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COntents FebrUARY 2014 | VOLUME 10 ISSUE 170

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Focus On 12 | Wake up! Alarm clocks help jump start your day Condo Profiles 20 | Straight ‘A’s Carlisle hits another home run with Albert Park Station 26 | Aspen gem Valmont at Aspen Stone offers choice west location 32 | Downtown tranquility The Park boasts of central Beltline location and peaceful surroundings 37 | Excellence and opulence A tale of two developments in Quarry Park 43 | Competitive advantage Copperfield Park II stands out from the condo crowd Community profiles 49 | Lake appeal 2014 looks to be an even bigger year for Mahogany

Cover Feature 14 | Village Verve Verve spearheads FRAM Slokker’s Calgary push in 2o14 CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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COntents Lifestyle 55 | Urban haven Suburbanite finds the joys in converting to the condo lifestyle

ITEMS 10 | Editor’s Message 98 | Maps 104 | Ad Index

features 61 | The right match Tommy Smythe works magic using old and new design elements 67 | Redefining monochromatic Finding inspiration in single-colour design

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77 | Ships Ahoy Cruise ship condos cater to select clientele 82 | Wintry respite Even in the coldest months, there’s plenty to do in the inner-city

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106 | Tales from the condo zone The poop detectives shopping 72 | Comfy much? Bed sheets and covers are everyday essentials, here’s how to choose the best Columns 87 | ACOA Owners’ Corner by Bernice M. Winter 89 | Condoscapes by Richard White 91 | Ask Maria by Maria Bartolotti 93 | Hope at Large by Marty Hope 95 | Around Town by Pepper Rodriguez

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EDITOR’S MESSAGE |  PUBLISHER

Cool runnings

By the time some of you read this, the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi may be well underway, and everyone will be anxious to see how our athletes will do against the world’s best. Everything else takes a backseat in those two weeks — especially when Team Canada’s all-star hockey team takes the ice. But we believe we’ve assembled our own stellar line-up of condo profiles and features in this issue that will be contenders in any competition. First off, let’s talk about Jim Zang’s in-depth piece on the emerging market for cruise ship condos. Buy a home and see the world, all in one fell swoop, that is if you have the dough (not to mention the time), but I’m sure Calgary’s high-rollers in the oil and gas field will have no problem with the concept, which is next logical step-up from the (multi-) milliondollar home. Then we have Elizabeth Booth’s examination of what to do in the inner-city during the winter months. Turns out — a lot. It’s a very informative piece that we thought would be appreciated by those new to Calgary (which many of our readers are) and gives them a hand in finding their way around their new environment. We’ll be re-visiting the theme throughout the year with more features in the same vein. We also got to talk to emerging HGTV design star Tommy Smythe, the headliner at this year’s Home + Garden Show at the BMO Centre. You are all encouraged to check out the show to hear his latest design tips Next month: and see all the amazing new trends on the home front. Watch for our Of course, our ever-growing line-up of condo profiles takes a cover feature on backset to no one, and we’ve assembled some of the city’s best Stonecroft. this month, starting with the spectacular Verve by FRAM Slokker in East Village that will wow with its sleek contemporary design that you can see in their new show suite. There’s Albert Park Station by Carlisle Group that makes the most of its central location with condos under $200,000 so near the downtown. Valmont at Aspen Stone is in the sought-after west-end of Calgary and offers a tranquil and conveniently located (not to mention, stylish) condos. Remington Developments offers two of the most distinguished condos in Quarry Park with The Gates and Champagne that nicely fits the mid- to high-range sector of the market. Then there’s Copperfield Park II in the southeast that has greatly benefitted from the opening of the Stoney Trail extension, as they continue to make waves with their line of “love it, live it, afford it” condos. And finally, the aptly-named The Park that’s sandwiched by two historic parks in the Beltline. Condo starts are expected to rise in 2014, which bodes well for the buyers, but there is the nagging question of the increasing lack of serviced land in Calgary’s suburbs that may present some problems ahead. But you can be sure that it’s something Condo Living will be keeping an eye on in the year ahead.

Source Media Group info@sourcemediagroup.ca ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jim Zang jim.zang@sourcemediagroup.ca Editor

Pepper Rodriguez pepper.rodriguez@sourcemediagroup.ca ART director

Jean Faye Rodriguez jean.rodriguez@sourcemediagroup.ca graphic designers

Lama Azhari lama.azhari@sourcemediagroup.ca Dave Macaulay dave.macaulay@sourcemediagroup.ca Megan Sereda megan.sereda@sourcemediagroup.ca PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR

Colleen Leier colleen.leier@sourcemediagroup.ca EDITORIAL

Maria Bartolotti, Elizabeth Booth, Karen Durrie, Aaliya Essa, Marty Hope, Paige Johnston, Kathy McCormick, Jennifer Seamone, Janine Workman, Richard White, Jim Zang Photography

