Issuu on Google+

JULY 18–24 , 2 013 | F R EE | VOL . 3 3 NO. 3 | PI T CH.COM

J U LY 1 8 –2 4 , 2 0 1 3 | V O L . 3 3 N O . 3 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

P R O D U C T I O N

W O R K ER S UNI TE Utilitarian Workshop — makers,

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Page Olson, Brooke Swenson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

builders, believers. BY THERESA BEMBNISTER

6

LO O S E TH AI

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

” A BOLD, BEAUTIFUL MOVIE. -MOVIES.COM

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

N A T I O N A L

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 19! “

©Copyright 2012: Space Rocket Nation, Gaumont & Wild Bunch

KANSAS CITY Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet (816) 474-4545

IF ‘A HIJACKING’ WERE AN AMERICAN MOVIE,

IT WOULD BE WIDELY PROCLAIMED AS ONE OF THE BEST FILMS OF THE YEAR.” – Andrew O’Hehir, SALON

HHHHH “HHHH.” HHHH SOMETHING TRULY SPECIAL

– NY POST

” .

KANSAS CITY PITCH WEEKLY – Joshua Rothkopf, Time OuT New YORk

THU 07/18 2 COL. (4.77") X 3" ALL.OGF.0718.KCP

– NY DAiLY NewS

.”

but needs to tighten up.

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin NORDIC DISTRIBUTION IN COLLABORATION WITH SCANBOX ENTERTAINMENT A/S AN OFFICIAL DANISH-FRENCH CO-PRODUCTION IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 1992 EUROPEAN CONVENTION ON CINEMATOGRAPHIC CO-PRODUCTION

Pad-Thai gets points for effort

D I S T R I B U T I O N

17

STO K I NG TH E FI R E Art Closet Studios draws an all-ages scene to the back of a pizza shop.

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE C OVE R

JL/RR

BY CHARLES FERRUZZ A

BY DAV I D H U D N A L L

22

3 5 6 11 14 15 17 18 22 28 30 34

AUDIENCE AWARD NEW AUTEURS

AFI FILM–FESTIVAL

OFFICIAL SELECTION – VENICE

A FILM BY TOBIAS LINDHOLM

OFFICIAL SELECTION – TORONTO

WINNER

MEANW H I LE AT PI TCH .CO M

BEST PICTURE & AUDIENCE AWARD

– IFF THESSALONIKI

magpictures.com/ahijacking

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 19 2

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

Kansas City Tivoli Westport Manor Square(913) 383-7756

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC THE PITCH MUSIC SHOWCASE BALLOT NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS MULLINS

pitch.com

PASSION PIT and JOY FORMIDABLE are headed to the Midland. MGMT is coming to Crossroads KC at Grinders. BASSNECTAR returns to the Midland this fall.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2

QUESTIONNAIRE

COME BE OUR GUEST

BRYAN HOBBY

Quizmaster for Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz

HAS A BEAUTIFUL NEW SPACE SALON • PHOTO STUDIO • BOUTIQUE - SEEKING QUALIFIED STYLISTS -

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

7105 W 105TH ST OVERLAND PARK, KS 66212 913.766.7465

Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri Current neighborhood: Rosedale What I do (in 140 characters): I host Pub Quiz,

“Kansas City needs …” A downtown/midtown

comedy venue.

“I always laugh at …” Juggalos.

which requires me to read into a microphone and make people think about stuff. I’m like an alcoholic version of an NPR host.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” I don’t watch enough TV to binge-watch anything.

What’s your addiction? Cof-

25 years, you would think it would get old. Turns out, nope.

MORE

O

Q&As

E NLIN

PITCH.CO

AT

M

fee. I want all the coffee!

W ha t ’s your g a m e?

Any of the general nerd games: Civ5, Settlers of Cattan, D&D and such.

What’s your drink? I love a good malty brown

“I can’t stop listening to …” The Pixies. After

“I just read …” Something funny/interesting on Reddit.

The best advice I ever got: Lefty loosey, righty tighty.

ale. Barring that, a stiff vodka tonic.

My sidekick? I’m a loner, Dottie. A rebel.

Where’s dinner? Burgers at the Green Room.

My dating triumph/tragedy? Any date I get should be considered a triumph. #triumph

What’s on your KC postcard? Streetfighter

My brush with fame: Hanging with (read: mesmerized by) Paul F. Tompkins after KC Improv Festival last year. He and Superego are returning this year. I can’t wait!

That’s what’s up.

doing push-ups outside Buzzard Beach.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It established the Power & Light. I

don’t think I have seen an Affliction T-shirt in Westport since.

My recent triumph: Being named Quizmaster

“Kansas City screwed up when …” We let

Take the Arrested Development quiz at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 20, at Charlie Hooper’s (12 West 63rd Street).

Katie Horner slip away. Now I have no idea when to panic about the weather.

of the Geek Bowl in Austin. It’s a major award.

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

3

s AND e n e i d La tlem Gen

Dirty deeds will be done.

Death in the Dustbowl The Mystery Train

Welcome

• PINNED UP

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

816-235-6222 www.kcmysterytrain.com

I am Addy!

A N N O U N C I N G

ADDY’S PICK

O F

TH E

WEEK

FABULOUS HANDBAGS! F IND TH E SE & MUCH MORE IN WOMEN’S

FA S H I O N AT R U B Y R O U G E !

7917 SANTA FE DRIVE

• DREAD LOCKS • EXTENSIONS

an AVEDA salon

1517 Westport Road, KCMO• 816.753.4447 Hours: TUE-FRI 10a-6p & SAT 11a-6p

Please call us to book a reservation. Walk-ins are welcomed. HIGH QUALITY SCREEN PRINTED

T-SHIRTS

O V E R L A N D PA R K , K S 6 6 2 0 4

YOUR LOGO HERE

nsas cit Ka ycle s y er rc o

v

e ic

mo t

RUBYROUGEKC.COM | 913.400.2096

24

PRINTED T-SHIRTS

START@

$120

unionpress 1219 Union West Bottoms

816.842.5683

www.unionscreenprinting.net

Cafe Racer

Exceptional Motorcycle & Scooter Service

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

1305 Union Ave. KCMO | 816-221-0711

Cover Me Badd k @ KC Live Bloc

Fallout B

oy

I can do this! I am strong,

I will not let him treat me this way.

I will Learn self-defense for real people:

913.248.3288

5725 Nieman Rd Shawnee, KS

shesapistol.com

4

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

ton y Hamil

Anthon

The Dirty Heads @ Indie

Upcoming Events

7.19 - Wonderfuzz @ KC Live Block 7.19 - Global Dance Festival @ Indie 7.20 - Floozies @ Crossroads KC 7.25 - Boz Skaggs @ Uptown

See more on the “promotions” link at p

NEWS

TIF BOUNTY

Bryan Cave makes lots of money working for the TIF Commission — but doesn’t make everyone happy.

T

he Bryan Cave law firm makes a tidy keep from its work representing the Tax Increment Financing Commission of Kansas City. From fiscal years 2010 to ’13, the fi rm’s lawyers (primarily partners Wesley Fields and Stephen Sparks) have billed $3.758 million to the agency that administers the oftenE MOR used TIF development incentive. Those billings range from a low AT E N I ONL .COM of $636,530 in 2010 to PITCH a high of $1.2 million in 2011. And those price tags have some TIF commissioners wondering if the agency should hire its own lawyer to reduce how much it spends on legal fees. The TIF Commission vets requests for new TIF projects and changes to existing ones. It sends a recommendation to the Kansas City, Missouri, City Council for approval. The commission is under the Economic Development Corporation of Kansas City, a quasi-governmental agency that receives its funding partially from City Hall but also from a portion of revenues from the TIF projects that it endorses. A TIF district is often used to spur development as it takes increases in property and economic activity (sales, utility and earnings) taxes that would otherwise go to local government and instead helps defray project costs. It’s revered by Kansas City’s politicians, bureaucrats and business interests as a means to replace the city’s deteriorating land plots with gleaming new office buildings and shopping districts. The concept plays less well among neighborhoods and other political subdivisions like library and school districts, all of which want to see tax money spent for basic services as well as for their own coffers, only

NEWS

Ground zero for a long-running TIF dispute to see that money siphoned off by development projects in parts of town where their need is dubious. But the TIF Commission’s spending isn’t the only rub that commissioners from noncity taxing jurisdictions like Jackson County and the Kansas City Public Library have with their legal representation. In recent months, they’ve raised questions about their lawyers’ actions and positions on a strange TIF plan known as the Southtown TIF. Southtown is a sprawling TIF plan that stretches from just south of Union Station up along Main Street, stops before the Plaza, then leapfrogs several other TIF plans before resuming along 63rd Street. Southtown is such a big TIF that it’s actually a collection of various projects within the same plan. One of these was the Citadel Plaza, once

BY

S T E V E V OC K R OD T

The way bonds work is, they’re sold to investors so a project can have money up front to start construction, then those investors are paid back (plus interest) over time with TIF revenues. Bond issuances make sense for big projects — such as when the city issued $295 million in bonds for Kansas City Power & Light District — but not for relatively small projects like sprucing up Penn Valley Park. For one reason, there’s a big cost associated with issuing bonds. In the case of the TIF district around the Federal Reserve, the cost to issue the $11 million in bonds was about $4.3 million of tax money. Bryan Cave’s lawyers, in addition to representing the TIF Commission on the transaction, also served as counsel to the bond underwriter, which seemed to put them on both sides of the transaction. In addition, Wesley Fields, the Bryan Cave lawyer representing the TIF Commission, is a trustee for Research Medical Hosconsidered a site for a grocery store–anchored pital, which is owned by HCA, the developer development at 63rd and Prospect that deof the Southtown TIF. Fields has said that his volved into an asbestos-laden strip of barren work as a Research trustee doesn’t involve land, thanks to incompelegal advice, so there isn’t tent developers. a confl ict of interest. Bond issuances make Another is known as TIF Commissioners repProject I, which is where resenting the taxing jurissense for big projects but the Federal Reserve Bank dictions have made it clear not for relatively small of Kansas City moved from in commission meetings downtown to near Liberty for almost a year that they projects like sprucing up Memorial. The Fed didn’t had misgivings about how Penn Valley Park. want TIF to grease the skids bonds for Project I were for its new building, but a issued and managed. On district was approved anyJuly 10, they scored someway. The TIF Commission issued $11 million thing of a victory, when the majority of in bonds in 2007 to fi nance $9.6 million in the commission agreed to start defeasing construction for those projects. TIF revenues (fi nance-speak for early termination) that from Project I didn’t go toward paying for the $11 million in bonds, which would return construction of the new building, but rather the money to bondholders. improvements and upgrades to infrastructure along Main Street and Penn Valley Park. E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

THURSDAYS 7pm pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

5

B Y T HER E S A BEMBNI S T E R | P HO T OGR A P H Y B Y CHR I S MUL L IN S

6

the pitch

j u ly 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

From left: John Anderson, Nicole Williams, Destiny Shelton and Angiela Meyer sit among handcrafts in their storefront.

Utilitarian Workshop: makers, builders, believers.

A

fter nearly a year of preparations, John Anderson and Nicole Williams are about to tear down the paper covering the storefront windows at 1659 Summit and unlock the doors at Utilitarian Workshop, the space the couple hopes will be ground zero for Kansas City’s local retail revolution. Utilitarian Workshop isn’t a physical workshop. What it builds are ideas. Anderson and Williams’ design firm specializes in bringing entrepreneurs’ notions to life by planning, building and decorating interior spaces, designing logos, and producing printed materials. “We have the capability to take a business or a brand from conception to brick and mortar,” Anderson explains. He and Williams did exactly that for Port Fonda. But Utilitarian Workshop is also a physical space, one that shares its name with that of Anderson’s furniture line. So, in addition to being an office for the design end of the business, the Summit address is a showroom for Anderson’s furniture. And it’s a store for other makers’ handcrafted goods, sold on consignment. The shop operates on a pop-up model, with new goods cycling through every three months. The opening weekend features jewelry, leather goods, ceramics, handprinted postcards and paper goods, antiques and furniture from 13 vendors, as well as pour-over coffee from Thou Mayest Coffee Roasters. The next run of new products debuts in October. “For us, design and art are very philosophical things,” says Anderson, who uses the word holistic to sum up the multifaceted business. “Utilitarian Workshop is about addressing all aspects of what a client needs — not just buying a table. We can help you brand. We can present an overall vision for you. Or you can just walk in off the street and buy something.” “We don’t want to use the word lifestyle,” Williams adds. “But that’s the best we can come up with right now. We’re home goods, design goods. It’s tricky.” They may not find a better word than lifestyle to describe what’s going on here. Williams and Anderson are unabashedly creative people, and they’ve fused their identities with their livelihood, both as individuals and as a couple. Talk with Williams, Anderson or any of the vendors under their roof, and it’s easy to believe that the West Side space might be a catalyst for something much larger. Utilitarian Workshop represents an opportunity for its sellers and customers to make quiet, positive changes rooted in the intangibles built here — among them, relationships.

