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Finalist artworks


Finalist artworks


Premier’s statement

Since the first Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize exhibition in 2003, artists have shared their interpretations of the scientific issues that affect our natural world through a variety of different art forms including paintings, sculptures, and jewellery. The prize acts as a platform to encourage artists to contribute to the challenges that face our natural world, and provides economic support to South Australia’s cultural sector, with over $2.5 million in sales and prize money to date benefiting our state and artists. The biennial exhibition at the South Australian Museum has become a major event on the arts calendar. It represents an opportunity for not only established, but also emerging artists to explore and present their perspectives on natural science. Charged with highlighting the strong links between art, science and the natural world the Waterhouse Prize also sparks debate among viewers as we grapple with the need to conserve our planet. It also inspires ongoing interest among the next generation of scientists and artists, and encourages young minds to undertake science and artbased studies and activities. I applaud the South Australian Museum for its continuous effort to produce and support scientific ventures that we can all relate to, and extend my congratulations to all the 2018 Waterhouse Prize finalists. Hon. Steven Marshall MP Premier of South Australia

Director’s statement

Established now as a biennial exhibition, the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize allows artists time to reflect on how their art interprets natural science. As science is a dynamic endeavour this interpretation has to keep pace with new knowledge and our evolving understanding. I am delighted to see that the artists featuring in this year’s exhibition have again risen to the challenge to engage and provoke the viewing public. Within this stimulating and everchanging environment there continues to be some constants. Since its inaugural exhibition in 2003 the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize has continued to provide a truly unique nexus for the examination of the relationship between art and natural science. The Waterhouse continues to attract leading and emerging artists from throughout Australia and internationally and this year’s exhibition is no exception. At the South Australian Museum we are proud to have created this unique event in Australia’s cultural calendar. It has never been more important to stimulate the artistic community and the public’s interest in natural science. It provides an exciting forum to communicate ideas, create debate and enable society to be better informed. I would like to thank all the artists who entered this year’s competition and for sharing their creativity. I would also like to thank the international panel of judges for their informed adjudication of the artworks in the exhibition. I am very grateful for the continued support of all our donors and sponsors – without you there simply would not be a 2018 Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize. Finally, I thank you the visitor for viewing this year’s Waterhouse. I hope you that you leave feeling enriched by this intriguing exhibition. Brian Oldman Director, South Australian Museum

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The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

Exploring the natural world through artistic creativity

Prize categories

Science is more crucial than ever before in helping us understand and address the overwhelming number of environmental challenges facing our planet.

Emerging

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize was first exhibited in 2003 and commemorates the birth of the South Australian Museum’s first curator, Frederick George Waterhouse. The prize is an opportunity for artists to investigate the world around them, and present their perspectives on natural science. It encourages artists to make a statement about the scientific issues facing our planet, and offers a valuable platform for them to contribute to the environmental debate. Over the years the competition has become a much loved fixture on the arts calendar, allowing artists and audiences to explore natural science through a range of creative outlets.

Scientist’s Choice Award

Since 2003 artists from over 30 different countries, including the United Kingdom, Ecuador, Israel, Syria, France and Canada, have taken part in the competition. Hundreds of entries are received each year, and the Prize is judged by an independent jury that changes annually. The stunning diversity and colour showcased in the gallery, as well as the scientific messages behind the high-calibre artworks, continues to attract visitors who love to see science through the boundless imagination of the talented artists. The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize is a fixture in the Australian arts calendar and continues to play a significant role in provoking debate about art and science in order to encourage a greater understanding of our world.

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Open The People’s Choice Dr Wendy Wickes Memoriam Prize

Competition judges Chris Saines (Director, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art) Barbara Maria Stafford (independent writer, curator and speaker whose work explores the intersections between the visual arts and the physical and biological sciences) Angela Valamanesh (contemporary Australian artist) Brian Oldman (Director, South Australian Museum)


Acknowledgements

The People’s Choice Dr Wendy Wickes Memoriam Prize

About Dr Wendy Wickes

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize encourages artists to investigate the world around them and to make a statement about the scientific and environmental issues facing our planet.

The most important activity that a human being can obtain is to learn to understand, because to understand it is to be free.

