered Students Alvin L. Reid

Alvin L. Reid focuses on the need for student ministry to be engaging, missional and gospel centered in his book “As You Go: Creating a Missional Culture of Gospel-Centered Students.” Reid draws out practical applications from his work as an author, speaker and evangelism professor at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He challenges readers to be focused on Christ as they engage with the church and parents to minister to young adults in today’s culture. “I submit the goal of student ministry is to glorify God by developing disciples who learn both to see the world as missionaries and live as missionaries—to live focused on the mission of God.”

Have a global impact through your institution 24

sebts.edu


Southeastern Faculty Works

Books

The Problem of Evil: The Challenge to Essential Christian Beliefs Jeremy A. Evans “The Problem of Evil: The Challenge to Essential Christian Beliefs” thoroughly examines arguments surrounding the existence of evil. Evans states: “Christians have generally agreed that evil is not a substance or a thing but instead is a privation of a good thing that God made.” Evans draws from both his pastoral experiences and scholastic training to offer theological and philosophical answers to questions about evil. He covers topics such as hell, divine hiddenness, moral evil (comparing theism and naturalism) and the defeat of evil. Evans gives readers objective and substantive responses to apply to the subject.

Those Who Must Give an Account: A Study of Church Membership and Church Discipline Edited by John S. Hammett & Benjamin L. Merkle

“The title of this book is taken from Hebrews 13:17, where church leaders are characterized as those ‘who must give an account.’” John S. Hammett and Benjamin L. Merkle explore the topics of responsibility and discipline of church leaders and members. “Those Who Must Give Account: A Study of Church Membership and Church Discipline” features contributions from pastors-theologians, biblical scholars and church historians. Church membership and discipline are the two foundational topics of their work. Hammett and Merkle offer a fresh perspective on practicing accountability within the church body.

for $4 a month.

sebts.edu/alumni sebts.edu

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Topics

by Daniel Akin

In Revelation 5:9 the Bible teaches that Jesus Christ,

becoming. It gives us a kingdom agenda on earth for

by his blood, “ransomed people for God from every

our churches that says, “There is neither Jew nor Greek,

tribe and language and people and nation.” This is the

there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and fe-

breadth and scope of the redeeming work of the Lamb

male, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Gal. 3:28).

who is enthroned in heaven. Then, in Revelation 7:9-10

Racial distinctions, ethnic distinctions and socio-eco-

we read that John saw, “a great multitude that no one

nomic distinctions are abolished because we are fam-

could number, from every nation, from all tribes and

ily. We call out to the same Father, look to the same

peoples and languages, standing before the throne and

Savior and share the indwelling of the same Spirit.

before the Lamb, with palm branches in their hands,

Therefore, we strive mightily out of gospel gratitude

and crying out with a loud voice, ‘Salvation belongs to

and gospel unity to plant, build and grow churches on

our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!’” Here

earth that reflect the beautiful diversity of all peoples

are two complementary visions of redeemed worship-

which we see in heaven.

ers. Here are two marvelous visions of the church in heaven.

I used to say wrongly, but with good intent, that our God is a color blind God. What I meant was he was a

When we examine these two passages of scripture a

God who, as Samuel says, “sees not as man sees, man

couple of things immediately jump out. First, Jesus

looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks

Christ, the Lamb of God, is greatly adored, loved and

on the heart” (1 Sam. 16:7). However, I now realize that

exalted by the church in heaven. Second, those who

our God is not color blind at all. He sees the beautiful

worship the Lamb have come together from every ethne,

rainbow of diverse colors that make up the human race

from every people group on the planet. They have come

and he loves what he sees. He rejoices in what He sees.

together as the ransomed of God (Rev. 5:9), the Bride

He is redeeming a people for Himself out of what he

of Christ (Rev. 19:7; 9) and the wife of the Lamb (Rev.

sees.

21:9). This is the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ that will exist for all eternity. Such a vision in heaven has tremendous relevance for

If this is how God sees his world of people, this is how I should see them too. A church on earth that looks like the church in heaven! A seminary on earth that looks

the church that exists on earth today. It informs us who

like the body of saints in heaven! That is a vision worth

we are to be and what we should be in the process of

having. That is a vision worth pursuing.

