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ASCEND

2019

a publication of the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce


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FEATURES 2019 Issue South Carolina Chamber of Commerce 1301 Gervais St., Suite 1100 Columbia, SC 29201 800.799.4601 ASCEND is a publication of the

16 LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

Fair Weather Fun

25 THE SC CHAMBER AWARDS 43 THE SOUTH CAROLINA 100 52 WHY SOUTH CAROLINA PARKS

ARE ESSENTIAL FOR THE ECONOMY

66 THE DNA OF GIVING

DEPARTMENTS 5 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT President & CEO Ted Pitts Chief Operating Officer Robbie Barnett Executive Vice President of Public Policy, Communications & Of Counsel Swati Patel Executive Vice President of Membership & Marketing Sunny Philips Vice President of Finance Susan O’Neal Vice President of Education & Workforce Development Cynthia Bennett

7 LETTER FROM THE CHAIR 12 2018 LEGISLATIVE RECAP 40 HUMAN INTEREST

Tim Arnold – A Life Transformed

56 THE CHAMBER FOUNDATION 62 HOMEGROWN BUSINESS

Making Life Easier

72 AFTER THE EVENT 80 CHAMBER PAST CHAIRS

Associate Vice President of Administrative Services & Board Secretary Caroline Donaldson • ASCEND Magazine Published by The Brand Leader Copyright ©2019 by the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce and The Brand Leader. All foreign and U.S. rights reserved. Contents of this publication, including images, may not be reproduced without written consent from the publisher. Published for South Carolina Chamber of Commerce by The Brand Leader.

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S.C. Chamber of Commerce

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE LOU KENNEDY – CHAIRMAN President & CEO Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation JACK SANDERS – PAST CHAIR President & CEO - Retired Sonoco STEVE SPINKS – CHAIR-ELECT CEO Spinx Company, Inc. MIKE SHETTERLY – GENERAL COUNSEL Managing Shareholder Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. CHRIS BARRAS – TREASURER Executive Director Ernst & Young, LLP DAVID LOMINACK – COMMERCE CHAIR SC Market President TD Bank TED PITTS – CEO President & CEO SC Chamber of Commerce KENNY JACKSON – CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE Senior Vice President, Services/Rates & Regulatory Affairs South Carolina Electric & Gas

OUR VISION

Make South Carolina the best place in the nation to live, work and do business.

OUR MISSION

To strategically create and advance a thriving, free-market environment where South Carolina businesses can prosper.

SIDNEY J EVERING II – LEGISLATIVE AGENDA TASK FORCE COMMITTEE CHAIR Attorney Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein, LLP TOMMY LAVENDER – ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNICAL COMMITTEE CHAIR Member Nexsen Pruet, LLC DAVID ALEXANDER – TAX COMMITTEE CHAIR Director of Taxes Mount Vernon Mills, Inc.

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THOMAS RHODES – SMALL BUSINESS COMMITTEE CHAIR President Rhodes Companies

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KODWO GHARTEY-TAGOE – CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE State President Duke Energy JAMES D’ALESSIO – CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE Vice President of Government Affairs BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina TYLER EASTERLING – COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE CHAIR President & Chief Operating Officer The Brandon Agency

BEN REX – INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION COMMITTEE CHAIR CEO Cyberwoven, LLC SAM KONDUROS – CHAIRMAN’S NOMINEE President & CEO South Carolina Biotechnology Industry Organization

DAVID CUDA – MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE CHAIR Director of Corporate Solutions Colliers International, Inc.

DEE DEE HENDERSON – CHAIRMAN’S NOMINEE COO Agape Hospice

KATHY HELMS – EDUCATION & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE CHAIR Shareholder Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.

ROGER SCHRUM – SOUTH CAROLINA CHAMBER PAC CHAIR Vice President, Investor Relations & Corporate Affairs Sonoco

BRYAN HAMRICK – HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE CHAIR Director, Human Resources Zeus Industrial Products, Inc.

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CYNTHIA WALTERS – DIVERSITY COUNCIL CHAIR Corporate Director of Inclusion Palmetto Health


Chamber Ad 2018.pdf 1 10/10/2018 2:56:17 PM

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Industry Updates Letters

A LETTER FROM THE CHAIR As a native South Carolinian, I am honored and excited to serve this state and the business community as chair for the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce. South Carolina as a whole has proven to be a great place for resources and workforce—and the proof is in the numbers. Nearly 50 percent of our employees at Nephron attended South Carolina universities or technical colleges, and we are thrilled to have retained their talent within our state. The Palmetto State attracts top companies including, but not limited to, BMW, Volvo, Boeing, and Michelin. From Charleston to Greenville, the state offers economic diversity, a thriving labor force, and great resources, making South Carolina a great place to live, work and play. Among the many things that attracted Nephron to South Carolina were its hospitable and hardworking people, its innovative and advancing workforce, and the commitment from this state to educate and train employees. The Chamber has played a key role in this advancement by connecting students to real businesses through programs such as the HCBU STEM Program and Business Week. Nephron is implementing an intern apprenticeship program in partnership with a South Carolina college, which provides students with specific skills that our business desires. The Chamber’s goal is to evaluate business employment needs and utilize that information to craft programs for our students. My plan this year is to support these efforts, and promote the immediate need for tax reform. From growing up in the Midlands, relocating my company to the state, and serving alongside many South Carolina organizations, I have seen first-hand the passion and determination of the Carolina community. Together we will continue to promote, recruit and transform top talent, so that South Carolina will continue to thrive in both education and business. I am happy to serve my state and look forward to a successful 2019.

Lou Kennedy CEO and President, Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation Chair, South Carolina Chamber of Commerce

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Industry Updates Letters

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Since 1940, empowered by the unwavering support of the business community, the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce has made a difference. Even today, we remain the state’s primary protector of business interests and serve as the champion for business in the Palmetto State, and because of that, South Carolina continues to be a leader in job growth and capital investment due to the business environment that we have worked together to create. As we look back on the 2018 legislative session, it will be remembered as the year that was consumed by the failure of the VC Summer nuclear project. There are no winners with the failure of VC Summer, but the session was not a complete loss for the state’s business economy. We must not overlook the fact that there were key wins on several business issues: • Automatic stay, a provision that previously allowed any party to hold up a permit stance indefinitely without cause • Nuisance laws to ensure protection for manufacturers from frivolous lawsuits • Agricultural laws that will allow South Carolina’s agribusiness atmosphere to be more competitive with Georgia and North Carolina • Workforce development laws that will reintegrate non-violent ex-offenders back into the workplace • Tax conformity, which will continue to ensure that our state has a simple tax filing system and will save taxpayers millions of dollars On March 13, 2018, the Post & Courier wrote an article with the headline “Business Bills Cut Through SC Legislature while Others Trudge Along.” This article highlights the fact that South Carolina’s business community has a strong voice and that our General Assembly listens. But there is still much more work to do. South Carolina businesses continue to face challenges like finding workers with the right skills, an outdated and uncompetitive state tax code, rising healthcare costs, and a K12 education system that must be modernized, as well as the need to push back against the constant pressure from trial lawyers, unions, and environmental activist groups. By standing together and by recruiting other businesses to join our efforts, we can continue to succeed in making our state the best place in the nation to live, work and do business. One of the highlights of ASCEND is the formal recognition of the business community’s honorees for Business Leader and Public Servant of the Year—two awards which we are honored to be able to offer every year. This year we are proud to honor Kim Wilkerson, South Carolina State President, Bank of America and South Carolina Market Executive, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Wealth Management, and Bobby Hitt, Secretary of Commerce for the South Carolina Department of Commerce. They have been champions for business and their mark has been left on the state. I hope you enjoy this edition of ASCEND. The Chamber staff and I are incredibly proud and privileged to serve the business community—together we will continue to do great things.

Ted Pitts President & CEO South Carolina Chamber of Commerce

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S.C. Chamber of Commerce

BOARD OF DIRECTORS David Alexander

DISTRICT OPERATIONS MANAGER

Robert Alexander

Sky Foster

Mount Vernon Mills, Inc. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Coroplast

Michael Allen

PROJECT DESIGNER

McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture Keith Avery

PRESIDENT & CEO

Newberry Electric Co-op., Inc. Don Balderson

SENIOR VP/ SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Bank of America Chris Barras

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ernst & Young LLP Michael Baxley

SENIOR VP & GENERAL COUNSEL

Santee Cooper

United Parcel Service

MANAGER CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS

BMW Manufacturing Co., LLC Kodwo Ghartey-Tagoe STATE PRESIDENT

Duke Energy

Christian L. Gullott

DIRECTOR OF STATE & FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Bridgestone Americas Bryan Hamrick

Oceana Resorts by Wyndham Vacation Rentals Richard Lackey

LEGAL COUNSEL

Cox Industries, Inc. John T. Lay

SHAREHOLDER

Gallivan, White & Boyd Tommy Lavender

Ben Rex

Nexsen Pruet, LLC

Cyberwoven, LLC

MEMBER

Aaron Lawrence

PLANT MANAGER

BP America

Kathy Helms

SHAREHOLDER

COO

Zeus Industrial Products, Inc.

SENIOR DIRECTOR OF STATE & LOCAL, GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS

Boeing Company Sidney Locke

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC MARKETING & COMMUNICATION

SAGE Automotive Interiors, Inc. David Lominack

SC MARKET PRESIDENT

TD Bank

First Citizens Bank & Trust Company

Mason Hogue

SHAREHOLDER

Kay Biscopink

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Ben Breazeale

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Spirit Communications

Nucor Steel - South Carolina

Charter Communications

Todd Hyneman

Jarrett Martin

Frank Bullard

Total Comfort Solutions, Inc.

Mar-Mac

Holt Chetwood

MIDLANDS MARKET MANAGER

Wells Fargo Joe Clark

SHAREHOLDER, MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE MEMBER

Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. CEO

Thomas Rhodes

PRESIDENT & CEO - RETIRED

Agape Hospice

BB&T, Charleston

Matt Puckett

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Lindsay Leonard

James Bennett

REGIONAL PRESIDENT, COASTAL REGION

Ted Pitts

PRESIDENT & CEO

SC Chamber of Commerce

John Harvey

Zeus Industrial Products, Inc.

Dee Dee Henderson

SENIOR DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS FOR SC

Koch Industries

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

AECOM

Elliott Davis

Fatima Perez

REGIONAL MANAGER, STATE GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Rhodes Companies

Dan Becker

MID-SOUTH AREA EXECUTIVE

Tracy Kundey

EXECUTIVE GENERAL MANAGER

VP OF CORPORATE STRATEGIC PLANNING & BUSINESS ANALYTICS

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.

SENIOR VP & CONTROLLER

PARTNER

Grey Humphrey

PRESIDENT

Kenny Jackson

Dr. Forest E. Mahan PRESIDENT

Aiken Technical College Matt Manelli

DIVISION CONTROLLER

PRESIDENT

Sharon Marra

Jack Sanders Sonoco

Roger Schrum

VICE PRESIDENT OF INVESTOR RELATIONS & CORPORATE AFFAIRS

Sonoco

Darrell Scott

SENIOR DIRECTOR OF LEGISLATIVE & REGULATORY AFFAIRS

NextEra Energy Resources Richard Shaffer

SENIOR VP OF GROWTH MARKETS & ENROLLMENT CENTER

Colonial Life

Mike Shetterly

MANAGING SHAREHOLDER

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Dave Solano

VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER

Enterprise Holdings Jane Sosebee

SENIOR VP OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, GOVERNMENT, & REGULATORY AFFAIRS

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC

Richard Jackson

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER,

PRESIDENT & MANAGING PRINCIPAL

Chris McCorkendale

Steve Spinks

South Carolina Electric & Gas CEO

C. R. Jackson, Inc. David Jameson

SR. VP & SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY DEPUTY DIRECTOR

PRESIDENT

Chad McAllister

Milliken & Company

STATE PRESIDENT

AT&T

Paul Sparks

RealOp Investments

Dr. David Cole

PRESIDENT & CEO

Greater Aiken Chamber of Commerce

VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS, ENGINEERING & STRATEGIC SALES

Spinx Company, Inc.

Medical University of South Carolina

Charles Johnson

Virgil Miller

SHAREHOLDER

David Cuda

EDTS Cyber

Colliers International, Inc.

Boyd Jones

PRESIDENT

DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SOLUTIONS

CEO

VP OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

DIRECTOR, MIDDLE MARKET BANKING CORPORATE BANKING, REGIONAL CHIEF BANKING OFFICER

Hunter Dawkins

David Jones

James D’Alessio

BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina

Synovus

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, NATURAL RESOURCE DIVISION

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT & CMO

Steffanie Dohn

GENERAL COUNSEL

Johnson Development

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

Southern Current Tyler Easterling

PRESIDENT & COO

The Brandon Agency Sidney Evering

SPECIAL COUNSEL & DIRECTOR OF DIVERSITY

Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

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Lauris Finney

DIRECTOR OF TAXES

Jackson Marketing Group George R Jurch, III

Continental Tire the Americas, LLC Lou Kennedy

PRESIDENT & CEO

Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation Thomas Komaromi

GENERAL COUNSEL

Samsung

Sam Konduros

PRESIDENT & CEO

South Carolina Biotechnology Industry Organization

Hargray Communications Group

PRESIDENT, AFLAC GROUP INSURANCE, EXECUTIVE VP & COO, AFLAC U.S.