The People’s Choice Dr Wendy Wickes Memoriam Prize recognises the significance of the public vote, a unique feature of this award, and provides exhibition visitors with the opportunity to make their choice on the piece that most significantly reflects the spirit of the Waterhouse Prize. The People’s Choice Award is the embodiment of Wendy’s love of the Waterhouse. The work that receives the most votes is awarded this prestigious prize.

Baruch Spinoza

Dr Wendy Wickes commenced her professional career in Marine Biology after graduating with a Bachelor of Science (Hons). Wendy worked both here and in Israel before her career was cut short when her hearing in one ear was compromised due to diving, preventing her from taking up an appointment with Aberdeen University. After her return to Australia Wendy went on to study Medicine, becoming a founding member and Fellow of the Australasian Chapter of Addictions Medicine. Her work in this field was acknowledged both nationally and internationally, as was her contribution to the World Health Organisation in facilitating the education of medical staff and the setup of methadone clinics throughout Indonesia. It was Wendy’s belief that we needed to be supportive of the less privileged and fight for the underdog which her other position as a member of the Social Securities Appeals Tribunal accomplished. Her commitment to all of these causes was provided selflessly and with generosity of spirit, and with a love for her profession and the achievements with her diverse client groups. Wendy was a great believer in the power of education, and throughout her career worked as an educator at various universities, always with the goal of helping young people develop their careers. Her personal interests were also diverse, ranging from bird watching to equestrian dressage, and an uncanny and natural ability in diverse artistic pursuits, and a voracious appetite for art and literature. Above all, Wendy will be remembered by her life’s companion, family, friends, colleagues and clients as a person of exceptional integrity and humility. Her intellect, love and compassion have enriched us all and continue to be an inspiration. Wendy’s love and respect for the Waterhouse Prize since its inception is the motivation in providing this prize.

From art, from nature, from the schools, Let random influences glance, Like light in many a shiver’d lance That breaks about the dappled pools: Lord Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam

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Acknowledgements

Thank you The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize is an ambitious undertaking. The competition, exhibition and related events would not be possible without the collaboration and unconditional support of individual donors, government and corporate partners. We wish to express our sincerest gratitude to them and acknowledge their pivotal role in ensuring the continued success of the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize.

Exhibition Prize Sponsors

Touring Partner

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Print Partner

Media Partner


Finalist artworks Emerging finalists

1. Zoë Slee Arcanum reconnect – object V Porcelain and plexiglass 80 mm x 165 mm x 90 mm $658

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2. Jane Dennis Extant DNA Raw fish (Aptychotrema rostrata, shovel-nose shark) monoprint 900 mm x 600 mm $1250 3. Adrian Bradbury For a whole night at sea we searched and searched Oil on canvas 1220 mm x 910 mm $4000 4. Mahala Hill Apocalyptic fracture Bone china, black clay, ceramic shards, glass, glaze 230 mm x 170 mm x 200 mm $960

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5. Anna Louise Richardson Little big rock Charcoal on cement fibreboard, brass plate 1200 mm x 2000 mm $3000

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Emerging finalists

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1. Caro Facelli Bloom, Aurelia aurita, 2016 (detail) Paint marker on glass 950 mm x 1130 mm x 60 mm $3600 2. Emma Kirby Manus scientia (detail) Acrylic and ink on board 645 mm x 645 mm $850

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3. Ella-Maude Wilson Glitch in nature Oil on canvas 1016 mm x 762 mm $30 000 4. Pauline Dewar After the autumn rains Watercolour on paper 750 mm x 970 mm $2100

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5. Sorcha Yelland Asphyxia (detail) Cast glass 80 mm x 180 mm x 120 mm $800 6. Hayley Lander The great forgetting (detail) Oil on board 625 mm x 1150 mm $3800

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Finalist artworks Emerging finalists

1. Nic Mason Pie down (detail) Oil on linen 400 mm x 400 mm $950 2. Caitlin Hughes Anastasis Smalti and unglazed ceramic mosaic over fibreglass, steel mesh and cement substrate 650 mm x 650 mm x 300 mm $11 000

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3. Chelsea Hopkins-Allan Wing-scales of the female orchard swallowtail butterfly (Papilio aegeus) Oil pastel, watercolour and gouache on 300gsm watercolour paper 1500 mm x 1100 mm $3500

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4. Madeline Prowd Ghost gum Blown glass 210 mm x 290 mm x 200 mm $2100 5. Michelle Driver Windows no. 3 – self portrait (detail) Hand woven tapestry 450 mm x 385 mm $1500 6. Kate Little Buddleja (detail) Natural dye (Buddleja davidii) and cotton thread on paper 1010 mm x 650 mm $900