@dannyakin

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on the web

/sebts /sebts

/southeastern

/southeasternseminary

southeasterntheologicalreview.com betweenthetimes.com danielakin.com sebts.edu/multimedia sebts.edu/missions sebts.edu/blog sebts.edu collegeatsoutheastern.com

sebts.edu

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Topics

by Walter Strickland

At first glance, a course on Black Theology at Southeastern Seminary is like spotting Lil Wayne at a Taylor Swift concert … it just doesn’t seem to fit. In my estima-

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cific reasons for how this course will benefit the average Southeasterner. The African American community has nurtured a

tion, the racial and cultural incongruence of the average

long-standing Christian commitment, particularly

Southeasterner and a ‘dyed in the wool’ black theologian

since the Second Great Awakening. The revivalistic

is exactly what makes this course so dynamic!

Christian faith that slaves and freedmen received car-

In recent years there seems to be a rediscovery of

ried a marginalized people through chattel slavery, Re-

value in having Christian community with believers in

construction, Jim Crow Segregation and into the era

various stages of life. As each person brings their unique

that is commonly known as the Civil Rights Movement.

perspective and experience into the community, there

During the Civil Rights Movement the Christian beliefs

are fewer blind-spots, new opportunities to apply Scrip-

that had long undergirded this community were lever-

ture and new awareness of needs in society. Doing the-

aged to speak prophetically into the political, social and

ology is no different; the introduction of a new ‘voice’

economic injustices blotted across the African Ameri-

into a theological dialogue will unearth biases, illumi-

can landscape of the 1960s. This matrix of events sets

nate blind-spots, and sharpen the thinking of all who

the general stage for the emergence of Black Theology.

earnestly take part in the dialogue. This is why a course

After having faithfully followed Martin Luther King

on Black Theology is valuable to Southeastern’s campus.

Jr. for nearly a decade, the Movement’s “foot soldiers”

As a teaser for the course, I’ll offer a brief sketch of

began to grow weary of the frequent sit-ins, marches

the historical developments that led to the advent of

and imprisonments that were part and parcel with

Black Theology, and in this article I’ll offer more spe-

King’s nonviolent methods. By contrast, the more ag-

sebts.edu


Topics

gressive tactics of Malcolm X began to catch the atten-

academic discipline and in short order other black theo-

tion of the masses, including some Christians. The 1968

logians proposed alternative ways of relating the Chris-

assassination of MLK served as a tipping point that trig-

tian Scriptures to the black experience (i.e. cultural

gered a methodological shift in the minds of many. In

context). In the course, we will spend the majority of our

the words of Dwight Hopkins, “With [the bullet that

time exploring three major black theologians and their

killed Dr. King], the movement for peace, non-violence

approaches to the relationship between the Scripture

and racial fellowship ground to a halt. Within a week of

and the black context. Beyond James Cone, we will dive

King’s murder, one hundred and thirty cities went up in

deeply into the work of J. Deotis Roberts who empha-

flames… forty-six civilians died, over three thousand

sizes the necessity of liberation in order to have recon-

were injured and twenty-seven thousand were arrested.”

ciliation in the church as a testimony of the Gospel. We

In 1969 James Cone published his first monograph

will also examine William R. Jones who insisted that

with the express purpose of demonstrating that the

the primary concern of Black Theology should be theo-

politics of Black Power was the gospel of Jesus Christ.

dicy (the problem of evil). For Jones, until that paradox

In emotive terms, Cone’s book Black Theology and Black

is satisfied there is no reason to initiate constructive

Power articulated a means for blacks to hold fast to

theology in the black context.

black church traditions and teachings (the longstanding

This simplistic historical sketch offers a window into

backbone of the black community), while providing li-

some of the cultural dynamics and theological issues

cense to embrace the Black Power movement that sought

that we will tackle together in the two-week course. I

liberation “by any means necessary.”

look forward to seeing you in class (THE 7950) from

Cone’s 1969 volume solidified Black Theology as an

January 6th-17th from 8 am to noon each day.

@w_strickland

sebts.edu

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Topics

by Bruce Ashford

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS)

each classroom experience, as well as the overall cur-

operates with the clear mission to “glorify the Lord Je-

riculum, would foster a desire to see the ethne worship

sus Christ by equipping students to serve the church and

together and think together about the things of God.

fulfill the Great Commission.” In keeping with this

Our faculty members are now discussing what it means

stated purpose, SEBTS has historically engaged in an

to teach for a diverse student body, taking into account

ongoing, institution-wide effort to foster a missional

some of the questions and concerns that arise within

disposition among its students so that they will minister

various non-white communities.

to people from every national, racial, ethnic and cultural background.