Aflac Group

Paul Mitchell

MANAGING PARTNER

South Coast Paper

CEO

Chris Stormer

Bauknight, Pietras & Stormer, P.A. Jonathan Taber

MANAGING MEMBER

TaberPatrick, LLC Greg Taylor

MANAGING PARTNER

Steve Mitchell

Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP

Fisher Phillips

Henry Tisdale

Ben Mustian

Claflin University

REGIONAL MANAGING PARTNER

SHAREHOLDER

Willoughby & Hoefer, P.A. Tim Norwood PRESIDENT

Bistro Holdings, Inc. Leesa Owens

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Michelin North America, Inc. Paul Patrick

EXECUTIVE VP FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS & CFO

College of Charleston

PRESIDENT

Cynthia Walters

CORPORATE DIRECTOR OF INCLUSION

Palmetto Health Dan Weekley

VICE PRESIDENT, SOUTHERN OPERATIONS

Dominion Energy


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Governor McMaster signing nuisance bill

2018

LEGISLATIVE RECAP SOUTH CAROLINA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FILLING THE WORKFORCE PIPELINE AND MAKING SC MORE COMPETITIVE

This year our primary focuses were filling our workforce pipeline and making our state more competitive with other states. Members of the General Assembly working together with the business community passed workforce reintegration laws, made our farming laws more competitive, relieved businesses from burdensome regulations, reauthorized the Conservation Bank indefinitely, passed tax conformity, and made meaningful strides in reforming education.

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Legislative Recap 2 0 1 8

COMPETITIVENESS AGENDA In 2018, the South Carolina Chamber continued to fight for policies to make South Carolina the best place in the nation to live, work, and do business. The Chamber Board developed the 2018 Competitiveness Agenda through information captured from our investor surveys, grassroots meetings in partnership with our local chambers, and dialogue with business leaders from around the state. Though there are many other policy issues we take positions on and advocate for or against, the Competitiveness Agenda focuses on the top issues as determined by South Carolina businesses. This year, our central initiatives were tax reform and filling the workforce pipeline.

Taxes We must make South Carolina’s tax system more competitive. • Lower property taxes for businesses. South Carolina is home to some of the highest commercial and manufacturing tax rates in the nation. • Reduce the income tax burden on the state’s workforce. South Carolina’s top marginal income tax rate of seven percent is higher than any state in the Southeast.

Workforce South Carolina’s business community needs targeted strategies that will increase the number of people with the right skills in the talent pipeline. • Grow apprenticeship opportunities. • Become the home of choice for veterans leaving the service and starting their second career by fully exempting military retirement benefits. • Expand policies aimed at reintegrating ex-offenders into the workforce. • Shrink the skills gap by working with K-12, higher education, government training agencies and private sector partners. • Focus on soft skills development for our students. • Address the growing prescription drug and opioid epidemic.

2 0 1 8

LEGISLATIVE SUCCESSES Passed Business Friendly Bills H.3653 (Sponsors: Forrester and others) Nuisance Suits This bill will protect rights of manufacturers and industrial facilities from unwarranted nuisance related lawsuits. H.4727 (Sponsors: White and others) Conservation Bank Reauthorization This bill permanently reauthorizes the Conservation Bank, an important tool in protecting South Carolina’s natural resources, tourist attractions and agricultural land. S.105 (Sponsors: Rankin, Goldfinch, and Verdin) Automatic Stay This bill limits the amount of time an economic development project can be stalled by third parties without cause. H.4931 (Sponsors: Elliott and others) Applied Manufacturing Baccalaureate This bill authorizes certain Technical Colleges to offer an Applied Manufacturing Baccalaureate, a program needed to help employee growth and address the shortage of managers in the manufacturing industry. H.5341 (Sponsors: Lucas and others) Tax Conformity This bill provides a revenue-neutral option for tax conformity in light of the federal tax reform, keeping state tax filers from having

the burden of keeping two sets of books and preparing two different returns. H.3209 (Sponsors: Pope and others) Ex-Offender Workforce Re-integration This bill allows for the expungement of some minor, non-violent offenses and provides a safe harbor for employers who hire exoffenders. H.3929 (Sponsors: Hiott and others) Agricultural Animal Facilities This bill clarifies and sets standard rules for poultry farmers across the state. H.3146 (Delleney and others) Superintendent of Education This joint resolution amends the constitution to allow voters to require the Governor to appoint the Superintendent of Education.

Blocked Business Negative Bills H.4421 (Sponsors: J.E. Smith and others) Solar Subsidies This bill would have expanded solar subsidies paid by non-solar consumers to those that install solar panels on their roof set up in Act 236 that were intended to get the solar industry started.

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WHAT IS THE CHAMBER PAC? The South Carolina Chamber PAC is a tax-exempt organization organized under Section 527 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its purpose is to educate voters on policy issues and influence the selection, nomination, and election of business-friendly state political candidates.

Why does the South Carolina Chamber have an affiliated Political Action Committee? Fully funded by South Carolina business contributions, the PAC provides a place where business leaders can help ensure that South Carolina continues to be a great state in which to locate and grow.

How does the Chamber PAC operate? The South Carolina Chamber PAC educates voters on policy issues being considered by the state legislature that advance job creation and economic opportunity. The Chamber PAC also supports pro-jobs, business-friendly candidates on the state level by making campaign contributions. Our PAC realizes that there are two ways to impact policy: from the outside, with targeted, issues-based messaging; and from the inside, by helping elect and support like-minded candidates who represent pro-business values. We need you on our team to keep South Carolina moving forward. To get involved, go to www.scchamber.net/initiatives/chamber-pac.

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In South Carolina, the thrill of amusement rides, sweet treats and shrieks of laughter can be found in a variety of places—but none so prominent as our two most popular destinations for fair-flavored fun. From Carowinds, which straddles the North Carolina border, to the S.C. State Fair, now celebrating its 150th year—one thing is certain:

SOUTH CAROLINA HAS NO SHORTAGE OF FUN TO BE EXPERIENCED.

Articles by Lisa Stryker & Bertram Rantin

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Industry Updates Love Where You Live

by Lisa Stryker

Carowinds is the place where the Carolinas come together. Located off I-77 (Exit 90) at the N.C./S.C. border, the premier entertainment destination of the Carolinas is the only amusement park to straddle two states. This 400-acre entertainment center touts world-class thrill rides, live music and entertainment, delicious dining options featuring authentic Carolina cuisine, special events that make every visit unique and so much more. Adrenaline junkies visit the park to experience the 13 incredible rollercoasters­—soon to be 14! In 2015, Carowinds introduced Fury 325, the world’s largest and fastest giga coaster. The park’s variety of coasters offers something every age can enjoy. Carowinds also features many thrill rides such as Slingshot and Ripcord. Classic family rides can be found in the County Fair section of the park that takes you back in time to an early-era local fair. In 2019, Carowinds will unveil the largest investment in park history, including a brand new themed area named Blue Ridge Junction. This exciting addition will pay tribute to the Carolinas’ beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains and is anchored by a brand new coaster, Copperhead Strike. As the Carolinas’ first double launch coaster, this ride is twice the boost and twice the bite with a total of five inversions. A new restaurant, Blue Ridge Country Kitchen,

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will also bring new life to this area of the park. Here, guests will enjoy delicious rotisserie chicken and other farm-fresh goodness inspired by the mountains of the Carolinas. To cater to guests eager to enjoy new offerings inside the park, a new Springhill Suites by Marriott at Carowinds will provide a comfortable place to rest on site after enjoying all the thrills and fun the park has to offer. This hotel will feature 130 rooms, a pool, fitness center, an outdoor seating area and so much more. Luxurious amenities will ensure guests are refreshed and energized for a fun day in the park. Carowinds also offers plenty of live entertainment. During the summer months, nine different shows appear throughout the park. Check out the daring aerial stunts at Seasons of Cirque, or meet the PEANUTS gang at the Happy Campers show. All of this fun can work up an appetite. The park’s executive chef has cooked up some genuine Carolina eats that can be found at over 20 dining locations throughout the park. Everyone loves to cool off at Carolina Harbor, where the charm of the Carolina coast meets the thrills of Carowinds. This massive waterpark was doubled in 2016. It features everything from


Industry Updates Love Where You Live

giant water slides and wave pools to a three-acre kids’ area. Best of all, entry into Carolina Harbor is always included with Carowinds admission.

with plenty of shade. This section of the park features beautiful landscaping, large seating areas, and summer camp theming so parents can relax while kids play.

In addition to summertime fun, Carowinds hosts seasonal events to keep the excitement going all year long. SCarowinds transforms this “theme park” to “scream park.” Six terrifying mazes, three live shows, six scare zones and 500 monsters give guests the fright of their life. Great Pumpkin Fest features kidsized fright with costume contests, trick-or-treating, games and live entertainment for the whole family. Carowinds comes alive with holiday spirit during WinterFest. Friends and families are treated to an ultimate holiday celebration as the park magically transforms into a winter wonderland—full of enchantment, cheer and classic family fun. Other special events, such as KidsFest, Great Carolina Fest and Breakfast with the Characters, make each visit to the park new and exciting.

With so much to do, one day at the park just isn’t enough. Guests can kick back and stay a while at the on-site family campground, Camp Wilderness Resort. This campground features comfortable two bedroom cabins, as well as a large luxury cabin, sleeping up to 14 people—perfect for a family gathering. Additionally, plenty of RV sites are available, each with their own grill. Camp Wilderness also features a pool, a trading post with a general store as well as free shuttle service to the park.

At the beginning of the 2018 season, Carowinds unveiled Camp Snoopy—a new fantastic adventure for kids! Camp Snoopy completely transformed the kids’ area with six new attractions including junior rides like Pig Pen’s Mud Buggies and a soaring Camp Bus, along with an 8,000-square-foot climb and play area

Carowinds’ 60 rides, shows and attractions offer up everything you need to make lifelong memories with the family. Special ticket packages are available, and a season pass is the best deal for anyone who plans to visit more than once—and you’ll need more than one visit to experience everything Carowinds has to offer. Carowinds also hosts the best group and corporate events around. Visit carowinds.com for more information including operating hours, the event calendar and pricing.

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Industry Updates Love Where You Live

ANNIVERSARY

By Bertram Rantin

The South Carolina State Fair will mark a century and a half showcasing the state’s agricultural roots when it holds its 150th Anniversary fair October 9-20, 2019. Since its organization in 1869, the fair has continued to celebrate those roots with a mix of entertainment, food, rides, competitive exhibits and educational activities while establishing itself as the state’s largest event. “Our State Fair is a celebration of everything that is great about South Carolina, and we are excited to put that greatness on display again during our special 150th Anniversary event,” said State Fair manager, Nancy Smith. “Every county across the state and each of the state’s seven congressional districts will be represented during this year’s fair. There really is a little something for everyone.” The fair will begin showcasing the 150th anniversary early in 2019, bringing attention to its long-standing community involvement. In addition to the long list of traditional favorites, the 150th Anniversary Fair will feature several special offerings including a published History of the Fair as well as a display of

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interesting fair memorabilia through the years. The South Carolina State Fair is a self-supported, charitable organization dedicated to educating South Carolina’s young adults and awards more than $300,000 in scholarships each year. While it is the official state fair of South Carolina, the fair is not connected in any way with the state government but is a private non-profit organization with a self-perpetuating governing board, the State Agricultural and Mechanical Society of South Carolina. And while maintaining its primary mission of supporting statewide education, the fair regularly contributes to regional and statewide charitable efforts including the donation of all parking proceeds to statewide flood relief efforts in 2015. “We are very grateful for the way the community has supported us through the years, and we feel is it our responsibility to pay that support back to our communities,” Smith said.


Industry Updates Love Where You Live

Today’s State Fair welcomes more than 400,000 visitors each year. While many fairgoers attend to experience the most recent midway ride or sample the latest craze in carnival food, the State Fair continues to offer premiums in a wide variety of classes that range from students showing their prized farm animals to senior citizens competing in home crafts and gardening categories. Education remains an integral part of the State Fair’s mission and is reflected in the annual Ride of Your Life Scholarship program.

One of the fair’s major landmarks is the iconic “Rocket”, which is located at the fair’s north entrance and has become a popular meeting place for fair guests. The Rocket is a Jupiter intermediate range ballistic missile, designed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and built by Chrysler. Its name is Columbia, and it was given to the city in the early ‘60s by the US Air Force. In 1969, the “Rocket” was erected at the fairgrounds at a cost of $10,000. Through the years, the iconic figure has generated the popular phrase … “Meet me at the Rocket!”

Since its inception, the State Fair has promoted agriculture and industry while also reflecting the culture and special features of our state.

The South Carolina State Fair is encouraging statewide residents to be a part of this year’s 150th Anniversary celebration and is gathering memorabilia that patrons or their families have kept through the years. Those willing to share items for the celebration or who wish to send photos of their family and friends at the fair over the years are encouraged to email favoritememory@scstatefair.org.

The essence of the State Fair was captured in an editorial in The State newspaper on October 18, 1960: “The South Carolina State Fair may mean different things to different people… In a very real sense it is the opportunity to take stock within our state as to where we stand in agriculture and industry, in science and art and history. It is foremost the reflection of our educational values and where we put our faith.” Throughout the year, the fairgrounds serve as the venue for some of the state’s most popular events including the annual Craftsman’s Classic, the Home and Garden Show, and the Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic. Additionally, the fair offers tailgate parking for University of South Carolina home football games that include luxury tailgate packages.

“We are very excited to mark this historic occasion,” Smith said.

“It is our hope that visitors from across the state will join us as we continue to showcase South Carolina and make the best better.”