A

nderson didn’t set out to build furniture. He studied painting at the University of Kansas, but left Lawrence for New York and

found work there as an art handler. Making crates as part of that job was his introduction to woodworking, which appealed to his bluecollar streak in a way that painting didn’t. “It turned into functional painting for me,” he says. “Wood is just my medium, instead of canvas.” Af ter returning to the Kansas City area, Anderson, 37, started his own line of furniture, primarily tables, working in various garage and West Bottoms shops while also taking design and fabrication jobs. He hung out his own design shingle — Utilitarian Workshop — in 2006. Williams, 30, wasn’t at KU at the same time Anderson was, but she studied visual communications and art history there. In addition to her partnership role in Utilitarian Workshop, she puts in overtime-filled weeks for a local advertising agency. Mutual friends introduced Anderson and Williams during an elevator ride on a First Friday art crawl. “It was easy. It was just, like, ‘Yep, that works.’ ” Williams says of the romantic relationship that eventually led to another kind of partnership. “Two and a half years later, we are running a business.” Over the past year, the couple has adopted a new puppy, purchased a fixer-upper in Fairway, and signed a lease on Utilitarian Workshop’s brick-and-mortar location. “There are so many people who are like, ‘How are you guys still able to function and not rip each other’s heads off?’ ” Williams says. “Even my mom is like, ‘I’m just amazed that you guys don’t argue.’ And we don’t.” The two-for-the-road spirit of their relationship informs their approach to customers as well. “Our design process is very much like get to know our client, spending time with our client,” Williams says. “When John was doing Port Fonda, he was having beers weekly with Patrick [Ryan, the restaurant’s chef and owner] and getting to know his personality and his energy.” Anderson echoes: “It’s important for us to really love our client. And we want our client to love us. When you are talking about a full identity and branding a build-out from A to Z, that person has to trust us with their life because we are helping them realize their dream.” “I wanted a much more urban and hip feel to go with the pace and energy of the restaurant,” Ryan says of his decision to hire Utilitarian Workshop. “We’ve gotten a healthy amount of press and publicity, both locally and nationally. I’d like to think that part of the accolades are from what our place looks like.” What Port Fonda looks like reflects what Anderson calls the “modern industrial” aesthetic of Utilitarian Workshop: clean and sleek lines, heav ily continued on page 8

pitch.com

j u ly 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

7

Workers Unite continued from page 7 textured rustic elements, reclaimed materials from local sources. For Ryan, that translated to reclaimed barn wood for the restaurant’s wall paneling; fabricating the bar, tabletops and shelves; sourcing chairs and stools; and designing the Port Fonda logo, sign, website and promotional materials. “It’s not like we reinvented the wheel,” Anderson says of what amounted to a global design for Ryan’s place. “This is just an oldschool approach to business.”

W

hen Anderson and Williams signed the Summit lease, in August 2012, the building, which had most recently served as a business, handling day-to-day operations storage unit, required a new façade, roof and and selecting merchandise. Like Ward-Bopp, interior walls. They also needed to update the Meyer was part of Anderson and Williams’ plumbing and electrical wiring. social circle before there was a business ready To get these things done, they used their for collaborators. own money and their own constant labor. And Another longtime friend, Kylie Grater —who they turned to their friends. moved to Oregon from Lawrence in 2011 — sells Some volunteered their time; 119 backers also pledged $15,533 to a Utilitarian Workshop items from her Early Jewelry line and helps with visual merchandising. Kickstarter fund, launched last November. Anderson found other Utilitarian Workshop Nick Ward-Bopp, a fellow craftsperson and a driving force behind the Jarboe Initiative vendors online. On Instagram, he spotted and KC Maker Village, met Anderson in 2011. the handmade leather goods turned out by Dominic Scalise and Austin They got to know each other Lyon’s KC CO., as well as during long talks over beers Utilitarian Workshop la ndscape draw ings by discussing their business 1659 Summit, printmaker Kelly Clark. Bo plans and goals. He describes utilitarianworkshop.com, Nelson and Bill Holzhueter, Williams and Anderson as opens Saturday, July 20. of Thou Mayest Cof fee “aesthetic geniuses.” Roasters, met Anderson “R ight away, when I through Nathan Eaton of Bureau Visual. Eaton saw their work, I wanted to help out and has put together videos for Thou Mayest, KC collaborate,” Ward-Bopp says. So he helped CO. and Utilitarian Workshop’s Web presences. them with the build-out in March, when local Watch a ll three of Bureau Visua l’s woodworkers and craftspeople gathered to marketing videos and you see some themes raise Utilitarian Workshop’s indoor walls. emerge, including a focus on hard work The next month, West Side neighborhood and a connection to the land. You see the residents Destiny Shelton and Angiela Meyer signed on to manage the retail end of the men — Anderson, Scalise, Lyon, Nelson and

Holzhueter — working with their hands in rooms fi lled with natural light. You also see them in timeworn urban industrial areas or pastoral Midwestern settings, doing things like fishing, driving pickup trucks and scouting materials. They wear plaid flannels, white undershirts, denim workshirts. In the Utilitarian Workshop and KC CO. videos, the closing shot pictures the men staring proudly into the camera. Eaton’s images merge distinctly different American types: the bohemian, the blue-collar, the rustic. What they have in common here is an idea of craftsmanship, harnessed to a vivid nostalgia. These young entrepreneurs are branding themselves with an aesthetic designed to recall the most prosperous eras of U.S. industry and agriculture. Still, if you ask Scalise, Nelson or Anderson about their businesses, they’ll tell you about a vision that’s trained on the future.

A

young couple just purchased a home and they want to furnish it. Where do they go?” Anderson asks. “They go to a bigbox store.”

Vendors are taking their wares to Summit. But just as restaurants are increasingly focused on locally produced ingredients, and organizations such as Cultivate Kansas City have helped educate local eaters about where their food comes from, Utilitarian Workshop wants to raise consumer-goods awareness. Where does your chair come from? “We’re putting people in the position to rethink how they shop for their Christmas gifts,” Anderson says. “We’re showing the importance of seeing something that comes out of their city or their neighborhood and supporting that.” The f lourishing of the West Bottoms antique district and the boom of online craft marketplaces such as Etsy suggest that plenty of people are eager for alternatives to corporate retail. That shift in buying habits has already helped fuel the success of KC CO. Scalise, who, along with partner Lyon, launched the website for the Kansas City–based leather goods company last November, quit his fulltime corporate job in January to focus on KC CO. full time.

Ever wanted to drive a demolition derby car? Now is your chance! Go to any of the 13 Johnson County Library locations to enter a drawing to drive a demolition derby car. Visit www.jocolibrary.org for more details.

www.jocolibrary.org 8

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

9 “People are getting tired of this throwaway society,” Scalise says. “It has become normal to buy something knowing it’s cheap and poor quality, but justifying the purchase because  it’s so cheap you can buy more when it breaks. People like the fact that we’re producing heirloom-quality products. They actually get better with age.” Utilitarian Workshop isn’t the first retail space in town dedicated to selling handmade goods. Stuff opened in Brookside in 1996. Westport’s Mash Handmade has been around since 2009. Bon Bon Atelier, which operated on Westport Road from 2006 until January of this year, sold goods made by local artisans. But it’s a distinctly more stick-it-to-the-Man endeavor than its predecessors. Whereas Stuff’s mission statement plays up words and phrases such as “personality,” “unique character” and “filled with creativity,” the “about” page on Utilitarian Workshop’s website reads: “We instigate communal thought and collaboration. We insist on progression through action. We resist complacent satisfaction.” “It’s not like we are having Marxist roundtable meetings in here,” Anderson says, “but it’s very anti-establishment. It’s very anti-corporation, but not in an aggressive, revolutionary fashion.” Purchasing power is political capital, and creative workers should “We’re providing a platform for interaction have agency over their own designs, in a space between the client and the craftsperson,” where they can present those designs to a more Anderson says. enlightened consumer. Many of the Utilitarian Workshop vendors “We want to support the artists more have set themselves apart through their focus than anything, and give them leverage,” on building relationships Williams says. with customers. When a customer “It’s not like we are having “We’re not a huge force spends money at Utilitarian Marxist roundtable meetings in in a high-rise, with a plant Workshop, from 60 to 70 here, but it’s very in some random country percent goes directly to the p u m p i n g o ut g o o d s ,” maker. And while the retail anti-establishment.” Scalise says. “We get to space is equipped to handle do personal touches, from that monetary exchange, it’s also intended to encourage other types of personal e-mails to hand-written notes sent with each purchase. Most [people] aren’t transactions, especially those between makers used to a business being run like that. These and customers.

The Workshop puts relationships on view, too. connections are one of my favorite parts of this company.” Plans are in the works for Utilitarian Workshop to host resident makers, who would work on their crafts in the retail space during business hours, allowing customers to see vendors in action. Nelson, who started Thou Mayest Coffee Roasters in a garage last year with partner Holzhueter (see Fat City, page 18), plans to use Utilitarian Workshop’s Summit location to let potential clients sample his product. But he sees it as more than just a spot to make presentations.

R E M M SU CONCERT

Utilitarian Workshop vendor meetings have already led to creative collaborations that probably wouldn’t have occurred otherwise. Scalise fashioned a leather sleeve to fit around the steaming-hot Mason jars in which Thou Mayest serves its pour-overs. And the roasting company is in talks with ceramist Lea Griggs to design a line of drinkware. Nelson, who grew up in a farming family, recognizes that Utilitarian Workshop provides an opportunity for disparate makers to band together and pool their resources. “It is difficult, as a startup, to get traction,” he says. “I carry around these guys with me like we are all part of a team. I’m always selling them to other people. “At the end of the day,” he adds, “we want to have a cool fort to hang out in. We want a space where ideas can collide with each other.” It’s also a refuge from the lonely difficulties of making a living as a one-craftsperson show. Grater, who began Early Jewelry in 2004 and has grown it through wholesaling and craft fairs, knows this from experience. “Most indie designers who make their own products handle all aspects of the business — designing, fabricating the product, sales, bookkeeping, client relations,” she says. “This is taxing. Having a community of other designers to talk to about highlights and hardships of the lifestyle of a fulltime designer or crafter or artist is very important. The Kansas City area — Lawrence included — has a high level of contemporary artist-crafter entrepreneurs.” With Utilitarian Workshop opening, the level seems about to rise again. Starting this weekend, KC craftspeople have a new place to gather, meet and befriend clients, and sell their goods. Call the enterprise a political statement or a lifestyle choice or a social network — or all three — but Grater might put it best. “Inspiration,” she says, “is local.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

2013 OLATHE

IES FREE SER

th ar! Now in Our 14 Ye

SPECIAL EVENTS

with The Band of Heathens

July 19

JOIN US FRIDAYS AT

FRONTIER PARK 15501 INDIAN CREEK PKWY, OLATHE, KS

www.OlatheKS.org/ParksRec

Mingo Fishtrap

OLATHE K A N S A S

Donations Will Be Accepted for Local Charities pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

9

S Z

ust G u A

nd

Y

2—

Y

Z

1

ght! i—

n

2—n5ds! v

B

& dj’S

6—cks!

Buy Tickets at any Showcase venue or call 816.561.6061 or online www.southcommevents.com/pitchmusic

through July 19 $ e t T Ck s 6 i Bu S-—--———————— Venues S thE Riot r0Om | C L RNO | re ordbaR | Outd or Stage | & more ——— ----——————————-—--------------

———

A IFO

10

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

S

c

8 July 20 - August 1 10 Day of

$ $

o

WEEK OF JULY 18–24 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

14 PAG E

FRIDAY

7.19

the r: from Keillo . Plains to the Prairie

STAGE How does Fringe hold up this year?

15

PAG E

FILM This boy’s life: The Way Way Back.

22 PAG E

MUSIC Pizza and punk rock in a closet.

T H U R S D AY | 7. 18 | ON THE EDGE

In its ninth year, the KC Fringe Festival is going against the grain and opening entries to film, visual art and photography alongside the usual performingarts acts: burlesque, E MOR spoken word, theater and music. It’s all art, right? See tonight when T A E IN ONL .COM the Opening Night Party PITCH gets under way at the Spencer Theatre (4949 Cherry) and 50 of the 134 acts do an abbreviated, three-minute presentation of their

EVENTS

I H E AR THAT OLD PIANO … This year’s A Prairie Home Companion at Sea 10-day vacation cruise with the whole cast, including Garrison Keillor, is already sold out. But before they set sail in August for the Mediterranean Sea, they’ll tour the States on their Radio Romance Tour works. This preview event is free; doors open at 5:30. The festival performances and art showings begin Friday and run through Sunday, July 28; a $5 button gets you access, and tickets for each show cost $5–$20. For a full schedule, look in this week’s issue for the Fringe Festival print supplement or see kcfringe.org.

F R I D AY | 7. 19 | VIVA MEXICO!

You’re aware that unless you park in the underground garage, there is no admission fee to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278), right? The museum also

2013, which stops tonight at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827). Expect the usual poetry, poppycock, storytelling and parodies, starting at 7 p.m. Tickets run $20–$95; see kcstarlight.com.

has plenty of free programming going on this summer, like tonight’s family-friendly Fiesta in the Park, the four-hour Mexican-themed showcase of the Donald J. Hall Sculpture Park and Bloch Building. Look for live music, games, food and lots of Frida-and-Diegoinspired diversions throughout both locations, starting at 5 p.m. Picnic dinners and lawn chairs are encouraged. See nelson-atkins.org.

S AT U R D AY | 7. 2 0 | BEER, CUPS, BALLS

In 2008, Kevin Will and a friend were at a charity pub crawl, which inspired them to

create their own. “We looked around at how much fun people were having and that a lot of money was going to a good cause,” Will says. Shortly thereafter they created Beer Pong for Babies, a tournament that drew 48 teams in its inaugural year, in the space formerly known as the Beaumont Club. Now, the double-elimination tournament has doubled in size and moved to the Power & Light District. To participate in Beer Pong for Babies, preregister at beerpongforbabies.com. A few spots will be open the day of the tournament on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 10 a.m. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. continued on page 12

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

11

12

DAY SATUR

7.20

Y

S

A

7:00

la guerre singer/songwriter

8:00

9:00

akkilles emerging/indie rock

special guests from NYC

Y BANDS & TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

v

rev gusto hank & cupcakes

B

& dj’S

Y

10:00 emerging/indie rock 11:00

d

2n—

2—n5ds!

Y

claque ROCK

6

— ! B u c ks

$8 july 20 - AUGUST 1 $10 DAY OF

until th july 19

-1020 --— - —— —64111 —|— —— WESTPORT RD, — KCMO 816.753.5207 S

TickeTS START AT JUST $10!

