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Fall 2013 • red deer Living  3


contents Fa l l 2 0 1 3

VOL 3 • ISS 15

11 departments 8

food | ”I think I can” A resurgence of interest in food preservation

18

11 People | Charming centenarian Edith Hudson reflects on the past 102 years 15 OUTDOORS | Off the beaten track Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park is a hidden treasure along the trail system 18 Culture | Earthdance Red Deer Participate in the largest global dance event on the planet 25 community | Urban design, nature’s way. Inspiring a sustainable city through the Centennial Design Charette

25 15 21

feature 21 A small world. Aspen Heights MicroSociety provides real life learning

column 30 A SLICE OF LIFE | Fall splendour Autumn brings new stops on the journey of life

8 @RedDeerLiving

items 6 Editor’s message

RedDeerLiving Cover photography by Jock Mackenzie

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Fall 2013 • red deer Living  5


editor’s message

The fun side of fall Fall is here. But that’s not a bad thing. Fall is about so much more than just falling into a comfy chair and getting ready for many months of TV. It’s about getting out and squeezing every last bit of warmth from the sun’s rays. For me, it’s also about football: CFL, of course, and cheering on my beloved ‘Riders. For others, it’s about

PUBLISHER

Source Media Group info@sourcemediagroup.ca A ss o c ia t e P U B L I S H E R

Jim Zang jim.zang@sourcemediagroup.ca

defying the coming winter and wearing shorts in October, despite the temperature.

Editor

No matter how you slice it, fall is a pretty unique season filled with connecting and

Shelley Newman

celebrating, preserving and learning — all things that you’ll find in this edition of

shelley.newman@sourcemediagroup.ca A r t d ire c t o r

Red Deer Living. We start with the preserving, of food, that is. Whether you’re an avid gardener with a bountiful harvest or you just can’t stop buying fresh produce at the local markets, the article on canning and preserving is sure to pique your interest. Plus, there’s an enhanced digital version of the article, which has two recipes offering even more canning goodness. Next, Edith Hudson shares her story from the past 102 years. This charming senior has led a diverse and interesting life, and she has the stories and sense of humour to prove it. In this year of Red Deer’s centennial celebrations, Red Deer Living salutes Edith and all the other centenarians in our city. The cyclists out there are sure to celebrate

Jean Faye Rodriguez jean.rodriguez@sourcemediagroup.ca G raphi c d esig n er S

Lama Azhari lama.azhari@sourcemediagroup.ca

Dave Macaulay dave.macaulay@sourcemediagroup.ca

Megan Sereda megan.sereda@sourcemediagroup.ca pr o d u c t i o n a d m i n is t ra t o r

Colleen Leier colleen.leier@sourcemediagroup.ca E D I TO R I A L

Jennifer Blair, Jason Brink, Jock Mackenzie, Treena Mielke, Shelley Newman, Laurette Woodward P H OTO G R A P H Y

the article on Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park, a

Jennifer Blair, Jason Brink, Jock Mackenzie, Laurette Woodward

hidden treasure that’s filled with diverse stunts

A d v er t isi n g S A L E S

and trails. Sticking with the outdoor theme, you’ll read about Earthdance Red Deer, a dynamic dance event that celebrates worldwide peace and inclusion. The creative crew at Aspen Heights Elementary School describes the concept of a MicroSociety in the article “A small world.” This is back-to-school with a twist, as one of the first tasks for students is to elect a prime minister and members of parliament. Next, the creativity continues when ReThink Red Deer hosts the Centennial Design Charrette, a nature-inspired way to create a sustainable city. Treena Mielke rounds out the magazine by sharing a vivid and relatable look at the little bumps and blissful moments of a fine fall day. Plus, readers will have something special this edition, as there’s an extra article in the digital version of Red Deer Living. In the health column, which you’ll find online, Susan Cossi shares advice about possible reactions between the herbal supplements and pharmaceuticals you take. You can find this extra article at http://digital.lovereddeerliving.ca/fall2013. Whether you like to hold a shiny copy of Red Deer Living in your hands or peruse the articles online, there are lots of ways to catch up on what’s happening in and around Red Deer this fall. Until next time, happy reading!

Andrea Rinkel andrea.rinkel@sourcemediagroup.ca A CCO U NT I N G

Donna Roberts accounting@sourcemediagroup.ca DISTRIBUTED BY

Canada Post, Media Classified, Source Media Group P R I N T E D I N C A N A DA

Copyright 2013 by Source Media Group Corp. Material cannot be reprinted in whole or in part without the expressed written permission of the publishers. Red Deer Living™ is published 4 times per annum and is available free through select distribution points in and around Red Deer. Source Media Group agrees to advertise on behalf of the advertiser without responsibility for claims or misinformation made by the advertiser and acts only as an advertising medium. Source Media Group reserves the right to refuse any advertising at its sole discretion. Red Deer Living™ accepts editorial submissions and letters to the editor by electronic mail only. Please forward any submissions, including your full name phone number and return email address, to reddeer.editor@sourcemediagroup.ca Contact: Source Media Group, 207, 5809 Macleod Trail SW, Calgary, AB T2H 0J9. Tel 403.532.3101, Fax 403.532.3109, Toll free 1.888.932.3101. www.sourcemediagroup.ca