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Emerging finalists

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1. Mickelina Barlow Wattle seed dreaming Acrylic on canvas 1220 mm x 1220 mm $12 600 2. Llewelyn Ash Sea of glass Hand blown glass 350 mm x 280 mm x 280 mm $6500 3. Annika Karskens A modern inconvenience, pods of extinction (detail) Mixed media: aluminium coffee pods, plaster, resin, gilding in perspex cabinet 900 mm x 900 mm x 80 mm $7500

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4. Andrea Wyatt A snapshot of Mount Barker Summit throughout the ages (detail) Watercolour, gouache and handmade ochre paints from South Australian pigments 965 mm x 1200 mm $3600 5. Kate Butler Remember Paris? Unglazed porcelain, vitreous glass, tinted mortar on hand formed substrate 700 mm x 700 mm x 80 mm $6500

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6. Nicola Jarvie Adaptations Porcelain 420 mm x 170 mm x 310 mm $540


Finalist artworks Emerging finalists

1. Emma Kelly Lichen world – golden moonglow Pencil on paper, digital colour 500 mm x 500 mm $600

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2. Perrin Millard What we know, what we imagine (detail) Oil on canvas 1500 mm x 1500 mm $2200 3. Annie Smith Banksia menziesii Oil on canvas 1800 mm x 900 mm $1600 4. Maria Kraatz Undercurrents Hand-built earthenware clay 140 mm x 380 mm x 280 mm $440

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5. Anne Harris Response (E. tereticornis: a self directed residency with a tree) Hemp cotton and natural Eucalyptus dye 1250 mm x 1300 mm x 40 mm $1500

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6. Judith Woolston Playing for pleasure playing for time Oil on canvas 1220 mm x 610 mm $4800

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

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1. Debbie Symons Limacina helicina Antarctica – the butterfly effect HD video Duration 5:21 min $1950 2. Cheryl Hutchens Bifurcate Glass beads, nylon thread 970 mm x 940 mm x 20 mm $2000

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3. Bethany Wheeler B. integrifolia (detail) Pierced paper, charcoal 730 mm x 730 mm $1200 4. Gaye Chapman Weeds and wasteland: dissolution, essence and embodiment of place (detail) ‘Weed’ species, 74 qualitative filter papers, site-specific organic materials, polymers, and stemmed glass laboratory funnel 1950 mm x 1950 mm $10 000

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5. Jason Cordero The question has been answered Oil on linen 1980 mm x 1020 mm $13 500

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

1. Nick Mount Fruit and olive #020218 Blown glass, murrini, battuto, olive wood and Huon stems, oak base 540 mm x 480 mm x 220 mm $11 000

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2. Morgan Allender Elusive flight: chequered copper butterfly (Lucia limbaria) Oil on linen 1520 mm x 1830 mm $9945 3. Carole Bann Monstera Metalpoint (24 carat gold, pure silver) 740 mm x 430 mm $3000

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4. Malcolm Koch Oxygen captured Polymer synthetic on JPP synthetic 760 mm x 1020 mm $6500 5. Mariella McKinley By the shore Hand blown and cold carved glass 170 mm x 185 mm x 185 mm $4400

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6. Christobel Kelly Vaster than empires and more slow Leaves, 22 carat gold, Petri dishes 100 mm x 450 mm $1200

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

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1. Marguerite Derricourt Evolution Moulded paper on Arches watercolour paper, pen and ink 1060 mm x 750 mm x 50 mm $6000 2. Nicola Hooper The giant flea Digital print of hand coloured lithograph on paper, foam board and fishing line 1400 mm x 1300 mm $4500

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3. Vanessa Lee ‘Best supporting role goes to…’ Sterling silver, 18 carat yellow gold, freshwater pearls, smokey quartz 370 mm x 90 mm x 5 mm $5000 4. Simon Reece Medusozoa Ceramic 45 mm x 350 mm x 330 mm $1500

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5. Zoe Woods Vortical pair XI Blown glass, wheel cut 160 mm x 330 mm x 160 mm $7800

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6. Natalie Maras Shield no sword Polymer clay on board 740 mm x 560 mm x 80 mm $1450