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EDUCATION WITH A IIBOOST

A look inside BP’s programs to boost STEM learning

by John Harvey, Plant Manager, BP Cooper River Plant

When leaders at the BP Cooper River plant selected education as one of three key focus areas for external engagement in the Lowcountry of South Carolina, they were serious about our commitment to both education and engagement — especially when it comes to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The STEM subjects will play a crucial role in preparing today’s students for successful careers, including careers at BP. Over the past five years, BP has donated more than $42 million to U.S. STEM programs. Indeed, we have a long history of supporting programs that encourage students to pursue STEM careers, that educate and train teachers, and that mobilize our employees — like those at Cooper River — to volunteer in their communities. Many of our STEM investments have focused on traditionally underrepresented groups. For example, BP has sponsored STEM-themed summer camps led by the National Society of Black Engineers. We also support the Million Women Mentors project, which helps young women learn about and succeed in STEM fields. Here in South Carolina, where workforce development is a huge challenge for manufacturers, BP is proud to partner directly with neighborhood schools near our plant. We provide funds to support competitive robotics teams, build interactive maker space labs, and train teachers on STEM integration. The ability to support a more cohesive and hands-on approach to STEM subjects helps bring learning to life for many students and adds a broader level of relevance to classroom experiences.

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Recently, a class of young students in a Berkeley County elementary school read the classic story of the Tortoise and the Hare. They had learned about engineering through experiences in the maker space lab that BP sponsored at their school. So when these students were asked to “engineer” a plan to ensure that the Tortoise won its famous race, they quickly proposed creative solutions for defeating the Hare, ranging from hoverboards and rocket-propelled roller skates to eating an energy bar. It was a great example of how integrated STEM education can help promote critical and creative thinking and effective problem solving. BP also seeks opportunities to collaborate creatively with community partners like the Center for Birds of Prey. Together, we are working to elevate STEM subjects at a low-income school by introducing a project named “The Year of the Bird.” This initiative combines a summer teacher training internship, integration of a supplemental wildlife curriculum into standard coursework, hands-on classroom projects, and innovative field trips, all designed to elevate STEM engagement to a new level. Whether it’s second-graders hatching chicks, third-graders taking a field trip to learn about vultures, or fourth-graders


planting a bird garden, the students will be immersed in fun, educational activities. Through it all, BP employee volunteers will provide support. This past year, our company helped launch “BP Global STEM Academies,� which allowed 100 students from around the world to participate in a fully funded, four-week study-abroad program featuring a blended curriculum of STEM subjects and global competence. More than 1,000 students from 27 countries applied to participate in the BP Global STEM Academies, which were held in Brazil, Egypt and the United States. Many of these students would not otherwise have had the opportunity to study abroad. Across countries and cultures, dynamic STEM education helps enhance college and career readiness for the workers and innovators of the future. BP is proud that our support for STEM education has helped open doors and create opportunities for students of all backgrounds, including right here in the Lowcountry.

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EMPOWERING VISION

With our low-cost, reliable electricity and choice industrial sites, Santee Cooper continues to help new businesses picture a better future – and to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

POWERING SOUTH CAROLINA

www.poweringsc.com


PRESENTING the

2 0 1 8

Leadership Awards

by Jordana Megonigal

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2018

Business Leader OF THE YEAR

KIM WILKERSON

South Carolina State President; South Carolina Market Executive, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management 26


In June of 1980, Kim Wilkerson joined Bank of America’s predecessor bank, Bankers Trust of South Carolina. Her first assignment in the training department was not exactly what she expected. “We were launching this new technology called an Automated-Teller Machine (ATM), and my role was to sit in front of the banking center in the middle of summer, in a full suit, to demonstrate how to use the machine,” Wilkerson said. “It was hot out there.” Today, both the technology and Wilkerson’s career have progressed exponentially. Wilkerson is now Bank of America’s State President of South Carolina. She also serves as South Carolina Market Executive for U.S. Trust, Bank of America’s Private Wealth Management, where she leads the overall effort to serve the wealth management needs of high net worth individuals and families in South Carolina. Wilkerson was born in Tennessee and was eight-years-old when her father moved the family to South Carolina. She credits her parents for providing a strong foundation and for teaching a solid work ethic, the value of hard work and modeling the importance of giving back to others. While attending Clemson University, she met a special professor who quickly recognized her strengths and became one of her first mentors. “I changed majors, from chemical engineering, after my freshman year. As graduation approached, my finance professor, Perry Woodside, recognized something in me, and asked if I had considered banking. When I said no, he replied ‘Well, now you have. I have signed you up to be interviewed by two banks,’ ” Wilkerson said. This experience left a meaningful impression and has been a guiding influence throughout her life. She is now a member of the Board of Trustees for Clemson University and actively supports programs across campus. “I think it is important to ‘lift while you climb’ and advance others around you on your journey,” she said. “I have been lucky enough to have wonderful mentors who have taught me how important it is to support others.” In her second role with the bank, she was asked to serve as a loaned executive to chair the local United Way campaign for three months. This experience demonstrated how important service was to the bank, which underscored that she was in the right place. Wilkerson feels extremely fortunate to work for a company so committed to community engagement and giving back. After a decade with the bank, Wilkerson began her family. She realized that balancing her career with being a good mother was going to be challenging, even with the support of an outstanding partner, her husband Avery. After a late

night in the office where she missed her son’s daycare pick-up, it was time to reevaluate her priorities. “It was a big ‘Ah-ha’ moment,” she said. “Avery was so supportive of my goals and we really tried to figure it out together, but sometimes you have to consider big changes in order to make that balance really work.” When Wilkerson contemplated resigning, the leader of her team drove two hours to talk her out of it. Unwilling to let her leave, they offered her flexible options to keep her at the company and she took a sabbatical. After her time off, she enrolled in a new program called Select Time, allowing her to work on a part-time schedule and reduced her travel responsibilities. She learned through this experience that it was important to have courage and ask for what she needed and she credits the flexibility of the bank to keep her happy. “Bank of America has done a great job of finding unique ways to attract the top talent and I’m proud of their commitment to diversity and inclusion, as well as working families over the years. We have grown the flexible working program. Parental leave is now available to all employees for 16 weeks and we have been recognized by Working Mother magazine for 30 years in a row as a result,” Wilkerson said. This commitment to diversity and inclusion has been evidenced in other ways throughout her career and has kept her at the bank through some challenging times. “When I was named state president, others in the community made a big deal that I was female. However, at the time, there were already 15 other female market presidents at Bank of America. Today, over 50 percent of our employees are female, and 40 percent of the management team is comprised of women.” A unique piece of Wilkerson’s responsibilities is her role as the South Carolina Market Executive for U.S. Trust. She leads a team of advisors, client managers, investment and trust professionals tasked with growing U.S. Trust in the state by working with clients to help meet their individual needs and goals. Wilkerson’s role is unusual compared with peers in the market who do not generally have a business role in addition to their market president responsibilities. “I have been truly blessed throughout my career with having several national roles that I could fill from South Carolina. Our leaders realized early the importance of strong local ties in our communities. This commitment locally has allowed us to serve as a catalyst within communities throughout the state to bring organizations together to serve the interests of South Carolinians. I could not be more proud of the role we have played to date, and I am excited about what the future holds,” Wilkerson said.

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2018

Public Servant OF THE YEAR

BOBBY HITT

Secretary, South Carolina Department of Commerce

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When Volvo was looking for a place to base their first U.S. plant, with the state of South Carolina as a viable option, it wasn’t the Department of Commerce that they first contacted— it was BMW. BMW, of course, had already been down the same road decades before, when they opened their North American manufacturing plant in the early ‘90s. Back then, when BMW announced, they entrusted their public affairs to Bobby Hitt, who had a long career in media and was at that time serving as the director of planning and development with legal firm Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough. Over two decades later, when Volvo inquired at BMW who they should talk with about moving into the state, the answer was familiar—Bobby Hitt, who was now working as Secretary of Commerce. Since his appointment to that position under then-Governor Haley, Hitt has had notable successes—with Volvo being just one of many that comprise $32 billion in capital investment and more than 118,000 jobs brought to the Palmetto State. What really sold Volvo on South Carolina, though, was the network of companies that existed here already, or as Hitt calls it, “the ability of one complex company to look at another complex company.” South Carolina has now become known for big brand names, he says, effectively changing our prior reputation as a “grey cloth” state, where nothing manufactured had any brand association with it, nor did it reflect any sort of brand of the state. “What transformed our state is that we’ve started to attract name-brand companies here that make products,” he says. “BMW was a real revolution for us. They make a complex product, made exclusively here, so the brand of South Carolina and the brand of BMW overlapped.” To that point, now the brands of Boeing, Volvo, Mercedes, Michelin and Samsung, do as well. Those products—as well as many others from thousands of other companies—build up another part of the South Carolina system that Hitt is proud of: our trade system. With a robust ports system that spans the state, and now a decade past the recession that affected businesses large and small, the state’s exports have boomed under Hitt’s leadership and reveal his desire to open South Carolina up to more and more global business. In fact, he says, one of their newest strategies is to include South Carolina companies in their travels to trade fairs across the globe. “It’s now seven years in a row that we’ve been increasing exports, year over year, and it’s not just the big companies like BMW… with our Export Incentives Program, we have assisted over 50 companies in their efforts to reach new international markets,” Hitt notes. “Why is this important? As I tell my staff, 70 percent of all transactions in the world take place outside of the U.S.— we need to go get our share of those.” Still, for Hitt, the large manufacturers are only one piece of an increasingly large picture that makes up the business economy

of South Carolina. In South Carolina, half of the population lives in only eight of the 46 counties, so for Hitt, there are many small counties that need focus, too. “The people who live in those counties have found a lifestyle that they enjoy in that type of community, and it’s part of our job to make sure they can continue that,” Hitt says. In many cases, that may mean focusing on bringing larger manufacturers or jobs to those specific areas, which South Carolina has done a great job of in the past few years. “When I came in, we were at 11 percent unemployment, and in some counties like Marion, it was more like 20 percent. Now Marion is down to around five percent unemployment,” says Hitt. Still, South Carolina is seeing the same trends that the rest of the nation does, in that more and more people are moving to the urban areas. Those moves mean more jobs are needed, and those jobs mean that more infrastructure is also required. That means the “team” approach that Hitt embraces is valuable— from working closely with the Department of Transportation, to logistics groups, to local utilities companies and area economic development groups. “We’re fighting above our weight with North Carolina and Georgia, but that competition doesn’t necessarily equal more money or more incentives,” he says. “We don’t write checks to companies; we build infrastructure.” With the increase in more companies coming to the area, that also means there is a need in this ever-expanding network to ensure that South Carolina’s workforce is ready to sustain those companies that call South Carolina home, and programs like Ready SC and Apprenticeship SC—both programs that tie into Hitt’s overall vision for the state—and the results that the state as a whole has been able to realize. “What we have to do to be successful is believe in ourselves, and realize that our systems are maybe better than we’ve believed them to be in the past,” he notes. “Our education system is working very well right now; we have a great technical education system, which we overlap with every day.” Still, while Hitt and his team are constantly searching for new ways to develop the talent of South Carolina, and to expand opportunities across the state for its citizens, there is a much more important goal he has in mind. The most important thing, he says, is the people of South Carolina. “I routinely tell people that I don’t care whether a new plant goes into McCormick, or to York County, or to Chesterfield— it’s South Carolina, and we should celebrate every job we get,” he says. “Every job touches a family. I look at all of them as important because every one of them represents a family that is reliant on that job.”

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P R E S E N T I N G the SOUTH CAROLINA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

State Chamber AWA R D S

Throughout the year, the SC Chamber of Commerce recognizes a number of people throughout the state for industry excellence. From our Human Resources awards to recognizing top companies in our manufacturing space, we are honored to see those persons and companies on the following pages continually representing our great state.

DIVERSITY

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKFORCE

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M A N U FAC T U R I N G

SC BRANDED


2018 State Chamber Awards

Excellence in Workplace Diversity AWARD

The Excellence in Workplace Diversity Award recognizes companies for their significant contributions to the advancement of South Carolina through diversity initiatives and inclusion efforts. Criteria considered in selecting the winners include diversity initiatives, effectiveness and applicability/replicability. All South Carolina companies are eligible to apply.

201 8 AWA R D F I N A L I S T S Presented at the 39th Annual Summit, November 27, 2018

SMALL/MEDIUM EMPLOYER (Fewer than 1,000 employees)

LARGE EMPLOYER (1,000 or more employees)

Starbucks Coffee Company Sandy Run Roasting Plant

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2018 State Chamber Awards

Human Resources Professional O F T HE Y E A R

The Award for Professional Excellence in Human Resources Management recognizes creative approaches and consistently high performance that benefits the nominee’s company or organization and the business and professional community. The person selected is the “best” in the human resources profession. The annual award is a joint venture of the S.C. Chamber of Commerce and the South Carolina State Council/Society for Human Resource Management.

2018 AWA R D W I N N E R

Bob Lowe O W N E R & CO N S U L TA N T PEOPLE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE, LLC

Bob Lowe retired from his role as Director of Human Resources with The Prepared Foods Division of Nestle USA in December of 2013 after serving in various leadership positions for approximately three decades. In his last role with Nestle, Lowe was responsible for the overall direction and strategy for the Human Resource function for nine factories and over 7000 employees across the US.

201 8 F I N A L I S T S

Leigh Anna Compton SPHR, SHRM-CP Director of Human Resources, HKA Enterprises, LLC

Paula Fulghum

Chief Innovator, Innovate HR

Upon retiring, Lowe formed his own LLC,“People Make the Difference,”which focuses on assisting organizations with a variety of Human Resources, Labor, and Training needs. In addition to his own business, in January of 2016, Lowe partnered with Robyn Grable to launch a unique new venture in the Greenville/Spartanburg area dedicated exclusively to entrepreneurs and small businesses, “sbHR” (Small Business Human Resources). The business provides comprehensive, best in class, affordable Human Resources support to small businesses that have no dedicated Human Resource Specialists.