Shelley Newman, Editor shelley.newman@sourcemediagroup.ca 6  red deer Living • Fall 2013

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food

“I think I can” A resurgence of interest in food preservation By Laurette Woodward

“I

remember it being 30 degrees, in August, sweating away in our kitchen, canning,” says Kathryn Huedepohl, fondly remembering a part of her childhood. “I always had a job, like tightening rings on the jars. In our family we always made lots of pickles, jams and jellies. Sometimes we did tomato sauce. We always put away a lot of fruit. Usually we were down to our last five jars by the time the snow was melting,” says Huedepohl. “Our canned food got us through the Alberta winters.” Now as Public Programmer with the Waskasoo Environmental Education Society, Huedepohl is sharing her love of preserving with other interested Red Deerians through classes she teaches. “There is definitely a surge in interest in it — in ‘back-to-basics’ skills that most people had 20 or 30 years ago,” says Huedepohl. “People I talk to crave acquiring skills. They want to be less reliant on the grocery store.”

“People I talk to crave acquiring skills. They want to be less reliant on the grocery store.” Kathryn Huedopohl leads a canning workshop.

Photo courtesy DBA. 8  red deer Living • Fall 2013

She says, “Usually people who come to classes are beginners; people who have seen their mothers or grandmothers canning, but who haven’t done it themselves.” Barb Hazenveld, who also offers classes on canning and preserving, is seeing a similar increase in popularity. “I started offering classes three years ago because I had girlfriends asking me to teach them how to do it. The classes were a huge success and very popular,” says Hazenveld. “I think there is a big resurgence of interest in preserving.” For some, the interest in preserving dovetails with a focus on eating local and slow food. Permaculture, or edible landscaping, is a movement around the world that is picking up steam in Canada and may be adding to the interest in preserving. According to Hazenveld, in some countries permaculture can mean harvesting food from the yard all year, but because the growing season is limited to a few months here, “the reality of permaculture in Canada is preserving.”

The benefits of preserving your own food People who preserve their own food say that it’s possible to save money by canning, freezing and dehydrating — all different ways of preserving foods for later use — if you grow your own food. If you choose to purchase food, the cost goes up. In that case, although the final product may not be cheaper than you’d find in the grocery store, home preserving still offers some considerable benefits. Like Huedepohl, Hazenveld has many childhood memories of preserving food with her mom and grandma. “I podded peas all summer,” says Hazenveld. “And I remember how good my mom’s jams tasted. Also, freezing rhubarb; that’s definitely an Alberta thing.” “There is just nothing like preserving your own food,” she says. “If it comes out of your garden, you SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR


food

Canned salsa. Photos on this page by Laurette Woodward

know exactly what’s gone into it. You put the minerals in the soil, so you know the food is nutritious.” “Preserving, for me, is about capturing the most goodness in the food possible. There is really no comparison to industrialized food,” says Hazenveld. “You don’t know what’s gone into a can of food you buy from the store.” Even if you purchase food to preserve, Kathryn such as from a local u-pick farm or from Huedepohl a farmer’s market, you can achieve a high quality result. If you are able to talk to the producer, you will gain increased understanding of what has gone into the food, and what chemicals were or were not used during the growing process. Hazenveld points out that quality also comes from the way food is processed, which you have control of when you preserve it. “You can blanche the heck out of it,” says Hazenveld, “and that significantly reduces the nutrients.” Or, she says, you can look for the blanching times for each food online — and follow them — so you are assured to maintain the greatest amount of nutrients possible. According to Huedepohl, one of the most enjoyable benefits of canning is the pride of knowing ‘I did it myself’. She says, “There is nothing like seeing the cupboards full of food you’ve prepared.” For many canners, it’s joyful to hear the lids on the jars seal with a little ‘ping’ sound. And, Huedepohl says, “It’s a great teaching experience for kids. They see where their food comes from, and that’s important. Being able to preserve your own food is a valuable skill.”  RL

Editors Note: Looking for more canning ideas? Check out the two tasty recipes in our digital version of this article at digital.lovereddeerliving. ca/fall2013

A comparison of different preserving methods Because there are different methods of preserving, it’s important to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each. Freezing • Least amount of nutrients lost • A very quick method of preserving: some vegetables require blanching and/or chopping first, but many fruits require no preparation other than cleansing • Shelf life often 6 months or less • Freezer space can be an issue Canning • Longer shelf life than with freezing • Initial purchase of jars can be costly • Some foods require a pressure canner (not just a water bath canner) to seal properly Dehydration • The most portable of preserved products • Can be extremely nutrient rich depending on temperature during dehydration • Easily stored on shelves • Easy to rehydrate

www.waskasoopark.ca or www.gorgeousandedible.com SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

Fall 2013 • red deer Living  9


Red Deer Downtown Destination downtown Character and community makes a special shopping experience Downtown is the place to be. With the great gathering spaces at Veterans’ Park and the redeveloped of Gaetz Avenue, Red Deerians are frequently treated to events, concerts and markets throughout our historic city centre. Plus, the diverse cafes and restaurants offer a delicious sampling of North American and multicultural cuisine. And, you may have heard: the shopping is fantastic. Downtown Red Deer is filled with specialty and locally-owned shops that have a unique mix of products. Looking for local artwork? You can find that downtown. Perhaps you want a one-of-a-kind item for your home? Downtown. And when it comes to fashion, downtown retailers are making a name for themselves with designer items that can’t be easily found elsewhere. To learn more about downtown, just park your car and let your feet guide you. You can also visit www.downtownreddeer.com.  RL

