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Kansas City Pitch

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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NOVEMBER 22–28, 2012 | VOL. 32 NO. 21 E D I T O R I A L

HOMOPHOBIA AT KU

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Joe Miller, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Nadia Imafidon

Survey says KU doesn’t get LGBT. BY B E N PA L O S A A R I

7

SEEING IT THROUGH

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Director of Accounting Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Online Content/Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

At Subterranean, an engaging cross-section of Curatorial Studies BY THERESA BEMBNISTER

16

B A C K P A G E . C O M

“THIS IS BOND LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN HIM BEFORE. ” IN A WORD: . Peter Travers

WOW

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

B AR N I N THE U. S. A . The silenced Drum Room gives way to a warm Providence. BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

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C O P Y R I G H T

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ON T HE COVE R

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BROOKE VANDEVER

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ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE CEO Tim League sits closer than you do. The five best HOSTESS CAMEOS in film. COLE LINDBERGH, local This American Life star, has a song for you.

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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Artist and writer

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Occupation: Producer and host, Artspeak Radio; founding member, Latino Writers Collective; member, the Ukulele Fight Club

Hometown: Kansas City Current neighborhood: Independence Who or what is your sidekick? My iPod

“In five years, I’ll be …” Schlepping my bass fiddle to gigs.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? American Horror Story

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Indie and local music

What movie do you watch at least once a year? What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Study gorillas in their natural habitat. What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Jack Stack in Martin City Where do you drink? Joe’s Standard in Blue Springs

What’s your favorite charity? Chain of Hope

E AT

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M

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: No one

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Seriously, I avoid First Fridays. Ick!

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: The enormous egos of others

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Smithsonian

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” Union Station was restored. Imag-

Last book you read: Global Babies, by the Global Fund for Children

ine the untold stories of folks throughout its history.

Favorite day trip: Lawrence

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Overdevel-

What is your most embarrassing dating moment?

“Kansas City needs …” To quit being in the middle of the country and move a little more to the north — perhaps we would experience cooler summers, yes?

Interesting brush with the law? Arrested for civil disobedience at Whiteman Air Force Base.

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Am

Artspeak Radio on KKFI 90.1 Community Radio

“On my day off, I like to …” Play my ukulele and

run. Not at the same time.

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Q&As

IN ONL

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Jack Black

and nothing is that important for me to follow on Twitter. There, I said it.

really shy. Yes, it’s true. Sort of.

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

MORE

Music

oped in all directions. Stupid overdevelopment.

THE PITCH

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Dia de los Muertos at Mattie Rhodes

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Legacy

Cascone’s

6

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

I’ve forgotten because I’ve been married forever. Phew, dodged that bullet.

Describe a recent triumph: Producer and host of Listen to Vasquez Boyd and Blair Schulman on 90.1’s Artspeak Radio. Check kkfi.org for the schedule.

PLOG

SURVEY SAYS: HOMOPHOBIA AT KU

BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

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University of Kansas faculty say anti-LGBT sentiments on campus are common.

A

survey released November 16 regarding faculties at Kansas’ seven state universities reveals that University of Kansas professors believe homophobia is commonplace on campus. As one KU respondent put it, “AntiGLBT discrimination is the norm in the unit and school levels quite often.” The Kansas Conference of the American Association of University Professors sent the survey to faculties at Kansas State University, the University of Kansas, Fort Hays State, Emporia State, the KU School of Medicine, Pittsburg State and Wichita State. It asked more than 4,000 faculty members at those schools to rate their institutions report-card style — from A to F — on 39 statements across a variety of topics of university governance. The results show that KU’s employees believe the university does a poor job of including faculty in university governance. More glaring than that were KU’s terrible marks for fostering inclusion of GLBT faculty members. “University [is] OK,” a KU respondent wrote. “[The] school is fundamentally homophobic.” “GLBT — beware of parts of KU,” added another. Allegations of institutional homophobia aren’t new at KU. A Pitch feature story in April (“Denied,” April 12, 2012) profiled Albert Romkes, a KU assistant professor of mechanical engineering who is gay and was denied tenure under questionable circumstances. Romkes was told that the denial was due to his failure to line up enough grants. However, Romkes had secured a major federal grant. The university had also cited new rules — rules that had never been applied to another faculty member — to deny him tenure. Several professors and dozens of students argued that the real reason Romkes — who had won teaching awards and was highly regarded by peers — was let go was because of his sexuality. The university denied the charges. In October, the Kansas Conference of AAUP sent the survey to faculty members. About 8.25 percent of faculty members responded. The survey asked faculty to grade the university on several topics including how influential the faculty is on budget matters, how part-time employees are treated and how well minority educators are included. The survey also asked respondents to grade their institution on the following statement: “The campus community discourages discrimination and fosters participation, inclusion and leadership by GLBT faculty members.” Faculty at KU rated the school a low C-minus. Of the Sunf lower State’s other universities, only Pittsburg State received a C-minus grade. The average grade for the state’s other seven institutions was a C. An almost identical survey statement replaced “campus community” with “school or college.” KU again ranked lowest with a C-minus. Fort Hays’ faculty graded the school

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B BC+ C CESU

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a slightly higher C-minus. The average score was a C-plus. Jill Jess, director of KU News Service, defended the university’s governance and inclusivity in a statement. “The University of Kansas has a long, productive history of shared governance, and we continue to believe in its importance to the future of the institution,” Jess said. “We’re disappointed that some of the faculty who responded to this survey have concerns and will continue to work to ensure all feel welcome at the university.” Aerospace engineering professor Ron Barrett-Gonzalez, who has been a vocal critic of KU’s handling of Romkes, says his colleague likely influenced KU’s low marks. “It’s clear that Albert’s case is on people’s minds” he says. “And had this survey been put out a year or two prior, I suspect that the numbers would be different.” Romkes says he’s pleased that his fight with KU administrators stuck with the faculty. “I’m glad that this is out,” Romkes says. “The most important purpose it serves is it’s a warning for people in LGBT communities when they consider faculty positions at KU. I’m not saying they shouldn’t come, but be aware of what people at KU honestly think of LGBT issues on campus.” K U economics professor Moha med El-Hodiri, president of the KU chapter of the Kansas Conference of the AAUP, says the survey’s results shouldn’t surprise anyone. “Homophobia is alive and well at the University of Kansas,” says El-Hodiri, who has taught at KU since 1968. El-Hodiri says KU officials, specifically Richard Lariviere and Jeffrey S. Vitter, former and current provosts respectively, treat “the university like a junior high school,” with little collegiality between faculty and administrators. “The university has been drifting for a long time,” he says. The survey’s results could spur changes at the university, El-Hodiri says, but it isn’t likely to affect rank-and-file faculty members concerned about keeping their jobs.

KU

KUMC

PSU

WSU

KU is ranked the lowest of all the state of Kansas’ institutions. “It’s not going to change the minds of my spineless colleagues because they made up their minds; they’re not going to rock the boat,” El-Hodiri says. “Maybe their bosses will realize that you can’t get away with that [homophobia] anymore.” Both professors argue that the survey could severely hurt the university’s reputation. The AAUP could censure KU, Barrett-Gonzalez says. The AAUP censures universities when “conditions for academic freedom and tenure are unsatisfactory.” It’s largely a symbolic move, but censure could possibly lead to the school being dropped by the prestigious Association of American Universities. “Being on the AAUP sanction list or censure list is pretty much a guarantee that you’re going to get kicked out of the AAU,” BarrettGonzalez says. “So it’s especially troublesome to the administration.” Last year, the AAU expelled the University of Nebraska for failing to keep up with the robust research programs of its peers. Furthermore, the professors worry that the survey could turn off current and potential faculty members of KU. “Within academia, discrimination of any sort is considered to be really uncool,” Barrett-Gonzalez says. “A lot of people who are at the top of their profession, they’re extremely mobile. And if something doesn’t smell right at one place, they find a great slot in another spot.” El-Hodiri says KU is simply not attractive to top academic minds. Vitter, the provost, is asking professors for recommendations for 12 distinguished “foundation professor” positions that the Kansas Legislature funded with $3 million this year. “What does he have on his list [of recommended hires] for economics? All the Nobel Prize winners for economics,” El-Hodiri says. “Why would anyone want to come to a university like this?”

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THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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KAUFFMAN DAUGHTER LAUREN LAPOINTE CAN AFFORD TO TAKE UP BALLROOM DANCE, BUT SHE SAYS SHE CAN’T AFFORD TO LOSE.

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BY CHARLES FERRUZZA PHHOTOG OOTTOG O RRAAPH PHYY BY DIAANNNA NA NARO R TSKI TSSKI

f U.S. ballroom dance had a Super Bowl, it would be the Ohio Star Ball. Held for the past 35 years at the Hyatt Regency in Columbus, Ohio, it’s the final big annual competition on the Pro-Am DanceSport circuit, a six-day event for amateurs and professionals. It involves hundreds of contestants, 70 judges, three masters of ceremonies, two DJs — and, this time, one extremely well-heeled Kansas Citian. Lauren LaPointe has spent the past year preparing for this event. She’s the daughter of an elite, high-profile figure — Julia Irene Kauffman, one of Kansas City’s wealthiest women — and she understands that this has always invited a certain scrutiny. “I think everyone is judged. It’s human nature to make assumptions about people,” she says. “And because of my name, I’m used to being judged on all kinds of levels.” She has come to Ohio to be judged differently. But she has learned to be judged as a dancer only recently, and she’s about to put herself in front of a battery of former competitive ballroom dancers and dance teachers. These judges are, by defi nition, critical — about technique and costumes and personal appearance. “The way you look and the costumes you wear are very critical in the judging process,” says LaPointe, who has lost 45 pounds this year while also enduring several painful laser treatments to have upper-body tattoos permanently removed. “I didn’t want anything to take away from the image I’m trying to portray on the dance floor.” It’s an image she has worked hard to build from scratch in a very short span of time — an image apart from the one she inherited in Kansas City.