2018 H R R I S I N G S TA R AWA R D

Kevin G. DeLoach, SHRM-CP HUMAN RESOURCES GENERALIST S O U T H C A R O L I N A E D U C AT I O N L O T T E R Y

Kevin DeLoach, Human Resources Generalist with the South Carolina Education Lottery, is an accomplished professional with over four years of Human Resources experience. He is responsible for overseeing many of the daily operations of the Human Resources department, including the administration of health and retirement benefits and management of the talent acquisition process. In addition to his role in Human Resources, DeLoach serves as an on-air draw talent for the Lottery.

201 8 F I N A L I S T S

Mariel McAllister

Director of Human Resources and Public Relations Leigh Fibers, Inc.

DeWarren Register Human Resources Director Climatic Corporation

Prior to joining the South Carolina Education Lottery, DeLoach worked as a Fellow for Congressman Mark Sanford in Washington, DC, where he researched and advised on legislation and federal issues affecting constituents of the First District of South Carolina.

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2018 State Chamber Awards

Manufacturing Employee O F T HE Y E A R

The Chamber presented the South Carolina Manufacturing Employee of the Year Award on October 5, 2018 in conjunction with Manufacturing Week. This award was created to focus attention on the important contributions non-executive manufacturing employees make to their employers, customers and communities. The award showcases employee contribution in the areas of innovation, teamwork, community service and leadership. We are pleased to announce the following winners for 2018:

PRODUCTION

SUPPORT

ENABLING

SMALL/MEDIUM CO M PA N Y

SMALL/MEDIUM CO M PA N Y

SMALL/MEDIUM CO M PA N Y

West Vieau

Team Lead, Sargent Metal Fabricators

Supply Chain Manager, Volvo Car US Operations

Amanda Lovin

Tommie Cochran

LARGE CO M PA N Y

LARGE CO M PA N Y

LARGE CO M PA N Y

Janice Lawson

Deputy Vice President of Environmental Management Operations, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

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Sammy Davis

Safety & Training Facilitator, Milliken & Company - Allen Plant

Plant Manager, Pleasurecraft Marine

Christina Trainor

Vice President of Human Resources, Prysmian Group North America


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Daniel Andreu

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2018 State Chamber Awards

Workforce Innovator AWAR DS

The South Carolina Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce the small, medium, and large employer award winners for this year’s Workforce Innovator Award. The winners represent the Chamber members who have used their own resources and ingenuity to implement private sector workforce development solutions to address the skills gap and help create a South Carolina workforce of the future. The following businesses were honored at the 2018 Workforce Symposium, hosted in partnership with SC Deptartment of Employment & Workforce, the State Workforce Development Board, the SC Technical College System, and the SC Chamber Education and Workforce Development Foundation, and presented by Bank of America.

20 1 8 AWA R D W I N N E R S

SMALL EMPLOYER

Dennis Corporation Dennis Corporation recognizes the unique value of internship programs and on-the-job training opportunities in mentoring students for a career in the engineering, surveying and construction management professions by fielding two programs: the Student Internship Program and the Business Mentoring Program. Candidates for the Student Internship Program are recruited from high schools, universities, and career fairs. Business Mentoring Program candidates are recruited from two specific core groups of disadvantaged and minority individuals.

MEDIUM EMPLOYER

LARGE EMPLOYER

Volvo Car US Operations

MAU Workforce Solutions

In 2015, Volvo Cars chose Berkeley County for its first manufacturing facility in the US and announced the creation of nearly 4,000 jobs. Recognizing that many in the rural areas of the Lowcountry lack manufacturing experience, Volvo Cars partnered with the SC Department of Commerce, Trident Technical College, readySC, and Berkeley County Administration to develop a curriculum—the ManuFirstSC initiative—that would provide the necessary training. As of May 1, Volvo Cars has hired 26 ManuFirstSC graduates, and six more have received offers for a manufacturing career with Volvo. In addition, other manufacturers in South Carolina, including Mercedes Benz, BMW suppliers, and 46 others have agreed to accept the ManuFirstSC credential in lieu of one year’s manufacturing experience.

In 2014, MAU saw a lack of trained candidates for material handling/forklift positions for many of its clients. To meet the need, MAU developed its Skill School as a solution for its clients. MAU partnered with clients when developing the curriculum to ensure it would be adequately comparable to the training previously provided at manufacturing facilities. This has led to an approach of providing training for both individuals with and without prior experience, with three separate courses catering to different existing skill levels. In 2017, MAU made a significant investment in a larger building offering 22,500 square feet of training space. To date, Skill School has trained well over 3,000 people for various Upstate companies.

s

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2018 State Chamber Awards

SC Branded AWAR DS

On November 26th, the S.C. Chamber of Commerce, in collaboration with The Brand Leader, presented the second SC Branded awards, honoring 15 winners and an additional 28 finalists for acknowledgement of brand excellence within their industries.

BREWERY OF THE YEAR

Sonoco

BRAND ON THE RISE

EDTS Cyber

C H A R I TA B L E I M PAC T

D E S T I N AT I O N AWA R D

E CO N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T P R OJ E C T

LEGENDS AWA R D

Frothy Beard Brewing Company

Colonial Life

Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum

TA S T E O F T H E S TAT E

H O M E TOW N S . C .

Agape Chocolates

PA L M E T TO G R E E N

Southern Current LLC

City of Aiken

H E A L T H I N I T I AT I V E OF THE YEAR

FA R M , F O R E S T & FIELD

CO M M U N I T Y D I V E R S I T Y AWA R D

MUSC Center for Telehealth

P R O D U C T I N N OVAT I O N

TSO3, Inc.

Mercedes-Benz Vans, LLC

McCall Farms

Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation

EVENT OF THE YEAR

W OV E N & W O R N

SC State Fair

R. Hanauer Bow Ties

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TIM ARNOLD

A LIFE TRANSFORMED

By Katie Henderson

When people in South Carolina hear the name “Colonial Life,” they might think of hot concert tickets, basketball games or any of the other popular events that the Colonial Life Arena hosts. But beyond the curtains of this venue lies a well-established insurance company that makes a large impact on the South Carolina economy and community—and a leader who is working hard to make sure it stays that way. When walking through the doors of Colonial Life’s headquarters —which is in the middle of a $24 million renovation—you’ll find an open-concept, wall-free office—something not out of the ordinary in many new office buildings of the day. But one thing you might never expect is to find the President and CEO of the company, Tim Arnold, sitting at one of these open desks among the rest of the employees. Prior to his role of President and CEO of Colonial Life—a title he has held for the past four years—Arnold also worked as the Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing and the Chief Operating Officer since transferring to Colonial Life back in 2011 after a 25-year career with Unum US. Arnold and the senior leadership team wanted to lead by example as the company transitioned to the new workspace design, so they decided to be among the first to move into the new collaborative and open space. He wants employees to feel comfortable to discuss issues and ideas with him and his leadership team. Colonial Life is a 79-year-old insurance company headquartered in Columbia, South Carolina and is a part of the Unum Group health care umbrella, a large Fortune 500 company. Colonial Life employs over 1,200 Columbia residents and another 300

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employees around the country. So when it came time for a new office space, Arnold says, they had to take into consideration who worked there, and why. “We spent a lot of time researching and decided we needed a space that would attract and retain talent while also providing collaboration,” said Arnold. “It’s a myth that insurance companies aren’t looking for millennials and millennials don’t want insurance jobs. We’ve adapted to what millennials want and now our workforce consists of approximately 35 percent millennials.” Part of the culture that millennials typically look for is community involvement, and over the past year, the employees of Colonial Life have contributed more than 11,000 hours of volunteer time and donated $2.4 million to charities across the state. Colonial Life employees serve on 30 different community boards. But that activity isn’t limited to the younger generation of the company. When Arnold isn’t behind an open desk, he is serving the community and state through several organizations—as chair for S.C. Center for Fathers and Families, and the American Heart Association Metro Board; as vice chair for United Way of the Midlands; and through organizations like the Midlands Business Leadership Group and the Palmetto Business Forum.


Industry Updates Human Interest Arnold credits his own benefit from such organizations as a reason for his involvement today. As the first person in his family to go to college, he notes that a local organization offered him a scholarship for his freshman year and helped open the door to his college experience.

“I know that I wouldn’t be where I am today without my education, and that education is pivotal in transforming lives and communities,” said Arnold.

“One thing I can credit my success to is the fact that the Hixson Chapter Area Chamber in Chattanooga offered me a full firstyear scholarship,” said Arnold. “It closed the question of whether or not I would go to college.”

“TransformSC does a great job of making sure educational needs across the state are met and that’s one reason I have really enjoyed being involved in that organization.”

Today, because of that opportunity, Tim and his wife, Edie, now offer a first-year college scholarship called the Arnold Family Scholarship, which provides college funding for students at the high school both he and his wife attended to attend the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. This past year, the University also recognized him as the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award. With education playing such a pivotal role in his life, Arnold also co-chairs TransformSC which takes initiative to collaborate with business leaders, teachers and students to make sure every student is prepared for their career through real world training and digital instruction.

Like his draw to education-based projects, Arnold is drawn to those charities and organizations that provide significant benefit to our community and families. When he witnessed one of his own family members deal with heart issues, he became involved with the American Heart Association, and now the company encourages healthy lifestyles by offering treadmill desks, an onsite fitness center, healthy lifestyle messages on the walls and steps and soon plans to subsidize healthy food options in the new cafeteria. But as much as his own fingerprints cover the culture of Colonial Life, Arnold is not quick to accept credit for its growth and successes.

“All the credit for the success of this company is a result of the contributions of the people who work here.” “A lot of CEOs will say that, but very seldom do you run into organizations where people believe and buy into your company’s mission statement—a mission statement that our employees created and that keeps us all focused on the important work we do serving America’s workers and their families.”

speaking at the 2017 Edventure Be A Boss Summit

serving food at Transitions

Arnold with the Heart Walk team when he was the Heart Walk chairman (2017)

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Local Roots. Global Reach.

Our experienced attorneys are not only proud to be part of South Carolina’s rich legal history, we’re passionate about shaping the practice of modern law to better serve our clients across the state and beyond. CHARLESTON · COLUMBIA · FLORENCE · GREENVILLE · MYRTLE BEACH


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G

rant Thornton has proudly recognized the top 100 private companies in South Carolina through the Grant Thornton South Carolina 100™ (“The South Carolina 100™”), the only ranking of the state’s largest privately held companies, since 1984. The South Carolina 100™ is compiled under the direction of Mark Ballew, office managing partner of the firm’s Columbia office, and Andrew Pope, Audit partner, in cooperation with the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce. Participation in the South Carolina 100™ is voluntary and companies are ranked by their net revenue for their most recent fiscal year, based on data provided by the participants. The SC100 list is restricted to companies based in South Carolina that do not have publiclytraded stock. Companies owned by private equity are permitted. Nonprofits, financial services companies, health care providers, such as hospitals, companies engaged primarily in retail, and subsidiaries of corporations are excluded. Founded in Chicago in 1924, Grant Thornton LLP (Grant Thornton) is the U.S. member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd, one of the world’s leading organizations of independent audit, tax and advisory firms. Grant Thornton, which has revenues in excess of $1.8 billion and operates 59 offices, works with a broad range of dynamic publicly and privately held companies, government agencies, financial institutions, and civic and religious organizations.

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The 2018 ranking of the Grant Thornton South Carolina private companies includes many dynamic companies in multiple industries. While each year the ranking experiences some changes, highlights of changes from last year are: 1. total revenue was approximately the same while the number of employees declined by 12 percent

2018

2. revenue for manufacturing declined seven percent with a decrease in employment of 25 percent, and distribution showed a decrease in revenue of two percent and a decrease in employment of 21 percent between years

RANKINGS

($ amounts in Billions)

2018

CATEGORY

REVENUE

EMPLOYEES

9.1

29,836

6.0

5,187

MANUFACTURERS

23

$

DISTRIBUTORS

18

$

ALL OTHER

59

$

8.9

42,891

$

24.0

77,914

REVENUE

EMPLOYEES

9.8

39,722

6.1

6,565

#AMOUNTS IN BILLIONS

CATEGORY

2017

#

100 #

MANUFACTURERS

22

$

DISTRIBUTORS

21

$

ALL OTHER

56

$

8.1

42,445

24.0

88,732

#AMOUNTS IN BILLIONS

100

$

$

24.0

$

24.0

45


2018 TOP COMPANIES Mungo Homes, Inc. broke into the top 10 companies for 2018. There were some changes in the ranking between 2017 and 2018 as indicated in the following table.

2018 RANK MOVEMENT The 2018 ranking included the addition of nine companies joining the ranking for the first time or after an absence.

SIGNIFICANT RANK JUMPS FROM 2017 Companies that moved up in the ranking by 10 or greater for 2018:

46

2018

2017

COMPANY

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 4 3 2 5 6 7 11 9 8

Milliken & Company Novolex Holdings, LLC J.M. Smith Corporation The Intertech Group, Inc. and Affiliates Southeastern Freight Lines, Inc. Quality Business Solutions, Inc. Lincoln Oil Co., Inc. Mungo Homes, Inc. Greystar Real Estate Partners, LLC Carolina Eastern Inc.