Finalist artworks Open finalists

1. Roy Underwood Miramiratjara Acrylic on linen 2000 mm x 1370 mm $12 000

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2. Kate Cooper and Jennifer Freebody Fragility Wire, paper, bees wax, polymer clay 300 mm x 250 mm x 250 mm $4500 3. Claudine Marzik Torrid Zone (detail) Acrylic on canvas 1360 mm x 1200 mm $6600 4. Karen Cunningham Diamond ring (detail) Hot sculpted glass, radiated diamond nanoparticles, 532nm laser, 532nm laser filter 600 mm x 800 mm x 500 mm $8800

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5. Alicia King The future of nature Resin, rare earth magnets, iron 400 mm x 400 mm x 300 mm $4500 6. AK Milroy Anamnesis (detail) Acrylic 430 mm x 1800 mm x 330 mm $4500 5

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

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1. Emily Snadden Highland limb brooches with winter lichen Fine silver, sterling silver, 18 carat yellow gold, high fired southern ice porcelain, fresh water seed pearls and stainless steel pin 11 mm x 73 mm x 18 mm; 11 mm x 80 mm x 24 mm; 14 mm x 77 mm x 28 mm $9000 2. Selena de Carvalho The elasticity of time [souvenirs] Icelandic glacier recording, King Billy Pine cone, proximity sensor, speaker, raspberry pi, rammed earth, metal and concrete 1700 mm x 280 mm x 280 mm $7000 3. Sophie Carnell The ocean is crying, bleeding, dying. Triptych Found fishing line, beach debris, plastic bottle and straws, discarded ‘disposable’ contact lenses, deconstructed beach rope, recycled sterling silver, brass, glass beads 800 mm x 1100 mm x 150 mm $1900

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4. Datsun Tran We are red in tooth and claw Oil on board 1980 mm x 1980 mm $30 000

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

1. Liz Shreeve The platonics (detail) Curled rag paper on paper 120 mm x 750 mm x 120 mm $1100 2. Sally Blake Eucalyptus mantle (detail) Dry eucalyptus leaves and eucalyptus dyed wool, silk and linen on paper 1300 x 1060 $4500

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3. Louise Feneley Bouquet – natura morte Oil on Belgian linen 1370 mm x 1220 mm $12 500 4. Deidre But-Husaim The reclaiming Oil on linen 1520 mm x 1370 mm $24 000 5. Jan Howlin Core blimey Stoneware paperclay, slip, underglaze, glaze, wax 350 mm x 300 mm x 280 mm $1100

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

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1. Lara Tilbrook Fat cat Skin, claw, feather, bone, teeth, gold, copper, cotton 740 mm x 500 mm x 110 mm $3800 2. Anna Madeleine Fool’s gold Paper, glitter, glue 1500 mm x 2000 mm x 1000 mm $2800 3. Neil Huggett Soft colours in the western sky before sunrise Pastels on paper 660 mm x 980 mm $1900 4. Jane Bamford Weaving – porcelain ‘spines’ and bull kelp “Ecosystem tipping” Southern ice porcelain and bull kelp (Durvillaea potatorum) 1800 mm x 610 mm $3000

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5. Jamie Willis Transmarine ultramontane part 1 Oil on canvas 1270 mm x 1980 mm $2750

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

1. Lee Harrop We are making a new world (after Paul Nash) #2 (2018) Hand engraved core sample from the Yilgarn Craton, WA, Australia 810 mm x 45 x 45 mm $1000 2. Erica Seccombe Metamorphosis Single channel video 6:46 minutes $5500

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3. Astra Parker Lumen Stainless steel 780 mm x 780 mm x 780 mm $5000 4. Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello Bush flower bicornuals, set of two Hot blown glass with murrine 250 mm x 230 mm x 140 mm; 270 mm x 240 mm x 140 mm $9500

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5. Sandy Webster Fatal Shore dustbin Mixed media 250 mm x 500 mm x 100 mm $1000 6. Michelle Kelly Growth Stainless steel 830 mm x 2000 mm x 550 mm $7200 6

All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

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1. Catherine Nelson EveryNothing Single channel HD video Duration 01:01:02 $10 000 2. Erin Conron Tide Blown glass with multi fired enamel 350 mm x 290 mm x 320 mm $2900 3. Carolyn Corletto Life savings (detail) Seeds, plastic 1500 mm x 300 mm x 10 mm $1500