D

on’t call LaPointe an heiress. She hates that word. Don’t say she’s a socialite, either. She hates that term even more. OK, how about philanthropist? “My family supports the arts in Kansas City,” she says. “But my mother is the philanthropist.” In the Kansas City arts community, Julia Irene Kauff man does indeed run the dance floor. A longtime supporter of the Kansas City Ballet (one of her mother’s pet projects), she oversees the Muriel McBrien Kauff man Foundation and was appointed to the Ewing Kauffman Foundation board of trustees last February. Hers is perhaps the first name in local wealth. Julia Irene Kauffman’s mother, the late Muriel McBrien Kauffman, married the billionaire Ewing Marion Kauff man in 1962, when Julia was 12 years old; he later adopted Julia, and she took his name. Ewing M. Kauffman, the founder of the pharmaceutical company Marion Laboratories (which reported revenues of continued on page 10

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Step by Step continued from page 9 $930 million in 1989, the year it merged with Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals; both firms are now part of French-based Sanofi), was bestknown as the owner of the Kansas City Royals baseball team from 1969 until his death in 1993. After Muriel’s death in 1995, her estate was left primarily to Julia and the foundation bearing her name. It was a significant enough inheritance that Julia Irene Kauffman paid $31.3 million in estate taxes the following year. Lauren Muriel-Marion LaPointe is Julia’s middle daughter, from her second marriage to Canadian Richard Wayne LaPointe. (The couple divorced when Lauren was 5 years old. LaPointe died in Canada two years ago.) LaPointe is divorced and a single mother currently in a long-distance romance with a doctor in California. Her 13-year-old daughter, Brittany, is also a dancer — she had the lead role in the Kansas City Ballet’s The Nutcracker several years ago. “She has beautiful taste and a beautiful home,” a friend says of LaPointe. “She really doesn’t need to do anything.” So what do you call this 39-year-old woman who happens to be the granddaughter of the legendary Kauff man couple (and the daughter of one of Kansas City’s wealthiest women, Julia Irene Kauff man)? Simple: She’s a dancer. A very serious competitive ballroom dancer. “I set a goal for myself last year, before I even knew I could be a ballroom dancer,” LaPointe says. “I wanted to be a world champion.”

T

he Star Ball is the seventh dance competition that LaPointe has entered since committing to her goal in 2011. “I’ve gotten a lot of first-place ribbons — second place and third place, too,” LaPointe tells me on the third day of the Ohio event. “But the real honor was the opportunity to do a solo number for the judges. Not many new dancers are ever given that chance.” She and her coach and dance partner, Louis Bar, have come here expecting to compete in at least 198 heats, each about 90 grueling seconds. And for their turn away from the usual crowded floor full of fellow dancers, they’ve worked up a Victor/Victoria cabaret number that involves a quick costume change. “While we’re dancing,” LaPointe

example). And the late Rebekah Harkness — whose husband was a Standard Oil heir and the nephew of Lamon V. Harkness, once the richest man in Kansas City — created a New York dance empire in the 1960s. But on the road, LaPointe is virtually incognito. “When I meet other dancers on the competition circuit, they have no idea who I am,” she says. “It’s only when we have extended conversations with each other that I’ve learned that one of the dancers is actually a Broadway producer and another might be a professional salesman. I tell them that I’m from a successful family of entrepreneurs and I’m a mother. And that’s what I am.”

I

says, “I take off my skirt and wig, and Louis puts them on, and I put on his jacket.” Afterward, LaPointe is pleased with how the solo went. “The audience loved it,” she tells me later that day. “We got a terrific response. “I really expected to be nervous here, but I wasn’t,” LaPointe continues. “This is probably the biggest competition of the year, and I imagined that the competition could be ruthless. But the coaches and the other competitors have been really lovely, very supportive. It’s not the bloodbath that I was dreading.” It’s hard to imagine LaPointe ever being nervous. Nothing about her, from the expensive high heels that add to her already imposing height to the amusingly no-nonsense conversational habits she inherited from her mother, comes across as shy. As one of her friends puts it, “She’s wickedly funny — and wickedly mean if she wants to be.” Before she started competing at balls, she was organizing them for the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival and the Kansas City Ballet. She had inherited all the right social credentials, of course, as well as the resources to buy tables at the events. But she also brought ideas. “She’s very creative and imaginative,” says Laurie Ingram, publisher of The Indepen-

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LaPointe and Bar take Ohio. dent, the magazine that bills itself as “Kansas City’s Journal of Society.” Ingram has reported on the Kauffman family since Ewing M. Kauffman made his first million, nearly half a century ago. “But the way that she’s channeled this passion for dancing into a career is amazing. She looks great and clearly loves what she’s doing.” LaPointe looks good on the f loor. She’s a determined dancer whose work in the studio shows. “I feel so much more selfconfident in all areas of my life since I started dancing competitively,” she says. “And I’m much more observant of the people around me and have become a much better listener. Since dancing is all about being in-sync with your partner, it’s made me more sensitive to the people in my life.” It’s not unusual for a wealthy woman to choose dance as both hobby and cause. Many of the great ballet companies in America have been championed by women with deep pockets (Texas millionaire Anne Bass, for

had already taken some lessons at the Kansas City Ballet School,” LaPointe says. But she traces her recent dance obsession to the unexpected death of her father, in 2010. “I went through a period of depression, then realized that I needed to focus on myself, find a new path, a different journey,” LaPointe says. “I didn’t think of dance at the time, but when it all came together, it felt right.” It began to come together the day she drove to the Overland Park studio run by Bar. The French-born former Olympic ice dancer has won a dozen national and international dance championships and was a grand finalist at the 2004 Argentine Tango World Championship. If anyone in town could make a serious dancer out of a socialite — one who at first was seeking lessons just to improve her basic ballroom skills for KC’s society calendar — it was Bar. “After a couple of lessons with Lauren, I told her that if she really worked hard, she might want to compete in a few national competitions,” Bar says. “And when she started practicing and rehearsing, she announced she wanted to be a world champion. I’m a really tough coach, so I wasn’t going to indulge her. I told her she had to make a serious commitment to that goal. And she really did.” LaPointe started her training with three 90-minute lessons a week. (She now averages six lessons a week.) After 10 weeks, LaPointe entered her first competition, the Nashville Starz Dance Spectacular, last January.

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“BEST THEATER- IN AMERICA” Entertainment Weekly Two months later, LaPointe competed again, this time at the St. Louis Star Ball. She danced 140 heats and received the Newcomer Award as the top bronze-level student. And she hasn’t limited her stage time just to other cities. In July, when the New Century Follies fundraiser played the Folly Theater, LaPointe joined a list of entertainers that included Ron Megee, Daisy Bucket, Damian Blake, Annie Cherry. She and Bar danced a sizzling tango. “I thought she was great that night,” says local actor David Wayne Reed, who was at the event. “It was like watching Dancing

Student and teacher switch up for their big number. thousands of dollars, now counts LaPointe among his clients. “This is the only sport I know where you’re coifed and dressed to the nines and you’re sweating like a professional athlete,” LaPointe says. “This isn’t about pretty people dancing prettily. It’s more like roller derby.” Going into the Ohio Star Ball, LaPointe held the second-place position in her category in the 2012 Dancer’s Cup Tour and was

“I TELL THEM THAT I’M FROM A SUCCESSFUL FAMILY OF ENTREPRENEURS AND I’M A MOTHER. AND THAT’S WHAT I AM.” with the Stars with this local person who has all this gusto and passion for dancing. She was a star.” “I was making a lot of progress fast,” LaPointe says. “But I have one of the best coaches in the United States. He works as hard, or harder, than I do.” “Competitive ballroom dancing,” Bar says, “is the only sport on the planet where the coach exercises more than the people he trains.” The world of competitive ballroom dancing isn’t easy. LaPointe has rehearsed and competed until her feet are swollen and bleeding. And it’s not cheap. There are the dresses, for one thing. The top dancers on the circuit don’t buy anything off the rack, instead choosing elaborate gowns customstitched by a few big-name couturiers. Chris Stephenson, whose New Jersey–based J’ordy line is the preferred name in terpsichorean haute couture and whose pieces fetch

ranked 14th out of 7,000 dancers on the DanceSport tour. “I won the top Newcomer Award and the Inspiration Award at the Twin Cities Open, based on my performances,” she says. In Kansas City, anyone can become a socialite. Becoming a champion, that’s another story. “I think this has really changed the perceptions people have about me,” LaPointe says. “My mother finally realized that this isn’t just something to do for fun or one of the projects I’ve started and not fi nished, but a very serious goal.” She goes on: “I don’t think I’m dancing to step out of my mother’s shadow. I see it more as embellishing my grandmother’s passion for the dance. It’s a way of fi nding myself and paying homage to her.”

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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(s12)

KANSAS CITY - THE PITCH 9.72x5.291 4-COLOR MOON ART

FINAL

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 22-28 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

ART The lessons of Curatorial Studies.

18 PAG E

FRIDAY

11. 23

CLEAR EYES, FULL HEARTS At the end of each holiday season, the 100-foot-tall Douglas fir in Crown Center Square (2450 Grand) is cut down and made into ornaments that are sold to benefit the Mayor’s Christmas Tree Fund and the city’s less fortunate. Tonight, Mayor Sly James and three Kansas City Chiefs Ambassadors officially ring in the holiday season at the Mayor’s Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony. The admission-free ceremony begins at 5:30.

wel own je The Cr ys a d li ho of the

FILM Bradley Cooper’s got the Silve r .

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PAG E

CAFÉ Seeking Providence? Go downtown.

T H U R S D AY | 11 . 2 2 |

F R I D AY | 11 . 2 3 |

ALL LIT UP

SHAKIN’ THE HOLIDAY BLUES

On this day, Filter would like to give big ups to Roger Naber and the crew keeping the Thanksgiving Blues Breakfast Dance going. The recession knocked this early morning R&B-and-gospel concert out of commission in 2009 and ’10, but the local tradition has made a comeback. (This year’s show features Floyd Taylor and Southern soul sensation Ms. Jody.) Dust off your finest Sunday crown and throw down on some shoe polish and a bottle of Remy — it’s that kind of party. Buy $40 advance tickets at Niecie’s, Club Rain, M&M Bakery, Mad Jack’s and City Fish & More. (Get tickets at the door for $45 or reserve seats for $50.) Doors open at 8:30 p.m. at the National Guard Armory at 18th and Ridge (100 South 20th Street, Kansas City, Kansas), and the show goes from 10 to 2.

T H U R S D AY | 1 1 . 2 2 |

HOLY PRODUCTION VALUES, BATMAN!

What’s cooler than Batman? Not much, except for Batman Live, the arena adventure that’s setting up shop this weekend at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7100). We at The Pitch gathered our burning questions — nerdy, logistical and otherwise — and sent them to Nick Grace, the show’s executive producer. See Batman Live Friday through Sunday, twice each day. Tickets start at $19.50. More information and a full schedule at sprintcenter.com. The Pitch: How did the creative team work the anti-bullying message into the show? Grace: That particular continued on page 14

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his is the 83rd year of the Plaza Lighting Ceremony. Where will you be when Sporting KC stars Matt Besler, Kei Kamara and Jimmy Nielsen and a random kid from the audience flip the switch on thousands of bulbs at 6:50 p.m.? The Elders bring the post-party craic from 7 to 8 at the new stage location at Nichols Road and Pennsylvania. See countryclubplaza.com for more information. pitch.com

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

THE PITCH

13

F R I D AY | 1 1 . 2 3 | LEGENDS 1867 VILLAGE WEST • next to Dave & Busters

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 FOR TICKETS, LOG ON TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND ENTER THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCHAHS2 You must download a pass to gain admittance to the screening. No purchase necessary. Limit two (admit one) passes per person. Passes will be available while supplies last. This film is rated PG-13 for some violent images, sexual content and thematic material. Please note: Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. Seating is not guaranteed.