JULY 23-28

Presented by

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

13-STAR-0865_LtlMMD_Ptch_RUN.indd 1

pitch.com

continued from page 11 We asked Will some tough questions. The Pitch: How much money have you raised? Will: Our first year, I think we were only able to donate about $1,500 because the event was fairly small. That seems like a long, long time ago. Because the event grows every year, obviously our donations get larger and larger. And obviously there are costs that go along with putting on an event like this. However, after everything is paid for — cups, balls, etc. — 100 percent of the remainder is donated. Registration is $103. What does that cover? Registration covers beer and/or water during the MORE tournament. Obviously, the choice is up to the individual. Each team also T A INE gets bags with shirts, ONL .COM PITCH koozies and various swag from our sponsors. Have you tried BPFB in other cities? BPFB is in the infant stages of spreading to other cities. We have interest from Los Angeles; Denver; St. Louis; Austin, Texas; and Stillwater, Oklahoma. We would love for this event to go national. Let’s be real here. Alcohol causes birth defects. What are your thoughts on that and how you’re raising money? Valid point. We definitely understand that this event may be difficult for some to wrap their heads around. We get it. It’s weird. I bet Crawl for Cancer probably sounded like a weird idea at first, too.

EVENTS

hosts the Purple Party, a tribute to the man once known as a symbol, featuring Diverse, Reach, Les Izmore and DJ Mike Scott. Expect covers of Prince’s work from 1979 through the 1990s. “Diamonds and Pearls,” anyone? Tickets for the all-ages show are $5 or $25. Show starts at 8. See uptowntheater.com or diversejazz.com.

S U N D AY | 7. 21 | THE CULTURE OF ’CUE

Martin Diggs and Kevin Fossland fell short of their $50,000 Kickstarter goal last September for The Kansas City Barbecue Documentary. But the two former service-industry veterans are still making the film, and as production continues, the stories, recipes and rub secrets keep rolling in. Today, Diggs and Fossland talk about their research and finds at the Kansas City Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400). Part of the Missouri Valley Sunday series, this free lecture begins at 2 p.m. See kclibrary.org.

WHOLE FESTIVAL

Whole Foods (7401 West 91st Street, Overland Park, 913-652-9633) hosts its annual Local Foods Festival, a free indoor and out-

LOVE SYMBOL NO. 2

By all accounts, Prince was tremendous at this year’s South by Southwest. Backed by an 11-piece horn section, the 55-year-old singer performed for two hours and 40 minutes, then did six or seven encores, according to Rolling Stone. Will Anthony Saunders, Julia Haile and Lee Langston — the vocalists leading the six members of jazz band Diverse — be able to pull off the same feat? Find out tonight when the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway)

kcstarlight.com 816.363.STAR

12

are , prep lo cup Red So . le tt a for b

uGust

7/12/13 3:32 PM

Dig, if you will, the Purple Party.

T U E S D AY | 7. 2 3 |

where with a smartphone. But how well can you navigate KC? Today’s Scavenger Dash pits up to 300 two-person teams against one another to solve 12 clues while completing challenges and picking up items from specified locations — while traveling by foot or public transportation. The race begins at Johnny’s Tavern in the Power & Light District (1310 Grand), and check-in starts at 11 a.m. Registration costs $130 per team. At least one person on the team must be older than 18 (the minimum age is 12). See scavengerdash.com and click on the Kansas City link for more info.

M O N D AY | 7. 2 2 | JER-RY! JER-RY!

SPIN CITY: DJ HOODNASTY AT GUSTO LOUNGE

I

W E D N E S D AY | 7. 2 4 | PINE TAR PARTY BOY

Way before George Brett spoke candidly and graphically about shitting his pants, he was known for the “Pine Tar Incident.” Today is the 30th anniversary of the Pine Tar Game, so celebrate Brett and the team as they continue a home series against the Baltimore Orioles. Tonight’s game begins at 7:10. Tickets bought with a college ID are just $7; see kansascity.royals.mlb.com.

S

Y

AuGunsdt

2—

7:00

mat shoare singer/songwriter shades of jade jazz

8:15

2—n5ds!

Y

n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-the-week beat. Name: Ryan Hood Hometown: Sacramento, California Current residencies: the Gusto Lounge, Tuesdays; Buzzard Beach, Thursdays; and Roxy’s in Columbia, Missouri, once a month Beat vehicle: Technics SL MK5 turntables, Pioneer mixer, Serato Description of your set: “I play a little bit of everything but mostly bass music and hip-hop.” Current top-five songs: “Pursuit of Happiness (Slinks Hangover remix)” by Kid Cudi, featuring MGMT; “Serious” by Nick Hannam; “Do My Thing (JayCeeOh remix 2.0)” by Estelle, featuring Janelle Monae; “Swimming Pools (Drank)” by Kendrick Lamar; “Jump (the Wize Guys “Get Down Edit”)” by Kriss Kross DJ HoodNasty appears at the Gusto Lounge (504 Westport Road, 816-974-8786) for Tape Deck Tuesday, starting around 10 p.m.

It wouldn’t be a stretch to say Jerry Springer is the most polarizing of all talk-show hosts. Since 1994, his show has featured a cavalcade of prostitutes, little people, cheating husbands and assorted ne’er-do-wells. This begs the question: “Is this the America in which I live?” Yes. Yes, it is. Question your ethics and pay your respects when Springer stops by the 7th Street Casino (777 North Seventh Street Trafficway, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-371-3500) from 3 to 5 p.m. “Jerry has a lot of loyal fans here in Kansas City,” says Gregg Cox, KCWE-TV promotion manager. “We’re hoping he’ll get the chance to meet many of them on July 22.” Attendees must be over 21 to enter the casino.

9:30

Sure, you can figure out how to get any-

v

URBAN ADVENTURE

B

st dallas & the sinners country

brandon draper jazz mark lowrey jazz

10:45 12:00

Y BANDS & TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE “I respectfully disagree with your ruling, Tim.” E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

& dj’S

Y

door fair with sampling booths, live music, product demonstrations, and kids’ activities. “We invite our local vendors to connect with their customers, tell their story, and sample and sell their products at the event,” says Jennifer Matascik, store marketing specialist. “We’re anticipating between 20 and 30 local vendors from Kansas and Missouri to attend the event.” Come hungry and find $3.99 Shatto ice-cream floats and $5.99 Campo Lindo chicken brats. It all happens from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

6

— ! B u c ks

$8 july 20 - AUGUST 1 $10 DAY OF

until th july 19

S———————— -4124 --— PENNSYLVANIA AVE, KCMO 64111 | 816.531.7878 pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

13

S TA G E BY

with these shows.

L I Z C O OK

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

COULD IT BE MAGIC?

Start your Fringe Festival

F

or newcomers and veterans alike, the sheer scale of Kansas City’s Fringe Festival can be overwhelming. Starting July 18, local performers, playwrights and spoken-word poets converge to mount 363 shows, preMORE sented across 19 venues in 11 days. But don’t let the numbers intimidate T A INE you. Whether you attend ONL .COM PITCH 20 shows or just a couple, Fringe offers unparalleled access to fresh, uncensored theatrical thrills. Anything can happen in live theater, and Fringe compounds that spirit. Productions are unjuried and often experimental, and some shows’ post-performance talkbacks invite audiences to participate in the creation of stage magic. From the frenetic herd of Fringe acts, we’ve culled a few of the most promising. At MET (3614 Main), Central Standard Theatre presents the International House of Theatre, a rotating buffet of four globetrotting productions (including Adelaide, Australia, and Oakland, California). IHOT serves up a satisfying short stack of imports and domestics, among them Bedtime Solos and The Submarine Show. The latter takes audiences on a two-man acrobatic under-

STAGE

14

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

sea adventure, with highly physical per- Longwood High’s “third-most-popular formances from a Cirque du Soleil veteran sophomore” joins the math team? We’re and an Emmy-winning digital puppeteer. pretty sure you can solve for x. Model meets Expect a show as eclectic as the program mathletes may seem a little derivative now description (“a cappella foley mime”). On (familiar from Mean Girls and The Big Bang the other side of the dramatic spectrum, Ja- Theory’s nerd-blackface pastiche), but Vickob Holder’s Bedtime Solos tracks a couple’s toria Martin’s eponymous star, the talented intimacy and isolation through three differ- and funny Daria LeGrand, suggests more ent sexual encounters. The language is often Ellen Page than Lindsay Lohan. Walat’s dreamlike — erotic, existential, dense with script balances the equation by adding smart Holder’s lush images and passionate poetics, quips and emotional depth to the formula of the thinking person’s 50 Shades. geek gaffes and grrl power. The festival ought to just knight Vicki On the Unicorn’s Jerome Stage, Michelle Vodrey. Her third Fringe musical in four years, T. Johnson (The Kansas City Star’s “Diversity Lucky Streak, follows Joey (played by Jeff Diva”) stages her Wiccans in the ’Hood, a play Smith), a small-time country that premiered at New York singer hoping to make it big City’s Midwinter Madness KC Fringe Festival in New York. Country-music Festival earlier this year. kcfringe.org haters, never fear: Her latWiccans examines four est mashes several genres, friends’ religious ritual in including gospel and jazz, an urban graveyard, and the into a love story with humor and heart. And assumptions and misgivings of the cemetery’s the unifying principle is less honky-tonk than neighbors. The titular religion takes a backCopacabana: The tunes are all well-coifed seat in Johnson’s surprising comedic drama chanteur Barry Manilow’s, repurposed for the about race, ritual and fear of the unknown. stage. This Mamma Mia! for Fanilows opens on At the Fishtank (1715 Wyandotte), Heidi the Unicorn’s Main Stage (3828 Main). Van directs An Adult Evening of Shel SilverAlso at the Unicorn, Coterie Ignites prostein, a collection of the schoolyard poet’s duces Victoria Martin: Math Team Queen, comic one-acts. Take “adult” to heart and leave the kids at home — The Giving Tree, this by Kathryn Walat. What happens when

pitch.com

From left: Acting apprentices Jenny Ward and Tim Wilkinson performing a scene, and the Fishtank’s Heidi Van. ain’t. Silverstein’s adult plays are saucy and delightfully bizarre, and the Fishtank Acting Apprentices lend bubbly energy and snappy comedic timing to the laugh-packed scripts. Also at the Fishtank, a late entry to Fringe: An Evening of Alli Jordan, which features two short scripts by the home-team playwright. Jordan’s ballsy work shocked audiences at the Fishtank’s “Drunken Shorts” series in June, and they demanded reprises of BookSpace, a lighthearted literary comedy, and Burn, a dark, intense drama starring an unusually subdued Forrest Attaway. Burn’s acting makes the dialogue crackle, and director Bryan Moses’ innovative staging flares up palpable tension in the Fishtank’s intimate space. If you’re feeling indecisive, there’s always the Fringe Hangover. Timid types can wait around until July 28 to sample the festival’s biggest hits. The shows with the best attendance at each venue earn bonus performances at those venues that day, followed by the closing party at Fringe Central (Open Fire Pizza, 3951 Broadway).

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

FILM

SLIDE SHOW

Growing up at the water park in The Way Way Back.

BY

S C O T T W IL S ON

Movies > Movie Showtimes

1051 MERRIAM LANE, KCKS • WWW.BOULEVARDDRIVEIN.COM

Adults $10 Kids 11 & under are FREE We are a CASH ONLY business Movie Infoline: 913.262.0392

R

emember when you were 6? You and your brother snuck into an empty building through a basement window. You were gonna play doctor. He showed you his, but when it got to be your turn, you chickened and ran. Remember that? You ever tell anybody that?” That, you’ll recall, is Harrison Ford’s cop talking to Sean Young’s replicant in Blade Runner, cruelly revealing that her memories have been implanted and aren’t real at all. The memories being made in The Way Way Back, a well-cast but disposable coming-of-age comedy, feel no less manufactured (though much less Freudian, this being PG-13). It’s everyone’s nostalgia and no one’s, a damp, lukewarm American summer of lightly won wish fulfillment that hits the expected notes — a first kiss, a supercool adult role model, a low-impact victory over the pains of having divorced parents. It’s not set in the past, but it relies on the idea that U.S. adolescence remains suspended in what looks and sounds like July 1985. Well, doesn’t it? If that season of The Goonies and Back to the Future and Real Genius wasn’t some kind of pre-Internet multiplex zenith, nothing ever was. This fondly imprecise sense of a generation-old moment, of chlorine-scented towels at the pool and a world without bike helmets, is what the writer-directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash — whose screenplay for 2011’s The Descendants won an Oscar — get right. (The title isn’t about time but about space — the rearmost seat in an old station wagon.) For The Descendants, the team worked from

p THE WORLD’S GREATEST DRIVE IN 4k Digital Projection & dts DIGITAL SOUND

Fri & Sat ONLY | July 19-20 | Gates open at 6:30pm

Despicable Me 2 (PG): 9:10pm 1051 MERRIAM LANE, KCKS WWW.BOULEVARDDRIVEIN.COM Turbo (PG): 10:50pm | Lone Ranger (PG-13): 12:25pm Sunday, July 21

Despicable Me 2 (PG): 9:10pm | Turbo (PG): 10:50pm

LEGENDS 1867 VILLAGE WEST NEXT TO DAVE & BUSTERS

JUDY TENUTA

• THREE HBO SPECIALS • TONIGHT SHOW • CENTER SQUARE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES JULY 17-20 • 2 SHOWS ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7:45PM & 9:45PM