We are further investing financial and personnel resources into the continued development of co-curricular

The primary justification we have for making this a

programs which exist to foster intercultural and cross-

strategic goal is the biblical injunction to make disciples

cultural engagement. The Center for Great Commission

of all the “ethne” (Matthew 28:18-20) and the biblical

Studies represents one such program; the Center for

eschatological vision of all “tribes, tongues, peoples and

Faith and Culture represents another.

nations” one day worshiping the Lord together (Revela-

Our prayer is that SEBTS will be a microcosm of the

tion 5). Our conviction is that racial unity-in-diversity

kingdom diversity which we will experience one day on

is not just a social or political issue; more essentially it

the new heavens and earth, when Christ will be seen in

is a theological issue. God’s desire is to win for himself

his full splendor as King of the Nations. On that day, it

worshipers from among the ethne and further to draw

will be made clear that our Lord is not a tribal deity of

the ethne together in gospel unity.

some sort, but in fact the supreme Lord of the entire

As an institution, SEBTS strives to keep this biblical

universe, and the Savior of hot-hearted worshipers from

injunction and its attendant eschatological vision at the

among every tribe, tongue, people, and nation. May

center of our efforts to be a Great Commission Seminary.

SEBTS increasingly provide the world with a glimpse of

Thus, as a reflection of our mission, it is expected that

that future day.

@bruceashford

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Topics

by John Ewart

The Global Theological Initiative (GTI) seeks to de-

the director of Hispanic Leadership Development in

ploy the resources of Southeastern Baptist Theological

July, we are now ready to take major steps forward.

Seminary (SEBTS) to develop theological education

Edgar is a key part of the GTI team and the culmina-

around the world. We are engaged in partnerships and

tion of years of preparation and planning. He is busy

projects on five continents including North America.

networking and planning with leaders on the local

By its very nature and focus, intentional ethnic diver-

church, state, national and international levels.

sity is a primary characteristic and wonderful product

A new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in

of this initiative. Students participating in various GTI

hermeneutics will be coming in 2014 taught complete-

endeavors make up the most diverse arm of SEBTS.

ly in Spanish by Mr. Aponte. This will be a free course

Through this initiative we are offered a small glimpse

available to anyone who speaks and reads Spanish and

of what the gathering of those from every nation will

is seeking to develop their biblical interpretation skills.

look like in Revelation 5.

We pray it will be a very useful resource for Hispanic

In Latin America, for example, we are training fac-

church leaders and teachers around the world. We look

ulty and missionaries as well as developing curricu-

forward to meeting new students through this course

lum in coordination with national leaders to reach the

as well.

unreached and develop the church and academy. In

Aponte and the Distance Learning Office will soon

fact, we are in a consultation relationship with one of

be developing an online Hispanic church leadership

the world’s largest sending agencies outside of the

certificate in coordination with several of our His-

United States to work together toward a global mission.

panic partners in the United States and other nations.

Specifically, our work with the Hispanic community

We are also working toward an online certificate in

includes current partnership and equipping processes

Hispanic church planting with one of these partners.

as described above, as well as new initiatives soon to

Discussions concerning degree programs in Spanish

come to fruition. With the arrival of Edgar Aponte as

will soon follow.

Continued on next page

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In addition, our EQUIP network office is engaged

gospel and discipling believers.

in the development of local church intern and leader-

Our strong desire is to continue to develop our re-

ship training processes in key Hispanic churches.

lationships and network within the Hispanic com-

Our Center for Great Commission Studies is working

munity. It is imperative that we take the mandate

to send Spanish-speaking students into strategic lo-

seriously to reach people from every tribe and tongue.

cations. These include Spanish-speaking nations and

With the growing Hispanic population across N.C.

Spanish-speaking populations found in other nations

and the U.S., our strategic international partners and

in addition to urban centers across North America.

Hispanic leadership development processes are ab-

Their language abilities will be critical in sharing the

solutely critical.

G R E AT C O M M I S S I O N EQUIPPING NE T WORK Southeastern Seminary believes that theological education is best done in partnership with the local church. Therefore, we began Equip: Great Commission Equipping Network as a way to partner with local churches and para-church organizations to provide practical theological training through internships.

sebts.edu/equip 919.761.2460 equip@sebts.edu

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Topics

Danny Akin | Thabiti Anyabwile | Alistair Begg | Mark Dever | Ligon Duncan | Jonathan Leeman