IN SELECT THEATERS DECEMBER 7 14

THE PITCH

continued from page 13 element was integral to Dick Grayson’s development into Robin. It was always going to be a coming-of-age story, but we wanted to engage our younger audience to feel an alliance with the young boy onstage. The challenges that Dick faces are huge; he is orphaned and homeless and is determined to avenge his parents’ death. And when he discovers that the Joker has been responsible, his first instinct is murderous. How has the production avoided SpiderMan-type musical stunt problems? The shows are very different. We wanted to produce a show on a scale big enough for arenas so that we could bring Batman to as many different cities as possible. The scope of physical space available to be utilized in an arena is immense, so Batman has many spectacular flying entrances and exits during the show. Our cast is made up of 42 actors and trained acrobats, who are all incredibly disciplined in preparing themselves for the physical demands of working in this environment. How many trucks does it take to move the show to a new arena every couple of days? The production travels in 17 53-foot semitrailer trucks. It takes two days to build the production in each arena (and only five hours to take it all out). Overall, Batman Live seems like a mash-up of Batman eras. Can you tell us a little bit about how you selected the eras you pulled from? I like to describe Batman Live as a comic book come to life, and our artistic inspiration has largely come from the work by Jim Lee — his comic book Hush was a big influence, for example. Our costume designer, Jack Galloway, always felt it was important, especially in an arena environment, that when the characters come onto the stage for the first time that the audience are clear who they’re looking at. More often than not, we hear huge cheers and applause when they recognize their favorites. Any hidden nods to the old-school fans? How does a dinosaur in the Batcave sound?

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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CYNTHIA LEVIN

NOVEMBER 21-25

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BLACK BALLED

After searching for deals all day, rest up and prepare yourself for a raunchy one-woman show presented by a man. Daisy Bucket (aka drag performer Spencer Brown) hosts Black Balls of Brass, a high-energy performance for the retail holiday. “Black Friday is certainly going to inspire some material for the show,” Brown says. Listen for power ballads and the latest news events in his comedy routine. “When I’m performing, I feel like I’m hosting a party,” Brown says. “The only difference is that it’s not at my house, so I don’t have to clean up after.” The show starts at 8 p.m. at Hamburger Mary’s (101 Southwest Boulevard, 816-842-1919). — NADIA IMAFIDON

S AT U R D AY | 11 . 2 4 | HOLIDAY HODGEPODGE

It’s been 24 years since the first Bizarre Bazaar was held in a Lawrence living room, but the arty and crafty gift exchange thrown by local artists is all grown-up, now featuring 130 artists and filling all three floors of the E R O M Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, 785-843-2787). “This is T A INE ONL .COM a nonjuried show, where H C PIT unique and unusual artwork is encouraged,” says Elenor Buffington, event coordinator. Among the many items, find fishing-lure bottle openers, papier-mâché sculptures, and skateboard art by 12-year-old artist Maximillian McGraw. Get some gift shopping done from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m (it starts Friday, from 5 to 9 p.m.). Admission is free. See bizbazart.blogspot.com. — NADIA IMAFIDON

EVENTS

BLOKES GOING FOR BROKE

Tiaras, penis straws, copious amounts of Moscato, marabou boas — grab your arsenals, ladies (or fellas). The Aussie male revue Thunder From Down Under is ready to do some

A Christmas Carol Kyle Hatley directs this classic for KC Repertory Theatre, which promises upbeat musical numbers, complicated costumes and an extra-special shot of hope and cheer. It plays through Wednesday, December 26, in the Spencer Theater (4949 Cherry, 816-235-2700). See kcrep.org. Inspecting Carol A case of mistaken identity leads to Santasized awkwardness in this Noises Off–and Waiting for Guffman–like plot about a ragtag Midwestern theater troupe learning that the money for its annual Christmas production hangs in the balance. The show opens Wednesday, November 28, and runs through Sunday, December 23, at the Unicorn Theatre (3828 Main, 816-531-7529). See unicorntheatre.org. Junie B. Jones in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells The Junie B. Jones series of children’s books ranked No. 71 on the American Library Association’s top 100 banned or challenged books from 2000 to 2009. It must be because Junie is a little mouthy — but damn, she’s funny! See her in Christmas action this week through Saturday, December 29, at Union Station’s City Stage Theatre (30 West Pershing, 816-460-2020). See tya.org The Kentucky Cycle Part I and Part II A series, running in repertory, composed of nine one-act plays about three Kentucky families over 200 years. Showing through Sunday, December 2, at the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre (3614 Main, 816-569-3226). See metkc.org. Nuncrackers — The Nunsense Christmas Musical Nuns be gettin’ nutty when they score the scratch to film their first Christmas TV special in the basement of the Sisters of Mount St. Helens convent. It plays through Sunday, December 23, at the American Heartland Theatre (2450 Grand, 816-842-9999). See ahtkc.org. Shrek the Musical Much like the computer-animated fantasy tale, this production deals with isolation, loneliness, breaking stereotypes and overcoming bullying. It shows through Sunday, December 30, at the Coterie Theatre (2450 Grand, 816-474-6552). See coterietheatre.org.

Theater Presents It’s thundering and raining men.

T U E S D AY | 11 . 2 7 |

panty damage at VooDoo Lounge (1 Riverboat Drive, Harrah’s Casino, 816-472-7777). Tickets run between $17 and $40, and doors open at 7:30. A friendly reminder for the cool moms: The show is 21-and-older. For more information, see voodookc.com.

LIGHT SHOW & 6 DJ’s!

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S U N D AY | 11 . 2 5 | DON’T STOP ... EATING

Is that turkey grease on your collar? It totally is. Get a new stain on your ugly sweater at one of these bountiful brunches and buffets. Bristol Seafood Grill (51 East 14th Street, 816-448-6007). This is the Mack Daddy of KC buffets. Fresh oysters and shrimp enchiladas? Yes. Hook it up for $22 (adults) or $12 (kids under 12), from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cinzetti’s (7201 West 91st Street, Overland Park, 913-642-0101). Back off that pasta bar, girlfriend! If it’s brunch you want, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cinzetti’s has all your breakfast faves including made-to-order crepes, for $14.99 (adults) or $4.99 (kids 12 and younger). Joy Wok Super Buffet & Hibachi Grill (11920 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-498-8888). You can eat like a healthy king at this Pitch Best Buffet of 2012. For $14.25 (tax included), get nigiri sushi, crab legs, crawfish and moo goo gai pan from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. V’s Italiano Ristorante (10819 East Highway 40, Independence, 816-353-1241). Solid protein choices round out this classic spread out east. Bonus: This one comes with a bottomless glass of spumante. Adults eat for $18.50 (kids 12 and younger for $8.50), from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

M O N D AY | 11 . 2 6 | YOUR INNER MONET

Victoria Crowder Payne is a self-described “creativity strategist.” The local art teacher and texture specialist’s latest endeavor is the launch of her Fearless Studio Live Painting Sessions. Rhythm & Booze (423 Southwest Boulevard, 816-221-2669) hosts the threehour, 21-and-older affair, which costs $40 per person and includes acrylic paints, brushes and a 16-by-20-inch canvas. “No skills are necessary,” Payne promises. Just be ready to ask for help if you need it. Drink $2.50 wells and domestic bottles to keep the creative juices flowing. Preregister and see Payne’s work at freedomofstitch.com. Dress for painting, starting at 6 p.m.

LASER

HELL IS FOR HIPSTERS

Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! stars Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim are both in The Comedy, but the movie steps out of the Adult Swim pool and into a whole other culde-sac in the man-child neighborhood. Director Rick Alverson — co-writing with Robert Donne and Colm O’Leary — casts Heidecker as a numb, rich Williamsburg jerk (with Wareheim and LCD Soundsystem retiree James Murphy as two of his pals) who fights his Brooklyn boredom by convincing people to do humiliating things. Pitched somewhere between the failed Belushi-Aykroyd swan song Neighbors and the deadpan sleaze of Harmony Korine, the already divisive new film plays Screenland Crossroads (1656 Washington, 816-421-9700) at 7 tonight. Get tickets at screenland.com. — SCOTT WILSON

W E D N E S D AY | 11 . 2 8 | BADD COVERS

What do you know about R&B a cappella group Color Me Badd? Did you know that C.M.B. — the R&B boy band’s 1991 debut album — went triple platinum? Or that former member Sam Watters has written hits for Whitney Houston and Kelly Clarkson? Did you know that KC has a CMB tribute band, Cover Me Badd? They’ll be at Angels Rock Bar (1323 Walnut, 816-896-3943) tonight, throwing down the Oklahoma City quartet’s greatest hits. Paired with a $5 yard beer and Fireball shot combo and a free cover, this deal is — as they said in the early ’90s — “totally boss.” The jams start at 10. Look for Rock Bar on Facebook for more information.

Buy your tickets before the Mayan calendar ends on 12.21 & get last years pricing of $40 (limited to the first 400)

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E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

THE PITCH

15

ART BY

cross-section of Curatorial Studies

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

SEEING IT THROUGH

At Subterranean, an engaging

Left: “Cuttlefish Submarine” by Amanda Gehin. Above: Rexroth at home/work.