James and Rockwell bond. Kaui Hart Hemmings’ firmly plotted, emotionally specific novel. This time, though, there’s no source material. Not much happens in The Way Way Back, other than 14-yearold hero Duncan (Liam James) learning to straighten his geek-hunched spine a bit on the walk to manhood. In this enterprise, Duncan has an advantage that most boys don’t: Sam Rockwell, here slowing his motormouth-fuckup routine to family-friendly speed as water-slide guru Owen. Owen gives Duncan a job, then delivers gently swaggering lessons on joke telling and girls and staying up all night. In a movie set where REO Speedwagon holds more sway than Facebook, their relationship is endearing

rather than creepy, a small grace for which we can thank both actors. Toni Collette plays Duncan’s mother, Pam, as cannily self-aware, then tragically oblivious. Steve Carell plays Pam’s boyfriend as you’d expect just about any reasonably smart actor to play a salesman named Trent. Both do more than their share to suggest an actual relationship in which actual decisions may carry actual weight. But Pam and Trent are narrow ideas, not characters. They’re just more visible versions of the struggling, or else not very good, parents usually left offscreen in movies like, say, The Goonies. The kind of popcorn parents with much to learn from their teenage children, if only they’d listen. But that’s how it has always been in forgettable summer movies. ■

GO TO KICKSTARTER.COM TO HELP THE STANFORD & SONS ANIMATED SERIES STARRING THE GLAZERS, TJ MILLER & MANY OTHER COMICS! SPONSORED BY HOLLYWOOD CASINO SUMMER COMEDY SERIES

TUE-SUN 7:45PM & 9:45PM 913.400.7500 • STANFORDSCOMEDYCLUB.COM

& invite you to a special advance screening of

OUT THIS WEEK A HIJACKING

T

here’s no hijacking scene in A Hijacking, a razor-wire Danish drama that’s otherwise as straightforward as its title. That’s just as well. Any more tension in writer-director Tobias Lindholm’s tightly wound anxiety machine would be almost physically unbearable. A ship is boarded, an office is raided from afar, but it’s the viewer who finally yields. Aboard the cargo vessel Roszen, we meet Mikkel Hartmann (Pilou Asbaek), the ship’s cook, whose wife and daughter are ready for the end of this latest voyage. Mikkel’s distant employer is shipping CEO Peter (Soren Malling), an adept dealmaker whose confidence seems absolute. We’ll see. At the home office, news arrives that the Roszen has fallen to machine-gun-toting Somali pirates. Peter wants to handle negotiations himself: “It’s my job to bring back my men.” A high ransom is met with an insult-

ing offer, translations prove tricky, and time begins its dreadful unspooling. It’s a staring contest as art, and it’s very satisfying. — S.W.

ONLY GOD FORGIVES

N

icolas Winding Refn loves red: the crimson-soaked bars of Copenhagen’s underworld in Pusher II, the neon-saturated Los Angeles of Drive, the hallucinatory landscapes of Valhalla Rising. The director’s new Only God Forgives maintains that affection, along with one for elliptical storytelling, with admirable rigor. But its ease with prolonged carnage is ultimately misguided. In this campily Oedipal drama, Ryan Gosling’s Julian Thompson runs a muay Thai training gym in Bangkok but reserves his passion for monstrous-mom Crystal (Kristin Scott Thomas). His brother dies in retaliation for the rape and murder of a 16-year-old prosti-

tute, and Julian is understandably reluctant to kill righteous avenger Lt. Chang (Vithaya Pansringarm). Behind Julian’s back, however, Crystal organizes reprisal. Cinematographer Larry Smith’s camera crawls unnervingly and then moves with lightning speed, showing us savage eye slittings in grindhouse close-up, samurai sword wieldings, and a nightmarish whorehouse where the hallways glow dark crimson. These individual shots seem designed as events in themselves, but they don’t acquire cumulative rhythm. Refn’s sudden jumps in location or omissions of narrative connective tissue are consistent but not intriguing. He has framed Only God Forgives with ostentatious discipline, but the movie’s transgressive urges get lost in an indiscriminate barrage of colors. — VADIM RIZOV

Log on to:

gofobo.com/rSVP

and enter the code PitcHc7PX to download a pair of complimentary screening passes to see

Written and directed by Maggie carey

on Wednesday, July 24th at 7:00pm. LIMIT ONE ADMIT-TWO PASS PER PERSON. Sponsors and their dependents are no eligible to receive a pass. Screening is overbooked to ensure capacity. Please refer to pass for any other possible restriction. No purchase necessary. All federal, state and local restrictions apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to the use of the tickets and accepts an restrictions required by the ticket provided. CBS Films, Allied-THA and the Pitch and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in the connection with use of prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. You must be 18 years or older to win. Rated R for pervasive strong crude and sexual content including graphic dialogue, drug and alcohol use, and language - all involving teens.

in tHeaterS JULy 26 thetodoListMovie.com

facebook.com/thetodoListMovie

@todoListMovie #thetodoList

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

15

20948 The To Do LisT KC - PiTCh 2.305" x 4.822" 4C RUN DATE: 7/18/13 AD DUE: 7/10/13

B VITAMINS. PROTEIN. SIZZLE.

KANSAS CITY’S OLDEST AND LOCAL FAVORITE

“EXTRAORDINARY” - Charles Ferruzza, The Pitch Get 10 essential nutrients all in one delicious recipe at BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

3906 BELL KCMO 64111

(off 39th St, just east of KU Med)

816.753.3600 • www.gkbbq.com

INTRODUCING 2 FOR $12

New Lunch Menu Monday through Friday features two courses for $12. Free valet always offered for all guests dining. FIRST COURSE, CHOICE OF: Tomato Bisque Blue Note Salad Parmesan Crisp, Basil Olive Oil

Funded by The Beef Checkoff

Top Sirloin • Recommended 3 oz. serving 151 calories • 27% of the daily value of B 6, 24% of B 12, 7% of riboflavin, 36% of niacin and 50% of protein

Gem Lettuce, Blue Cheese & Blueberry Vinaigrette

SECOND COURSE, CHOICE OF: Lobster Mac & Cheese Cold Water Lobster, Cavatappi Pasta, Herb Bread Crumbs

Patty Melt

Kobe Style Beef, Caramelized Onions, Swiss, Campo Lindo Pate, Marbled Rye

Turkey, Asparagus & Goat Cheese Sandwich

Hanger Steak and Arugula Salad

Smoked Turkey, Spicy Goat Cheese, Grilled Asparagus, Farm to Market Sourdough

Nebraska Bison, Wild Arugula, Local Vegetables, White Balsamic Vinaigrette

Campo Chicken Sandwich Fresh Mozzarella, Celery Salad, Grilled Baguette HAPPY HOUR NIGHTLY, featuring $4 small plates MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 4-6:30

1329 Baltimore in the Hilton President Hotel | Kansas City, MO (816) 303-1686 or www.providence-kc.com Connect on Facebook at facebook.com/ProvidenceKitch and follow on Twitter at @ProvidenceKitch

16

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

CAFÉ

LOOSE THAI

Pad-Thai gets points for effort but needs to tighten up.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Pad-Thai Restaurant • 14319 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-685-4500 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, noon–9 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday • Price: $–$$$

T

here are two reserved parking spaces in front of the six-month-old Pad-Thai Restaurant in Overland Park. They are simply labeled “Thai.” A strip of blue tape covers the word “Tasty.” Don’t drive away confused. There’s still plenty of tasty Thai cuisine served inside this sunny storefront, but the tenant has changed. In January, Vouglas Palzer took over the space — previously occupied by the Johnson County outpost of the Tasty Thai restaurant (the Northland restaurant is still open) — and renamed it. You might feel compelled to order pad Thai at a place called Pad-Thai. It’s Thailand’s bestknown dish, after all — the popular stir-fried noodle E R MO dish that’s t y pic a l ly tossed with tamarind juice, red chili peppers, AT E N I ONL .COM bean sprouts, eggs, fish PITCH sauce, coriander and lime juice, then garnished with crushed peanuts. And Palzer’s version of the namesake dish is excellent here — fresh, light, seductively fiery. But some of the other dishes command their own attention. Before the food, however, come some distractions, because Pad-Thai has some quirks to work through. During dinner service, the tables are set with black cloth napkins, but the flatware is rolled into paper napkins. I wondered whether the cloth napkin was there for purely decorative purposes, like the fresh red rose on each of the glass-topped tables. I used the cloth and also the paper. I needed a couple of extra paper napkins while eating the sticky, peppery basil chicken wings. They weren’t the meatiest wings I’d ever tasted, and I wish they’d been crispier, but the spicy glaze was delicious. They provided a strong counterpoint to the cool, soft spring rolls, packed nearly to bursting with ribbons of carrots and enough chopped greens that the row of sliced rolls looked like an unmowed lawn. A friend of mine insisted on a bowl of lightly steamed edamame (the dullest starter on Earth), which came salted like pretzels. I found myself eating it anyway, because the kitchen’s timing can be off. The pot stickers I sampled had been steamed a little too quickly, and the “Royal Thai” chicken had been cooked until it bordered on jerky. All of the ginger-garlic sauce in the kingdom couldn’t have restored the meat’s moistness. There are unexpected victories, though. I’m thinking mainly of the pineapple fried

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

rice, a dish I always avoid unless under The namesake dish (above) isn’t the only duress. The friend with me on one visit Thai favorite at the new Pad-Thai. to Pad-Thai insisted on the dish over the more traditional basil fried rice, believing it astringent bell peppers) are a tad too chewy. Further still from an aphrodisiac is the resmight cool us off after the kick-ass-hot laab taurant’s “frozen coconut custard.” I asked salad we’d shared. Fair point — the mound of sautéed pork on that salad, decked out the server to describe the creation. “Well, it’s not frozen,” he said. “We heat it up.” with chopped red onion, mint and cilantro, And suddenly there it was before us, little was aggressively seasoned. (“medium Thai hot” on this menu is described as “Tabasco slices of pale brown something. The consistency was that of grainy tofu, and it was just is no sweat.”) We ended up bickering over the chunks about as tasteless. There’s coconut ice cream, too, just as bland, melting of pineapple, which I was away under flakes of fresh convinced had come from Pad-Thai Restaurant coconut. The ice creams a can because they were Spicy basil wings ........... $7.95 here — there also are green so soft. My friend insisted Pot stickers.....................$6.95 tea, mango and purple-yam that, despite the conveRoyal Thai chicken .......$12.95 fl avors — melt quickly benience, canned pineapple Gang phet ped yarng ....$19.95 cause they’re sided with is too expensive to go into a Pad Thai .........................$12.95 two bananas, encased in fried-rice dish like this one. Frozen coconut custard ..........................$6.95 wonton wrappers and fried (The server told us it was a until the banana dissolves secret.) Either way, it’s reinto a white-hot custardy freshing and even kind of mush that spurts out (potentially dangersexy, with all that succulent pineapple, chewy ously) at the fi rst bite. Eat at your own risk. cashews, raisins and fragrant garlic cloves. The crew is trying hard to put out a conA dish that needs to be a little more aroussistent product, even if you can too easily ing is the gang phet ped yarng. Under a red sense the kitchen’s chaos when the intimate coconut-curry sauce, the pieces of roasted duck (tucked in with pineapple, cashews and dining room fills up. There was only a single

waiter on each of my visits to the restaurant (never a good sign in my book), and he also appeared to be the only person in the place with a solid command of English. (Solid enough, anyway, to greet tables with a slightly premature “Are you ready to order?”) Six months in, a restaurant should be able to deliver the right pot stickers (I wanted fried but got steamed) at the right moment (they were lukewarm). Pad-Thai isn’t perfection. But it’s still one of the few exotic-leaning restaurants this far south into Johnson County, a zone of lookalike mini-mansions and strip malls and discount retailers and the odd “cupcakery.” Palzer may not get around to redoing those parking signs anytime soon, but if he irons out some of the place’s kinks, he can save me a spot in the lot.

pitch.com

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

17

FAT C I T Y BY

aims to start a revolution.

JON AT H A N BENDER

CHRIS MULLINS

WEST OF EDEN

Bo Nelson’s Thou Mayest Coffee

Nelson (left) and Holzhueter: a coffee team

A

passer-by might think that Bo Nelson is smuggling a small jungle in the back of his Honda Element. On a hazy July afternoon, the longleaf plants disappear one by one into the Utilitarian Workshop — the design shop that has been bringing makers to the West Side for the past several months. (See our cover story, page 6.) An enticing, almost silky coffee scent lingers near his SUV. The smell follows Nelson, 27, into the shop as he sets down the black planters from Family Tree Nursery, which has been in his family for three generations. Nelson, with a jet-black curled mustache and hair blown back by constant motion, sets a trio of half-pound bags filled with whole beans from Guatemala, Indonesia and Ethiopia on a table made from a rectangle of cardboard. “This is about learning the language of something that doesn’t use the English vocabulary,” Nelson says, gesturing to the plants by the front door and the bags in front of him. “But everything around us is always speaking to our senses. It’s a question of ‘Are you listening? What does a [coffee] bean want to be? How can I roast that and get out of the way, so the person on the other end of this can have a beautiful moment with that bean?’ ” Kansas Citians may not yet be picking up