Get Connected! Advertise in Red Deer Living

10  red deer Living • Fall 2013

Contact Andrea Rinkel 403.877.2560 • 1.888.932.3101 andrea.rinkel@sourcemediagroup.ca SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR


people

Edith Hudson reflects on the past 102 years

Charming centenarian By Shelley Newman

E

dith Hudson reached an amazing milestone this past February: at a party surrounded by her family and friends, she celebrated her 102nd birthday. The active senior loves family festivities, as she also attended a family reunion west of Bowden this summer. And, back when she turned 100, the party was so big that her family had to book a different venue than they normally would have in order to accommodate the crowd. “We had too many people for the Penhold drop-in centre, so we had to hold the party at the Multiplex,” she says. “I think I was related to most of the people there!” Strong friendships and family ties are very important to Edith, who has lived throughout central Alberta for essentially all of her 102 years. She moved to Red Deer in 1999 and has lived in Piper Creek Lodge for the past six years. Many years

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before that — back in 1911 — her story began near Calgary. “I was born at my family’s home on Pole Line Road near Calgary,” she explains. “At that time, Calgary really wasn’t much more than a cow town, and people used to haul logs out along the road where we lived.” Her parents, David and Julia Adams, had 10 children. Edith was the sixth child and grew up with four brothers and five sisters. The family moved to the Innisfail area and, after her father returned from the First World War, they settled near Raven, located half way between Spruce View and Caroline. Their homestead was on the shore of a small lake on the property, and the family lived the work-filled life of early Albertan settlers. Edith and her siblings attended school in nearby Raven, although wet weather sometimes made the muskeg road impassable for the horse and wagon.

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Fall 2013 • red deer Living  11


people

B

A Edith’s childhood home near Raven. B Edith and Alfred on their wedding day in 1932.

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C Family home near Dixon, 1927.

As a 19-year-old, Edith unexpectedly met her husband-to-be, Alfred Hudson, at a community dance. “My sister and I always used to ride horseback to dances. One night, when we were putting the horses in the barn, a boy I didn’t know called out: ‘Can I have the first dance?’” she laughs. “I said ‘sure,’ and when the music started he came to get me.” Edith and Alfred continued seeing each other for two years and then got married in Calgary — although the freshfaced Edith had to work hard to convince the minister that she was, in fact, 21 years old and that he could legally marry the couple. In 1933, Edith, Alfred and their first daughter, one-year-old Helen, moved into a newly built two-room log house on a farm west of Bowden. “That house only had one door and two windows, and the heater was right beside the door — if there was a fire we would have been trapped,” she says. “So, when the weather was bad and we had to have a fire in the stove overnight, my husband and I would take turns staying up all night to make sure the family was safe.” After their daughters Shirley and Eunice were born, the small, dangerous space became too cramped, and the family built a new, larger 12  red deer Living • Fall 2013

house on the farm. Edith and Alfred then had a fourth child, Ken, and the new house was filled with family. Edith, as well as her daughter Eunice Kullman, niece Georgina O’Coin and nephew Ken Adams — who all currently live in or near Red Deer — recall the hard work and funny memories of farming in the 1930s and 1940s. “We lived across the river from Aunt Edith and Uncle Alfred,” says Ken, “and I remember walking across the bridge as a little guy and having the old gobbler turkey bite me.” Edith also has distinct memories of the sassy poultry on the farm. “That big gobbler would take after Alfred all the time, but for some reason I could lead it anywhere in the yard,” she recalls. “The big gobbler weighed 34 C pounds fully dressed... and he tasted pretty good!” After 33 years of hard work on the farm and with their four children grown and having their own families, Edith and Alfred moved to Bowden in 1965. Edith took work as a seamstress at the Bowden Penitentiary and Alfred worked at the stramit plant in Innisfail.

“One night, when we were putting the horses in the barn, a boy I didn’t know called out: ‘Can I have the first dance?’ I said ‘sure,’ and when the music started he came to get me.” With the couple living in town, Edith faced a new challenge: getting her driver’s license. A lifelong driver on the farm, she had never mastered certain skills of city driving. “My brother lived in Bowden, and I used to drive on the road to town and then let him drive in town,” she says. “I failed my driving test the first time because I put my arm out the window to signal instead of using my signal light. When I took my test the second time, I had the same driving examiner, and he may have given me a pass just so that he wouldn’t see me again.” While in Bowden, Edith started bowling — a hobby she kept at until she was 88 years

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people

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old — and she also became passionate about raising money to build a community drop-in centre. She held a flea market twice a month to raise money for the centre, which was eventually built. The Hudsons moved to Penhold in 1976, and Edith became one of the founding members of the Lions Club in that community. She also dedicated herself to raising money to build a drop-in centre in Penhold, and the on-going work of this facility has great meaning for her to this day. Alfred died in 1982, after a six-year struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. Edith took comfort in her hobbies, her friends and her ever-growing family of grandchildren and great grandchildren. Today, her descendants include 15 grandchildren, 23 great grandchildren and 13 great, great grandchildren. Her parents’ legacy has also been preserved on the farm where they settled so many years ago: in 2012, thanks to the initiative of Edith’s family, the small lake on their former homestead was officially named Adams