S

tanding underneath coolly diff use track lighting, staring intently at artwork encased in expensive Plexiglas and wood hung at regular intervals on white walls, you might fi nd it easy to forget that what you’re experiencing in a museum or a commercial art gallery is a product. Like the socks on your feet or the burrito you just put in your stomach, art exhibitions are produced for your consumption. Packaging the works on display for an audience — especially when the show is a group exhibition — falls to the curator. It’s a reE R MO sponsibility that Ayla Rexroth, who opened Subterranean Gallery T A INE ONL .COM in April 2010, is always PITCH thinking about. She has treated each exhibition at this young space as an opportunity to figure out just what it is that a curator does. Curatorial Studies is Rexroth’s first group show in the exhibition space that she runs in her garden-level apartment. It’s an unorthodox venue, and she has approached this

ART

show with some similarly unusual choices. First among these: Rexroth has documented the studio visits leading to the exhibition in photos and writing, a process shared with Subterranean’s audience on the gallery’s website. It’s a good idea: Anyone who takes the time to read the short essays — crafted by Rexroth, exhibitions manager Clayton Skidmore and gallery assistant Melaney Mitchell — is likely to enjoy a deeper understanding of this thing that has been produced for their consumption. It was during Rexroth’s visits to these artists’ studios that she learned the concepts and processes behind the works she would ultimately decide among when assembling Studies. Rexroth got a feel for the right kind of practical questions to ask the artists: Has this work been shown in Kansas City before? Will it be included in any upcoming exhibitions? Armed with this information — and the knowledge and familiarity that she had accumulated over two years of putting together intimate exhibitions in her own living and work space — she tapped into a strong instinct for consumer-usable packaging. She

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has arranged these works in a way that highlights specific aesthetic aspects of each and creates meaning for viewers. Rexroth began her selection process at the H&R Block Artspace’s Kansas City Flatfile exhibition, looking through portfolio after portfolio of artwork by local artists. She then e-mailed 10 artists to set up studio visits. Pieces by seven of those artists ended up on the gallery walls. Rexroth fi nds complementary spots for the 13 works, which include paintings, works on paper and a sculpture. The most visually detailed objects in the exhibition — Jaclyn Senne’s tour-de-force painting “Backyard/ beach course vacation-planked location with strand-lit courts and towels and iced coolers” and Amanda Gehin’s three gouache drawings on paper — hang near (but not above) a couch. For Rexroth and Skidmore, the sofa is a functional, everyday consumer good; for anyone regarding Senne’s and Gehin’s art, it’s a comfortable perch for the concentration that their pieces demand. Senne’s painting, which depicts a nonsensical architectural structure with equipment or else a practice

area for just about any sport or leisure pursuit imaginable (as suggested by the title), is on display within view of the apartment’s bookshelf and record player, hints of the real leisure that goes on here in the hours when the room isn’t a gallery. Other observations at Subterranean require standing up. The work that demands a kind of intellectual gymnastics hangs in a chairless corner. David Ford’s “Ajuka” is simple in its construction — Ford has placed a pair of cheap plastic headphones on a wooden African mask — but complex and varied in its implications: the music and dance of masquerades, contemporary life versus tradition, shifting technologies, other ideas as well. Hanging next to Ford’s work is a series of four inkjet prints by Paul Anthony Smith, the first three of them scans of a recent Kansas City Spaces fashion spread titled “In Living Color.” Here Smith covers the exposed skin of the female model with black marker, but in the fourth, the model appears unmarked, her image instead cut out and collaged on top of a Boost Mobile ad featuring Young Jeezy. Rexroth tells me that she picked this series

Career Exploration Night >LKULZKH`5V]LTILY!WT

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Above: “Molly and Athan: Separation” by Molly Kaderka. Right: “Study for Aging New House” by Robert Josiah Bingaman.

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the curatorial process made transparent fresh off Smith’s studio wall — it is what he through the website and the installation was working on when she walked through of the works themselves. A curator fi lling a the door and is a reaction in part to the artmore traditional space might have indulged ist’s frustration with the locally produced in the parlance known to anyone familiar spread’s lackluster art direction. with the usual well-intentioned artspeak, With her installation of Garry Noland’s might have said that these work, Rex rot h demonworks have been arranged strates just how canny Curatorial Studies this way to “create a diashe has become at workThrough November 30 logue.” Rexroth does ining around the limitations at Subterranean Gallery, deed ac h ieve just t hat of her basement space. 4124 Warwick, Apt. B. with her installation. But Noland’s nine colored-tape By appointment: the visual language of her works on paper occupy the subterraneangallery@ installation and the verbal same wall as the basegmail.com, subterraneangallery.com language of its website are ment apartment’s copper approachable, and she has pipes — a place that turns broadened the conversaout to be a smart spot for tion around this show. Personal interaction Noland’s pieces, given how the curving line is an important part of the package. of the edges of his organic forms relate to the Curatorial Studies lets the audience lisspindly lines of the copper tubing. Together, ten in on her exchanges with artists in the those lines contrast the blocky geometric studio, and the result is something that’s shapes inside the compositions. not hard to follow and easy to think about If you talk to Rexroth — as you must in order to see the exhibition, which is open later, too. only by appointment — she may tell you that Curatorial Studies has two components: E-mail feedback@pitch.com

O Engineering Technology (Computer/Electronics, Civil, Architectural, Mechanical, and Construction Management emphasis)

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FILM

BREAKING DAWN

Red Dawn, a remake no one was asking for, invades theaters.

P

itch staff writer Ben Palosaari proudly lists Red Dawn — John Milius’ somber 1984 movie positing a Soviet-backed invasion of a United States populated by Brat Packers — as one of his three favorite movies. That indefensible enthusiasm finally came in handy last week, when it was time for us to send a reviewer to see the new Red Dawn remake. Below, a debriefing. Wilson: Is the new Red Dawn any good? Palosaari: No. Wait, are you just saying that because the original Red Dawn is your third-favorite movie of all time? I am not. Also, seriously: third-favorite? ever? I’m a sucker for movies with sad, downbeat endings. Give me a movie where the guy doesn’t get the girl, the family dog is really dead or commies gun down child soldiers in the snow. Are the bad guys Russian this time? No, they’re North Korean. When this remake was shot, the script called for a Chinese invasion, but in the year or so that this thing has sat around, somebody at the studio remembered that it makes a lot of money from Chinese moviegoers, so there’s some awkward dubbing early on. They also clearly wanted some product-placement money. At one point, a Subway franchisee gives the good guys, like, a month’s worth of tasty Subway foods and a really big bucketful of, I think, Pepsi. So, North Korea? Is the movie in black-andwhite? No, it’s in color. But there’s no red in this Red Dawn — there’s so little blood and carnage that you could air this thing on PBS right after Sesame Street.

Oh, no. The first movie to be rated PG-13 isn’t even PG-13-y this time? Right. In the original, all kinds of people get blown away. This time, you see the shooter shoot, but you don’t really see anyone bleed when there’s a hit. Are the freedom-fi ghting kids still called the Wolverines? Yes, and they all look around 25, even though they’re supposed to be high schoolers. Do a lot of people die? Not nearly enough. How’s the acting? Josh Peck takes the Charlie Sheen role — Matt Eckart, the little brother — and makes

Duck, you guys! you miss the intense genius of Charlie Sheen. When Peck plays angry, which he must do often, he just kind of squints and imitates Christian Bale’s Dark Knight voice. He used to be on a Nickelodeon show, and he was chubby. I was hoping that he’d be fat here so we could get some tension out of the Wolverines having to wait on the fattest guerrilla. Who’s the big star? Chris Hemsworth, the Australian hunk with Jack Donaghy eyes — you know him as Thor.

BY BEN PALOSAARI AND SCOTT WILSON

Does he have a hammer here? No, just semiautomatic rifles. Also, he scolds a lot. He’s always like, “You’re endangering the team.” Was he a Marine? Yes, one who served in Iraq. And does he have things to teach the Wolverines? Yes, but not how to sleep in shifts so someone doesn’t steal your shit in the night. Is there a montage in which Thor trains Wolverines? Yes. He shows them how to shoot guns, how to fight hand-to-hand, how to stitch wounds, that kind of thing. Is that the only montage? No. After they agree to be insurgents, they also agree to do a second montage in which they’re all, “We’re sneaking into the city to get some weapons and then retiring to a secret cave with a lockable door that’s never explained.” That sounds awful. It really is. But the audience I saw it with cheered and laughed and clapped and generally gave no indication that they weren’t watching an NRA-approved episode of Two and a Half Men. Would you rather have been watching Two and a Half Men? [Thinks hard.] No. I felt driven to see this. It was duty. Do you feel betrayed? You know, I kind of do. They could have called this anything. I don’t know why it had to be called Red Dawn. I feel like the studio knew my sense of duty and exploited it. I regret not leading an uprising inside the theater. Wolverines! „

OUT THIS WEEK in a sermon. Though he’s in just one or two scenes, the hyena here is probably better developed as a character than any number of human protagonists on film right now. Go to Life of Pi for the animals. Stay for the gnostic speculation. — SIMON ABRAMS

LIFE OF PI

B

latantly allegorical and loosely episodic, Life of Pi is bound to make its more literal-minded viewers squirm. But there’s a genuine sense of wonder in this adaptation of Yann Martel’s best-selling novel, which a very assured Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain, The Ice Storm) directs with lavish, picturebook grandiosity. The movie begins with an adult Pi Patel (the honey-tongued Irrfan Khan) recounting his story to a writer (Rafe Spall). A young Pi (Suraj Sharma, in an accomplished debut performance) travels with his family from their home — a Pondicherry zoo — to North America, in a freighter packed with the zoo’s livestock. After a freak storm capsizes the ship, the only survivors are Pi, a Bengali tiger, a zebra and a hyena, all jammed onto a curiously accommodating lifeboat. Pi’s resulting struggle to stay alive is a physical one, but the story also requires of him a great deal of moral and spiritual introspection. As he learns how to fish and how

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

I to avoid being eaten by Richard Parker, the ravenous Bengali tiger, he must also complete a faith-testing quest. He must learn that there is more to life than sheer animal instinct, that the human spirit must transcend its amorally savage will to survive. Lee and screenwriter David Magee (Finding Neverland, Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day)

18 T H E P I T C H N O V E M B E R 2 2 - 2 8 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com 2 T H E P I T C H M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

Holiday Pi clearly share a fascination with the story’s animals and their mannerisms, and it’s this affinity that keeps symbolism from overtaking the movie. These fever-dream versions of animals, moving through Lee’s tableaux vivants, feel like much more than players

t’s not an unreasonable complaint, worrying that confident, pretty Bradley Cooper is miscast as Pat, the frazzled bipolar soul at the center of Silver Linings Playbook. But the actor’s bland handsomeness, something until now less chiseled than forgettably cookie-cutter, finally magnetizes here, finally taps into a force that can repel as surely as it attracts. For this, Cooper can thank four collaborators. First, writer-director David O. Russell (adapting Matthew Quick’s novel with a free hand), whose script, all torrents and volleys, is flawless and whose style this time, all pushes and swerves, is its own participant in the narrative. Russell never stays with his leading

SUPERB.”

– Joe Morgenstern, WALL STREET JOURNAL

“‘A ROYAL AFFAIR’ ENTHRALLS WHERE MANY HISTORICAL DRAMAS START TO SAG.” – Mary Pols, TIME

“A FEAST OF A FILM.” – Marshall Fine, HUFFINGTON POST

MADS

MIKKELSEN

A LICI A

VI KA N DER

MI KKEL

B O E F Ø LS G A A R D

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man a moment too long or leaves him a second too early. And that’s saying something because Cooper’s Pat is, in thumbnail (and in that easy first name), someone we’ve seen many times: the Blockbuster version of mania-prone, nonthreatening, delusional mental illness, the kind of depression that can be treated with meds and cured with Natalie Portman. Russell and Cooper, though, have made Pat someone else, someone thornier and less consolable, and for a longer stretch than is usually allowed by a picture that’s unapologetically headed for the hypothalamus’ feel-good bull’s-eye. (Naysayers may carp that Russell has made Jerry Maguire Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. Naysayers should keep this to themselves.) Second, Cooper and Russell can both thank Jennifer Lawrence, combustible anywhere but explosive here as Tiffany — every bit the no-filter blurter Pat is but in a different (and maybe deeper) jeopardy. The usual version of movie-woman crazy, which punishes selfawareness and sexual confidence with predictable doom, gets its ass handed to it several times, yet Lawrence never settles for simple anger. It’s a big deal, this performance. Thanks third and fourth, Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver, who, as Pat’s parents, are allowed unexpected depth, friction and warmth. They’re reason enough to see this movie a second time. (Russell’s deep bench also includes Chris Tucker, Anupam Kher, John Ortiz and Julia Stiles, each given more than one crack at some kind of truth, each nailing it.) Executing Russell’s complex vision is cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi. As his camera follows and trails characters, sometimes guiding them and sometimes goading, his light and focus mimic the dulled edges and softened centers of medicated depression. One of Silver Linings’ rewards is its last-act dropping away of that Prozac palette in favor of sharp colors and revelatory illumination.