18

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

everything the bean is putting down, but their taste buds seem to be responding. Since Nelson and Bill Holzhueter launched Thou Mayest Coffee in October 2012, their beans have been snatched up by Aixois, the Upper Crust Bakery, and the Johnson County Sheriff ’s Office. All of this, Nelson says, has happened without a formal sales push. He suggests it could be Thou Mayest’s lighter roast, which caramelizes the sugars in the beans less and doesn’t burn off as much caffeine. “This is not about being the best,” Nelson says. “This is about art. It’s about letting people decide what they think is good.” The message of choice, which Nelson asserts is an “American battle cry for freedom,” is central to his company, as well as his life. Thou Mayest is named for a quote in John Steinbeck’s East of Eden and is meant to convey the idea that “the way is open.” And Nelson believes that his own path is just opening up because he has finally found a calling without a bottom. “I don’t know my limits,” Nelson says. “I don’t know if I have any limits. When my body says I can’t do more, or I can’t give more, that’s false. It’s what, in the days of old, manliness was all about.” Nelson, an affable storyteller, who’s as likely to mix a quote from Gandhi as a line

pitch.com

from a summer blockbuster into conversation, says this with earnestness, not bravado. He has searched for those limits in Zimbabwe, where a childhood friend runs a humanitarian ministry. Closer to home, he has done so as a production manager on his family’s 10-acre plant farm in Wyandotte County. But Nelson, who once considered playing basketball and studying for the ministry at MidAmerica Nazarene University, couldn’t find a way to challenge his mind and body in a way that would conquer his restlessness. Then in 2010 he met Holzhueter. The other half of Thou Mayest was new to Kansas City and hoping to find someone interested in roasting coffee. What Holzhueter found, through a family friend, was a horticulturalist and future partner. The men discovered a shared love of brewing and a desire to question the world around them. Nelson’s garage turned into a coffee salon, where the pair would drink their brew and talk politics, music and faith. The caffeine that fueled their discussions inspired Holzhueter to suggest they open the conversation to the community, one cup at a time. Their first business plan was a series of pictures and ideas scrawled on an 8-foot-sheet of trace paper left over from Nelson’s stint as an architecture

student at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. The business solidified when the pair invested in a used 10-pound roaster listed on eBay. In the process of designing their logo and brand, Nelson tapped into the area’s burgeoning community of artists and designers. “I’m hearing a lot from the younger generation that they want something made in KCMO,” Nelson says. “And so I’m looking at how I can help build that. This is not just coffee. It’s the third industrial revolution.” Nelson hasn’t decided if that means having a wholesale operation, retail operation or opening a drink boutique, founded in the same spirit as the Utilitarian Workshop and focused on selling locally made coffee, tea and beer. His phone often glows with text messages from realtors about potential spaces or orders placed through the Internet. Earlier this month, Thou Mayest received a shipment of 1,500 pounds of coffee, including beans from Zimbabwe, that Nelson will cup and have graded. “I can connect people to great coffee and still be doing the right thing half a world away,” Nelson says. “We just want to make it easy for people to get our coffee. I want millionaires and college students sipping it.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

1713 VILLAGE W. PARKWAY KANSAS CITY, KANSAS 913.299.8787 chiusanospizza.com

HAPPY HOUR 2 for 1 ALL drinks

beers & wine at the bar

Mon-Fri : 4-6

Locally owned & operated!

• 40 YEARS OVERLOOKING THE PLAZA • INGREDIENT DRIVEN MENU • AWARD WINNING Just got a change - please change the Tues & Th urs copy to: WINE LIST Tuesdays: Live Jazz Martini &Photograph: Wine Specials Angela Bond

201 WEST 47TH STREET KANSAS CITY, MO 64112 816.753.3565 • WWW.STARKERSRESTAURANT.COM

Pasta’moré!

Tues: Live Jazz

Martini & Wine Specials

4890 Main St. KCMO • 816-753-0810

Or book online at: accursos.com Accurso’s Caters! find us

!

www.elpatronkcmo.com

Tuesday: $1.50 Tacos from 2-10pm

HAPPY HOUR

Mon thru Fri 2-6pm

Specials on Mojitos, Margaritas, & Appetizers

Come and enjoy our authentic and unique Mexican cuisine

OPEN EVERYDAY FROM 11AM TO 10PM 2905 Southwest Blvd • Kansas City, MO • 816.931.6400 pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

19

FAT C I T Y

IRISH AMBASSADOR LUNCH BUFFET - $9.99

Contemporary Regional Missouri Cuisine Dinner: Tues - Sat Happy Hour: Wed - Fri, 4 - 5:30

Open Everyday

11am - 3pm, 5:30pm - 10pm Contact: (913)381-1234 or (913)381-4567 7301 W 91st St. Overland Park KS 66212

www.masalaskc.com

900 W 39th St. Kansas City, MO 64111

• WE SERVE HALAL MEAT ONLY •

DUBLINER THE

Irish Ale House & Pub

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 4-7

CHOICES for $ (M-F)

7

LIVE MUSIC

THURS-SAT

MENTION THE PITCH FOR A 1/2 PRICE APPETIZER

170 E. 14TH ST. KCMO IN P&L DISTRICT • 816.268.4700 THEDUBLINERKC.COM •

20

the pitch

/THEDUBLINERKC

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

CHARLES FERRUZZA

The Reserve’s new chef comes from Dublin, by way of Chicago.

New Menu! New Ownership!

13 LUNCH

BY

pitch.com

M

arshall Roth — the tall, outspoken talent who used to run the kitchen at Hollywood Casino’s Final Cut Steakhouse — gets credit for putting the Reserve’s new chef on my radar. “His name is Shaun Brady,” Roth told me in May, when he called to say that Geoffrey Van Glabbeek, the executive chef at the 10-monthold restaurant in the Ambassador Hotel, was leaving town. “He’s from Ireland and has exceptional credentials.” (Roth left Kansas City several years ago to take a job in Wichita as the executive chef of the Ambassador Hotel in that city.) “I think he’s going to make a name for himself in Kansas City.” Brady, 33, has reason to believe his own hype. After all, few young chefs get to open their own restaurants. Fewer still are 22 when opportunity doesn’t just knock but insists. “I had been working in a restaurant called Ouzos — the name was Greek but the cuisine was pseudo-Italian — during my years in culinary school,” says Brady, a Tipperary, Ireland, graduate of the Dublin Institute of Technology. “After working as a chef there for a few years, I took time off to travel around Europe and Asia. When I came back to Ireland, I went to work at a restaurant in Belfast. One day, I had a knock on my apartment door, and it was the owner of Ouzos, who told me to get in his car. We drove to Dublin, and he had me look at three different restaurant locations. When we drove back to Belfast, he asked me which one I wanted.” Brady made his choice, then designed the kitchen and the menu for a venue that would also be called Ouzos. “It was a steak and fresh seafood restaurant,” he says. “I had told the owner I wanted to focus on fresh seafood, and he went out and bought a fishing boat.” But it was Brady who got hooked. He met his wife, Kate, at his Ouzos. “She’s from Wichita,” he says. “She was traveling through Ireland and got a job at our restaurant.” The couple married in 2005 and moved to Chicago two years later. “There are lots of excellent restaurants there,” Brady says. “I’ll never forget the coldness. It was a total shock to my system. I didn’t think it could ever get that cold anywhere.” Brady worked at several Chicago restaurants (including Scylla, the place owned by Stephanie Izard, the fi rst woman to win Top Chef ). He was the executive sous chef at Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse when, he says, he had a “life-changing experience.” “Our son, Seamus, was born,” Brady says.

Brady is unreserved about his job at the Reserve. “And although we had a wonderful apartment in Chicago and an exciting life, we suddenly had to think about things like schools and playgrounds and having a backyard.” Kate Brady wanted to live closer to her family, but not in Wichita. So the couple chose Kansas City. “I felt confident that I would find a job,” Brady says. “But it actually came around a lot faster than I expected. We hadn’t even left Chicago when a friend in Kansas City told me that the Ambassador Hotel was looking for a new executive chef. I sent my résumé and had a phone interview. We arrived in Kansas City on a Saturday. I had my second interview two days later and was hired that week.” Van Glabbeek’s dinner menu at the Reserve was dominated by small plates. Brady has done away with most of those and is offering eight full-size entrées, including a bread bowl filled with steamed mussels in a shrimp-and-herb broth, and a Kansas City strip smothered in wild-mushroom truffle butter. “I’m already using more produce from local farms and local purveyors for dairy, pork and beef,” he says. “I go to check things out at the City Market almost every day. The food scene is exploding. I came to Kansas City on a visit 10 years ago, and there really wasn’t much to choose from downtown. I think there’s so much more happening now. It’s great to be a part of it.”

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

S

FRANK JAMES

There’s a NEW game in town!

SALOON

Happy Happy Hour Lunch Buffet, Salad Bar Hour 3-6 Daily Food & Drink Specials 3-6

Bloody Mary & Breakfast bar • Sundays 11am - 2pm

7pm-10pm bike night check Facebook For updates

10919 NW 45 Hwy (3.5 mi west of I-29)

Jerry’sCAFE BrEAkFAst & LunCh

OpEn EvErydAy

6Am

tO

3pm

816.941.4055

1209 w 103rd st. kCmO OwnEd And OpErAtEd By

thE jErry nAstEr

VOTED A BEST MISSOURI RESTAURANT 2013

parkville, Mo 816-505-0800

LOCALLY GROWN, DELICIOUSLY PREPARED! gluten-free, vegetarian, and dairy-free options Specialty Baked Goods

WWW.FIGTREECAFELS.COM

VOTED BEST DESSERTS 817 NE Rice Road, Lee Summit | 816.347.0442

KC’S ONLY FM SPORTS STATION! SPORTS RADIO 102.5 THE FAN LINEUP:

5AM-8AM: Tiki Barber, Brandon & Dana 8AM-11AM: John Feinstein 11AM-2PM: Jim Rome 2PM-5PM: Doug Gottlieb 5PM-9PM: Chris Moore & Brian Jones 9PM-1AM: Scott Ferrall 1AM-5AM: D.A. - Damon Amendolara

GRAB SOME

•GREAT DEALS• PITCH MUSIC

SHOWCASE+AWARDS TICKETS TO BOTH FOR ONLY $10

Daily Lunch Specials 1414 W. 9TH ST . MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN 816.472.6333

Morning Delight...

$50 CERTIFICATE FOR ONLY $25

BREAKFAST: MON-FRI: 7-11AM SAT: 7-12PM SUN: 8-1:30PM

7621 TROOST AVE KCMO 64131

EM CHAMAS

LUNCH:

$30 WORTH OF FOOD FOR ONLY $15

MON-SAT: 11-3PM SUN: 11-1:30PM

409 W. Gregory KCMO 816.444.1933 www.theclassiccookie.com

6101 NW 63RD TERR. KCMO 64151

.com pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

21

MUSIC

STOKING THE FIRE

Art Closet Studios draws an all-ages

BY

scene to the back of a pizza shop.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

A

M US I C

22

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

SRO for Seakings (at left)

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

few Mondays back, about 40 teenagers and 20-somethings were gathered in clusters in the sloped parking lot north of Open Fire Pizza (3951 Broadway). It was after 10 p.m. Open Fire had closed for the night, and to the untrained eye, the scene conveyed trouble: a mini-mob of young people, in ratty clothes and tattoos and complicated piercings, loitering in a secluded parking lot after business hours. Then, from inside the building, came a few raps on a snare drum, a whine of guitar feedback: sound check. Gradually the crowd moved through a propped-open side door of the building — the entrance to Art Closet Studios. Then the set started and somebody pulled the door shut, muting the music. Inside, it was the second night of Emo Fest, a three-day buffet of angst-packed bills featuring small touring acts (You Blew It, E R MO from Florida; Dads, from New Jersey) and young local bands (Only Words T A INE Last, Canyons) for $5 a ONL .COM PITCH night. Down a hallway, past a sign warning “No Alcohol, No Drugs, No Bullsh*t,” the bands performed in a room that indeed resembled an overgrown art closet — lockers, scattered chairs, a large painting of an eye, a mannequin draped in black cloth and a gas mask. You could practically taste other people’s sweat in the air. Like any all-ages venue worth its jacket patches, Art Closet Studios doesn’t bother with air conditioning. But Art Closet Studios wasn’t meant to be an all-ages venue. When Dakota Walz and Mike Moreno started it last summer, their objective was to create a space to provide free art workshops for underprivileged kids. “Formally, that’s what we still are — an arts education center,” Walz says. “There’s a big gap in what the Kansas City public school system can provide students for arts education, so we try to fill it. We offer workshops for screenprinting, ceramics, glass blowing. Kids — toddlers to around 11 years old — can come in and get free exposure to art.” Walz, who is 22, moved to Kansas City from Fargo, North Dakota, in November 2011. Within a week he met Moreno, a 34-year-old KC native who had recently returned from a 10-year stint in Eugene, Oregon. They were part of an art group called the Black Arts Society, which worked in the areas of glass etching and LED illumination. “We were trying to get the Black Arts Society out there in front of people, but we were fi nding it hard to get into art shows,

and there were these ridiculous entry fees and things like that,” Walz says. “The Crossroads arts scene started as a grassroots, community thing, I’m told, but when I got here a couple years ago it seemed snooty and exclusive. So instead of trying to fit in with that, we thought we’d start our own thing.” They eventually connected with Ahmed Awad, who had opened Open Fire Pizza on a stretch of Broadway a few blocks from the nexus of Westport nightlife. “He had this room in the back that he had no real need for, and he was super-stoked on the idea of us putting it to good use, particularly if it brought people to his pizza shop,” Walz says. “So he let us take over the room and donated some materials and didn’t charge us while we got on our feet. He’s been our biggest backer.” But things like kilns, glass, clay and instructors cost money, and Art Closet Studios quickly found it difficult to sustain its free workshops. That’s when Walz and Moreno thought to book rock shows.  Walz grew up going to basement punk shows in Fargo. But when he arrived here, he says, there wasn’t much in the way of all-ages venues. Legendary spots such as El Torreon, the Stray Cat, and Gee Coffee were all long shuttered. “I was only 20, and I didn’t know anybody here and I wanted to go to shows and meet people,” Walz says. “And every show was either at a bar or at some dirty punk house in a terrible neighborhood. I’d go to

pitch.com

[Troost house venue] the Gravyard and wake up the next day to fi nd out four guys with guns robbed the place after the show. So I defi nitely felt like there was a need for a place for people who want to see music but can’t get into a bar and don’t want to go to a dangerous neighborhood.” It looks like he was right. “The shows are now basically funding the art education side of it,” Walz says. “We do three or four a week, all kinds of bands, and charge three bucks or five bucks or even 10 bucks if it’s a really solid show.” And the venue has largely avoided the usual pitfalls associated with teenagers on the loose at night. “We haven’t had many issues with people breaking stuff or stealing,” he says. “The difficulty is with some of these older punks who have been around for years and just want to get drunk and do drugs and fuck things up. But we have a core group of kids that are really positive and helpful.” Young, inexperienced bands regularly play shows at Art Closet Studios, but older, more established local acts have also performed there this year: Bent Left, the Caves, Lazy. “It’s been cool to have this environment where these high school bands get to have the exposure of playing with bigger local bands and even national touring bands,” Walz says. Last winter, Awad sold Open Fire Pizza to Moreno and a partner, which has given them the opportunity to merge the building’s forprofit and nonprofit components. A commu-

nity garden is in the works, as are more art exhibits. And pizza diners will likely hear live music from the back of the restaurant more often. “We try to keep it down when the restaurant’s open,” Walz says. “If customers hear it, it’s usually muffled and in the distance. But sometimes they’ll walk down and poke their head in and try to figure out what exactly is going on back there.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT ANDY MCGHIE ENSEMBLE AT TAKE FIVE COFFEE + BAR

Much of the excitement in Kansas City’s jazz scene today is owing to the emergence these last few years of extraordinary young talent. Here’s a representative quintet. Andy McGhie fronts the band, blowing a tenor sax of rich tone and twisting solos all his own. He bounces off and entwines with the sometimes lyrical, sometimes driving trumpet of Hermon Mehari. They merge this interplay with the percussive vibraphone of newcomer Peter Schlamb and back it all up with drummer Ryan Lee and bassist Karl McComas-Reichl, another new-to-KC face. The Andy McGhie Ensemble captures the thrill and playfulness enveloping Kansas City jazz in 2013. — LARRY KOPITNIK Andy McGhie Ensemble, 8–10 p.m. Friday, July 19, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 913-948-5550), $5 cover.