Lake, in commemoration of her parents. At Piper Creek Lodge, Edith enjoys visits from her family and friends, and she also participates in a wide variety of activities. She plays card games and is an avid bingo player, despite her limited vision. In a mind-bending test of memory, Edith has memorized four bingo cards, and she plays four games of bingo at a time, on a regular basis. Also a sports fan, Edith sometimes has to choose between watching and listening to an Edmonton Eskimos game or playing bingo — although bingo usually wins out. In addition to staying socially active at her home, Edith also has a good sense of humour that undoubtedly keeps her young at heart. At Halloween, for example, she usually has a costume that encompasses her and her walker. “One year, Aunt Edith attached underwear and nylons to her clothes and filled the basket on her walker with underwear, and then she had a sign on the front labelled ‘Undie Taker,’” says her niece, Georgina. “She was quite a hit that year!” With 102 years of memories and experiences to enjoy, Edith is also happy and content with her life today. “Sometimes we have to forget about what we had and just appreciate what we have,” she says. “That’s one of the most important things to remember.”  RL

F

G

“Sometimes we have to forget about what we had and just appreciate what we have. That’s one of the most important things to remember.” SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

D Edith standing beside her wedding dress, which is now an exhibit in the Bowden Pioneer Museum. E Christmas, 2012. F Edith’s recent Halloween costume. G Edith with her four children (L-R): Shirley, Helen, Ken and Eunice. Photos courtesy Edith Hudson Fall 2013 • red deer Living  13


outdoors

N E T A E B E OFF TH TRACK Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park is a hidden treasure along the trail system Story and photos by Jennifer Blair

Rod Rysavy

Hidden along Red Deer’s sprawling trail system is a 77-acre park that few people seem to know about. But those who have visited Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park all leave saying the same thing: “We’ll be back.” With a free-ride area in the upper forest, a dirt jump area off 77 Street and an intricate section of cross-country trails tying it all together, the park appeals to the complete cross-section of cyclists, says park user and avid cyclist Rod Rysavy. “There are really three types of mountain bike riders — cross-country, free-riding and stunt-riding — and the park has three areas that will meet their needs,” says Rysavy, who owns Savy Cycle in Red Deer. “There’s something for everyone here.” Open to all park users — including those on foot — the Red Deer Mountain Bike Park was developed in 2001 as a space for mountain bikers to enjoy a cross-country trail system. Since then, the park has expanded to include miles of free-ride trails and stunts that will challenge novice and expert riders alike. While some cyclists may feel intimidated by the dirt jumps that can be seen from the 77 Street park entrance, Rysavy promises that “there’s more to the park than what it looks like from the entrances.” Most riders quickly get over their initial apprehension of the park once they see just how user-friendly it is, according to City of Red Deer Parks Superintendent Trevor Poth.

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Fall 2013 • red deer Living  15


outdoors

“For many of the stunts, you can ride them at any speed and be safe and successful on them.” Hidden along Red Deer’s sprawling trail system is a 77acre park that few people seem to know about. But those who have visited Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park all leave saying the same thing: “We’ll be back.” With a free-ride area in the upper forest, a dirt jump area off 77 Street and an intricate section of cross-country trails tying it all together, the park appeals to the complete cross-section of cyclists, says park user and avid cyclist Rod Rysavy. “There are really three types of mountain bike riders — cross-country, free-riding and stunt-riding — and the park has three areas that will meet their needs,” says Rysavy, who owns Savy Cycle in Red Deer. “There’s something for everyone here.” Open to all park users — including those on foot — the Red Deer Mountain Bike Park was developed in 2001 as a space for mountain bikers to enjoy a cross-country trail system. Since then, the park has expanded to include miles of free-ride trails and stunts that will challenge novice and expert riders alike. While some cyclists may feel intimidated by the dirt jumps that can be seen from the 77 Street park entrance, Rysavy promises that “there’s more to the park than what it looks like from the entrances.” Most riders quickly get over their initial apprehension of the park once they see just how user-friendly it is, according to City of Red Deer Parks Superintendent Trevor Poth. Trevor Poth

A view of the stunts at Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park.

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“Certainly, some of the stunts are challenging, but we’ve got areas that are suitable for a wide variety of skill levels,” says Poth, who has been mountain biking for almost 20 years. All of the stunts at the park are rated with stars, much like downhill ski runs. More stars means a more challenging stunt, making it easy for users to decide if their skill level matches that of the trick. “For many of the stunts, you can ride them at any speed and be safe and successful on them,” says Poth. “The park allows for skill progression, but it also offers some great opportunities for multi-generational mountain bike families to enjoy an area of the city that very few people know about.” Because of its appeal to a broad array of riders, the park is constantly evolving to meet the needs of its users.

Safe Cycling at Red Deer’s Mountain Bike Park Riding safely can mean the difference between a good day and a bad day on your bike. Cyclist Rod Rysavy offers up five tips on how to get the most out of your time at the park. • Ride within your limits. “If you’re riding with other people, don’t feel the need to do something you’re not comfortable doing.” • Wear a helmet. “It’s always a good idea to wear a helmet, especially when you’re trying new terrain.” • Ride slowly at first. “Most things are okay to ride slowly. Do one lap slowly, and once you have a feel for the trail, you can go faster.” • Drop your seat. “If you’re in an area where you’re uncomfortable with the skill level, drop your seat as low as it goes. That will make a big difference in the way you can handle your bike.” • Learn a good ready, or attack, position. “A ready position incorporates three things: pedals level with the ground, with your weight on the pedals and you looking forward, not down.”