2018

COMPANY

24 52 53 63 92 95 97 99 100

Nephron, Inc. and Subsidiaries Mashburn Construction Company Frampton Construction Company, LLC NaturChem Inc. Alpha Genesis, Inc. Palmetto Metal Products, Inc. C. Ray Miles Construction Company, Inc. Intellectual Capitol Sojourner Caughman & Thomas, LLC

INCREASE 13 12 11 11 11 10

COMPANY Infrastructure Consulting & Engineering, PLLC J.L. Anderson Co., Inc. A3 Communications, Inc. Builders Wholesale Flooring, LLC Sumter Packaging Corporation JEAR Logistics, LLC


MORE THAN $1 BILLION #

COMPANY

CITY

CEO

BUSINESS DESCRIPTION

1

Milliken & Company

Spartanburg

Halsey Cook

Diversified Industrial Products Manufacturer

2

Novolex Holdings, LLC

Hartsville

Stanley B. Bikulege

Manufacturer of a family of North American based packaging products

3

J M Smith Corporation

Spartanburg

A. Alan Turfe

Pharmaceutical distribution and pharmacy technology systems

4

The Intertech Group, Inc. and Affiliates

North Charleston

Anita G. Zucker and Jonathan M. Zucker

Diversified company with core operations and investments in consumer, industrial, real estate and financial services

5

Southeastern Freight Lines, Inc.

Lexington

W. T. Cassels, Jr.

LTL Motor Carrier

6

Quality Business Solutions, Inc.

Travelers Rest

Pamela Evette

Provides a wide and comprehensive range of benefits and services

7

Lincoln Oil Co., Inc.

Greenville

James E. Farish Jr.

Wholesale petroleum, biofuels, trucking and petroleum storage

$100 MILLION TO $999 MILLION #

COMPANY

CITY

CEO

BUSINESS DESCRIPTION

8

Mungo Homes, Inc.

Irmo

Steven W. Mungo

Residential real estate development, homebuilding, investment and property management

9

Greystar Real Estate Partners, LLC

Charleston

Robert A. Faith

Investor, developer and operator of multifamily real estate assets

10

Carolina Eastern Inc.

Charleston

Alton C. Phillips

Distributor of Fertilizer, Seed, and Ag chemicals

11

Mount Vernon Mills, Inc.

Mauldin

David Hastings

Diversified and integrated manufacturer of textile, chemical and related products

12

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Columbia

James K. Lehman

Legal Services

13

Blanchard Machinery Company

Lexington

Joseph R. Blanchard

Heavy Equipment dealer that specializes in CAT products. Parts, Sales, services and rental of Heavy Equipment and Power generation equipment

14

EDENS Investment Trust

Columbia

Jodie McLean

Retail SC owner and developer; national

15

Metromont Corporation

Greenville

Richard H. Pennell, Jr.

Engineering and manufacturing of structural and architectural precast concrete solutions

16

M. B. Kahn Construction Co., Inc.

Columbia

William H. Neely

General Construction, Construction Management, Construction Management at Risk, and Design-Build

17

Comporium, Inc.

Rock Hill

Bryant Barnes

Diversified communications company

18

Spartanburg Forest Products, Inc.

Greer

Steve Michael

Sell, distribute, manufacture, pressure treated lumber and all related products

19

Thompson Construction Group, Inc.

Sumter

Greg A. Thompson

Provider of industrial construction, maintenance, building construction and disaster recovery services

20

Dearybury Oil & Gas Inc.

Spartanburg

C.W. Dearybury Jr.

Wholesale distributor of petroleum and distillates

21

Southeastern Paper Group, Inc.

Spartanburg

E. Lewis Miller, Jr.

Distribution of disposable paper, plastics and cleaning supplies

22

JHM Enterprises, Inc.

Greenville

H.P. Rama

Developer, owner and operator of upscale hotels

23

AM Conservation Group, Inc.

Charleston

John Bailes

Provider of energy and water saving products and related services to utilities, municipalities, contractors, distributors, and retailers

24

Nephron, Inc. and Subsidiaries

West Columbia

Lou Kennedy

Blow-fill seal (BFS) manufacturing of generic respiratory medications with a mission to deliver safe, affordable medication to patients in need

25

Medical Services of America

Lexington

Ronnie L. Young

Home Health care services, rental and sale of home medical equipment and supplies

47


26

Spirit Communications

Columbia

Robert Keane

Fiber based communications service provider

27

Essex Homes Holding Company, Inc.

Lexington

Karl Haslinger

Construction of single-family residential homes

28

Cregger Company Inc.

West Columbia

Matthew Cregger

Plumbing, Electrical, HVAC ,Appliances and Lighting distribution

29

McCrory Construction Company LLC

Columbia

Allen Amsler

General Contractor specializing in non-residential construction

30

AGY Holding Corp.

Aiken

Patrick J. Burns

Manufacturer of advanced glass fibers that are used as reinforcing materials in numerous high-value applications, including aircraft laminates, ballistic armor, thermoplastic applications, architectural fabrics and specialty electronics

31

The Beach Company

Charleston

John C. Darby

Full Service real estate-sales, leasing, development, management

32

Diamond Hill Plywood Company, Inc.

Darlington

John C. Ramsey

Wholesale distribution of building materials, along with manufacturing of hardwood/plywood

33

Prestage Farms of South Carolina

Camden

Ron Prestage

Live turkey production

34

Broad River Furniture, Inc.

Fort Mill

Charlie Malouf

Home furnishings

35

G&P Trucking Company, Inc.

Gaston

G. Clifton Parker

Truckload transportation of freight

36

Terminix Service, Inc.

Columbia

Marion A. Knox Jr.

Termite and Pest Control company

37

Palmetto Corp. of Conway

Conway

Shawn Godwin

Heavy Highway Civil Contractor

38

Industrial Packaging Supplies, Inc.

Fountain Inn

Jerry Murdock

Wholesale distribution of packaging materials

39

CoLinx, LLC

Greenville

Donavan Louis

Logistics and ecommerce services

40

Human Technologies, Inc.

Greenville

Herb W. Dew

Multi-faceted human resource advisory firm

41

Eldeco, Inc.

Greenville

Allen McKinney

Electrical Subcontractor

42

H G Reynolds Company Inc.

Aiken

Jeffrey Reynolds

General contractor

$50 MILLION TO $99 MILLION #

48

COMPANY

CITY

CEO

BUSINESS DESCRIPTION

43

Thompson Industrial Services, LLC

Sumter

Josh Chambers

Provider of industrial cleaning and maintenance services

44

Builders Wholesale Flooring, LLC

West Columbia

Wayne Martin

Residential wholesale flooring

45

Commercial Food Service Tech 24

Greenville

Kurt Herwald

Installation, maintenance and repair of food service equipment

46

Life Cycle Engineering, Inc.

Charleston

Bob Fei

Professional Service Firm providing solutions to both commercial and government customers

47

The Ritedose Corporation

Columbia

Jody Chastain

Contract pharmaceutical manufacturer

48

Defender Services, Inc.

Hopkins

John N. McCarter, Jr.

Provides facilities services: Janitorial, Staffing, and Grounds Maintenance

49

JEAR Logistics, LLC

Mount Pleasant

Mark Neumeyer

Provide third-party transportation of products throughout the continental United States and Canada

50

Dilmar Holdings, Inc.

Florence

Earle Atkinson III and Gray Atkinson

Petroleum distributor, oil recycling, commercial & multi family real estate

51

The Yahnis Company, Inc.

Florence

Byron Yahnis and Jimmy Yahnis

Wholesale Beverage Distribution

52

Mashburn Construction Company

Columbia

Paul Mashburn

Full-service construction company providing preconstruction services, construction management, design-build and general contracting services

53

Frampton Construction Company, LLC

Ladson

Chad Frampton

Full-service construction firm offering planning and design support, preconstruction, construction services, and sustainability services


54

Roebuck Buildings Co., Inc.

Roebuck

Dean Anderson

General Contractor

55

Springs Creative Products Group, LLC

Rock Hill

Derick Close

Develops textile-related products in Fabric, Crafts & Accessories, Home & Lifestyle, and Technical & Specialty Fabrics

56

Vino.com, LLC

Mount Pleasant

Dave J. Pardus

Importer and supplier of beverage alcohol products

57

Trehel Corporation

Greenville

Will W. Huss, Jr.

Design Build General Contractor

58

Gregory Electric Company, Inc.

Columbia

Robert E. Livingston, Jr.

Electrical and mechanical construction operating in - commercial, institutional, industrial, and utilities

LESS THAN $50 MILLION #

COMPANY

CITY

CEO

BUSINESS DESCRIPTION

59

McMillan Pazdan Smith LLC

Greenville

Joseph M. Pazdan

Architecture, interior design and planning firm

60

PCI Group, Inc.

Fort Mill

Christian Kropac, Jr.

Complete customer communications resource for businesses in which client-centric data is key, and efficiency, and security are paramount

61

Interstate Management & Investment Corporation

Columbia

Bert Pooser

Own, operate and manage hotels throughout FL, NC, SC and TN

62

A3 Communications, Inc.

Irmo

Brian Thomas

Systems integrator, provider of IT and security solutions

63

NaturChem Inc.

Lexington

Rom D. Kellis III

Providing vegetation management services for the governmental, municipal, industrial, and private markets

64

New South Construction Supply,. LLC

Greenville

James R. Sobeck

Building products distribution

65

H. R. Allen, Inc.

Charleston

Rod Allen

Industrial and commercial electrical contractor

66

Turbeville Insurance Agency, Inc.

Columbia

Bill Turbeville

Insurance Agency

67

AME, Inc.

Fort Mill

Jeff P. Campbell

Industrial Contracting

68

WALDROP, Inc.

Greer

William Caldwell

Mechanical Contractor

69

Infrastructure Consulting & Engineering, PLLC

Columbia

Elham Farzam

Civil Engineering and related services

70

Infinity Marketing Solutions, Inc.

Greenville

Tony Williams

Full-service advertising agency

71

Electric Guard Dog, LLC

Columbia

Mark Wesley

Electric security partner for commercial and industrial locations across US

72

Palmetto Synthetics LLC

Kingstree

Henry Postron

Producer of Synthetic Fibers

73

Companion Professional Services, LLC

Columbia

Terry M. Floyd

An information technology consulting group dedicated to providing innovative and cost-effective IT solutions primarily to the healthcare industry.

74

Sumter Packaging Corporation

Sumter

Benjamin T. DeSollar

Industrial packaging manufacture including corrugated shipping containers and specialties

75

Park Place Corporation

Greenville

Jason L. Kelley

Manufacturer of Sleep Systems and Products

76

Dove Print Solutions, Inc.

Florence

Richard B. Coxe

Business technology solutions

77

Delta Pharmacy, Inc.

Moncks Corner

Willis High

Independent Pharmacy

78

Find Great People, LLC

Greenville

John Uprichard

Administrative, accounting and IT Staffing and Direct Hire, Executive Direct Hire, HR Consulting, and Outplacement services

79

J.L. Anderson Co., Inc.

Cheraw

Robert S. Rogers III

Manufacture and wholesale brick and other masonry and building products

80

Piedmont Mechanical, Inc.

Spartanburg

Thomas R. Holt

Mechanical Contractor

49


81

International Plastics, Inc.

Greenville

Steve McClure

Manufacturer, importer and wholesale supplier of plastic bags and flexible packaging

82

Augusta Fiberglass Coatings, Inc.

Blackville

John W. Boyd

Manufacturing - Fiberglass Reinforced Plastics

83

Dillon Provision Co., Inc. / DilPro

Dillon

Jay Horne

Wholesale Meat Distributor

84

Colite International LTD

Columbia

Martin C. Brown

Full-service sign manufacturing who manages international brand implementation projects

85

VC3, Inc.

Columbia

Sandy Reeser

IT service provider to the private and public sectors

86

Eagle Construction Company

Newberry

Jeff D. Spotts

Heavy Highway Construction

87

Rhythmlink International, LLC

Columbia

Shawn Regan

Designs, manufactures and distributes medical devices and provides custom packaging, private labeling, custom products and contract manufacturing

88

GMK Associates, Inc.

Columbia

Thomas P. Monahan

Architecture, engineering (MEP), interior design, design-build, and construction services

89

Carolina Ceramics, LLC

Columbia

Michael Borden

Commercial and Residential Ceramics Brick Manufacturing, Distribution, and Installation

90

Alliance Consulting Engineers, Inc.

Columbia

Deepal Eliatamby

Civil and environmental engineering firm

91

Blue Ridge Log Cabins LLC

Campobello

Milton A. Smith Jr. (Chip)

Modular home manufacturer

92

Alpha Genesis, Inc.

Yemassee

Greg Westergaard

Provides primate products and bio-research services worldwide

93

CHICORA Affiliates, LLC

Myrtle Beach

Don J. Smith

Residential and commercial sales, residential and commercial rental management, land development

94

Greenville Meats, Inc.

Greenville

Gerald Sloan

Meat and poultry processing and distribution

95

Palmetto Metal Products Inc.

Columbia

Lisa Hamilton

Distributor of Doors: Hollow Metal Doors and Frames

96

Dennis Corporation

Columbia

Daniel R. Dennis, III

Engineering, surveying, and construction management firm

97

C. Ray Miles Construction Company, Inc.

Lugoff

C. Ray Miles

Heavy Road Construction

98

Chernoff Newman, LLC

Columbia

W. Lee Bussell, Sr.

Integrated marketing communications

99

Intellectual Capitol

Greenville

Traci Newkirk

Staffing company

100

Sojourner Caughman & Thomas, LLC

Columbia

David C. Sojourner, Jr.

Law firm focused on matters of trusts and estates

To learn more about this year’s survey, please contact Mark Ballew, office managing partner of Grant Thornton’s Columbia office at (803) 231-3045 or via email at mark.ballew@us.gt.com. Grant Thornton’s website is www.GrantThornton.com. For more information on the Grant Thornton South Carolina 100™ including prior year rankings, go to www.gt.com/sc100.

50


51


52


WHY SOUTH CAROLINA’S

ARE ESSENTIAL FOR THE ECONOMY

By Dawn Dawson-House South Carolina Parks, Recreation and Tourism

53


Hunting Island

T

he state parks in South Carolina are outstanding examples of natural, cultural and recreational heritage that contribute to the quality of life in South Carolina and, in many cases, drive local economies.