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

23

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS

MUSIC

CIRCLE OF LIFE

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

Lawrence’s Field Day Fest highlights a transitioning music scene.

BY

A P R IL F L E MING

JULY:

17: Nace Brother & Earl Cates

JULY 18TH, 2013 BUCKWHEAT

19: Trampled Under Foot CD Release Show The Railers 20: Chubby Carrier JVT Band

JULY 24TH, 2013 DALE WATSON

24: Iron Mike Norton 25: Tinsley Ellis Hazy Ray Kim Lenz

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

24

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

APRIL FLEMING

ZYDECO

M

etropolises are revolving doors, and this is especially true of college towns, where every May brings an exodus and every August an invasion. Right now, though, the Lawrence music scene is undergoing something of an evacuation. Two of its pillar groups, Fourth of July and Hospital Ships, are moving (to San Francisco and Austin, respectively). And a third, Rooftop Vigilantes, played its final show last week at the Replay. The Lawrence Field Day Fest, held over three nights at the Bottleneck last weekend, reflected some of these changes. The shows had the air of scenes in transition: Some of the musicians were saying goodbye, some were moving into new life phases, and still others were emerging to fill the voids left by the departing. All this isn’t to say it wasn’t great fun. Zach Campbell, the only member of Rooftop Vigilantes sticking around Lawrence, fronts a new band, Jocks, and about 20 minutes into its grimy garage-pop set on Friday, he switched out members, bringing fellow Vigilantes Oscar Guinn and Seth Wiese onstage and morphing the show into a Vigilantes performance. “We have four more songs that the Man didn’t let us play last night,” Campbell said, referring to the previous evening’s official farewell show at the Replay, which ran late. Watching the three dudes bang, thrash, lose their glasses, and deliver the heady tempo changes and Rooftop screams one last time was worth the price of admission. Not every band breakup is sad, but the Vigi-

pitch.com

lantes’ goodbye really is a bummer — those guys have been consistently creative and entertaining, and we’ll miss them. Mike Tuley has been a fixed point in the Lawrence scene going back to his days in the Short Bus Kids and at the Pirate House, a former punk house venue at 14th Street and Tennessee, whose new paint job and absence of an anarchy flag out front are unnervingly normal. Tuley has since led Ad Astra Per Aspera, then Ad Astra Arkestra, and is now a Kansas Citian and member — with his wife, Brooke Tuley, on drums, and Anna St. Louis on bass — of the psych-punk trio Bloodbirds. “This is the last one,” Tuley told us, meaning that Bloodbirds is his last band. “We’re gonna try to have a kid.” We wish the Tuleys the best of luck, but it seems unlikely somehow that Tuley will hang it up musically whenever Bloodbirds disbands. He has been one of the best around for more than a dozen years. But if he’s serious, then you had better get your ass to a Bloodbirds show next time you see that name on a bill.  Not just Lawrence acts filled the Field Day Fest. On Friday, KC duo Schwervon took a turn on the Bottleneck’s stage, channeling Blue Album-era Weezer and Viva Voce, in addition to delivering the wittiest back-and-forth stage banter of the night. Nature Boys, who increasingly seem like the hardest-working punk band in the area (and, not coincidentally, one of the best), also repped KC. Frontman Danny Fischer shreds so fast, it sometimes looks as though his right hand contains six fin-

Radkey: no sex, all rock gers. (Upon closer inspection: nope, just five.) Radkey, the teenage, brotherly St. Joseph rock trio, closed out the Friday leg of the fest. They’re just back from the U.K., where they were featured in a slew of British publications, including The Guardian and NME, which named Radkey its featured band of the week. (Google the article, in which the three reveal that they’ve agreed to a no-sex pact — not for religious reasons but because they don’t want to worry about paying child support.) It has been awhile since a band from these parts has gotten that kind of national (and international!) attention, but the kids still seem pretty grounded. “When we were in England, we visited Rough Trade,” guitarist Dee Radke said from the stage, referring to the London record shop. “They said they’re gonna put us [our album] on the wall, with the Ramones and shit. We’re just so humbled … we’re nobodies, man.” Up front pumping his fists during damn near every performance at Field Day Fest was Cameron Joel Hawk, the Dead Girls singerguitarist and organizer of the festival. (His other band, the hilariously named Many Moods of Dad, also played a set, and its quick technicality sometimes called to mind St. Louis’ Riddle of Steel.) “I just like this scene,” Hawk said, shrugging. “What are you gonna do?”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

25

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 18

NKOTB, with 98 Degrees and Boyz 2 Men

Four different boy bands root down in Kansas City this weekend, though only one of them, One Direction, is made up of actual boys. The rest are full of middle-aged men now, and they need one another’s crowds to fill out an arena. NKOTB did a lap last year with Backstreet Boys (the legendary NKOTBSB tour). This year they’re joined by the lesser, Nick Lachey–led 98 Degrees, along with 1990s R&B balladeers Boyz 2 Men. Sunday, July 21, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Bob Log III’s fuzzy Delta blues runs toward the bawdy and the boozy — the crowd favorite “Boob Scotch,” for instance. The man’s eccentricity doesn’t stop there. Onstage, he wears a tinted motorcycle helmet rigged with a microphone inside. He also plays three instruments at once: slide guitar, bass drum and foot cymbal. On his song “One Man Band Boom,” he introduces himself thusly: “On cymbals, left foot. Over here on the bass drum we got right foot.” Locals Hillary Watts Riot and Drop a Grand open. Tuesday, July 23, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Vans Warped Tour

One Direction

Hearts of Darkness, with Stik Figa 

It’s summertime, and Hearts of Darkness is probably KC’s best summertime band. No matter that this is an indoor show — there’ll still be lots of sweaty, shaking bodies bumping up against each other. Bolstering the group’s brassy, expansive Afrobeat party here is an appearance from Top City rapper Stik Figa, whose new EP, Let You Tell It, just dropped. Friday, July 19, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)    

One Direction

Global Dance Festival

Such is the fragmentary nature of our modern culture that a trance heavyweight like BT (Brian Wayne Transeau) can have 665,000 Facebook fans but remain completely anonymous to people who read Pitchfork and Stereogum every day. (Sufjan Stevens has about 485,000 FB fans.) Ditto Sound Remedy, Bro Safari, Pantyraid and many of the other absurdly named EDM acts set to perform on the three stages the Midland has put up for this dance party. Friday, July 19, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

My hope was that I’d listen to the One Direction album a couple of times, ferret out a song I liked OK, and then write something about how the boy band isn’t so bad. There were a few Backstreet Boys and N’Sync songs I liked back in the day, so it seemed plausible that I’d connect with a track or two from a modern version. But after 15 minutes of sitting with Up All Night, it started to interfere with my mood. Another 10 minutes and I was legitimately pissed off. Granted, I’m not One Direction’s target audience. But this is some prohibitively ugly pop music — and I like ugly pop music. Friday, July 19, at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)  

F O R E C A S T

26

Vans Warped Tour, the national magnet for emo and punk bands and the troubled teens who buy their merch, arrives in Bonner Springs Tuesday. At the top of the bill are Motion City Soundtrack and Reel Big Fish. Further down, you’ll find the Beautiful Bodies, the long-running local dance-punk group that’s riding high after being crowned the winner of the renowned Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands earlier this year. (The Bodies also perform at the Riot Room on Saturday, July 20.) Gates open at 11 a.m., and the shows go all day. Stay hydrated. Tuesday, July 23, at Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400)    

Jamaican Jam

Ol’ Forecast doesn’t have occasion to give many shout-outs to Lee’s Summit, but sometimes it’s nice to do a little exploring in the burbs. Friday night, on Green Street on the City Hall Plaza in downtown Lee’s Summit, it’s all about reggae. Arm the Poor, Jah Lion, and AZ-ONE perform from 7 to 10:30 p.m. at what they’re calling Jamaican Jam. Bonus: It’s free. Friday, July 19, at City Hall Plaza, downtown Lee’s Summit (220 Southeast Green, 816-969-1500)

 

 

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

..................................................... Summer Jams

..................................................... Choreography

.....................................Unusual Stage Presence

.................................................. Locally Sourced

.......................... Misguided Fashion Statements

...........................................................Glowsticks

.............................................. Not Recommended

.................................................................... Free!

......................................................Dilated Pupils

.............................................................Shrieking

.............................................................. Strollers

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

F R I D AY, J U LY 19 Baauer & RL Grime, Ryan Hemsworth & Jim — E Stack: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Judy Tenuta: 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 0

 

Bob Log III

Ampichino: 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Buckwheat Zydeco: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Hundredth, Counterparts: 5 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Parallels, Akkilles, Ecstatics: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Judy Tenuta: 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

Bad Rabbits, Air Dubai, Sahtyre, DJ G Train: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Chubby Carrier: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Judy Tenuta: 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

M O N D AY, J U LY 2 2 Bridgit Mendler, Alex Aiono: 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Relient K, the Almost, the Rocketboys, Driver Friendly: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Dax Riggs, the Hotdog Skeletons: 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 2 3 Six Feet Under, Decrepit Birth, Cannabis Corpse, Marasmus, Torn the Fuck Apart: 5 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 2 4 Griffin House Band: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Dale Watson: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

FUTURECAST SATURDAY 27 Rick Springfield, Dustin Walker, Drew Six: The Midland

AUGUST THURSDAY 1 Flobots, Taste Bud G-Spot, Brain Food: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 2 Josh Gracin: Kanza Hall, Overland Park SUNDAY 4 Lukas Nelson & the Promise of the Real: Knuckleheads Saloon FRIDAY 9 Matt Nathanson: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District SUNDAY 18 Peter Frampton and B.B. King: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

27

OFFICIAL BALLOT

Winners will be announced August 11 at The Pitch Music Awards at the Uptown Theater and August 15 in The Pitch. JA Z Z ENSEMBLE ❑ Alaturka ❑ Diverse ❑ The KC Sound Collective ❑ Parallax ❑ The People’s Liberation Big Band ❑ Shades of Jade

OPEN 6AM THUR-SAT - SUNDAY BRUNCH AT 10AM 7/19 - UNFILTERED FRIDAY: P/H 10-12 7/20 MISSOURI STAND UP MUSIC 7/21 PUNK ROCK SUNDAY

JA Z Z SOLO ❑ Brandon Draper ❑ Eddie Moore ❑ Hermon Mehari ❑ Jeff Harshbarger ❑ Mark Lowrey

VISIT BLACKGOLDKC.COM FOR OTHER EVENTS 816-561-1099 • 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

REGG AE ❑ 77 Jefferson ❑ Arm the Poor ❑ Born in Babylon ❑ The New Riddim ROCK ❑ Cherokee Rock Rifle ❑ Gentleman Savage ❑ Man Bear ❑ Not a Planet ❑ Soft Reeds ❑ Sons of Great Dane ❑ The Caves ❑ Claque SINGER-SONGW RITER (FEMALE)

DJ ❑ Brent Tactic ❑ DJ G Train ❑ DJ Kimbarely Legal ❑ Mike Scott ❑ Shaun Flo ❑ Sheppa ❑ Spinstyles

• UPCOMING EVENTS •

7/17 MATINEE- HEAR KITTY KITTY & THE FABULOUS MISS WENDY 7/17 BLKHRTS, BLIND PETS, + BEARFACE & WEREWOLF NEBULA 7/18 THE MELISMATICS, JOHNNY BANGS 7/19 PHIL CREIGHTON'S BIRTHDAY BASH W/CHEROKEE ROCK RIFLE 7/20 RAQ’S BOHEME BELLY DANCERS 7/22 DAX RIGGS W/ THE HOT DOG SKELETONS 7/23 ELKHEART’S DOWNTOWN OUTLAW FIASCO W/ SCOTTY HOLLYWOOD HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 4PM - 7PM . MON-SAT

1531 GRAND KCMO

816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM

KITCHEN OPEN TIL 12:30AM!