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Fall 2013 • red deer Living  17


culture

Earthdance Participate in the largest global dance event on the planet

By Jason Brink

M

artha and the Vandellas called it: summer’s here and the time is right for dancin’ in the street. Ross Street, that is. Earthdance Red Deer 2013 is set to go Saturday, September 21 downtown at the Ross Street Patio and Veterans’ Park at 3 p.m. If you’ve never been, you’re in for a unique and inspired experience. Celebrating its seventh year in our city, Earthdance Red Deer is about far more than just dancing, of course, but don’t let that stop you from busting your moves and cutting some concrete once the music starts. As part of the Earthdance Global Peace Party social activism movement that began in the late 1990s, Earthdance represents a world of communities working and playing together to create a culture of peace through music and dance events, synchronized global link-ups and social activism. Last year, the 16th annual Earthdance festival included 63 public events in 24 countries, fuelled by social media activity and countless private events from simple house parties to a three-day music festival in California. Red Deer’s Earthdance will be a fun karmic smoothie — part street party, part open-air yoga studio, infused with healthy doses of entertainment and thoughtful presentations throughout the afternoon.

A

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B According to Lucinda Sheardown, one of the co-chairs of this year’s Earthdance Red Deer celebration, “It’s really about honouring the idea of peace and what that means to people both globally and locally.” Aligned with the UN International Day of Peace on September 21 each year, Earthdance events join in a synchronized global link-up and non-denominational prayer for peace, cued by the playing of the Prayer for Peace music track at exactly the same time at all locations across the globe. Described by Earthdance as a profound moment of shared intention for peace, the simultaneous link-up is an affirmation of peace on all levels — personal, family, community, nations and peace with the Earth itself. “Of course everybody wants peace,” says Sheardown, “but this is a conscious, deliberate opportunity for us to think about it and act on a local level.” The action at Ross Street Patio and Veterans’ Park will kick off with open activities, hula-hooping and art displays at 3 p.m. Then local yoga teacher, Paula King, will lead an open yoga session at 3:30 p.m. (B.Y.O. yoga mat), because what better way to achieve collective SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR


culture

Red Deer E

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harmony and some Seinfeldian “Serenity Now” than by limbering up with a little group yoga before shaking your groove thang? Multicultural dance groups including the Red Deer Aboriginal Dance Troup will perform from 4:15-4:45 p.m., followed by local young singer and “Canada’s Got Talent” alumni, Olivia Smith. Smith will perform an original song she wrote about peace, and community members will deliver a few short speeches about what peace means to them. Jan Underwood, a committee member of Earthdance Red Deer since its inception, will then coordinate the unified prayer for peace on behalf of the Central Alberta Refugee Effort (C.A.R.E.) at 5 p.m. sharp, followed by the mayor’s proclamation of the international day of peace. Immediately afterwards, be ready for an “interactive community dance event” featuring Strive Dance Academy. If the yoga and dancing isn’t necessarily your thing, take some time to check out the various SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

A Earthdance art displays and information kiosks. organizers and Community organizations actively involved in dignitaries. Earthdance Red Deer include the Downtown BusiB Earthdance ness Association, Central Alberta Refugee Effort participant hula(C.A.R.E.), the HUB, the Central Alberta Immigrant hooping. Women’s Association (C.A.I.W.A.), the Freebirds — a C Aboriginal dancers. self advocacy group from COSMOS, Council of Cana- D Polynesian dancers. dians and The City of Red Deer. E Lucinda Sheardown Underwood talks about the beauty of the non-deat Ross Street Patio. Photo by Jason nominational prayer for peace, both in its content Brink. and delivery, spoken by representatives from the F Earthdance girls vast array of cultures in our community, many hula-hooping dressed in their national costumes of origin. “The mayor usually says the first couple of lines and Photos A-D & F then everyone says it in English together, and then courtesy Earthdance they separate and say two lines in English and then Red Deer. repeat it in their own languages,” says Underwood. “The powerful part of the whole experience is that at the same time, with the same music, with the same words, it’s being recited in 60 different countries around the world.” Underwood says the message behind Earthdance fully complements C.A.R.E.’s mission to support the efforts of immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers and participate fully in Canadian life as valued members of the central Alberta community. While Earthdance Red Deer is a completely free public event, every year the committee chooses two charities, one local and one global, for whom they raise money beforehand from fundraising activities, selling buttons and receiving donations or services in kind. “Because this year’s global theme is community,” says Sheardown, “we chose Family Services of Central Alberta as our local charity and Earthdance International as our global charity.” So come out, do a little downward dog, shuffle your feet and show your support for peace and inclusion.  RL Fall 2013 • red deer Living  19


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feature

A small

world Aspen Heights MicroSociety provides real life learning Story and photos by Jock Mackenzie