While the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism hasn’t completed a formal, comprehensive study on the economic impact of state parks, some anecdotal evidence suggests their significance on both local and statewide scales.

Accommodations Tax Collections In some under-discovered destinations in South Carolina, state parks contribute more than half of the county’s accommodations tax collections. According to a report for fiscal year 2013-14, the three state parks along Strom Thurmond Lake in McCormick County (Hickory Knob State Golf Resort, Hamilton Branch and Baker Creek state parks) for example, combined to contribute almost 90 percent of the county’s A-tax collections. In Abbeville County, Calhoun Falls State Park contributed 54.3 percent of the county’s A-tax collections. This revenue is distributed back to counties to help pay for tourism promotion and development, which further expands economic opportunity in the state.

Foundation for Growth Some of our most popular tourist destinations grew, in part, from the intrinsic appeal of a state park nearby. The city of Greenville, for example, considered itself a gateway to the Blue Ridge when it launched a significant economic development boom in the 1990s. The 10,000-acre Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area located in upper Greenville County and Paris Mountain State Park in downtown Greenville, were cited as examples of the city’s access to significant mountain country. South Carolina is at the southern terminus of this mountain range and, because it drops suddenly and significantly as an escarpment, the mountain country has a large number of waterfalls, rolling verdant hills and abundant wildlife that many find appealing. Leaders in this part of the state recognized this appeal, and took steps to preserve and protect as many parts as they could before growing an economy around it. The historic city of Charleston built its award-winning tourism economy from South Carolina’s distinctive centuries-old history. That story begins, however, at Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, the place where, in 1670, English settlers were directed by the Kiawah to a dry spot in the dense marshes at Albermarle Point and established the state’s first permanent settlement. Ten years after that landing, the British Crown established the port city of Charleston across the marsh.

Treasured Tourist Attractions State Parks also have helped South Carolina develop its national and international brand as a family destination that offers exceptional experiences in natural beauty and historic significance. That’s why Hunting Island is among one of the most popular state parks in the system. It’s a barrier island in Beaufort County, where people discover its natural beauty on the beach, in the maritime forest trail and in its nature center.

54


The park also offers the only historic lighthouse in South Carolina that’s open daily to the public. Visitors who make the 167-step climb to the top are rewarded with sweeping views of the island, the Atlantic and several other islands nearby. The road to Hunting Island is dotted with seafood restaurants, souvenir shops, grocery stores and other businesses that beach campers and day-visitors would find useful, and that contribute to Beaufort County’s tax rolls. Likewise, Table Rock State Park in Pickens County is an iconic landmark, a sheer-face granite outcrop that legend suggests the Cherokee used as a natural marker when traveling. Today, its expansive trail system up the mountainside, which connects to the Appalachian Trail system, is considered one of the best destinations in South Carolina for backpacking, hiking and exploring nature. In addition to the trail system, the park offers cabins and campgrounds for overnight lodging, interpretive programs for guided experiences and an historic lodge for group gatherings. It also brings hundreds of thousands of visitors to rural Pickens County.

Caesar's Head

Tax Relief It takes a little more than $30 million to operate all 47 state parks in South Carolina, and the Park Service has generated enough revenue to cover most of that cost. For the first time in its history, revenue from admission, camping, cabin and picnic shelter rentals, and other fees in fiscal year 2017-18 generated about $30 million. While this level of operational self-sufficiency lifts the burden off taxpayers, it gives them the benefit of a public enterprise that improves their quality of life and contributes to local economies. State Parks are many things to many people. They have, for many decades, also contributed to everything that makes South Carolina grow.

STATE PARKS’ MISSION STATEMENT: To encourage people to discover South Carolina’s State Parks by providing resource-based recreational and educational opportunities that emphasize the conservation, protection and interpretation of the state’s natural and cultural resources.

Table Rock Paris Mountain


The South Carolina Chamber Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to advancing the long-term welfare of the Palmetto State and her citizens by identifying, researching and analyzing factors that are key to improving the state's business climate, workforce readiness, and quality of life. Founded in 2017, the Foundation is a business-led, solutions development and research organization, working in partnership with the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce to advance public knowledge and understanding of issues facing South Carolina businesses. This year the Foundation focused its efforts on two main topics that negatively impact South Carolina businesses: • HEALTHCARE: Chartered a business community-led task force to identify what actions South Carolina state agencies, businesses, and legislators can pursue to begin to reverse the negative business impacts of current healthcare policies. Once complete, their  “White Paper” and associated recommendations can be found on the Foundation’s website www.scchamberfoundation.org.

56

• TAXATION: Contracted with the Tax Foundation, an independent think tank based in Washington, D.C., to review, analyze and make recommendations for tax reform to make South Carolina’s tax code more competitive for investment and job creation. Their “Tax Reform Roadmap” can also be found at www.scchamberfoundation.org. The Chamber Foundation's endeavors requires funding to commission practical policy research. Those businesses who choose to invest will play a leading role in making sure our state maintains its competitive edge. Donations are fully tax deductible. For more information about the South Carolina Chamber Foundation please contact Foundation President Swati Patel at swati.patel@scchamber.net.


The True Tale of Taxes

Tax reform is a subject often in public scrutiny, but what is the real story? In these two graphs, we get a birds-eye view of the tax situation in South Carolina. They tell two stories: (1) income taxes are higher than many believe, and (2) while the Act 388 tax swap certainly reduced property tax liability for primary residences, it didn’t do much to reduce property taxes as a whole.

South Carolina Income Tax Liability is High for Many Filers Income Level: $75,000 $150,000 $250,000 $16K $14K $12K $10K $8K

In Thousands

$6K $4K $2K $0

MD

MS

AL

KY

NC

LA

VA

GA

WV

AR

SC

Notes: Liability is for a single filer, and includes standard deductions and personal exemptions Sources: State statutes; Tax Foundation calculations

$6B Act 388 Goes Into Eect

The Act 388 Tax Swap Shifted, $5B

Not Reduced, $4B

Overall Property Tax Collection $3B

$2B

In Billions

$1B

$0 1961

1966

1971

1976

1981

1986

1991

1996

2001

2006

2011

2016

Note: Collections are adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Census Bureau

57


MUSC Health Going Where You Are

58


Industry Updates Healthcare

By Dr. Patrick J. Cawley, MUSC Health CEO, Vice President of Health Affairs-University

As Hurricane Florence approaches the Carolina coast and all local clinics have closed, a man connects to MUSC Health Virtual Care through his mobile device to ask questions about a rash on his hand. A busy, working mom squeezes in a quick visit to an MUSC after hours care clinic for her son’s check-up regarding his broken arm, between soccer practice and a piano lesson. A family in Orangeburg County breathes a collective sigh of relief as an MUSC Health provider on the digital screen in a hospital room talks with the provider at the bedside, confirming there is no need to transfer their grandmother to Charleston. A production line technician at the Volvo Cars plant in Ridgeville, S.C. heads to a prostate cancer screening offered at his worksite MUSC Business Health clinic, where he also recently received a flu shot and some information about healthy eating habits while on the third shift. Whether its accessing health care through MUSC Health Virtual Care’s telehealth service, in one of our community outreach clinics, via our affiliate and partner community hospitals, or in the workplace as part of an on-site health and wellness program, MUSC Health care team members want South Carolina residents to know one thing: MUSC Health is where you are. The message itself is simple, but it means more than just accessing nationally-recognized services and the latest research driving health care innovation; it’s also about establishing local and regional partnerships that create and support a more healthy, productive and economically viable workforce. MUSC Health consists of three business components: local Tricounty business, regional business that falls within a two-hour radius, and state/national business. By expanding in all three of these general domains, MUSC Health is increasing access to innovative, high quality, and perhaps most importantly, patient and family centered health care delivery through more than 100 outreach locations, clinical affiliations with numerous health care and business partners, and a robust telehealth network. Regionally, MUSC Health works with partners like Tidelands Health in Georgetown, Horry and Williamsburg counties; Regional Medical Center in Orangeburg; Carolina Pines Regional

Medical Center in Darlington, Chesterfield, Lee and Marlboro counties; Kershaw Health in Kershaw County; and Beaufort Memorial Hospital in Beaufort County to offer specialty services to South Carolinians in these areas. For example, Regional Medical Center, with about 100 physicians, is able to augment its services by collaborating with MUSC for its cancer and stroke care. Likewise, MUSC offers specialties like thoracic surgery and nephrology in Beaufort and Bluffton. Earlier this year, MUSC and Beaufort Memorial announced plans to open a micro hospital together in fast growing Bluffton. With the announcement of our newest MUSC Business Health partner in late September 2018, the South Carolina Ports Authority, we continue the momentum of creating and supporting a healthier workforce for our state. We understand that a healthy workforce equals a healthy business. Employees need to know that they are valued and cared for every day, especially when it comes to their health. Building on our own successful approaches to creating a culture of well-being within our own team, MUSC Business Health programs are customized to meet the needs of individual companies or businesses, centered on the science of health promotion and evidence-based practices, and are delivered directly within a worksite by MUSC experts. By building these kinds of partnerships that include on-site clinics, convenient ambulatory facilities, e-visits, telehealth, emergency care, and hospitalization referral when needed, we are creating a betterequipped and healthier workforce, which in turn means more growth and economic prosperity for South Carolina. While the Charleston peninsula and larger tri-county area remains our “home” in the sense that our flagship, acute and specialized care hospital facilities are there, we recognized long ago that whenever we can, we need to be where people work, live, play and learn. Our ultimate goal is to ensure that South Carolinians, no matter where they are in the state, are able to access the right care, in the right place, and at the right time with a trusted and forward-thinking partner.

59


by Anita Patel

Manager, S.C. Department of Commerce Trade Program

60


Industry Updates Exports

Referred to as an “industrial powerhouse” by esteemed Wells Fargo economist Mark Vitner, South Carolina is enjoying unprecedented economic growth; and, as a result, our businesses are having international success like never before. So, what has driven the state’s rise to international prominence? The answer is simple—our people are good at making things. Long before companies like Michelin and BMW established significant manufacturing operations in the Palmetto State, South Carolinians were busy making things and selling those things all over the world. As our economy has matured, becoming more and more advanced, so have the items that we produce and sell. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, South Carolina exported a great deal of rice, indigo and cotton to Europe. As industrialization took hold in America, the state began to export an abundance of textile products. Today, we export more complex items, such as cars, planes and major household appliances. This more advanced economy is responsible for the ongoing growth of South Carolina’s international trade footprint. In 2017, the state’s exporters achieved an eighth consecutive record year, with total export sales exceeding $32 billion. In fact, South Carolina is the only state to experience an increase in export sales in each of the last eight years. The state even accounted for large percentages of the total U.S. market share of several top commodities—31 percent for tires and 16 percent for completed passenger vehicles. While major industries are certainly doing their part to fuel the state’s export growth, a lot of South Carolina’s international trade success comes at the hand of small and medium-sized businesses. In fact, approximately 85 percent of the companies that export from South Carolina are businesses with fewer than 500 employees. Recognizing this, the S.C. Department of Commerce offers an export incentives program to assist these smaller firms in expanding their reach to marketplaces all over the world. Recently, this program received additional support as the state,

for the seventh year, was awarded a State Trade Expansion Program grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Projected to help more than 60 small and medium-sized businesses seize export opportunities this year, the grant funding reimburses a portion of business participation in upcoming S.C. Commerce trade missions to Canada, Colombia, Brazil, Vietnam, Korea and Mexico; major trade exhibitions, such as the Paris Air Show and Arab Health; and involvement in U.S. Commercial Service programs, such as Trade Winds Indo Pacific. With more than 70 percent of the world’s purchasing power located outside of the United States, it’s clear that future prosperity for both South Carolina companies and our state as a whole will be determined by the continued development of our international trade efforts. Not only is exporting able to promote business expansions and overall economic development in the Palmetto State, it’s also extremely beneficial for individual companies. More than just an opportunity to widen a firm’s revenue stream, exporting helps businesses diversify their market footprints, making them more resilient in what can be an unpredictable global economy. All South Carolina companies—both large and small— contemplating whether or not to pursue international trade are encouraged to visit www.sccommerce.com/international and contact S.C. Commerce’s International Strategy and Trade Division. Find out how your business can get involved and how you can take advantage of the grant funding and other available resources. After all, as we strive to build on South Carolina’s recent reputation as an “industrial powerhouse,” it’s clear that we must look beyond our borders. There truly is a world of opportunity for the Palmetto State, and I’m excited to see what the future holds for all of us.