Membership

September 26-27, 2014 sebts.edu/9marks

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Spotlights

Get the stories at sebts.edu/multimedia or scan below

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Scott Hildreth, Director

For many years, Southeastern Seminary has pos-

sionaries and church planters in the world. These men

sessed a world-class missionary training program for

and women are a wealth of knowledge and have a desire

master’s level students: the M.Div. in International

to pass this off to younger missionaries. Along with

Church Planting, also known as the 2+ program. This

these personal contacts, The Missionary Formation So-

fall, the College at Southeastern, in partnership with the

ciety also mobilizes its members for “hands-on” mis-

Center for Great Commission Studies at SEBTS, kicked

sionary experiences; students will share the gospel with

off a new missionary development program designed

internationals in the area, minister to the underprivi-

specifically for college students with a desire to explore

leged and also assist local churches in outreach oppor-

God’s missionary call. According to Dr. Jamie Dew, dean

tunities.

of the College at Southeastern, “The College at South-

The core component of The Missionary Formation

eastern now offers a Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies.

Society is a monthly meeting named after a famous

This degree program was designed with mission stu-

prayer meeting which is said to have birthed a modern

dents in mind and seeks to provide basic training in

missionary movement, The Haystack Meeting. At South-

cross-cultural studies, missiology and world religions. It

eastern, these meetings mirror the original Haystack

also provides exciting opportunities for students to com-

meeting which was held at Williams College in New Eng-

plete nine hours of course work while on the mission

land in the early 1800s. As a result of this original gath-

field.” The B.A. in Global Studies seeks to deliver supe-

ering, a group of young men resolved that they would

rior classroom knowledge while at the same time, devel-

take the gospel to the whole world. According to Will

oping and refining a passion for the Great Commission.

Taylor, the assistant program coordinator of Global

In cooperation with this newly developed degree, the

Studies, “We hope that the society will be a comfortable

Center for Great Commission Studies is sponsoring The

means to foster and emphasize camaraderie, friendship

Missionary Formation Society. This is a student club

and genuine love for one another that is itself a testi-

seeking to provide college students with the spiritual

mony of devotion to Christ.” Students meet together and

and practical resources needed for successful mission-

pray regularly for the nations and for one another. They

ary service. This society is designed to link college students with people and practical experiences in order to strengthen class-

also encourage one another to be bold witnesses to the lost and to pursue holy living. The combination of the B.A. in Global Stud-

room learning and develop missionary

ies with the Missionary Formation

skills. Southeastern’s reputation as a

Society offers a unique opportunity

Great Commission seminary grants

for college students to develop their

us the privilege of hosting some of

heads, their hands and their hearts

the most energetic and creative mis-

for successful missionary service.

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Jonathan Six, Director Diversity is no small task. As Southeastern embarks

it is important for the Church to also be more diverse,

on her journey to bring Kingdom diversity to this insti-

so that our pool of incoming students too shall be di-

tution, she without a doubt will need the support of her

verse.

alumni. Southeastern, for almost a decade, has been known as a “Great Commission” seminary. Often this

there are new costs that arise, often these cost are un-

moniker is associated with overseas missions, and

budgeted, but desperately needed. This year alone

rightly so. However, being a Great Commission semi-

Southeastern has added two new strategic positions to

nary is a much larger endeavor than only going on over-

help with our diversity efforts. The first is a Special Ad-

seas mission trips. This notion of a Great Commission

visor to the President on Diversity and the second is a

seminary entails God’s mission to redeem a people to

Director of Hispanic Leadership Development. These

himself. This comes fully alive in the Apostle John’s

two offices have great need to accomplish their task in

account of the throne room scene in Revelation 5. Here

cultivating diversity at Southeastern. Additionally, we

we find that there is a “ransomed people for God from

hope to develop more financial aid support to encour-

every tribe and language and people and nation” (Rev.

age a diverse student body. For more information on

5:9). This is no small vision. This verse encapsulates for

how you can contribute please contact our Alumni De-

us the diversity of the Kingdom of God and hence pro-

velopment or Financial Development offices.*

vides the biblical and theological warrant for “Christian

Finally, participate! Diversity in many cases begins

diversity.” It is this kind of diversity that Southeastern

with a dialogue. This dialogue is currently taking

hopes to achieve. How can Southeastern’s alumni participate in this

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Third, support financially! Like any new initiative

place on Southeastern’s campus. In August, we held a Kingdom Diversity panel and pastors’ event. These

kind of journey? I believe there are at least four ways

events were the first steps to having substantive con-

that you can help. First, pray! This is no small task.

versations about diversity and hopefully were cata-

Without a doubt we want to see God honoring, kingdom

lytic to increasing Kingdom Diversity across our de-

diversity that the Scripture calls us to. Pray that we will

nomination. I want to encourage you to participate in

be wise and courageous with our approach to diversity.

these dialogues. We need to hear your voice. To learn

Also, pray that we will be aware of our biases and seek

how you can be more involved and to keep up with the

to put to death any bias that will prevent us from honor-

various Kingdom Diversity events happening at

ing the Lord.