I

t’s been described by parents as the best program ever. Students say it’s pretty cool: no other school has it. Teachers claim it’s well received, providing focus and motivation for students. The “it” being discussed is Aspen Heights Elementary School’s MicroSociety. The school of 180 students uses cross-graded “ventures” with production days and market days to mirror our modern world. Students from kindergarten to grade five are grouped to become producers, a bank, a police force, a radio station, the postal service, a non-profit organization and, of course, an elected government. For the last four years, the concept has grown under the watchful eye of principal, Peter Lazuk, and all staff; but, three teachers in particular have had a large impact: Milton Williams, Allan Baile and Melisa McIntosh. “’Bringing Real Life to Learning’ is the MicroSociety’s motto,” says teacher Milton Williams, “and Aspen Heights is living proof that real life experiences happen throughout the year.” Using a constitution based on the Canadian constitution and constitutions from other MicroSociety schools, the Aspen Heights model was adopted. The school year begins with the election of a prime minister and members of parliament. There are campaigns with posters

MicroSociety Stingers. SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

and slogans and speeches and a secret ballot. The winner is sworn into office by Provincial Court Judge Mitchell. Students apply for jobs in one of 15 ventures: Penguin Avenue (food vendor), Busy Beavers (woodworking shop), Bank of Aspen, Book Nook, The Buzz (increases awareness of the MicroSociety), Dream Catchers Gift Shop, Helping Hearts, J & A Scrumptious Smoothies and Snacks, Moose on the Loose (General Store), Post Office, RAMP (Royal Aspen Micro Police), The Spa, The Sting (radio station), Warehouse, Wellness Centre and Worm Wranglers. “Each venture is facilitated by a teacher or an educational assistant,” says Vice-Principal Kelley Lund. “Both teachers and students are encouraged to change ventures every so often to keep the experience new and challenging.” Within each venture, there are different jobs. As one example, the Warehouse has a manager, an assistant manager, a bookkeeper, two sales clerks, a promotions/ advertising person and two warehouse workers. The currency is not the dollar or the peso or the euro or the yen — it’s the stinger. Stingers come in one, two, five, 10 and 20 dollar denominations. Workers are paid in stingers, items are bought using stingers and the government charges rent, taxes and GST in stingers. Some young entrepreneurs have even saved up and purchased their own businesses.

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“’Bringing Real Life to Learning’ is the MicroSociety’s motto, and Aspen Heights is living proof that a wide variety of real life experiences happen throughout the year.” Fall 2013 • red deer Living  21


feature A

B

C

D

At the 2013 Micro Awards ceremony held this past June, parents praised the program, and the impact it’s had on their kids. Grade one student, Anelise Misner, joined forces with grade two student, Kaylee Waugh, to purchase the food vending business, Penguin Avenue. After pooling $500, the two young ladies are looking forward to school starting in September so they can prepare and sell grilled cheese sandwiches, hot dogs, popcorn, cookies, fruit and vegetables. Despite being excited about this new beginning, neither of the co-owners plans to stagnate in the same venture. Anelise has her eyes on the Post Office, and Kaylee sees the Wellness Centre as her next challenge. “The MicroSociety within the school is not an island unto itself,” says Allan Baile. “Each venture makes at least one field trip out into the community.” Some have visited the Food Bank to sort food and fill hampers, others toured the Document Centre at Red Deer College to learn about printing and still other venture employees went to Costco, Booster Juice or Parkland Nurseries. The greater community has been equally involved. SponsorE ship from State Farm Insurance, Servus Credit Union, Dow Chemicals, the Red Deer Public School Foundation, Penn West, Walmart South, The City of Red Deer and the Aspen Heights Parent Council make it possible for the students to have job-related T-shirts, to pay for signage, to provide startup costs for the material and food purchases, to buy recycling bins and so on. 22  red deer Living • Fall 2013

As well as providing financial support, the community has also given the students recognition for the great work they are doing. Outgoing grade five student and Prime Minister Jordan Raugust has had the opportunity, along with a number of his MPs, to visit the Mayor, Chamber of Commerce and Rotary clubs and to address the College of Alberta School Superintendents. “When we began the MicroSociety,” says Williams, “I only had one student I could rely on to address outside groups. Now I have the pick of 15 to 20 students.” At the 2013 Micro Awards ceremony held this past June, parents praised the program, and the impact it’s had on their kids. “I’ll never take my son out of here until he graduates,” says Christine Hermes, who has moved across town but still drives her son to Aspen Heights daily. “It’s helped him so much.” The Aspen Heights MicroSociety appears to be making the grade on all levels: the students are engaged, the staff is enthusiastically involved and parents couldn’t be happier.  RL

F

A Student donation to Dream Catchers Charity. B Grade one student, Anelise Misner. C Grade two student, Kaylee Waugh. D Anelise and Kaylee’s new property. E Teacher, Allan Baile. F Teacher, Milton Williams. G Vice Principal, Kelley Lund.