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4. Geoff Overheu Colony (detail) Bronze 650 mm x 280 mm x 450 mm $7700 5. Laura Wills Substance that promotes healing Watercolour, pastel, pencil and pigment ink on rag paper 900 mm x 660 mm $2450

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6. Aly de Groot Water bird Handwoven monofilament (fishing line), fish hook 800 mm x 700 mm x 300 mm $3500 7. Lorraine Biggs Small wonders (detail) Pastel chalk on paper (made from Tasmanian Richea pandanifolia leaves) 1700 mm x 1150 mm x 40 mm $5000

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Finalist artworks Open finalists

1. Cobi Cockburn Innate lines Fused and engraved glass 1160 mm x 1160 mm x 40 mm $9900

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2. Maiju Altpere Windows to soul’s garden, 2016–18 (detail) High fired porcelain, mono-print, erosion 1680 mm x 1520 mm x 25 mm $9000 3. Tania Mason Connected to another by two Gouache and watercolour on canvas 1100 x 1720 (diptych) $6000

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4. Anna Glynn Antipodean nocturne Moving image Duration 7:00 min – moving image/single channel MP4 (edition of 7) $5750

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All measurements are supplied by the artist. They may represent framed or unframed dimensions. Buyers are advised to contact the Museum Shop to check specific details prior to purchase.

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Price list Emerging finalists

ARTIST

TITLE

PAGE

NO.

PRICE

Llewelyn Ash

Sea of glass

10

2

$6500

Mickelina Barlow

Wattle seed dreaming

10

1

$12 600

Adrian Bradbury

For a whole night at sea we searched and searched

7

3

$4000

Kate Butler

Remember Paris?

10

5

$6500

Jane Dennis

Extant DNA

7

2

$1250

Pauline Dewar

After the autumn rains

8

4

$2100

Michelle Driver

Windows no. 3 – self portrait

9

5

$1500

Caro Facelli

Bloom, Aurelia aurita, 2016

8

1

$3600

Anne Harris

Response (E. Tereticornis: a self directed residency with a tree)

11

5

$1500

Mahala Hill

Apocalyptic fracture

7

4

$960

Chelsea Hopkins-Allan

Wing-scales of the female orchard swallowtail butterfly (Papilio aegeus)

9

3

$3500

Caitlin Hughes

Anastasis

9

2

$11 000

Nicola Jarvie

Adaptations

10

6

$540

Annika Karskens

A modern inconvenience, pods of extinction

10

3

$7500

Emma Kelly

Lichen world – golden moonglow

11

1

$600

Emma Kirby

Manus scientia

8

2

$850

Maria Kraatz

Undercurrents

11

4

$440

Hayley Lander

The great forgetting

8

6

$3800

Kate Little

Buddleja

9

6

$900

Nic Mason

Pie down

9

1

$950

Perrin Millard

What we know, what we imagine

11

2

$2200

Madeline Prowd

Ghost gum

9

4

$2100

Anna Louise Richardson

Little big rock

7

5

$3000

Zoë Slee

Arcanum reconnect – object V

7

1

$658

Annie Smith

Banksia menziesii

11

3

$1600

Ella-Maude Wilson

Glitch in nature

8

3

$30 000

Judith Woolston

Playing for pleasure playing for time

11

6

$4800

Andrea Wyatt

A snapshot of Mount Barker Summit throughout the ages

9

4

$3600

Sorcha Yelland

Asphyxia

8

5

$800

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Price list Open finalists

ARTIST

TITLE

PAGE

NO.

PRICE

Morgan Allender

Elusive flight: chequered copper butterfly (Lucia limbaria)

13

2

$9945

Maiju Altpere

Windows to soul’s garden, 2016–18

21

2

$9000

Kate Cooper and Jennifer Freebody

Fragility

15

2

$4500

Jane Bamford

Weaving – porcelain ‘spines’ and bull kelp “Ecosystem tipping”

18

4

$3000

Carole Bann

Monstera

13

3

$3000

Lorraine Biggs

Small wonders

20

7

$5000

Sally Blake

Eucalyptus mantle

17

2

$4500

Deidre But-Husaim

The reclaiming

17

4

$24 000

Sophie Carnell

The ocean is crying, bleeding, dying. Triptych

16

3

$1900

Gaye Chapman

Weeds and wasteland: dissolution, essence and embodiment of place

12

4

$10 000

Cobi Cockburn

Innate lines

21

1

$9900

Erin Conron

Tide

20

2

$2900

Jason Cordero

The question has been answered

12

5

$13 500

Carolyn Corletto

Life savings

20

3

$1500

Karen Cunningham

Diamond ring

15

4

$8800

Selena de Carvalho

The elasticity of time [souvenirs]