Southeastern visit sebts.edu/kingdom_diversity.

Second, get involved! In many ways our diversity ini-

Please know that Southeastern is here to serve and

tiative rests upon the diversity initiatives of the local

help you. In the days ahead, we are earnestly praying

church. All of our students, in one way or another, come

God’s blessing upon you. I pray that you are encouraged,

from local churches. They are often churches pastored

excited and have a sense of pride about the new initia-

by you, our alumni. If we are going to become diverse

tives going on at your alma mater.

sebts.edu

Alumni Development: jsix@sebts.edu, 919-761-2349* Financial Development: dpalmer@sebts.edu, 919-761-2352


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Jamie Dew, Dean of the College The College at Southeastern: A Changing College for the Sake of the Nations Southeastern has always had a great college. But recent changes and additions have positioned the college

nature of this program, we changed the name of this program from “Missions” to “Global Studies”.

to do much more than ever before. As always, we continue to be an institution focused on the church, Great

What Has Been Added?

Commission and training people to take the gospel to

Finally, we’ve recently added four new undergradu-

the nations. Yet, we have given fresh attention to our

ate degree programs that will help us place students in

curriculum and found ways to make it better.

churches, the mission field, or in some other vocation-

What Has Changed?

al setting for kingdom influence. Our new undergraduate Philosophy degree (BACS and Philosophy) is de-

The college continues to offer all the programs that

signed for those who want to do apologetics, theology,

make it distinctive. For example, we continue to read

or anything else that requires intellectual rigor. The

the Great Books of the Western tradition, study Chris-

new Biblical Studies degree (BACS and Biblical Stud-

tian theology, and offer a variety of exciting degree

ies) provides 18 hours of biblical languages and an ad-

programs like Theology, History, English, Pastoral

ditional 18 hours in biblical theology and book study.

Ministries and Humanities. Overall, this well-rounded

This degree is ideal for those that want to pastor or

curriculum enables students to articulate and defend

teach the Bible. Our new Worship Ministry degree

the Christian faith wherever God may place them.

(BACS and Worship Ministry) is for those that want

Within the past year, however, we have made some sig-

lead worship in the local church, but want something

nificant changes to our curriculum. For example, while

beyond basic training in music. This program’s pri-

we have kept the History of Ideas program, we have

mary focus is on theology, the Bible and ministry prep-

rebuilt it to give it greater clarity and focus. We have

aration. Lastly, our new History/Pre-Law degree (BACS

also given a major overhaul to our undergraduate mis-

and History/Pre-Law) is for those that want to serve

sions curriculum. We began by creating all new cours-

Christ in the public square or possibly in the legal pro-

es for this program to draw from intercultural & cross-

fession.

cultural studies, theology, apologetics, language and

In short, the College at Southeastern continues to be

missiology. Next, like our graduate programs, we built

the wonderful place it has always been. But recent

into this program a significant portion of the degree

changes have given it a greater ability to train students

that must be earned on the field. In most cases, this

for gospel ministry and send them to strategic places.

part of the program is fulfilled by students serving

These changes and additions open new doors for our

overseas for 6 months in places like Taiwan, Germany,

students and make the College at Southeastern an ex-

or the Sudan. Finally, to better reflect the well-rounded

citing place to prepare for a life of ministry.

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Spotlights

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Spotlight On: Distance Learning/EQUIP >

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Jerry Lassetter, Director of Distance Learning

Steven Wade, Director of Great Commission Equipping Network

Healthy preparation for Great Commission ministry occurs when training includes practical experi-

oped a few new courses including individual classes

ences on the church field. Over the past year, we have

on Old Testament interpretation, New Testament in-

worked in consultation with key leaders from the

terpretation and Christian theology. Additionally, a

Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) missions sending

spiritual formation class includes the missions send-

agencies to develop and propose a 36-hour degree, a

ing agencies’ process as a component of the course.

Master of Arts in Church Planting (MACP). The MACP

Qualified students may be able to earn practicum

can be earned in its entirety through distance educa-

and field ministry requirements for the MACP degree

tion. This means that a student is able to combine the

through Southeastern EQUIP network churches.

robust online education that Southeastern Baptist

EQUIP churches provide practical experiences and

Theological Seminary (SEBTS) offers while serving

academic rigor by fulfilling syllabi requirements cre-

in an existing church, church plant or international

ated by Southeastern while meeting our accreditor’s

context.

standards.