G

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SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

Fall 2013 • red deer Living  23


24  red deer Living • Fall 2013

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community

Urban design, nature’s way

Photo courtesy Rene Michalak

Inspiring a sustainable city through the Centennial Design Charrette By Jennifer Blair Central Alberta’s fertile lands first drew homesteaders like the famous Gaetz family in the late 1800s, turning Red Deer into the area’s economic epicentre and, eventually, the city it is today. And now those same lands may return to their farming roots, thanks to a Centennial Design Charrette led by entrepreneurial incubator ReThink Red Deer. “The J.J. Gaetz farmstead on the north Michener grounds is a really great piece of land that’s not being used to its full potential,” says Rene Michalak, project lead for ReThink Red Deer. “A permaculture plan to develop the location into an urban community farm could both honour the heritage of the site and make this a great community destination where people can connect with where their food comes from.” Permaculture is a form of environmental design that applies examples from nature to human design systems to make them sustainable. In an urban setting, permaculture can help ensure those systems — like food production, water distribution, and even city development planning — make the most of the resources available. “In practicing permaculture, we ask ‘How does nature do it?’” Michalak explains. “Nature basically functions without any interference, and we can use that example in an urban context.”

“Permaculture research institutes are typically located on farms, but we have to remember that cities are just as important...” SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

To help with that, ReThink Red Deer hopes to connect the J.J. Gaetz farmstead and other sites throughout the city through an urban permaculture Rene Michalak. research institute — the Photo by Jennifer Blair first of its kind in the world. “Permaculture research institutes are typically located on farms, but we have to remember that cities are just as important to apply permaculture to.” The institute would allow Red Deer to explore the first steps in retrofitting cities to be sustainable using permaculture design, while playing host to internships, certification programs, speciality workshops and community celebrations. Central Albertans interested in learning more about the project can attend free planning sessions at various heritage locations on September 17, 19, 30, and October 2. Michalak feels that these collaborative sessions — and the project itself — underscore the sense of community involvement and pride that is at the heart of Red Deer’s centennial celebration. “Projects like this connect people to the place that they live,” Michalak says. “Thanks to the Centennial Design Charrette, the J.J. Gaetz farmstead could have Red Deerians looking at the world differently, talking about new ideas and creating a new community space that honours our heritage while building a better future for the city we call home.”  RL

www.reddeer2013.ca or www.rethinkreddeer.ca Fall 2013 • red deer Living  25


| Advertising Feature |

50 West

Intimate dining with an urban chic atmosphere

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icture a Friday night out with your honey or grabbing martinis after work with some girlfriends, and you decide on somewhere new — downtown Red Deer’s hottest new bistro. You walk in the doors and you note the urban chic atmosphere as your eyes fixate on the details of modern lighting and rustic wood floors. Welcome to 50 West. Downtown Red Deer continues to heat up as more and more businesses make the move to a growing market in our city’s core. 50 West, Red Deer’s newest bistro, offers an intimate dining experience with an urban chic atmosphere. Owned by business partners and restaurateurs, Patrick Malkin and Mahziar Peyrow, 50 West is the perfect place for an intimate night out. “We really feel good about what’s happening in Red Deer and the revitalization of the downtown core; a lot of good things are happening there,” says Malkin. With 50 seats, the bistro strongly encourages reservations for

26  red deer Living • Fall 2013

their evening crowd. Hours of operation are from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., serving up quick and fresh bistro lunches, with two dinner seatings per evening. “We have elk on the menu, halibut and are looking at adding alternative meats such as alligator. We’re really supporting farm to table with a large portion of our foods being from Alberta grown sources.” Their 60 bottle wine list, amongst the largest in town, creates yet another reason to explore Red Deer’s downtown for a special night. The lunch menu ranges from $8 to $15, with dinner entrees costing anywhere from $22 to $32. “We really hope to add a lot downtown,” says Malkin. “If you’re looking for a dining experience that is unique, intimate and delicious, then we can wow you.” You can find 50 West on Ross Street in the old Farthing Block. Call 403-352-7712 to make a reservation today!  n

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| Advertising Feature |

Party perfect

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum an ideal location for events

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ith the holiday season not too far off, the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame & Museum is a great option for staff Christmas parties and other festive gatherings. Fun, interactive, and unexpected are just a few words to describe this destination, located on Highway 2. Visitors can stop by and spend a few enjoyable hours touring the facility or book the venue, including the spacious lobby, for parties and other functions. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame & Museum is filled with interactive games, challenges, exhibits and information.

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“This is a unique facility for parties, because it’s so interactive and experiential,” says Donna Hateley, managing director. “People can really customize the type of party they want, from a formal cocktail reception to a supper or birthday or team party. Plus, guests can tour the museum and enjoy games and other challenges — it’s a fun and social environment for a party.” Parties and functions are held in the open lobby, which can be adapted for different types of events. In the privately-owned building, party planners can bring in the caterer of their choice to ensure the food matches the theme of the event as well as their own decorations. “One group even held a Hawaiian-themed Christmas party,” says Hateley. “They brought the decorations and food, and it was a really successful event.” Whether an event is geared toward children, sports teams, corporate receptions or work colleagues, having access to the museum provides additional opportunities for socializing and fun. The exhibits are filled with active challenges and experiences, and staff can provide extra games, such as treasure hunts, trivia and an adaptation of “The Amazing Race,” suited to party-goers of all ages. To learn more about the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame & Museum or to plan your next event, visit www.ashfm.ca.   n