16

2

$7000

Aly de Groot

Water bird

20

6

$3500

Marguerite Derricourt

Evolution

14

1

$6000

Louise Feneley

Bouquet – natura morte

17

3

$12 500

Anna Glynn

Antipodean nocturne

21

4

$5750

Lee Harrop

We are making a new world (after Paul Nash) #2 (2018)

19

1

$1000

Nicola Hooper

The giant flea

14

2

$4500

Jan Howlin

Core blimey

17

5

$1100

Neil Huggett

Soft colours in the western sky before sunrise

18

3

$1900

Cheryl Hutchens

Bifurcate

12

2

$2000

Christobel Kelly

Vaster than empires and more slow

13

6

$1200

Michelle Kelly

Growth

19

6

$7200

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Price list Open finalists

ARTIST

TITLE

PAGE

NO.

PRICE

Jennifer Kemarre Martiniello

Bush flower bicornuals, set of two

19

4

$9500

Alicia King

The future of nature

15

5

$4500

Malcolm Koch

Oxygen captured

13

4

$6500

Vanessa Lee

‘Best supporting role goes to…’

14

3

$5000

Anna Madeleine

Fool's gold

18

2

$2800

Natalie Maras

Shield no sword

14

6

$1450

Claudine Marzik

Torrid Zone

15

3

$6600

Tania Mason

Connected to another by two

21

3

$6000

Mariella McKinley

By the shore

13

5

$4400

AK Milroy

Anamnesis

15

6

$4500

Nick Mount

Fruit and olive #020218

13

1

$11 000

Catherine Nelson

EveryNothing

20

1

$10 000

Geoff Overheu

Colony

20

4

$7700

Astra Parker

Lumen

19

3

$5000

Simon Reece

Medusozoa

14

4

$1500

Erica Seccombe

Metamorphosis

19

2

$5500

Liz Shreeve

The platonics

17

1

$1100

Emily Snadden

Highland limb brooches with winter lichen

16

1

$9000

Debbie Symons

Limacina helicina Antarctica – the butterfly effect

12

1

$1950

Lara Tilbrook

Fat cat

18

1

$3800

Datsun Tran

We are red in tooth and claw

16

4

$30 000

Roy Underwood

Miramiratjara

15

1

$12 000

Sandy Webster

Fatal Shore dustbin

19

5

$1000

Bethany Wheeler

B. integrifolia

12

3

$1200

Jamie Willis

Transmarine ultramontane part 1

18

5

$2750

Laura Wills

Substance that promotes healing

20

5

$2450

Zoe Woods

Vortical pair XI

14

5

$7800

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About the South Australian Museum

Come and explore the South Australian Museum – the most visited natural history museum in Australia and one of Australia’s most important scientific and cultural institutions. We’re committed to sharing our specimens, stories and science with you in an interactive and fun environment to inspire lifelong learning and give you an experience you’ll never forget. Wander through five floors of amazing exhibits where you’ll be surprised by nature and fascinated by our stories. The Museum cares for over four million objects and specimens collected over the last 150 years, ranging from minerals and meteorites to polar exploration artefacts and parasitic creatures. Our unique and globally significant collections are a vital part of Australia’s national heritage and the international scientific record and they’re growing every year!

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The South Australian Biodiversity Gallery highlights the extraordinary diversity of the wildlife you’ll encounter on your travels through the different regions of the State.

Museums are a trusted information resource because they are based on the real thing – the collections. Come and see ‘the real thing’ at the South Australian Museum.

Have the locals been telling you tall tales about our animals? The Museum’s Discovery Centre is open every day – our science communicators can answer your questions or identify any specimens you bring in.

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For artwork sale enquiries: South Australian Museum Shop +61 8 8207 7370 shop@samuseum.sa.gov.au Image: Simon Reece, Medusozoa. Ceramic. #waterhouseprize #winterartsadelaide

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Profile for South Australian Museum

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2018  

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize commemorates the birth of the South Australian Museum’s first curator, Frederick George Waterhouse....

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2018  

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize commemorates the birth of the South Australian Museum’s first curator, Frederick George Waterhouse....

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