— SCOTT WILSON

A ROYAL AFFAIR

T

here’s a certain red-state pleasure in watching a historical drama set in a country you don’t really care about. For instance: the lush but too leisurely A Royal Affair. Under its skirts and wigs and candle wax, the multinational production offers a lesson in the high-court skulduggery of Age of Enlightenment Denmark. Not necessarily a 100-percent accurate

Bradley Cooper: finally good lesson — as though any such movie ever is — but one with the virtue of telling you things you’re 77 percent likely never to be asked about later. If it comes up, though, and you can recall nothing beyond, say, the charismatic performances and cinematographer Rasmus Videbaek’s Arcadian landscapes and chilly interiors, you can just tell people the movie is about love and sacrifice. That sounds good, right? The love is between Johann Friedrich Struensee and Queen Caroline Mathilde. Casino Royale bad guy Mads Mikkelsen, looming and smoldering, plays the former, a country doctor turned royal physician turned reformist regent. Alicia Vikander, about to be seen in the new Anna Karenina, plays the queen, sister of England’s King George III and token of a little old-school European dynasty. Her arranged marriage to raging nut job King Christian VII — played by Mikkel Boe Folsgaard as though fresh from watching Tom Hulce in Amadeus and Yosemite Sam in “Shishkabugs” (Hassenpfeffer!) — leads to, you know, a royal affair. And the royal affair leads to the betrayals and sacrifices ensured by the mechanics of costume-drama romance, the kinds that don’t really send you scurrying to Wikipedia to confirm the timeline. Director Nikolaj Arcel, co-writing here with Rasmus Heisterberg, helped adapt the Swedish version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and has brought to this movie a similar sense of expository obligation, with a side of easily spotted villainy. People and their roles in the story are explained and explained again, and this is the sort of highgloss European art object that makes sure our heroes’ assignations include, in the afterglow, some “let’s modernize and liberalize the whole damn country” pillow talk. Vi ka nder ma nages f i ne what’s demanded of her lightly written character: milky beauty, growing up in public, feverish tragedy. There’s another, better movie somewhere, though, in a different affair. The best scenes follow Folsgaard and Mikkelsen through a kind of buddy-movie arc that’s more complex (dramatically and historically) than the obvious hot hetero love on display. Just a couple of wild and crazy guys who shouldn’t have let a girl — ew! — spoil their constitution-rewriting fun. — S.W.

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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CAFÉ

BARN IN THE U.S.A.

The silenced Drum Room gives way to a warm Providence.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Providence New American Kitchen • President Hotel, 1329 Baltimore, 816-303-1686 • Hours: Lunch 11 a.m.–3 p.m. daily; dinner 5–10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 5–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

S

ometimes what seems like a good idea isn’t really such a good idea. It’s true in restaurants all the time: If at first you don’t succeed, you try something else. A new menu, a different color of tablecloth, remaking a French bistro as an Italian trattoria — anything can sound like an inspired plan when the alternative is failure. And sometimes, if someone lets you, you start from scratch. When the 86-year-old President Hotel reopened in 2006, after an expensive and surprising renovation (the building had sat vacant for more than two decades), owner Ron Jury MORE decided that this was the right place for an upscale dining spot. And why not T A INE ONL .COM — the Drum Room, as it H C PIT was now called, had been home to a swanky bar and restaurant in the hotel’s glory days. It was a fitting homage, a glossy and upscale urban restaurant with serpentine, black-cloaked banquettes. On the walls were black-and-white vintage photographs of performers from the 1940s and ’50s, some of whom played the Drum Room back in the day. Executive chef Eric Carter created a dinner menu that was accessible but sophisticated enough to impress out-of-town diners who had sensibly decided not to venture far from their lodgings to eat. Two years later, the economy tanked, drumming Jury’s vision out of existence. The street-level lounge is still called the Drum Room, but the snazzy interior of the dining room, seven steps down from the bar, has been ripped out. And in its place is something frankly warmer and more inviting. Using reclaimed barn wood for the walls and the ceiling, complemented by natural colors — shades of sage, rust and earthy browns — the pretty dining room is now enjoying a second second life, as Providence New American Kitchen. Not that anyone is going to walk out humming about the décor. There’s nothing about this space that you haven’t seen at the more upscale casino steakhouses. (It looks rather like a set from a touring-company production of Oklahoma. I was tempted to burst into a chorus or two of “The Cowboy and the Farmer Should Be Friends.”) Ambition has given way to a kind of Midwestern nice that might lure not just captive hotel guests but also locals, who are notoriously resistant to dining in downtown’s hotels. Carter is still along for the ride (a corporate consultant is riding shotgun), tinkering now with a menu that mixes the standards crucial for this kind of venue (a hamburger, a steak, a Cobb salad, a BLT) with some unexpected choices. All of it is first-rate, and those left-ofcenter items closest to his heart are beautifully prepared and visually impressive.

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

perched on a jumble of baby potatoes and a couple of biscuitlike fried ovals containing lobster sausage, and all of it drips with a buttery bacon broth that’s light, not smoky, but The menu is heavy on meat, with pork deceptively rich. I wish I’d had a real biscuit taking center stage. Despite locally sourced vegetables, Providence isn’t especially provi- to sop up the golden liquid. I’m one of those diners who doesn’t mind dential to vegetarians, with just a single meatless entrée (roasted-vegetable tamales) and being surprised by a playful interpretation one starter that’s sort of meat-free (pierogi of a familiar dish, but some people are going to be thrown by Carter’s smoked-chicken stuffed with potatoes and Green Dirt Farm cheese) if you remember to have the bacon ravioli (people envisioning ravioli filled with, you know, smoked chicken). garnish left off. The latter — The actual dish isn’t that, golden, puff y pillows fried Providence New but it’s original and simple until crispy instead of lightly American Kitchen and deeply satisfying. The sautéed — contain an adBBQ-glazed pork belly ...$8.00 ravioli, filled with housedictively creamy filling but Loaded potato pierogi ...$6.90 Smoked-chicken made ricotta cheese and would benefit from a savory ravioli............................$14.50 blanketed in a pistachio dipping sauce. That bacon Roasted-vegetable brown butter, acts here as a garnish is unnecessary, even tamale...........................$15.50 delectable bed for two moist, as a visual note. Applewood-smoked delicately smoky pieces of There’s a dazzling starter, meatloaf .......................$15.50 Campo Lindo chicken. though, in Carter’s quartet Carrot cake ..................... $7.50 That lonely vegetarian of pork-belly cubes. They creation on the menu shares arrive at the table gleaming the same innovative spirit. Steamed corn under a maple-chili glaze, each balanced like a tightrope walker on a sliver of tart Granny tamales, dappled with caramelized onion Smith apple. It’s faint praise to say these are and mushrooms and sided with chopped summer vegetables (including, the night the city’s most glamorous-looking burnt ends, but their taste lives up to that billing I sampled the dish, squash and parsnips), come arrayed around a puddle of tasty jadeand then some. Bacon pops up again in Carter’s presenta- green tomatillo sauce. One of the hotel musts remains a burger, tion of rainbow trout, which centers on two crispy, pan-seared hunks of the fish. They’re and the Kobe version here is delicious —

A quartet of chile-glazed pork belly, presented cubist-style.

and almost big enough for two. A hunk of applewood-smoked meatloaf is also a fi ne comfort, surprisingly moist under a crusty exterior and served with ridiculously rich sour-cream mashed potatoes. The dessert menu includes a souvenir from the Drum Room: a skinny rectangle of not-very-spicy carrot cake, swathed in mascarpone cream and tricked out with a jewellike ribbon of candied carrots. It’s still pretty, but I prefer the delicious trio of fresh ricotta doughnuts, coated in sugar and key lime zest. Pastry chef Alejandro Diaz also serves a deconstructed s’more, the city’s latest attempt at a novelty I’d rather see fade away. This version isn’t bad, though: a scoop of graham-cracker ice cream in a bowl, with a dollop of caramelized, house-made marshmallow fluff and a tiny molten chocolate cake. No Scout has ever eaten this around a campfire, but at least it’s not another violation of crème brûlée. The service at Providence New American Kitchen is smooth and professional, adding to the space’s congeniality. Under the room’s flattering amber lights, with all that rustic wood around, the experience suggests something borrowed from one of Grant Wood’s less austere paintings. You’ll leave here full and happy, as is the right of any proud American diner.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FAT C I T Y

NUT JOB

BY

A BBIE S T U T Z E R

Chestnut Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s f ires up for another season.