AMERICAN A /BLUEGR ASS ❑ Dollar Fox ❑ John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons ❑ Olassa ❑ The Silver Maggies ❑ The Blackbird Revue ❑ The Grisly Hand ❑ Tiny Horse ❑ The Clementines AVANT-G ARDE ❑ Continents ❑ CS Luxem ❑ Expo ’70 ❑ Jorge Arana Trio ❑ Your Reflection ❑ Metatone

#pitchmusicshowcase

BLUES ❑ Grand Marquis ❑ Jason Vivone and the Billy Bats ❑ Katy Guillen ❑ Samantha Fish ❑ Trampled Under Foot ❑ Jeremy Butcher & the Bail Jumpers COUNTRY/ROCK ABILLY ❑ Adam Lee & the Dead Horse Sound Company ❑ Crybaby Ranch ❑ The Rumblejetts ❑ St. Dallas & the Sinners ❑ Starhaven Rounders ❑ The Blue Boot Heelers ❑ The Nace Brothers

LIV E AC T ❑ The Beautiful Bodies ❑ Cowboy Indian Bear ❑ The Dead Girls ❑ Hearts of Darkness ❑ Making Movies ❑ Radkey

EMERGING AC T ❑ Akkilles ❑ Oils ❑ Rev Gusto ❑ She’s a Keeper ❑ Y[our] Fri[end]

ME TAL /H ARD ROCK ❑ At the Left Hand of God ❑ Boreas ❑ Hammerlord ❑ Night Creation ❑ Torn the Fuck Apart

G AR AGE ❑ Bloodbirds ❑ The Conquerors ❑ The Empty Spaces ❑ Lazy ❑ Up the Academy

POP ❑ The ACBs ❑ Antennas Up ❑ Ghosty ❑ Hidden Pictures ❑ Shy Boys

HIP-HOP ❑ Gee Watts ❑ infO Gates ❑ MilkDrop ❑ Reach ❑ Rich the Factor ❑ Stik Figa ❑ The Popper

PUNK ❑ Bent Left ❑ Nature Boys ❑ No Class ❑ Pizza Party Massacre ❑ The Rackatees ❑ U.S.Americans

❑ Amy Farrand ❑ Heidi Gluck ❑ La Guerre ❑ Margo May SINGER-SONGW RITER (MALE)

❑ Ben Moats ❑ Erik Voeks ❑ Mat Shoare ❑ Ross Brown ❑ Sam Billen

music showcase special issue of the pitch

Aug 1

Showcase in westport

Aug 2 *Voting ends*

awards at the uptown theateR

Aug 11

winners published in the pitch

Aug 15

MAIL TO: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108, OR complete your ballot online at pitch.com

ANNOUNCING NEW CHEF

JAMES DAILEY!

ADOPT A DUCK HERE FOR CHILDREN’S TLC’S DUCK DERBY!

*RULES: Check one choice per category. One ballot per voter. Ballot stuffing will be detected. Original ballots only (no photocopies or other reproductions). Entries may be filled out online or mailed to The Pitch, or completed at any Showcase venue on the evening of August 2. Tickets to the August 2 Pitch Music Showcase cost $6 through July 19, $8 from July 20 through August 1, or $10 the day of the event. They’re available at The Pitch office and all of the Showcase venues: the Riot Room, Californos, RecordBar, Outdoor Stage and southcommevents.com/pitchmusic. Tickets to the August 11 Pitch Music Awards show are $6 in advance or $10 the day of the event, available at the Uptown Theater box office, 816-753-8665 or ticketmaster.com (VIP tickets: $20 in advance or $25 the day of the event).

1715 MAIN | 816.421.4799 | KCBULLDOG.COM 28

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

❑ Yes! Please include me on the pitch.com e-mail list so I can be the first to hear about exciting, upcoming events and promotions.

Name: Address: City: Phone:

State: E-mail:

Zip:

95569.7 – The Pitch – 07-18-2013

robert Cray

Dave Mason

eDDie Griffin

travis

steve vai

blUe oCtober

august 23, 2013

september 15, 2013

september 21, 2013

september 29, 2013

December 8 , 2013

october 27, 2013

UPCoMinG sHoWs: 7/19 flirt friday 7/20 Ultimate DJ summer series

7/27 voodoo Presents Musical blades: faire and back again

8/2

at vooDoo!

Kilroy Presents: elvis bash

7/26 blue Corner battles 1-800-745-3000

  •  VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

pitch.com V1_95569.7_4.776x9.8125_4c_Ad.indd 1

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

29

7/10/13 4:49 PM

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

F R I D AY 19 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. One Headlight High, Get Busy Living, First Things First, Faithful Distortion, Forget About Tomorrow, 6 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Melismatics, Johnny Bangs. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. Electric Needle Room, Fake Fancy, Four Arm Shiver, Something & the Whatevers, 8 p.m.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Damned by the Pope, Waltz of the Rabid, Enemies Laid to Rest, At the Left Hand of God, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Filthy 13. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Wonderfuzz, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Pedaljets, New Franklin Panthers, 10 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Dolls on Fire, 8 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Kilroy presents Monsters of Metal, 6:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Katie Guillen, 7:30 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Kirsten Thien, 8 p.m.; Jimmie Bratcher, 8 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. The Old Crows with Mo Paul, 9 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816E 531-7878. The MGD’s, 9 p.m. MOR Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Trampled Under Foot CD-release show with S G IN the Coco Butter Band, 8:30 p.m. LIST E AT IN Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., ONL M Overland Park, 913-239-9666. PITCH.CO Monsters Inc., 9 p.m.

T H U R S D AY 18 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Bo & the Locomotive, Pretty, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. La Guerre, the Blackbird Revue, Monster, 7:30 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Justin Murray.

DJ The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Titties. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Think 2wice Thursdays with Brent Tactic & friends. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Ajays. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Black & Blue Thursdays with Cyan. Port Fonda: 4141 Pennsylvania, 816-216-6462. Live Free or Die with DJ Keenan, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Eddie Moore & the Outer Circle, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Stan Kessler Latin Trio.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The New Suits, the Busted String Band, 9 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Granger Smith, Earl Dibbles Jr., 7 p.m. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Travis Marvin, 7 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. A Road Ahead, 6:30 p.m.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with Lady D., 5:30 p.m.; Lee Langston with Kyle Turner, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & the Blisstonians. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. Johnny Cascone’s Italian Restaurant: 6863 W. 91st St., Overland Park, 913-381-6837. Jim Mair Duo, 6:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Trio, Fridays, 7 p.m. Mutual Musicians Foundation: 1823 Highland Ave., 816-4715212. Late-night jam session, 1 a.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Andy McGhie Ensemble, 8 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Joey Cool, 10 p.m. The Chesterfield: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Pablo Francisco, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball league night, 8 & 9 p.m.

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

JAZZ/LOUNGE

The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Shay Estes’ Brazilian Party, 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Flirt Friday, 9 p.m.

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jeremy Joyce & David George, 8 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Marcus Words, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Jacknife Jones, 7 p.m.

the pitch

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Gusto Coffee Bistro: 3390 S.W. Fascination Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-767-1100. Euphorics. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Hot & Ugly, Pony Boy, This Is My Condition, Heroic Dose, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Me Like Bees, Antennas Up, Abandon Kansas, 8 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC

30

CLUB

Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. 1 Oz. Jig, Monzie Leo & the Big Sky, 8 p.m. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Hazard County. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. The John Joiner Band. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyrannosaurus Chicken. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Railers. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Paper Buffalo, 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Phil Vandel, 9 p.m. Scott Peery, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. The Adlers, 8 p.m.

pitch.com

VA R I E T Y Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Slam Radio Summer Jam, 6:30 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Cherokee Rock Rifle, Souless, Adam Lee & Brooke Blanche, 9 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Pablo Francisco, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Winter Wonderland Party, 8 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 0 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Red Line Chemistry, Mad Libby, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Bulletproof Tiger, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ricky Dean Sinatra, 7 p.m.; Cowboy Winter, 10:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Phil Neal & The Wornalls, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Unknown Stuntman, Circle of Trust, KTP, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m.; Levee Town, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Experience. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brody Buster, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brandon Miller Band, 7 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Toe Jam Band, 8 p.m. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Crawfish Pie.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Claire & the Crowded Stage, Tenderness Wilderness, Appropriate Grammar, Ally Peeler, 9:30 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Beautiful Bodies, Grenadina, the Strive, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. The Depth & Whisper, 8 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. The Purple Party — A tribute to Prince with Diverse and DJ Mike Scott, 8 p.m.

DJ Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip at Reserve Bar, 8 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. ThePhantom*, 10:30 p.m. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Kidtwist. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Kimbarely Legal, Brent Tactic, 10 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Stolen Winnebagos. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Strikeback. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Adam Thomas, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Danny Cox Quartet, 4 p.m. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Chasing Grace, the Walltalkers. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Earl Baker Band, 2-6 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Detour with Madame E, 9 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. DJ Dance the Night Away, 9 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. The Floozies, Zoogma, Freddy Todd, Purusa, 6:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Pablo Francisco, 7 & 9:45 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Ultimate Karaoke Summer Series, 6 p.m.

S U N D AY 21 I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Island Apart, Plains, Chris Hannemann, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Buildings, Jabber Josh, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Ben Leifer’s Plus Minus, 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Mike Herrera Ensemble, 7 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Cowgirl’s Trainset CD-release show with the KC Bear Fighters, 6-9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Earl Baker Band, 8-11 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Kyle Turner Band with Lee Langston, 7 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Joe Cartwright Trio, 9 p.m. Johnny Cascone’s Italian Restaurant: 6863 W. 91st St., Overland Park, 913-381-6837. Jim Mair Duo, 6:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Trio, 7 p.m. Mutual Musicians Foundation: 1823 Highland Ave., 816-4715212. Late-night jam session, 1 a.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Necessity Brass Band, 8 p.m.

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center: 30 W. Pershing Rd., Ste. 700, 816-474-3848. An Seisiun, an Irish jam session, 1-4 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Rockin’ Blues, Brews & BBQ Jam, 4-8 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Steady States, the Wheelers, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Prestige Poker League, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Pablo Francisco, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Summer Scooter Jam with the New Riddim and DJ Johnny 2Tone, 6 p.m. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Karaoke with Mike Perez, 3 p.m.

SLICK RICK • SPICE 1 • MC EIHT • PMD GLC • JAMES CHRISTOS • THE POPPER • DJ FRESH • DJ SPINSTYLES • THE KNUX • XTA-C • GEE WATTS • OOBERGEEK • CAM B • NITE OWL • AWDAZCATE HYMNLAYAS • QUEEN RHO • HEARTFELT ANARCHY • AVA BELLA • KCPL • DRUNKEN MONKEE • KING KIHEI • STEPHSTAA • EEMS • URBANIZE MUSIC THE HILLSIDERZ • LOOGEY • P2L • BLUNT RAP • NO HANDOUTS • WATCH CITY • LOU RIP • SIR ADAMS • DREADSWILLA • JPZ • BUCCS • POINDEXTER NELSON EL • LADY FLIPSIDE • LENO XTR • LEL • SAND GOD MC STORM • COA • XTRA MID • B VAX • KILLZ • THE SENATE • JUAN • NARDO • L ONE • IR NEKO HUEY P • DEMOND JONES • SNUCC • WURM & THE MADNESS • RYAN YOUNG FOREST • FIGHT CLUB • ENVY • MIC OFFICIAL • D ROCCA • YOUNG SCAR SPG’S • MILK DROP • SKRIBBLE • ABNORM • RHYMOCIDE • TBUN3 • THROWBAKC • KINGPEN COALITION • POKAFACE • K VALENTINE • BROOKS • DUKE BEN G • MIZZ NEKOLE • TD • SPADES • CHRIS LEAN • BBP • YOUNG DALLAZ & ZEN • Q MONEY • BINKY • KDS • BIG BEN • POPPA WILLOW • MSG CTRL MID RANGE MUSIC • DJ SETS BY JOC MAXX • BRIAN B SHYNIN • ROB G • DJ HYLANDA • URSP1 • JOEY BOUNCE • JAMEL ROCKWELL & MANY MORE!

BUY SINGLE DAY PASS OR ALL ACCESS 3 DAY PASS AT THERIOTROOM.COM pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

31

M O N D AY 2 2

MON: RURAL GRIT 6PM // K ARAOKE 10PM FRI 7/19 PIR ATE DJ THUND ERCUTZ MON 7/22 VISICLAND PARTY TO FRI 7/26 BLA R & PENNY - 6PM CK BIRD REVIE W, TUE 7/30 BMINONTH OF MAY, THE WELD ING FRI 8/9 CR GO - 8PM OSSED WIRES THE QUIVERS , DECO AUTO,

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Dsodean, the Please Please Me, DJ Lee of Scratch Track, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Volcano Veins, Gold Rush, My Oh My, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Brad Williams, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Tom Smith, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chris Foster.

VA R I E T Y

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo, 6-9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Costume Night, 9:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. Rhythm and Booze: 423 Southwest Blvd., 816-221-2669. Geeks Who Drink, 7:30 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 3 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. FreedomClutch, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Brain Food, the Bumping Uglies, Something & the Whatevers, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Dark Seas, Kill Noise Boys, Is Paris Burning, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Experience.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

A

uGust d

2n—

OUTSIDE

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Please Please Me, Ryan Reid, 8 p.m.

S 7:00

Y

reach HIP-HOP

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND

INSIDE

8:00

S

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, Scotty Hollywood, 7 p.m.

8:00

info gates HIP-HOP gentleman savage ROCK 9:00 9:15 GEE WATTS HIP-HOP not a planet rock 10:00 10:30 stik figa HIP-HOP 11:00 antennas up pop MIKE SCOTT DJ sons of great dane rock11:45 1:00

SHEPPA DJ

hammerlord metal

1:00

Y BANDS & TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

S-—--———————— 4048 Broadway St, KCMO 64111 | 816.442.8179 32

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright and Duck Warner, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Paul Shinn Trio, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase with Scott Ford, 7 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Frank Rardon, 8:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Sam Vicari, Isabel Zacharias. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dan Bliss. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Joel McNulty. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Crayons, 7 p.m.; Rock, Paper, Scissors.