Fall 2013 • red deer Living  27


28  red deer Living • Fall 2013

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| Advertising Feature |

Give what you love

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or some people, finding that perfect gift can be a daunting, intimidating, and often avoided task. It’s places like Hudson Madison that can help make shopping enjoyable. Having served central Alberta for 10 years, home décor and gift store, Hudson Madison, offers a classic downtown boutique experience. Owners, Janell Malkin and Rachael Willie, stay current on trends as they follow designer blogs, attend trade shows and keep their ears attuned to what customers are looking for. “Our designers can work with any style and give you a space that you love. That’s always our goal,” says Janell. As in past years, Christmas will be special at the store. From Frasier Fir, to flocked trees, to the ever-famous Sid Dickens tiles, they can help you adorn your home in magical Christmas simplicity. But this year, Hudson Madison will focus even more on helping you not only love where you live, but give what you love. With extended hours to meet your needs, Hudson Madison will offer “Wish Lists” and gift wrapping to make your shopping easier. Do you love something at the store and want your special someone to know? Just create a wish list and the store will take care of the rest! As you do your Christmas shopping, you may find the season has ‘gone to the animals.’ In style anyway! Shoppers can expect

SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

to see foxes, antlers and deer heads among the many vintage classic elements that are popular right now. When you pull out the Christmas décor and dust off the 11 months of storage, you may find that you want to freshen up your décor, but don’t know where to begin. Hudson Madison’s advice is simple: you may just need a small degree of change. “Sometimes it can be that someone needs a new tree, if it works with their existing décor. Flocked trees (pre-lit) are hugely popular, and we will feature more of those to buy in various sizes. And sometimes it’s swapping out one colour and adding a fresh new colour,” says Janell. “We love simple Christmas trees; sometimes less is more. You can purchase a few special ornaments from our vintage collection, and it could make your tree a little more unique.” For the latest updates on sales, special discounts and events, you can follow Hudson Madison on their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ShopHMHome or find them on Instagram @hmhome. Watch for the annual Christmas event this November, and bring back the delight in giving this Christmas. “At Hudson Madison we always want you to love where you live, and this Christmas season we want you to give what you love.”  n

Fall 2013 • red deer Living  29


a slice of life with Treena Mielke

Fall splendour

Autumn brings new stops on the journey of life

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y day started off almost on time, with the insistent ring of the alarm clock. Breakfast, lunches, homework. Hurry, hurry, hurry! I dropped one of my children’s children off at their school, barely driving away when I noticed the new black backpack and yesterday’s homework still sitting on the seat. I ran into the school, grateful I had found time to slip into jeans and a T-shirt. “Thanks, gram,” said my grandson, his blue eyes already scanning the kids milling about in the hallway, hoping, no doubt, they didn’t notice him talking to his grandmother of all people. It was a day I had not penciled into my planner. But the voice on the phone last night was slightly tinged with hysteria. “My babysitter cancelled, mom. Can you help me out?” “Of course,” I said, mentally canceling planned hair and dentist appointments. “You are awesome,” she said. “I know,” I replied. I sidestep the fluttering leaves, brazenly colored with old gold and burnished tangerine that danced and played across the schoolyard as I made my way back to my car, breathing the fall air deeply into my lungs. It felt good — almost, but not quite as good as it would if I didn’t continue to guiltily enjoy a cigarette or two every evening when the sun goes down, and I convince myself no one sees. But still, even without breathing in really, really deeply, I just knew the air was all crisp and clean. It reminded me of the way the sheets on grandma’s clothesline smelled, so good you wanted to bundle them up in your arms and just bury your face in their heady freshness. I drive home through the familiar streets, noting how quickly the season of summer has given way to fall. I’m sure it was only yesterday when green leaves, shyly playing peek-a-boo with each other, were wreaking havoc with cell phone coverage and hiding the magic oasis we fondly refer to as ‘the lake’ from view. Today, the trees have turned into a kaleidoscope of oranges and yellows and tangerines, turning slowly, as if directed by some unseen giant hand that will soon ruthlessly shake them all to the ground. Only the sky overhead remains unchanged: a clear, unblemished blue, broken only slightly by a few delicate

30  red deer Living • Fall 2013

puffs of white, spilling out randomly like marshmallows that have somehow escaped from their cellophane prison. I walk into the house to be greeted by the sounds of silence, broken only by the ominous ticking of the clock in the hallway. But, I only had time to form the thought of liking the silence when the phone rings. “Grandma, I forgot my gym shoes, you know those ones that look like they aren’t a pair, but really they are. And my gym clothes. Can I skip gym then? Will you come and get me, and we can hang out at the mall or something? I won’t tell mom if you don’t.” I have to admit I was tempted. For one thing, they have those melt-in-your-mouth delicious cinnamon buns at the mall. For some reason, and not really a sensible reason, it seems perfectly acceptable to eat one of these when I am with my grandchildren, but not so much so when I am surrounded by other mature ladies such as myself. “No,” I said. “Absolutely not. I will bring you your gym things. We can go to the mall later,” I add, not willing to entirely let go of the thought of those melt-inyour-mouth delicious cinnamon buns. They say life is a journey. I’ve heard it likened to a train ride through an ever-changing terrain. Sometimes the terrain is stark and bleak and sometimes, if we are very lucky, we pass through a kaleidoscope of beauty and are given simple, little pleasures that bring unexpected joy. Pleasures like achingly beautiful fall days, and grandchildren who remind you to savour the moment, smell the roses and, most importantly, taste the cinnamon buns.  RL

SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR


SOURCE MEDIA GROUP: CELEBRATING ITS 10TH YEAR

Fall 2013 • red deer Living  31


Red Deer Living Fall 2013  
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