Y

ou know what we eat here on the Plains: sauce-slathered barbecued ribs, mounds of mashed potatoes, breads of our golden wheat. Also: fire-roasted chestnuts. The Midwest turns out to be a darn good place to cultivate chestnut trees. And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a surprise oasis for the food thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close to home: north Lawrence. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Charlie NovoGradac has discovered since he and his wife, Deborah Milks, began growing chestnuts at their sustainable, organic orchard. When NovoGradac founded Chestnut Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, in 1995, he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure that the orchard would make it. But his trees survived a few dicey years and a couple of damaging freezes, and the farm has become successful. Harvest now involves NovoGradac, Milks, and a small army of local paid pickers collecting fallen chestnuts from September through mid-October. Even after this summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drought, NovoGradac says, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crop turned out â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair.â&#x20AC;? At press time, Chestnut Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had sold through its shipments. (See chestnutcharlie .com for availability at area KC and Lawrence stores.) The Pitch: How did you decide to grow chestnuts? NovoGradac: When I started reading about chestnuts, I learned the American chestnut was a dominant tree in eastern North America. And it was subject to blight, which effectively wiped it out. I was attracted by a nursery that claimed to have a chestnut hybrid that was Chinese-American that would grow to be a medium-sized tree, between the giant American chestnut tree and the orchard Chinese chestnut tree. It would essentially grow like the equivalent of the walnut tree. Nobody was doing it, and the demand for domestically grown chestnuts exceeded the supply of chestnuts. We consume a lot fewer chestnuts per capita than China or European countries might, but we still are importing chestnuts. You grew up on a farm? My dad had a farm in Basehor. He bought that in 1968 or so and planted Christmas trees. He had a lot of Christmas trees he sold as nursery stock. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a child of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s. If I was going to do anything at all, it was going to be organic. Did you study agriculture? I wanted to be a writer. I was an English and psych major. What are you going to do with that? I went on to law school. I had nothing better to do. I wanted to be a general practitioner. I went to Micronesia. I was looking for work and I found out I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough experience to qualify for a position that I saw advertised. But I found out I could be a Peace Corps volunteer. There was not that much guidance, but enough to get me into the community. And then, after Peace Corps, I partnered with

NovoGradac stays true to his roots. another fellow and Peace Corps volunteer whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been there years before and had already established a practice. That was my career and life for 17 years. How did you end up growing chestnuts here? My parents suffered strokes. They were moved off the farm, and my brother was taking care of them, and then my brother died suddenly of a heart attack. So I had to come back to the States. My father had always planted trees and loved walnut trees and Christmas trees. So I started the chestnut crop to see if they would grow. What was your backup plan if Lawrence couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sustain chestnut farming? While the trees were little, I planted some Christmas trees so that we would have something to watch. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know whether the soil was right. It was marginal, from what I had read. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what the trees would do given this situation. It was not wholesale successful, and we had a couple of bad winters and untimely freezes that killed back some trees that have since recovered. We have done some grafting and found some things that might work and some things that do work â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the alternative being bulldoze it and put it back into corn. That alternative would be unthinkable now. The last two years have been pretty good, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to consistently put together a package for some of the natural-food stores and chains. Who orders chestnuts? People who grew up in Europe and immigrated here or who grew up in Asian countries â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Korea, China, Japan. They really love chestnuts and are very, very pleased to find chestnuts in the area. At the farmers market, we might find nine out of 10 people have never had a chestnut before, and nine out of 10 of the ones who try it for the first time are indifferent to it. But I got a hug and a kiss from a lady who grew up in Iran who was just so happy to find chestnuts because they are so rare.

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23

MUSIC

ALL GROWN UP

BY

J OE MIL L E R

With Woods, and now the Babies, JoCo native Kevin Morby is inching toward indie-rock renown.

W

hen he was 17, Kevin Morby dropped out of Blue Valley Northwest High School, got his GED, and did what you do if you want to be in a successful indie-rock band: He bought a one-way ticket to Brooklyn. He had learned to play guitar when he was 10 and, before he could legally drive, formed bands with names like Creepy Aliens and Little Indian Boy. On weekends, Morby would hang out at places like the Stray Cat, the seedy allages downtown venue that fell prey to the construction of the Sprint Center. He got a fake ID so he could go see Arcade Fire on its first tour, at the Jackpot. When he announced his intention to move, his parents, Jim and Sandy Morby, were understandably concerned. “He was so young,” Sandy says. “But he was adamant. He was never really into school. He just didn’t like the whole cliquey suburbanschool setting.” For his first few years in New York, Morby bounced from crash pad to crash pad, working café jobs. One for the Babies’ scrapbook “My life was kind of a mystery to them,” This weekend, they’ll host the Babies, Morby says of his parents. “But at the same Morby’s new band. The Babies are a collaboratime, they embraced it.” tion between Morby and Vivian Girls guitarist Morby was working as a delivery boy at one Cassie Ramone that started more or less as a of those cafés when he became friends with joke. Out carousing in New York one night, some guys in a fledgling band called Woods. One of the members was about to quit and Morby spotted Ramone, whom he’d known move to Arizona, so Morby took his room in the since his earliest days in the city. They discovered that they were headed for the same party, band’s compound in the Bushwick neighborand Ramone asked Morby if he’d like to get a hood of Brooklyn, an old tenement building that serves as a combination recording studio, couple of “road sodas” for the walk. “What are road sodas?” Morby asked. practice space and boardinghouse. Not long “You know,” she said, “beer.” after moving in, Morby joined as Woods’ bass He laughed and said they should start a player. “I’d never played bass before,” Morby band called the Road Sodas. says. “I played guitar.” “And she took it seriously,” Morby recalls. Not long after, the folksy psych-rock band “She said, ‘Yeah, let’s do it.’ ” released its fourth album, Songs of Shame, to Later, Morby asked Ramone if he could move rave reviews, including a coveted Best New into her living room. She said OK. He brought Music nod from Pitchfork, which helped propel over an air mattress and bought four 99-cent it from obscurity to DIY-darling status. “We plastic tablecloths, which he started getting write-ups,” hung from Ramone’s ceiling, Morby says. “My parents The Babies, creating a sort of fort. “It was thought I was finally doing with Gashcat, funny,” he says of his days at something with myself.” Berwanger Ramone’s place. “You could Jim and Sandy’s affection and Bloodbirds only get the Internet — could for Woods went beyond mere Friday, November 23, only steal it from the neighat the Riot Room parental support, though. bors — in the corner where The two (both in their 50s; I was. So I would wake up Morby is 24) have evolved every day to Cassie sneaking in to use the Ininto borderline hipsters. They now buy reternet. The drapes I put up eventually got torn cords at Love Garden in Lawrence and find new down by the cat that was living there. It was underground music by typing “Woods” into described many times as a ‘jack shack.’ ” Pandora. They’ve traveled to Woods’ shows in The two started writing songs together, Omaha and Iowa City and California and New York. “Sandy elbows her way right up to the added a drummer and a bass player, and changed their name to the Babies. The initial stage,” Jim says. “Afterward, she goes online idea was to do something low-key, a party and makes DVD scrapbooks.” The Morbys have even opened up their band, to relive the days before Woods and home, deep in the 130th-and-Antioch heart the Vivian Girls (a much-buzzed about, hazy, of Johnson County suburbia, to roving indie retro garage-rock act) got too popular for house shows. But soon they were touring, bands. “We’ve had Woods, Crystal Stilts, the releasing singles and then a self-titled debut Vivian Girls,” Jim brags. 24

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

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garage-pop LP in 2011. “Everything I do, I do as seriously as possible,” Morby says. “I invest every ounce of energy into it.” Jeremy Earl, Woods’ lead singer and guitarist, also runs Woodsist, a record label whose early releases by now well-known acts like Real Estate, Kurt Vile and Wavves have earned it the kind of Brooklyn street cred that other labels only dream of. He’s scaling back Woodsist’s output this year to put all his resources behind Woods and the Babies. Woods’ latest, Bend Beyond, dropped in September; the Babies’ sophomore effort, Our House on the Hill, was released last week. The Babies dug in and spent more time on Hill, relocating to Los Angeles for a couple of weeks to work with producer Rob Barbato (Darker My Love, the Fall and Cass McCombs). “We were able to concentrate better, not having the distraction of going out every night in New York,” Morby says. “And the studio was fantastic, a beautiful studio.” As a result, the new album is richer and more varied than the first Babies record; organ, piano, saxophone and even strings mingle with the band’s punkish guitar-drum-bass foundation. After the recording comes the tour, and Morby has had a busy fall. Woods toured through September and October, opening for the Walkmen on some East Coast dates. Now the Babies are out for another lap, which has the group on the road until Christmas. First, though: Thanksgiving in Kansas City, where the Morbys, their son and the whole band will gather for turkey dinner before a Friday-night show at the Riot Room. “I’m excited to be having Thanksgiving there,” Ramone says. Another scrapbook opportunity? “Kevin likes to make fun of me for making them,” Sandy says. “But all the other band members like them.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

THE PITCH

25

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NOVEMBER 21: Trampled Under Foot NOV 23: MARK CHESNUTT with The Belairs One of the Best Country Singers out there

A: We Are DEVO!

WED. NOV. 21

MUSIC | STREETSIDE kcmo

7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS 10PM HAHA TONKA/NOT A PLANET THURS. NOV. 22

OPEN AT 9PM - NO TRIVIA SUNDIVER/CLAIRAUDIENTS/RADIO HIGH FRI. NOV. 23 7PM RAINMAKERS 10PM LEE LANGSTON PRESENTS THE SONGBOOK OF JILL SCOTT SAT. NOV. 24

1PM VICTOR & PENNY KIDS SHOW 7PM RAINMAKERS 10PM SLOWDOWN/SUPERNAUTS/ SONS OF GREAT DANE SUN. NOV. 25 SONIC SPECTRUM TRIBUTE TO DEVO W/ CHAD REX & THE VICTOR STANDS/ FEDERATION OF HORSEPOWER/ AND MEMBERS OF BE/NON/ ROMAN NUMERALS/FLAMING LIPS/ MOLLY PICTURE CLUB/DREAMWOLF MON. NOV. 26

24: The Belairs 28: Tommypresents Castro & The Pain Killers 29: Joanne Shaw Taylor 29: The Crayons Reunion Show 30: Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show

KARAOKE W/ TULIPANA TUES. NOV. 27 7PM ROCK PAPER SCISSORS 10PM THANKS FOR NOTHING WED. NOV. 28

BLUEPRINT/STEDDY P/MAD DUKEZ see www.therecordbar.com for our weekly events

1020 westport rd. kcmo 64111*816-‐753-‐5207

NOV 30: KINKY FRIEDMAN W/ BRIAN MOLNAR TIC THE TOUR KETBI-POLAR S NOW ON SALE!

30: Moreland & Arbuckle

DECEMBER 1 : Chubby Carrier

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

pitch.com

WILD BRUCE CHASE

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

Scouring a post-Springsteen downtown for something in the night

A

merican hero Bruce Springsteen was in Kansas City last weekend. I wish I could report a local Bruce spotting — best-case scenario would have involved him eating from a lunch pail outside some factory down on Front Street, though eggs at Succotash would have sufficed — but nobody I have spoken with or creeped on social media seems to have seen the man anywhere besides the Sprint Center stage Saturday night. I attended that show (you can read my review at The Pitch’s Wayward Blog at pitch. com), and afterward, my friend and I sought to ride the Springsteen high at some downtown bars, preferably with some fellow Springsteen fans. There wasn’t much action inside Duke’s on Grand, the new bar now open in the old Willie’s space, at the corner of Grand and Truman Road. Apart from the stupid-looking (though presumably temporary) sign outside, it appears that Duke hasn’t made many changes — same high tables, same setup. (It’s possible that the opening was rushed to court the postSpringsteen crowd, and I wouldn’t fault them for that.) We rolled past and ducked into the Cigar Box, which was muggy and crowded. As I made my way to the bar, I noticed a group of men hoisting a red bar stool in the air, but not in a violent way. It was more like they were trying to pass it around the crowd. Still, they were making a lot of noise and behaving recklessly, even for the Cigar Box, and the doorman rushed over and confiscated the chair. As I got closer, I saw that these culprits were idiot friends of mine. Having just come from Guns ’N Hoses, an annual charity event where cops and firefighters box each other inside a convention room in the downtown Marriott, they were running on adrenaline from a different source. (“There’s three rounds, and each round is only a minute, but it seems way longer than that,” I was told. “I mean, it’s pretty fascinating stuff to watch.”) The point in the evening when they could have articulated why they were whipping that chair around had long since passed. Per usual, Al Latta, the lounge singer at the Cigar Box (“It’s His World,” The Pitch, February 24, 2005), was presiding over the room, crooning classic songs and charming the women in the house. In tribute, he cued “Glory Days.” The friend who had accompanied me to the show, whom I would describe as a pretty big Springsteen fan, was handed the mic but weirdly couldn’t remember any of the lyrics besides glory days and pass you by. There are isolated tribes in Papua New Guinea that can sing along to “Glory Days.” But he just stood there with the microphone to his mouth and nodded his head, his brain searching in vain for the words, the instrumental version hurrying along in the background. Finally Latta grabbed the mic back.