VA R I E T Y Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Geeks Who Drink Trivia, 8 p.m.

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Ladies’ Night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Karaoke with Paul Nelson. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night, 7:30 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Karaoke with Mike Perez, 7 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer pong tournament, 9:30 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 2 4 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Salty Dawg. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Iron Mike Norton, 7 p.m.; Gospel Lounge with Annie Mack, 7:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus Trio, 7 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sam Vicari, the Author and the Illustrator St. Lux, 7:30 p.m.

DJ Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night, 8 p.m., no cover. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Cream with the KC Disco Club.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Lone Time Goners, Bonnie Montgomery Band, Loaded Goat, 8:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Jon Wolfe, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Ernie’s Steakhouse & Kross Lounge: 605 N. Sterling, Independence, 816-254-9494. Blues jam hosted by Rick Eidson. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Westport Girlz, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Mike Baldwin’s homecoming show, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Comedy Night, 9:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Godemis of CES Cru, Ebony Tusks, the Other Elements, Milkdrop, Sir Adams, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Willie Barcena, 8 p.m.

7439 Broadway in Waldo~| shotstopwaldo.com

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka

City

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

33

KC’s #1 dateline WILD LOCAL

S AVA G E L O V E

BOY T R O U B L E

GUYs & Girls (800) 409-Meet

6 3 38 *Free to browse and listen

BY

D A N S AVA G E

HOT CHAT real HooKUPs ALL MALE LOCAL CHAT

( 866 ) 779-MALE 6 2 5 3 www.localgayconnections.com

in love with each other, and (2) you’re actually into men. You can’t resolve those doubts until you’ve acknowledged them, which means a truth-telling, doubts-airing, non-role-playing Skype session is in order.

Dear Dan: I am a young gay man who has been so freaked out by the idea of catching an STI that I haven’t gotten with anyone for two years. But last night, I hooked up with a cute 21-yearold FTM trans boy, and maybe because it was a person with lady parts, I let caution go, and no condom was used. How worried should I be about having made a baby with a person who is way too young to have one?

Cautious Homo in Loopy Dilemma P.S. He is on hormone therapy. Dear CHILD: Here’s a good rule of thumb for all you sex-havers out there: A new sex friend who’ll have unprotected sex with you has probably had unprotected sex with other sex friends. Yes, yes, typically cautious people have been known to “let caution go” on rare occasions. It happens. But the odds that two typically cautious people will both simultaneously decide to “let caution go” and have unprotected sex with a brand-new sex friend just this once are pretty slim. “This person who’s having unprotected sex with me is having unprotected sex with other people” is a far more reasonable assumption than “This person who’s having unprotected sex with me would never have unprotected sex with anyone else.” Which means you should be less concerned with pregnancy — your sparkly new concern — and more concerned with that old concern of yours, sexually transmitted infections. The odds that you got that FTM trans boy pregnant are pretty slim; there’s only a 1-in-20 chance that a single act of unprotected penis-invagina sex will result in pregnancy. The fact that this guy is on hormone therapy may make him slightly less likely to conceive. But if your cute hookup was having unprotected sex with others, then you’re at greater risk of acquiring an STI than you are of acquiring an heir. Go and get tested, and while you wait for your results, ponder this: Health workers and HIV-prevention educators say the more freaked out someone is by the idea of catching an STI, the likelier that person is to have unprotected sex when he or she does have sex. So working to conquer your irrational fear of STIs — and actually having sex once in a while — will leave you less likely to contract one. Dear Dan: Twenty-one-year-old furfag here. I

consider myself a bi guy. I check out men and women (femmy guys and cute girls), but I’m a virgin. I have a boyfriend of three years, and we role-play online. He’s sweet, nice and sometimes a stubborn dick, but otherwise always there for me. We met online, and I fell in love with his personality two years before we traded pics. He’s totally OK-looking, average, and I’m fine with

34

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

this because he’s a sweetheart. He’s also four years my senior. I’m working on my bachelor’s and trying to get into graduate school. He swears that no matter where I go, he’ll follow me. Is this a strange relationship? I know it’s unorthodox, but is it a bad move? I don’t want to ruin his life. What if we meet and try gaying it up, and I’m not into it? It’s my senior year, and I think I love him. I’m certainly more fond of him than any other relationship I’ve been in. Sex doesn’t hold a big interest for me, and porn doesn’t do ANYTHING for me — gay, straight, it’s like watching a sweaty, breathy anatomy class. I’ve never even masturbated. Am I going about this wrong?

Fella Unsure Regarding Feelings About Gayness Dear FURFAG: Maybe I’m behind the times —

maybe I just don’t get this “online relationship” stuff — but I don’t think two people who’ve never met in real life (IRL) should be planning a future together. Attraction is about more than just shared interests, emotional compatibility and kinks in common. There’s an ephemeral, unquantifiable aspect to attraction, something that can be established only when you’re face to face/tongue to tongue. Call me old-fashioned, but I don’t think you can know for sure that it’s love — a love worth moving across the country for — until you’ve tasted each other’s spit. Don’t get me wrong: I think it’s great that you two got together, and I don’t doubt that there’s a real connection. One of the wonderful things about the Internet is the way it brings people with rare kinks together. And sometimes people with uncommon kinks have to go to uncommon lengths to be together, which can include taking a big risk like moving across the country to be with the furfag of your dreams. But before you do that, or before you let him do that, you need to meet in person at least once to establish that (1) you’re actually

Dear Dan: I’m a 19-year-old gay guy in a relationship with an 18-year-old gay guy (for nearly four years). My boyfriend and I have a good sex life, but I rarely get to top him. We’re both versatile on paper, but the actual act of getting penetrated is almost always painful or uncomfortable for my boyfriend, even with plenty of lubrication and preparation. I’m frustrated because I know it’s not his fault, but I sometimes feel that he isn’t putting in enough effort to try to bottom for me. Additionally, it’s hard for me to understand how he feels because bottoming is never painful for me, and I enjoy it a lot. We’ve discussed the possibility of my topping another guy (alone or in a threesome), and he isn’t opposed to the idea, but I’d much rather it be my boyfriend. Is there any way we can make bottoming pleasurable for him?

Ready to Top Dear RTT: The best way to determine if your boyfriend is a natural-born top — not into getting fucked, never will be into getting fucked — is to sideline your dick for the time being. Explore his ass, and his capacity to experience anal pleasure, without fucking him. Get some small anal toys that aren’t designed for in-and-out play but set-and-forget play: a few butt plugs, one or two small vibrating eggs. Pop one in his ass and then let him fuck yours. If you can take the pressure off your boyfriend while getting a toy in him, he may begin to associate having something in his ass with pleasure. If he can do that, he may be able to graduate to your cock. Good luck. Dear Dan: I’m a 21-year-old gay boy with a kinky side that I keep pretty private. (Total twink — you wouldn’t know what I’m into by looking at me.) I went to London in June to get with a guy who has an amazing dungeon. I spent a week being his slave boy and getting tied up and caged, and I had a blast. He posted some pictures of me to his porny Tumblr, which I was OK with, but some gossipy vanilla boys I go to school with recognized me, even though my face was blurred out. NO! What do I say to them?!?

Kinked Twink Dear KT: “I had a blast.” The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

GET ON TO OFF. GET OFF TRY FOR FREE!

816-533-0046 More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en Espa単ol / 18+

The fastest growing social network for men who like men

pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

35

OutdooR stage westport rd. / mill st.

• Five New Young Asian Girls Work Everyday•

AuGust d

2n—

7:45

nds! B— & dj’S

OPEN 7 DAYS • 10:30AM - 10:00PM

WALK -I N S WELC OME Credit Card • Debit Card •Cash

810 N RIDGEVIEW RD OLATHE KS 66061

6

— ! B u c ks ntil

u th ly 19 j $8 july 20 - AUGUST 1 u $10 DAY OF

Y BANDS & TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

A SIAN MA SSAGE JUST OPENED

Nice Friendly Kind Asian Staff are waiting for you

---WESTPORT —- —RD.—&— ————— MILL ST. | 816.561.6061 S

913.390.0008

Soft Breeze Spa

785-856-4994 23rd Street Lawrence, KS 2331 Alabama Street Suite #103

X

Haskell

Regional Qualifiers

• G RA N D O P E N I N G •

Y

Y

dancefestopia DJS

25

Alabama

11:00

Deep tissue / Swedish /4 hands Let us pamper your body with exquisite skill CASH / Credit / Debit

Naismith

9:45

WAlk-iNS OPEN 7 DAYS -10:30AM-10PM WElcOME 913-469-1616

13410 CoLLege BLVD LeneXA,Ks 66210

Y

oils emerging/indie rock 8:45 john velghe americana making movies rock

The BesT AsiAn MAssAge in Town

v

S

licensed massage

YOUR WISH IS YOUR COMMAND

Ancient discovery used by the rich and famous allows you to manifest whatever you desire! Money, love, power, luck, and health can be yours! Call 877 283 6559 for a free CD revealing the SECRET!

NEW SALON • GREAT OPPORTUNITY! •NEW WESTPORT LOCATION• We are looking for several motivated stylists to join our exciting mens only store and work in a fun atmosphere at one of the fastest growing hair care companies in the country. Sportclips experience is a plus, but not necessary. Come work in a fast paced environment in comfortable athletic attire. You will deliver the championship haircut experience that the brand promises.

COMPENSATION

Hourly base salary•Personal bonus & commission•Great tips

BENEFITS

Paid vacations & holidays•Medical benefits available Continuing training program•Exciting contests & rewards No more sweeping•Central vacuum system in every store Comfortable sports attire•No perms or colors Have fun & love where you work REQUIREMENTS Valid cosmetology license We are a Values Based Company. Meaning we treat our Team Members the way we want to be treated, with mutual respect & a dedication to excellence.

Motivated professional attitude, along with the ability to adapt to new ideas & skills. Come join our team! What are you waiting for,

CALL US TODAY AT 816 399-3915

36

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EvENt StaFF, USHERS, tIckEt takERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING FOR EVENT SERVICES

(Banquet/Catering/Experience Required)

ASST. RESTAURANT MANAGER ASST. BANQUET SET-UP MANAGER RESTAURANT SUPERVISOR COCKTAIL SERVER

APPLY IN PERSON ANYTIME: 200 W. 12TH ST, KCMO | EOE | GREAT BENEFITS/GREAT LOCATION

Want a New Career?

pitch.com/virtualjobfair pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

37

Park Apartments

First Class Living in Downtown Overland Park

2 BR/1 Bath in Overland Park

Only $655!

913.381.6666 • www.parkapartments.org theparkaptsleasing@yahoo.com 79th & Metcalf, Overland Park KS

Bring in this ad for $10 off application fee or deposit!

38

the pitch

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

DO YOU WANT TO

BUY LOCAL

FOR HALF OFF?

WELL ,

NOW YOU CAN! .com

F i n d trhf ee c t p l a c e to e pe

. T R A E H r u h a n g yo

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios FREE Downtown Area

$126/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

Month to Month Lease! On Site Loundry Facility

All Utilities Cable TV (816) 221-1721 Paid

APPLICATION WHEN YOU BRING IN THIS AD

HOUSE • LOFT• APARTMENT • ROOM• DUPLEX

&

Classifieds pitch.com

J U LY 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

39

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

816.218.6702 816.218.6759

EvEry PErsonal Injury CasE DEsErvEs FoCusED & PErsonal rEPrEsEntatIon

PlazaInjurylaw.com

wErE you InjurED?

435 Nichols Rd, Ste. 200 Kansas City, MO 64112

donovan@plazainjurylaw.com

PLEASE CALL ME AT 816.977.2680 SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

JULY 18-24, 2013

CALLING ALL WOMEN!

Are you a healthy woman between the ages of 18-65? If so you may qualify to participate in clinical research trials at our clinic in Lenexa, KS You Can Help Advance Medicine! Call PRA Today! 913-410-2900

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

ACTION-SPORTS

816-455-6319

* PA Y M E N T P L A N AVA I L A B L E *

KC MARRIOTT-Downtown NOW HIRING

Event Services(Banquet/Catering Exp. Req. Asst. Restaurant Mngr-Asst. Banquet Set-up Mngr-Restaurant Supervisor-Cocktail Server Apply In Person Anytime 200 W. 12th St.

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

WE BUY MAGIC THE GATHERING

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations. 816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON 435 NICHOLS ROAD STE 200 KCMO 64112

816.977.2763

W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

lifestylesofkc.com

NEW LOCATION-call for details House Parties Every Friday & Saturday Night. Hot Tub, Dance Pole, Live DJ, Pool Table 913-742-0022

BANKRUPTCY, KS, MO

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

P.I.--Work Comp.--DUI/DWI Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher www.bratcherlaw.biz

816-453-2240

HOTEL ROOMS

INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call 913-789-7477 For Your Free Copy Of

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331

"KANSAS & MISSOURI AUTO ACCIDENT VICTIM'S GUIDEBOOK"

6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd.

Written by: Mike Sexton

HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

BANKRUPTCY, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--DUI/DWI Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

lifestylesofkc.com

NEW LOCATION-call for details House Parties Every Friday & Saturday Night. Hot Tub, Dance Pole, Live DJ, Pool Table 913-742-0022

CALLING ALL WOMEN!

Are you a healthy woman between the ages of 18-65? If so you may qualify to participate in clinical research trials at our clinic in Lenexa, KS You Can Help Advance Medicine! Call PRA Today! 913-410-2900

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

HOTEL ROOMS SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

WE BUY MAGIC THE GATHERING ACTION-SPORTS

816-455-6319

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691


The Pitch: July 18, 2013