The MACP degree is intended for, and thus limited

If you are interested in learning more about church-

to, students who are in a sending relationship with the

es in the EQUIP network, training church planters or

International Mission Board (IMB) or North Ameri-

additional information on how your church can be-

can Mission Board (NAMB). The purpose of this de-

come an equipping church, please contact the EQUIP

gree is to give the church planter deeper training in

office at (919) 761-2460 or equip@sebts.edu.

the key areas of Bible, hermeneutics, theology and

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To facilitate this training, the SEBTS faculty devel-

To apply for the new MACP degree plan, please con-

history. Also, practical training is offered in missions,

tact the SEBTS Admissions office at 919-761-2280 or

evangelism, pastoral ministry and church planting.

admissions@sebts.edu.

sebts.edu


Spotlights

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Daniel Palmer, Director Fitting, Strategic and Enduring: Dr. Ed Young Sr. Chair of Preaching Installed As a special part of the fall Board of Trustees and Board of Visitors meetings, Southeastern shared in a joyful celebration of the establishment of the Dr. Ed Young Sr. Chair of Preaching with a chair installation service and luncheon on October 15. Young serves as the senior pastor of Second Baptist Church, Houston, Texas, the largest church in the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC). His church continues to grow and currently has over 63,000 members. Young is a former President of the SBC and a Southeastern alumnus. Young studied at Southeastern when few professors held a high view of Scripture, but he held fast to a robust, Christ-exalting theology. “Many of you would not be here today or you would not want to be here if it were not for Ed Young Sr.,” Akin said. As Young preached from Nehemiah, he focused on five essential characteristics of a great leader: having a vision, giving away the vision, discernment, tenacity and integrity. “God has entrusted you and me with a calling to bring this world Jesus Christ,” Young said. “The answer for every problem on this earth… is one simple thing, it’s the bending of the knee for Jesus Christ.” After Young’s sermon, Akin presented the President’s Award, the highest honor awarded by Southeastern, to Second Baptist Church. As a part of the ceremony, Akin was installed as the new chair, a selection made by Southeastern’s Board of Trustees. Akin expressed appreciation for the honor of serving not only as president but as a professor of expository preaching with the privilege of investing in the lives of future generations of God-called pastors. An Ed Young Chair Installation luncheon was held after the service with his family and church leadership as well as SEBTS faculty, the Board of Trustees and the Board of Visitors. The event featured an in-

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terview of Young with Akin. When asked about preaching, Young shared about his personal style. “I spend a lot of time by myself,” Young said. “If you are going to be a preacher in this world, you better spend a lot of time by yourself with God and with your books. … I spend more time preparing me than the sermon.” “I think preaching should have an element of surprise and warmth,” he said. “It is a wonderful adventure. I don’t have it mastered, but we spend a lot of blood, sweat and tears in preparation.” When asked about the significance of The Ed Young Chair of Preaching, Daniel Palmer, director of Financial Development said, “I would summarize this momentous occasion and this exemplary gift in three words—fitting, strategic and enduring.” Palmer continued, “It is only fitting that the people of Second Houston would commend their pastor with a chair that bears his name and recognizes his faithfulness in the pulpit. An endowed chair is among the most strategic gifts possible because it provides an enduring source of funding for professors—the backbone of a world-class program of Great Commission preparation that is impacting thousands of students who are, in turn, impacting millions for Christ.” Southeastern is training more than 3,000 students to serve the church and fulfill the Great Commission. From now until Christ returns, students training to preach the gospel will learn from a professor sitting in either in the Johnny Hunt Chair of Biblical Preaching or the Ed Young Chair of Preaching. To learn more about endowing a chair or professorship at Southeastern, supporting the Dr. Ed Young Sr. Chair of Preaching, or joining the Board of Visitors, please contact Daniel Palmer, director of Financial Development at dpalmer@sebts.edu, (866) 917-3287 or sebts.edu/give.


Spotlights

Dr. Daniel Akin presents the President’s Award to Dr. Ed Young Sr., and his wife, Jo Beth on behalf of Second Baptist Church.

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meet

MARA

english major from ToPSHAM, Maine collegeatsoutheastern.com

Get the stories at sebts.edu/multimedia or scan below

42

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loves biking in her free time


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The Great Commission Magazine of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary: Fall 2013