Latta: It’s hard to be a saint in the Cigar Box. The charm of the Cigar Box, for me at least, is its transparent sexuality. Nobody in there pretends that they aren’t there to fl irt and fuck. “Waiter, I’ll have one of those,” a middleaged blond woman purred, nodding at a pair of muscle-bound dudes who had costumed up for the show with matching cutoff shirts and bandannas. One of my friends chatted up this woman’s friend at the bar later, and when I went up to get a drink, he tried to rope me into the conversation. “This is a man of words right here,” he said. “A man of letters,” I corrected him. “You don’t say much,” she said. “He speaks softly but he carries a big stick,” my friend said, hilariously. Oh, she loved that one. “We gotta get out of here,” I said. We walked through the Kansas City Star truck tunnel between McGee and Oak and decided that it was fi nally time to see what goes on inside Madrigall, the club at the corner of 17th Street and Oak. On Saturday, the room was packed and intimate, lighted in dark-red hues, and full of people salsa dancing. Attention, women who just broke up with your boyfriends: You would totally love Madrigall. A woman friend of mine walked up to the bar, and within 30 seconds, a tall, dark, handsome stranger asked her to dance. “I like this place,” she said later, a little dizzy. “We mix it up,” the owner, a nice man named Sam, told me. “We do more electronic stuff on Fridays, which gets a younger, artier kind of crowd. And on Thursday nights, we do a salsa class for beginners at the beginning of the night. So then you can come back and dance with the girls for real on Saturday.” Who could argue with that? Don’t we all need a little of that human touch?

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

THE PITCH

27

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 2 2 The Schwag: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 2 3 The Babies, Gashcat, Berwanger, Bloodbirds: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mark Chesnutt, the Bel Airs: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Fourth of July, Y[our] Fri[end], Monster: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. Aaron Lewis, Randy Montana: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Sons of Great Dane, the Supernauts, the Slow Down: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Josh Thompson: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

T U E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 2 7 Twiztid, Hed PE, Lil Wyte, Potluck, Freddy Grimes: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 2 8 ill.Gates, Stephan Jacobs, Jay Fay: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Megadeth, Kyng: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

FUTURECAST John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons (left); Young Guru

Young Guru

He has worked on albums by Ghostface, T.I. and Ludacris, but to the extent that Young Guru is known at all, it’s for being Jay-Z’s righthand man behind the boards. In addition to engineering just about every record that Hova has released, Guru now also serves as Jay’s tour DJ. He does his own thing, too, though, and this Czar gig should provide an opportunity to see what kinds of sounds this mastermind fancies when left to his own devices. Wednesday, November 28, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

doubles as a fundraiser for victims of Hurricane Sandy (and not a bullshit opportunistic one, either — 100 percent of donations and merch sales go to Sandy charities). With its Americana roots and punchy brass section, Velghe and company comprise one of KC’s more likable rock acts. Think the Replacements doing “Can’t Hardly Wait” and you’re in the ballpark. Friday, November 23, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

Sonic Spectrum Tribute to Devo John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons

Sure, the Midwest has its share of knuckledragging rednecks, but with these hurricanes hammering away at America’s coastal cities, a prairie town is looking all of a sudden like a pretty reasonable place to call home. Until the shit really goes down, though, we’ll do our part as Americans and send money and relief to the thousands of citizens whose homes have been ravaged by the increasing volatility of climate change. In this spirit, John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons’ Friday-after-Thanksgiving show at the Brick

There’s really no way around it: The Monday after Thanksgiving is going to be bleak, just dark as all hell. The meaningless tedium of human existence is always more acute when returning to work after a holiday weekend. It will probably also be cold outside. And if it’s not cold, that will be even more depressing because we all know why it’s not as cold as it used to be. We are all going to die is what I’m saying here. My advice: Wring every last drop of joy out of your holiday weekend. Live, damn it! While you still can! And this early (8 p.m.) Sunday-night tribute to new-wave mad-scientist act Devo is an excellent last-

F O R E C A S T

28

ditch stab at fending off the abyss. Scheduled to perform: Federation of Horsepower; Chad Rex & the Victor Stands; Dream Wolf; the Inwards; and a special group of Devo-tees, featuring members of Roman Numerals and Be/Non, called the Booji Boyz. Sunday, November 25, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The Rainmakers

Steve Phillips is in the Elders now, but the other Rainmakers — Bob Walkenhorst, Rich Ruth, Pat Tomek — re-formed in 2011, the 25th anniversary of the acclaimed Kansas City band’s debut album. (Jeff Porter has replaced Phillips on guitar.) To accommodate the large Thanksgiving homecoming crowds eager for a taste of the band’s heartland rock, the Rainmakers have scheduled shows Friday and Saturday. And to accommodate its older-skewing fanbase, both shows are early, at 7 p.m. Friday, November 23, and Saturday, November 24, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

K E Y

............................................................ Goin' Solo

........................................................ Dance Party

.................................................. Locally Sourced

................................................ Unknown Legend

...............................Seasonal Affective Disorder

.........................Getting the Band Back Together

..................................................... Energy Domes

......................................................Worthy Cause

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

pitch.com

DECEMBER SATURDAY 1 Chris Isaak: Uptown Theater Killswitch Engage, Shadows Fall, Acaro: The Beaumont Club Keller Williams: The Granada, Lawrence TUESDAY 4 Kreayshawn, Rye Rye, Honey Cocaine, Chippy Nonstop: The Granada, Lawrence SATURDAY 8 KPR Big Band Christmas: Liberty Hall, Lawrence Lamb of God, In Flames, Hellyeah, Sylosis: Uptown Theater SUNDAY 9 Trans-Siberian Orchestra: the Lost Christmas Eve: Sprint Center WEDNESDAY 12 Brian Setzer Orchestra’s Christmas Rocks: Uptown Theater SATURDAY 15 Carrie Underwood: Sprint Center

JANUARY FRIDAY 18 Jeff Mangum: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

FEBRUARY

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

THURSDAY 29 Coheed and Cambria, the Dear Hunter, Three: The Midland Tyler Ward: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 30 Kinky Friedman, Brian Molnar: Knuckleheads Saloon New Found Glory, the Story So Far, Seahaven: The Bottleneck, Lawrence

pitch.com

SATURDAY 2 Morrissey: Liberty Hall, Lawrence MONDAY 4 Lady Gaga: Sprint Center SUNDAY 10 Emilie Autumn: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 21 Toro Y Moi, Sinkane: The Granada, Lawrence

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

8 12.1

We Deliver!

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THE PITCH

29

Happy Hour Specials til 6pm!

SIGHTS SOUNDS Food by: IMPERIAL FLAVOR 1531 Grand KCMO (816) 421-0300 czarkc.com

The SPOT for The

11/23-- 1 More Time for Creep 11/28-- Jay-Z’s DJ Young Guru 11/29-- Gold Fields 11/30-- Broncho inParts Johnson County 12/1-of Speech 12/4-Rebecca Wed NOV 21 Rego

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Rock Paper Scissors 7-10 Thur NOV 22

Closed for Thanksgiving Fri NOV 23

Jason Vivone 5:30-7 Doghouse Daddies 8-11

MON: RURA L GRIT 6PM , KARAOKE 1 WED 11/21 0PM EMPTY SPA RUN LITTLE CES, FULL BLOODS, RABB FRI 11/23 JOHN VELGH IT, E SONS, BAND & THE PRODIGAL 13 SAT 11/24 THE CAVES, TREE, KNIFE TUE 11/27 CRIME BINGO FRI 11/30 SOUL PROV IDERS CREW SAT 12/01 DREAM WO L F, NED LUDD B MOLLY PICTURE CLUB AND

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at 6:30 p.m.

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30

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

Wed 11/21

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PINT NIGHT WITH DJ HIGHNOONE AND ASHTON MARTIN pitch.com

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DOWNTOWN

POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 18th & VINE

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lvd st B hwe out

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Blanc Burgers + Bottles Reverse Happy Tacos,Calimari, and Great Drink Specials!

Westport

Torre's Pizzeria Beer Kitchen Any Specialty Pizza for $10 & 2 Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Slices for $4 Saturday 11pm-1am Westport Cafe and Bar Buzzard Beach $1.25 Domestic Drafts $2.50 Wells Shot and a Beer for $5 Westport Coffee House Californos 15% Off Any Coffee Drink $5 off $12 purchase Downtown Dark Horse $2 Wells $2 domestic draws $12 Anthony's Power Hours 8pm-10pm Fri & Sat 2 for 1 Any Item from Late Night Menu with Purchase of Two Beverages Dave's Stagecoach Inn John's Big Deck (Upper) $3 Jameson Shots and $2 16oz $3 Wells $4 Bombs and No Cover Cans of PBR Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar River Market 2 for 1 cover CafĂŠ Al Dente Fidelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cigar Shop $3 Mascot Shots, Buy One

Wornall Rd

18th & Vine Danny's Big Easy Get Your Wristbands here!

Plaza

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BROOKSIDER WALDO E 75TH

Where do I catch the trolley?

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NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

THE PITCH

31

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 2 ROCK/POP/INDIE Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Sleazebeats. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sundiver, Clairaudients, Radio High.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Nace Brothers.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Wesley Kelly.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. AJ Finney.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Thanksgiving Day Dinner. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Open on Thanksgiving, 5 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Thanksgiving Night Turkey Jam, 6 p.m.

F R I D AY 2 3 ROCK/POP/INDIE The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. The Looks That Kill. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Freak Juice, New Suede, Grenadina. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Claire & the Crowded Stage, Enemies of Bill W, 9 p.m. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. The Monarchs. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Super Crush. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Cover Me Bad. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Dry Bonnet; Mouthbreathers, Rooftop Vigilantes, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Junebug and the Porchlights.

32 2 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

Icons Restaurant & Lounge: 1108 Grand, 816-472-4266. The Boss Kingz, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Doghouse Daddies. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Lee Langston presents the Songbook of Jill Scott, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Nace Brothers.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Jon Eric, Tyler Gregory. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Jesse Harris and the Gypsy Sparrows, DJ Jabberock, Cornerstone DUB, 77 Jefferson.