61


Homegrown Business:

MakingLife

The Story of Spinx

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Industry Updates Homegrown Business Spotlight By Jordana Megonigal

When Stewart Spinks opened his first gas station—a small kiosk-styled building off of the corner of Poinsett and Rutherford in Greenville—he was ahead of the curve. Not only did he have the first digital pumps in the state (a move that caused his customer base to refer to him as “digit gas”) but at that time, in the late 1970s, he was the first self-service station anywhere around. “Early on, I made the decision to go all out in self-service,” Spinks notes. At that time, most states hadn’t even legalized the ability to pump your own gas (as of last year, New Jersey remains the sole state in that category), and the gas embargos of that decade were hitting the industry hard. “The industry at that time was paralyzed. We didn’t have enough petroleum to supply to the customer, and it was a very troubled time. No one knew what to do.” While the older generation in the oil industry fretted over their next steps, the 30-year-old Spinks decided to take a risk that would pay off in a big way. He invested in new technology and products that had only been seen and utilized in Europe, and that put him ahead of the curve in digital assets. But it was his steadfast focus on the customer that put him in a position of leadership in the industry as a whole. “I was trying to make life easier for my customers,” Spinks says, with a distinct callback to the commercial jingle that has long populated radio stations around the state. “I was giving the customer what they wanted, and then worrying about how I was going to pay for it later.” So, he streamlined the gas purchase experience, and then added in conveniences like drinks, potato chips, beer and candy bars to augment the customer experience and focus on the retail sale, rather than just transferring product. It was a move that few others would make at the time—and really, for quite a while after. “There were those peers of mine who would say, ‘Women will not pump their own gas…teenagers won’t pump their own gas…it’s too dangerous.’ On top of that, my 70-year-old peers were saying ‘I’ll never sell Snickers bars and Cokes in a cooler,’” he remembers. “It was a cultural change that I happened to be right on the edge of—either I jump or go bust, and it worked.” But for Spinks, just starting out made him nimble in such ground-breaking decisions. “It was easier for me to do what I did, than it was for someone who had 81 service stations,” he says.

produce the results,” Spinks says of Steve. “He knew: the more consistent you are, the more executable your plan is.” When Steve took over, there was no ceremonial transfer of power; Stewart stayed on to help guide the company with his own decades of experience. But a decisive shift has still been made—a shift that includes an expanded focus on the team element, rather than simply Stewart’s ability to maintain the company’s many moving parts.

“We are similar in how we make decisions and lead, but he was much more alone in his era— he was having to make all those decisions,” Steve says. “Today we’ve got very capable people and we’ve empowered people to make decisions and recommendations. It’s been more of an evolution in that we’re comfortable in making decision by consensus. Dad would have always been like that if he had the people around him that allowed that to happen, but over the past 10 to 15 years we’ve really built the team up.” Today, 46 years later, that “team” is comprised of more than 1,400 employees in 81 retail locations across South Carolina, which produced a record year for Spinx in 2017 and is on track for another successful year this year.

Over time, the Spinx brand grew, adding franchises like Burger King, Subway and Arby’s, eventually selling them off when he realized his growth was too limited by owning them. After that shift, he focused everything on building the Spinx brand— including everything from service centers to food brands like Spinx’s Legendary Chicken and Biscuit, which is available at most Spinx locations around the state and remains a best-selling item.

And looking forward, with new food technologies, and trends like ridesharing and fuel efficiency, the company is continually poised and ready to move forward.

That focus on brand is something that Spinks attributes to his son, Steve, who took over as CEO of the company in 2012. “Frankly, I think he has a perspective that’s better than mine; he understands the consumer and the leadership required to

“On the inside of the store we think our product offering is a good one,” he adds, “but it will always be our goal to make every interaction top notch and to deliver the experience and service that our customers expect from Spinx.”

“We’re working with the consumer and working to make life easier for the consumer—we’ve done that with frictionless checkout, and we’ve done it at the dispenser,” Stewart notes.

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Business Week

What is South Carolina Business Week? Throughout South Carolina Business Week, more than 30 prominent business executives teach current business topics and leadership skills to the state’s rising high school sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Starting with the basics and adding topics throughout the week, students collaborate with executives in an intensive program designed to develop a thorough understanding of private enterprise. Along with an emphasis on teamwork and leadership skills, some issues included in the program include: • Basic Business Finance • Ethics in Business • Leadership Profiling • The Significance of Diversity in Business • Entrepreneurship Additionally, student interaction with professionals provides them with the opportunity to gain information on a number of career options. Many students begin to form important choices related to college major and professional field of interest during South Carolina Business Week.

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The program features the following activities: • Information on future career opportunities and trends in business • Direct interaction throughout the week with loaned executives from companies like Michelin, Grow Financial, Goodwill and Colonial Life • Opportunity to experience college life and make new friends from across South Carolina • A tour of a major industry facility to obtain hands-on knowledge of business • Social activities such as movie night, banquet, sporting games and talent night For more information, visit www.scbusinessweek.com.


Business Week

HELP US TODAY

to develop a better workforce for TOMORROW! 2018 Business Week was made possible by the aid and support of corporate sponsors and individuals:

Get Involved Recruitment, training and retention of qualified employees are frequently identified as issues impacting business growth in South Carolina. In order to make sure we have the right workforce, we must invest in the students and education they are receiving right now. Mission The mission of S.C. Business Week is to develop tomorrow's business leaders today. Event While staying at a South Carolina college or university, students are placed into teams to form mock companies led by executives from different South Carolina businesses. Students are challenged to create the most profitable business through an engaging computer program and various workshops that focus on networking, leadership, teamwork, soft skills, and critical thinking. The following four scholarship were awarded at the 2018 S.C. Business Week; S. Hunter Howard Jr. Scholarship, Ron McNair Leadership Award, Mechanical Contractors Association of SC Scholarship and The Chelse Ward Elliott Scholarship.

Become a Company Advisor! As a company advisor, you’ll be working directly with our students. It’s a great way to help mentor South Carolina’s next generation of business leaders! Just contact us to let us know you’re interested.

AFLAC Agape Hospice AT&T of SC Bank of America Mr. Robert Barnett BlueCross BlueShield of SC Centerra SRS Colonial Life Columbia Urban League Commercial Metals Company (CMC) Ms. Melanie DeHaven Duke Energy Ernst & Young, LLP Excellence in Diversity Foundation FGP International. Inc. First Citizens Bank First Quality Tissue SE, LLC Friends of US Military Families FN America Goodwill Industries of Upstate/Midlands Mr. Alvin Harrison Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd Mr. & Mrs. Don Herriot Honda of SC The InterTech Group Foundation Kaydon Corporation MAU Mechanical Contractors Association of S.C. Metal Chem, Inc. Metglas, Inc. Michelin, North America, Inc. Nan Ya Plastics Corporation Nephron Pharmaceutical Ogletree Deakins Ms. Kathy Olson Personal Pathways, Upstate Region Mrs. Lessie Price Robinson, Bradshaw & Hinson, PA SC Council on Economic Education SC Dept. of Education SC Education and Workforce Development Foundation SCE&G a SCANA Company Shaw Industries Group, Inc. Sonoco Southeastern Freight Lines South Coast Paper Span-America Medical Systems, Inc. Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber Taylor Elmore Memorial Fund Total Comfort Solutions US Silica Company Walker Emulsions USA, Inc. Warehouse Services, Inc. Mr. Larry Weidman

For more information, visit www.scbusinessweek.com/sponsorships

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The DNA of

Giving

a look inside the ScanSource Charitable Foundation

By Betsy Hipp, Director, Worldwide Marketing, ScanSource

Since the very early days of the company, ScanSource has always made it a priority to support every community in which we have offices. We believe by giving back to the communities in which we live and work, we can play a part in bettering our society—whether it’s through the giving of our time, talents, or resources. To make this possible, the ScanSource Charitable Foundation was formed in 1994, two years after the company was founded. It has been employee-run since day one, with a primary focus on supporting organizations across the globe dedicated to the welfare of children, education and the environment. It’s humbling to look back at almost 25 years of the Charitable Foundation and the nearly $20 million impact we have had worldwide. It’s also amazing to see how our employees have increasingly rallied around the company’s charitable initiatives over the years. We learned that the efforts of the ScanSource Charitable Foundation—and the larger ScanSource Corporate Social Responsibility program—not only have a sizeable impact on our communities, but they have an equally great impact on our employees. Through these endeavors, the company is providing team members with greater job satisfaction and opportunities to make a difference through volunteering in their local communities. It means so much to our employees

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to be provided the time during the work week to mentor a young student, bring cheer to kids at their local children’s hospital, play a game of baseball with children and families in need, or work with their local first responders to provide coats to children during the winter months. What has sustained our philanthropic endeavors for so many years are the success stories we share with one another— when we’re able to see the difference our work and the work of our colleagues is making as a result of the giving of our time, talent and resources. In many cases, our charitable initiatives become group efforts, coordinated by a team of employees who have a firm belief or strong connection to a particular cause. It’s amazing to see employees of all levels, including executives, band together. Whether it’s delivering meals on a weekly basis to our neighbors in need, raising funds and participating in a race to cure diseases, or putting together exhibits for the Upstate’s largest STEM festival, it takes a team to make the difference.


While ScanSource was born-and-raised here in the Upstate, with our largest office right here in Greenville, there is certainly no shortage of philanthropic activity in our nearly 50 additional offices worldwide. The concept of giving back is built into our culture—it’s a part of ScanSource’s DNA, and we are very intentional about sharing good works and charitable efforts across geographies. When one of our offices in Brazil throws a party for children with special needs, we want all of our employees in North America and Europe to know about it. And vice versa. When we sponsor a concert in Greenville benefitting at-risk youth, we make sure our global offices hear the positive news. By sharing our good works, we are influencing all of our employees to become involved and make an impact in their community. We believe that by supporting our own communities, we ultimately support the greater good. And because the term “ScanSource community” means everywhere our employees live and work, it has always been our goal to look at our Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives from a global perspective.

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S TAT U S Q U O H O L D S Y O U B A C K .

Status Go

PR O PELS YO U FO R WA R D. Ready to focus your energy on tomorrow’s opportunities?

Welcome to Status Go. gt.com/statusgo

“Grant Thornton” refers to Grant Thornton LLP, the U.S. member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL), and/or refers to the brand under which the independent network of GTIL member firms provide services to their clients, as the context requires. GTIL and each of its member firms are not a worldwide partnership and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the United States, visit grantthornton.com for details. © 2018 Grant Thornton LLP | All rights reserved | U.S. member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd


Spartanburg, S C A TRUE H UB O F GROWT H & ACT IVIT Y

By Allen Smith, President/CEO, Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce

It’s hard to miss the signs of Spartanburg’s revitalization. Across our county, historic mill buildings are being repurposed and given a new chance to thrive. Investments totaling more than $5 billion have poured in over the past five years. Downtown, once dormant areas are now bustling with foot traffic as local businesses increase community pride and attract visitors.

The last five years have brought a lot of change—and even more success—to Spartanburg. The $5.1 billion in investment that has come into the county represents a majority of the investment in the Upstate, and accounts for nearly a quarter of the total investment across South Carolina in that time. Spartanburg County has been fortunate enough to see a level of economic investment that would make some states jealous. Spartanburg County has become home to dozens of international companies. We are now a manufacturing and distribution hub for worldwide brands like Adidas, BMW Manufacturing Co. and the hundreds of suppliers that help fuel their output, and, as of earlier this year, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc.

The well-known coffee and beverage company announced it would be the latest in a long line of companies with a major investment in Spartanburg County. In May, Keurig announced it would build a state-of-the-art roasting and packaging facility in Moore, where the $350 million capital investment is expected to bring yet another 500 jobs to the area. In portions of Spartanburg County, homes built as mill houses during the thriving textile era of our economy still stand despite many of those mills remaining long vacant. That’s starting to change as historic former mills are becoming hubs of development as revitalization projects get off the ground. A plan is in place to turn Converse Mill into 172 upscale apartments. Renovation of Arcadia Mill, not far from downtown, began earlier this year. The historic site is being renovated for use as 70 loft-style apartments and a designated arts space. In the northern part of the county, the former Inman Mills is set to be converted to 159 apartments with senior living space called for in the future. The historic Drayton Mills building is now home to loft apartments with a cornucopia of economic development blossoming on the property.

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Drayton Mills is now home to a Rick Erwin restaurant, The Standard, as well as a California-based nanobrewery, a pizza shop, a local coffee roaster, an event space and a handful of growing local businesses. Not bad for a formerly vacant space. The revitalization efforts ongoing across Spartanburg are the result of years of hard work, coordination and collaboration at organizations with wide scopes of focus. That work is perhaps best seen in Downtown Spartanburg.

Downtown Spartanburg is absolutely booming.

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Every parcel on Magnolia Street, once dormant, has either been developed or is under contract. The state’s first co-op grocery store can be found just across the street from USC Upstate’s George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics and the Chapman Cultural Center, the heartbeat of our Downtown Cultural District. The AC Hotel—complete with a rooftop restaurant and bar, Level 10—opened its first South Carolina location on the corner of Main Street and Daniel Morgan Avenue. Just across the street, another mixed-use development will bring new apartments and office space to downtown. Arguably the crown jewel of Downtown Spartanburg, in both the past and likely the future, is the Montgomery Building.

Twenty-four new places to eat and drink have opened or announced plans to open in just the last year alone. Residential growth has also come to Downtown Spartanburg, with 151 apartments coming online over the next year, the first of which were in the Aug W. Smith building on East Main Street. The renovated building is now home to a local college meeting and event space, a coffee shop and dozens of apartments.

Erected in 1924, a major redevelopment effort is making the 94-year-old building more attractive than ever. Arch panels, skylights, wood molding, all original pieces of the Montgomery Building, have been restored to their original glory. The iconic theater on the first floor will be joined by a modern pizza place, a coffee shop with room remaining for other retail projects.

The corner of Main and Pine streets, one of our county’s most visible gateways, is being redeveloped and will soon be home to a modern bank, restaurant and office complex.

The rebirth of the Montgomery Building parallels the progress of Downtown Spartanburg, and the progress of Spartanburg County as a whole.



After THE Event The South Carolina Chamber is known for its exceptional events designed to unite the business community on issues and topics of concern, including federal issues, manufacturing, infrastructure, healthcare, energy, the environment, education, workforce, workplace safety, diversity, human resources and loving where you work. Many of the events hosted for the Chamber’s members are designed to be listening forums and grassroots meetings, elevating regional concerns to the capital.

for more information on upcoming events, visit: scchamber.net/events

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After the Event

Economists Sarah House (Wells Fargo) and Joseph Von Nessen, Ph.D. (University of South Carolina) discuss current trends and forecasts for the upcoming year at Summit programming.