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Team trivia. The Chesterfield: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Burlesque Downtown Underground, 8 & 10 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. KC’s Original Dueling Pianos. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Black Friday Blowout. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m., $5. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 9 p.m. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Black Light Friday Party. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Black Friday Protest Party.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Winner’s Circle.

S AT U R D AY 2 4

Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Greg Krutsinger and the Georgia Overdrive.

DJ

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. M OR E Check Your Head with Johnny Quest. John’s Big Deck: 928 Wyandotte, 816-572-9595. Tony Snark (Ben S G Chaykin), Sam Blam, DJ Aira, DjRlax. IN LIST E AT Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816IN L N O 679-0076. Mosaic Friday hosted by M PITCH.CO Luke Rich, with DJ Allen Michael. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Proof on the patio. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ TA. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Conflicts (CD release), Kublai Khan, Genosha, Icon & Anchor, the Cast Pattern, Solace and Stable, 6 p.m. The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Poison Overdose. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Caves, Tree, Knifecrime. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Dirty Dillons; Thunder Kat, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Cynergy 67, Jimmy Coffin, Voice of Reason. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Camp Harlow, 5 p.m.; the Magnetics, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Various Blonde, the Difference Engine, Gentleman Savage, Sundiver. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. The Patrick Lentz Band.

CLUB

HIP-HOP Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Strider.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Chill with Phil.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Horace Washington, Everette DeVan. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Garrett Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; the Garrett Nordstrom Situation, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Bukeka Shoals & the James Ward Band. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Red Friday.

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JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Gerald Dunn, Jazz Disciples. Piropos Grille: 4141 N. Mulberry Dr., North Kansas City, 816-7413600. Candace Evans. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Hard@Play. West Chase Grille: 11942 Roe, Leawood, 913-663-5400. Mistura Fina.

AMERICANA

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ralph Harris, 7 & 10 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. AJ Finney, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Cadillac Flambe, the Silver Maggies, El Drifte and His Restless Hearts. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank and the Heartaches. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Bel Airs, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Janet Jameson, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Ben Miller Band.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Ass Jamz. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. KC’s Original Dueling Pianos. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Saturdays. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Shark Tank: No Men ’til 10. Sharks: 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Merriam, 913-2684006. Pool tournament, 1 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Thunder From Down Under. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Live karaoke with Separated at Birth.

DJ

EASY LISTENING

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DJ Finius. Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Pure. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Bump and Hustle with Cyrus D. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. DJ Howey. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Thrift Store 45s on the patio. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. DJ Highnoone.

HIP-HOP

Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Jill & Joe, Dryer & Adam.

M E TA L / P U N K The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. My Marionette, Fall Through, Eleven After, Autumn of Apologies, Engage the Broken.

SINGER-SONGWRITER

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite.

pitch.com

The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Sterling Witt.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2

S U N D AY 2 5 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Justin Hulsey, the Blackbird Revue, Eyelit.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. The Brickyard Tavern: 1001 S. Weaver, Olathe, 913-780-0266. Crosseyed Cat open blues jam, 3-7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss.

DJ Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

ACOUSTIC Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Acoustic Showcase.

JAZZ La Bodega: 4311 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-428-8272. Mistura Fina. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m.

CLASSICAL Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ralph Harris. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. AJ Finney.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Free pool, 3 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern - Lawrence: 410 N. Second St., Lawrence, 785-842-0377. Poker. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Show Stopper Karaoke, midnight. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m.

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brody Buster Open Blues Jam, 7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Jazz Jam with Nick Rowland and Sansabelt.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco.

JAZZ

REGGAE

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jerry Hahn. Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Warrior King Thanksgiving Sun.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

M O N D AY 2 6

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em Poker Night, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix, Gak Attack (after show). The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Scrabble Club, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Music Roulette. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Boob Tube Tuesdays, 7 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tele-Tuesday hosted by Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Trivia: the Bizarre, Pop Culture and Travel, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Country and Western Tuesdays.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Dwight Foster. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and Michael Pagan, 7 p.m.

COMEDY Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Comedy show.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia, service industry night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5.; karaoke, 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene, 7 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 7 BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudspeth and Shinetop. Trampled Under Foot, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Garrett Nordstrom Situation. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

M E TA L / P U N K RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Punk Rock Tribute, 9 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Nicolette Paige.

W E D N E S D AY 2 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Modern Rock Diaries, Til Willis and Erratic Cowboy. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Noise Ordinance.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Pink Royal. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Rob Foster and Dudes.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m.; Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Blueprint, Steddy P, DJ Mahf, Mad Dukez, 9:30 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. T.J. Erhardt piano.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Open Mic Night. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Eddie Ifft.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Ladies’ night, DJ. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Poetry Slam with Nightlife Jones, 9:30 p.m.

FOLK The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Michael Owen Rich, Cody Ross, the Ryan. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Lunadaz, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Guerrilla Movement, 10 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyler Gregory hosts Acoustic Jam Session. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

pitch.com N O V E M B E R 2 2 - 2 8 , 2 0 1 2 T H E P I T C H 33 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 3

S AVA G E L O V E

RULES OF THE BALLGAME Dear Dan: I am a 22-year-old straight female. I used to baby-sit for a wealthy family, but their children have outgrown baby sitters. The dad of this family is very into martial arts/ fighting and has invited me over several times for “self-defense training.” I have accepted his invitations a few times, and it has always started off as a normal workout in their home gym — treadmill, weights, swimming laps — but he is always pretty anxious to get to the self-defense part. Often he will blindfold me and then come at me, and I must then wrestle my way out of the situation using the moves I’ve learned. I did this a few times, Dan, but I found it a bit unsettling. However, he never touched me inappropriately. Last time we did this, he told me that he wanted to see how much pain he could take. He asked me to kick him in the groin with no protection until he couldn’t take it anymore. I thought, “This is strange,” but I was curious, so I did it. He was able to take it for a surprisingly long time. I haven’t been back since, but for the last six months, he has been pestering me to come back. Recently, he suggested that we have what he calls a “competition.” He will stand there, and I will kick him in the balls — or anywhere else I want — and if he gives up, I get $150. If I give up, by getting too tired, I give him $20. His wife knows about the workouts, but he said he doesn’t want me to tell her about the fi ghting. My question is this: Is there a sexual component to this? I have never heard of anything like this before, and I find it odd. But I am a poor college student, and for $150, I’ll stand there fully clothed and kick this guy in the balls! Please let me know your thoughts.

Will Kick Balls for Money Dear WKBFM: There are no nonsexual components to this, and if you’ve never heard of something like this before, well, you must be a new reader. What we’ve got here is a rich guy attempting to manipulate his kids’ former baby sitter into doing sex work for him — no, scratch that. What we’ve got here is a rich guy who has already manipulated his kids’ former baby sitter into doing sex work for him, and that’s pretty fucking creepy. (Your previous workouts with the blindfolds and the wrestling and the kicking? Unpaid sex work.) Don’t get me wrong: I don’t think his ball-busting fetish is creepy. It’s extreme, as fetishes go, and there are defi nitely risks. But the risks are his. Paying you to kick him in the nuts doesn’t put his wife at risk (swiftkick-to-sack is not a known mode of STI transmission). It won’t take food out of his children’s mouths. And he presumably has all the children he wants, so ball-bustinginduced sterility might be a blessing/vasectomy in disguise. If you need the money and you don’t think you’ll be scarred by the experience, tell the rich guy you’ll consider doing this 34

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 22-28, 2012

pitch.com

BY

D A N S AVA G E

Dear Dan: I am a 30-year-old straight man

who has always known that he is a poly. The woman I love is not a poly. She is a monogamous person. When we started being sexual, it was a strictly friends-with-benefits arrangement, although a sexually exclusive one, at her insistence, and I agreed to that because neither of us expected anything long term to come of it. But we fell in love, and now I can’t imagine life without her. She is amazing, and I love her like I’ve never loved any other woman. But she has asked me to betray my sexual identity by remaining sexually exclusive. If I cannot commit to that, she does not want to be with me. I am not asking the same of her: She does not have to sleep with other people to keep me in her life. She is, however, insisting that I not sleep with other people to keep her in my life. Can someone who is poly be happy with someone who isn’t?

Polyamorous Polymath Dear PP: You are not “a poly.”

for him — you’ll come over, remain fully clothed and kick him in the nuts — but only if he levels with you: He’s getting off on this. If he can’t level with you, don’t do this. You don’t want this rich asshole to think he has successfully manipulated you into doing sex work for him because once the session is under way, you don’t want him thinking, “Well, if I could get her to do this, I can probably get her to [remove her clothes, watch me masturbate, have sex with me].” If you go into a ball-busting session without both of you having acknowledged what you’re actually doing — you’re sorta selling sex; he’s defi nitely paying for sex — and he does try to get you to remove your clothes or watch him masturbate or have sex with him, you may fi nd it difficult to say no. Being direct with someone (“No, I’m not taking my clothes off, asshole!”) after you’ve accepted a dishonest premise (“Sure, rich guy, this isn’t about sex; you’re just testing yourself!”) requires you to admit that you were being dishonest, too. Most people are reluctant to admit to dishonesty, and a skilled manipulator will exploit that inhibition to get what he wants. So tell him you’ll play — you’ll bust his balls — but you’re not going to play along. He has to admit that this is about sex and he has to agree to honor your conditions: Everything that happens is agreed to in advance, no special requests during a session, he remains fully clothed, you remain fully clothed, no recordings are made, and you get the $150 — make that $250 — whether or not he bails.

Poly is not a sexual identity, and it’s not a sexual orientation. It’s not something you are; it’s something you do. There’s no such thing as a person who is “a poly,” just as there’s no such thing as a person who is “a monogamous.” Polyamorous and monogamous are adjectives, not nouns. There are only people — gay, straight, bi — and some people are in monogamous relationships, some are in open relationships, some are in polyamorous relationships, some are in monogamish relationships, some are in four-star-general relationships. These are relationship models, not sexual identities. So the question isn’t “Can a poly be happy with a monogamous?” The question is, can you, despite your clear preference for nonmonogamous relationship models, be happy in this relationship? Do you love your girlfriend so much that you’re willing to pay the price of admission that she’s demanding — you’re willing to behave monogamously (adverb!) — in order to be with her? Yes or no? Because your girlfriend has already indicated that she’s not willing to have a nonmonogamous relationship with you (or anyone else), the choice is yours to make. If you truly can’t live without her, if she’s the one you’re going to round the fuck up to the one, you’ll have to be monogamous. If that’s not something you’re willing or able to do — and “willing” and “able” are two different criteria, and you’ll need to make an honest self-assessment on both counts — then end this relationship and go fi nd someone whose romantic desires more closely align with your own. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

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The Pitch: November 22, 2012