December 5-6, 2017 | Kiawah Island

38TH ANNUAL SUMMIT

The Chamber’s annual meeting and signature event is the premier gathering of the state’s top business leaders. The Summit dinner honored our Business Leader of the Year, and the luncheon recognized the winners of the Diversity Awards, Business Week scholarships, the Sgt. William Jasper Freedom Award, and the Public Servant of the Year Award. Chamber CEO Ted Pitts chats with Rep. James Smith during the Gubernatorial Candidate Town Hall at the Summit.

Save the Date: 40th Annual Summit, November 20–21, 2019

Representatives from Bank of America and Clemson University making their way from the Summit Dinner to the Hospitality Suite. Chamber members packed the State House hearing room to hear from elected leaders – here, a panel of key House leadership moderated by Chair-elect Lou Kennedy.

January 23, 2018 | Columbia

Legislators and staff joined Chamber members to keep chatting about the issues at a reception after the forum.

BUSINESS SPEAKS

Business Speaks, presented in 2018 by Dominion Energy, is the Chamber’s annual legislative session kick-off, including a town hall with key South Carolina Senate and House members, a briefing on the Competitiveness Agenda, and a networking reception for attendees to meet and greet key legislators and staff. Save the Date: January 22, 2019

Chairman Jack Sanders moderates a panel with House Speaker Jay Lucas and Senate President Pro Tempore Hugh Leatherman.

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After the Event

February 7, 2018 | Columbia

SPOTLIGHT ON AGRICULTURE & FORESTRY

Chamber President & CEO Ted Pitts, House Speaker Jay Lucas, and Commissioner of Agriculture Hugh Weathers

Agriculture is one of the top industries in our state and is an important area of focus for the Chamber. This annual event is a partnership between the S.C. Chamber of Commerce, the S.C. Farm Bureau, the Palmetto Agribusiness Council, and the Forestry Association of South Carolina. Representatives of South Carolina agribusiness – from vegetable producers to canners to foresters – came together to showcase their wares in this premier networking event for their community. Save the Date: February 7, 2019 Key members of SC’s Agribusiness community networked with each other and with legislators at the Spotlight on Agriculture & Forestry, including Wayne Vermullen, Harry Ott, Ashley Burns, and Rep. Gary Simrill.

Conference Co-Chair Claire Jones moderates a panel of HR Professional of the Year and HR Rising Star Award Finalists.

February 28 - March 2, 2018 | Isle of Palms The rain didn’t stop the party! The awards reception moved inside and kept going until late night with great food and even some karaoke.

28TH ANNUAL HUMAN RESOURCES CONFERENCE

The South Carolina Chamber hosted the 28th Annual HR Conference in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. This event provided collaboration and development for the human resource leaders across the state. Bob Lowe, owner and consultant for People Make the Difference, was recognized as the 2018 Human Resources Professional of the Year and Kevin DeLoach, Human Resources Generalist for the S.C. Education Lottery, was the recipient of the inaugural Human Resources Rising Star Award. Save the Date: September 25–27, 2019

Conference attendees and exhibitors enjoyed time to network throughout the conference.

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After the Event

This annual luncheon is always a fun day of fellowship and recognition for the safety teams from workplaces across South Carolina.

March 29, 2018 | Columbia

SAFETY AWARDS

The Safety Awards luncheon honors companies that demonstrate exemplary workplace safety records. Winning companies had a commendable Lost Workday Case Rate during the 2017 calendar year; 212 of these companies were honored at the luncheon. Sonoco was one of this year’s biggest winners, with 11 locations garnering awards.

Save the Date: March 28, 2019

Michelin’s US5 plant is a long-time winner and always brings the team spirit to the Safety Awards. SC Chamber Chair-elect Lou Kennedy with Senator Lindsey Graham

Attendees make their way to the Capitol building

April 10, 2018 | Washington, D.C.

SC DC DAY

For the Chamber’s 3rd Annual SCDC Day, presented by AT&T, both large and small companies from South Carolina traveled to Washington D.C. and discussed federal issues that impact their business communities with legislators and policy experts.

Chamber members ready to head back to S.C. after a productive trip

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After the Event

The Salute to Small Business provides a guided networking event that connects small businesses with procurement officers from large private sector companies and public sector entities.

May 2, 2018 | Columbia

SALUTE TO SMALL BUSINESS The S.C. Salute to Small Business, presented by Wells Fargo, is the state’s annual National Small Business Week event. Hundreds of small business owners and advocates attended the 14th Annual Salute to Small Business, connecting with procurement officers from across the state and hearing the luncheon keynote address from Linda McMahon, National Small Business Administrator. Save the Date: May 1, 2019

National Small Business Administrator Linda McMahon receives the Key to the City from Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin and Councilwoman Tameka Isaac Devine.

Members of the SC National Guard accept the award for SC Federal Procurement Agency of the Year from SC District Director Gregg White of the Small Business Administration.

Panelists discuss security at our ports in front of a packed house.

Attendees heard about threats to national security and how many of those come through private business from keynote speaker Gen. Michael Hayden.

May 24, 2018 | Charleston

CYBERSECURITY SUMMIT Co-hosted by the S.C. Chamber, the U.S. Chamber, and S.C. Cyber, this annual conference was designed with both small and large businesses in mind. Strengthening small and mid-size businesses cybersecurity programs is crucial when it comes to protecting South Carolina businesses. Attendees learned from the best minds in the field, including Gen. Michael Hayden, Former CIA and NSA director, who gave the luncheon keynote. Save the Date: May 16, 2019

Mark Harrison of Pen Test Partners explained how hackers can enter your home through things as innocuous as a Bluetooth-enabled talking child’s toy.

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After the Event

July 22-27, 2018 | Clinton

South Carolina Business Week took place at Presbyterian College

SOUTH CAROLINA BUSINESS WEEK South Carolina Business Week’s mission is to contribute to the preparation of young adults for the business environment by introducing them to the principles of leadership, teamwork and the American free enterprise system while promoting self-reliance, individual responsibility and entrepreneurship. This year, more than 100 students participated, learning about personal finance, branding, community planning and development and how to make executive decisions. Four students received scholarships at the end of the week. To see more information, go to www.scbusineesweek.com. Save the Date: July 21-26, 2019

Jack Sanders, former CEO and President of Sonoco gives keynote presentation at graduation

75 companies gathered to celebrate their places and learn their rankings on the Best Places to Work list on August 1, 2018.

August 2, 2018 | Columbia

BEST PLACES TO WORK IN SOUTH CAROLINA

Life Cycle Engineering won the night’s Spirit Award.

The S.C. Chamber, the publishers of SCBIZ, and the Best Companies Group joined for the 13th consecutive year to produce the Best Places to Work in South Carolina program. This initiative is dedicated to identifying and recognizing South Carolina’s most innovative and top-notch employers. The 75 companies selected as 2018 “Best Places to Work” were honored at an awards dinner, presented by Colonial Life. Winners included Edward Jones (#1 Large Employer) and Advoco, Inc. of Greenville (#1 Small/Medium Employer). Save the Date: August 1, 2019

Props and theme dressing encouraged! The Terminix team really went all out, bringing a cockroach!

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After the Event

SC Chamber Legislative Agenda Task Force Committee Sidney Evering moderates a discussion with Representatives Joe Wilson and Ralph Norman.

August 22, 2018 | Columbia

WASHINGTON NIGHT

Washington Night, presented in 2018 by Parker Poe, is part two of the Chamber’s federal event series. Businesses from around the state participated in a modified town hall with members of South Carolina’s delegation to the House. Although South Carolina’s senators were stuck in Washington for a vote, they made sure to Skype in for this event! Save the Date: August 22, 2019

Senators Lindsey Graham and Tim Scott were stuck in D.C. for a vote, but they made time to web conference in and share their thoughts with the Chamber.

Chamber members from across the state mingled with key legislative staff at the post-program reception.

Journalist and professor Charles Bierbauer pulled no punches in his keynote address about #FakeNews and the current plight of the news media.

September 26-27, 2018 | Columbia

LEADSC YOUNG PROFESSIONALS SUMMIT The goal of the LeadSC Young Professional Summit is to educate and empower tomorrow’s business leaders. At this year’s event, Gov. Henry McMaster and Rep. Mandy Norrell participated in a town hall, informing attendees of their plans to develop South Carolina to benefit young professionals if elected in November. Charles Bierbauer, current professor and former dean of the University of South Carolina’s Journalism School, keynoted on #FakeNews and the current rights of the media, and other speakers presented on salary negotiation and leadership development. Ted Pitts and Governor Henry McMaster chat about McMaster’s plans to make S.C. more friendly to young professionals.

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After the Event

The team from Milliken & Co. rallies around to congratulate Sammy Davis, 2018 Manufacturing Employee of the Year in the Support Category.

October 5, 2018 | Greenville

MANUFACTURING DAY CELEBRATION

West Vieau got his start doing some welding on a ranch in Wyoming, and now he’s worked his way up to 2018 Manufacturing Employee of the Year in the Production Category as a Team Lead at Sargent Metal Fabricators.

This event, presented by Jackson Lewis, P.A., honored the 2018 recipients of the South Carolina Manufacturing Employee of the Year Awards. The award winners, selected by the Chamber’s Manufacturing Steering Committee, showcase employee contributions to manufacturing in South Carolina in the areas of innovation, teamwork, community service and leadership. Attendees also heard from leaders in the field on current efforts to galvanize South Carolina’s manufacturing workforce.

October 29-30, 2018

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM

Attendees enjoyed two rich days of programming featuring three different tracks and over 30 different speakers and interactive sessions.

The Chamber partnered with S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce, the S.C. Technical College System, the Chamber Education and Workforce Foundation and State Workforce Development Board for a two-day Workforce Development Symposium, presented by Bank of America, which brought together South Carolina business leaders, educators and state officials to offer insight on innovative workforce development, best practices and resources that will help stakeholders build a strong talent pipeline. SC Technical College System President Tim Hardee moderates a panel of legislators discussing the top issues facing workforce development at the State House.

The event offered finalists and sponsors from across the state the opportunity to network together.

November 26, 2018 | Kiawah Island

SOUTH CAROLINA BRANDED AWARDS For the second year in a row, the Chamber and The Brand Leader partnered together to host the SC Branded Awards, focusing on brands that define South Carolina. The event includes 15 awards called ‘Brandies’ – presented to qualifying companies, products and people who have become known for their brands meaning and impact on the state. Brandie award winners include small businesses, large corporations, non-profits and individuals in 15 different award categories.

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SC Chamber of Commerce

PAST 36 YEARS OF CHAMBER LEADERSHIP Past Board Chairs Jack Sanders

Emerson Gower, Jr. 2005-2006 Progress Energy

1992-1993 Carolina Eastman

Barbara Melvin

Mack Whittle

C. Ronald Coward

2017-2018 Sonoco

2016-2017 South Carolina State Ports Authority

2004-2005 Carolina First Bank

1991-1992 Coward-Hund Construction Co., Inc.

John Uprichard

W. Lee Bussell, APR

William L. Mazilly

Don Herriott

Tommy Gregory

2015-2016 FGP International, Inc. dba Find Great People

Mikee Johnson

2014-2015 Cox Industries, Inc.

Pamela Lackey 2013-2014 AT&T

2003-2004 CNSG

1991 Fluor Daniel, Inc.

2002-2003 Roche Carolina

1990 Gregory Electric Company, Inc.

Hayne Hipp

John Settle

2001-2002 Liberty Corporation

1989 Home Federal Savings Bank

Michael Brenan

M. Edward Sellers

James Shoemaker, Esq.

2012-2013 BB & T

2000-2001 BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina

Jim Reynolds

Paula Harper Bethea

Frank Smith

1988 Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham, P. A.

2011-2012 Total Comfort Solutions, Inc.

1998-2000 Bethea, Jordan & Griffin, P.A.

1987 Colonial Life & Insurance Co.

Dick Wilkerson

2010-2011 Michelin North America, Inc.

Bill Amick

1997-1998 Amick Farms

Leonard Fulghum, Jr.

Joseph Salley

Paul Campbell

W. Mat Self

1986 Ferguson Fulghum, Inc.

2009-2010 Milliken & Company

1996-1997 Alumax of South Carolina, Inc.

1985 Greenwood Mills, Inc.

William C. Boyd

Joe Anderson

John Boatwright

James Micali

2008-2009 Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd, P.A.

1995-1996 Southern Bell

1984 NCNB Carolinas

2007-2008 Michelin North America, Inc.

Hugh Lane, Jr.

1994-1995 Bank of South Carolina

John Huguley

Harris DeLoach, Jr.

James Morton, Jr.

George Dean Johnson, Jr.

2006-2007 Sonoco Products

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John Beckler

1993-1994 Michelin North America, Inc.

1983 Huguley Co.

1982 Johnson Development Associates


BP is honored to support the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce At BP, we’re committed to supporting the communities where our employees live and work. Our Cooper River plant, located just outside Charleston, supports more than 1,200 South Carolina jobs. And it’s surrounded by 5,500 acres of pristine forest and wetlands, which we manage as a certified wildlife habitat and use as a vast outdoor classroom to conduct conservation education for schools and community groups. We recently completed a major facility upgrade that significantly reduces energy use and emissions. It also supports the launch of a new line of low-carbon products. To learn more about how we’re supporting the low-carbon energy transition, visit bp.com/energytransition © 2018 BP Products North America Inc. All rights reserved.


IMPACT.

With a more than $9 billion investment in South Carolina, BMW Manufacturing is where engineering perfection for the X-model family of products begins. It’s a place where the philosophy of BMW thrives and the Ultimate Driving Machine is built. Learn more at bmwusfactory.com.