Don Molyneaux, Janine Workman ADVERTISING SALES

Al Donegan al.donegan@sourcemediagroup.ca accounting

Donna Roberts accounting@sourcemediagroup.ca DISTRIBUTED BY

Gallant Distribution Services, Media Classified, Source Media Group Issue 170 • ISSN 1918-4409 ©Source Media Group Corp. Material cannot be reprinted in whole or in part without the expressed written permission of the publishers. Source Media Group agrees to advertise on behalf of the advertiser without responsibility for claims or misinformation made by the advertiser and acts only as an advertising medium. Source Media Group reserves the right to refuse any advertising at its sole discretion. Condo Living® is published 12 times per annum with copies available for distribution at more than 1,500 locations every month. Condo Living® accepts editorial submissions by electronic mail only. Please forward any submissions including all personal information to: cleditor@sourcemediagroup.ca. Unsolicited submissions will not be returned. Advertising information available only by request. Condo Living® is a registered Trademark the property of Source Media Group Corp. Reg. USPTO 3,584,683 & 3,584,583. Contact: Source Media Group Corp., 207, 5809 Macleod Trail S.W. Calgary, Alberta T2H 0J9; Tel 403.532.3101 Toll free 1.888.932.3101; www.sourcemediagroup.ca

@CondoLivingYYC

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FOCUS ON | 

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Wake up! Alarm clocks help jump start your day

By Aaliya Essa

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What did people do before alarm clocks? Roosters must have played a major role back then, but not anymore. Nowadays, the basic tool to help up rise in the morning is so much more than just that. Alarm clocks come with so many new features, attachments, colours, shapes, and styles. The varieties are endless for matching with the décor of your home and, of course, your preference. It’s just a matter of choosing the one that suits you. CL

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1 Oregon Scientific Radio Controlled Projection alarm clock with temperature display, $79.99 at The Home Depot. 2 Sony iPod clock radio, $89.97 at Future Shop. iPhone not included. 3 Angry Birds twin bell alarm clock, $17.96 at Walmart. 4 Spiderman bank alarm clock, $19.96 at Walmart. 5 Twin bell alarm clock, $32.95 at Pier1 imports. 6 iCraig dual alarm clock radio, $58.83 at Walmart. iPhone not included. 7 Retro iCraig alarm clock radio, $39.83 at Walmart. iPhone not included. 8 iHome Bluetooth clock radio, $69.99 at Future Shop. 9 Sangean AM/FM Atomic clock radio, $64.98 at Future Shop. CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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| Advertising cover Feature |

Village

V er v e

Verve spearheads FRAM Slokker’s Calgary push in 2014

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he promise of a refined contemporary lifestyle is what buyers can look forward to with Verve’s stylish and functional design, but it is the vast potential for a fulfilling life in East Village that everyone is excited for. Verve’s developer, FRAM Slokker, is one of the major players in the rejuvenation of East Village. Its several projects here promise to bring a new sense of international sophistication in the city’s multi-family development market that speaks to the city’s image as western Canada’s economic powerhouse. It’s initial development — FIRST — has done just that and has been extremely successful with almost 85 per cent of homes already sold and construction well underway. Verve is expected to be even better, and FRAM Slokker has brought on the veteran interior design firm of Cecconi Simone Inc. to bring their vision to life. “We’re very excited to introduce Anna Simone and Elaine Cecconi as interior designers and spacemakers for Verve,” says Fred Serrafero, FRAM Slokker vice-president for development and construction. The pair has worked in the residential, retail,


corporate and hospitality sectors from Canada and the U.S. to Anguilla, Europe, the United Arab Emirates, India and China. For Verve, the designers didn’t have to look far for their inspiration. “The interior design for Verve draws inspiration from East Village itself and its emerging potential as Calgary’s progressive, urban epicentre, steeped in the city’s industrial past while connected to the local, renewed, natural landscape,” says Doug Convoy of Cecconi Simone Inc. Simone herself says she sees Calgary as a “city that’s coming of age, actively innovating in many fields,” and the firm has responded to Calgarians’ love of the outdoors, balconies and views in Verve. Convoy tells Condo Living that the most distinctive aspect of the suites at Verve is that they “maximize the living experience of homeowners, creating a personalized and customized environment” that meets all their needs. “The suites are crafted with strong attention to views, right through to the exterior beyond, with doors kept away from principal sightlines wherever possible. An open-concept live–cook– dine area offers maximum flexibility and maintains the kitchen as the hub of the home.”

Verve’s newly opened show suite in the East Village Experience Centre succeeds in delivering this message of high style and perfectly functional space. “We’ve renovated our FIRST show suite at the Experience Centre to show a 670-square-foot Verve one-bedroom-plus-den suite, which we think will be a very popular choice,” Serrafero says. Verve sales manager Sandra Peters says it’s easy to picture yourself living in the suite’s elegantly modern environment that boasts a sleek, chic urban feel in line with today’s modern lifestyle and the youthful, vibrant energy of the city. “It is designed for modern life, an open concept that uses every inch of space with the convenience of the resident(s) in mind,” Peters says. Convoy says they are proud of the show suite’s custom, backlit wall of millwork, spanning the full length of the open-concept space, interrupted only by the kitchen in the centre. Most of what you see in the show suite are standard features in Verve, including the sturdy and stylish Corian countertops, European-style, Cecconi Simone-designed custom cabinetry and island encompassing storage, display, preparation and dining areas. Pre-finished, European, engineered-laminate flooring blend well with the flat-slab swing doors and sliding doors to bedrooms and closets, achieving a smooth, flawless look.

“It is designed for modern life, an open concept that uses every inch of space with the convenience of resident(s) in mind.”

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| Advertising cover Feature |

“The riff will have a very European sense of style...It will be a big part of life and culture in East Village, and verve will be at the very heart of it.”

Verve will have 195 homes in one-bedrooms, one-bedroom-plus-den, two-bedrooms, and two-bedrooms-plus-den configurations. Suites will range in size from 500 to 1,600 square-feet. Hardwood flooring, tall ceilings and windows, and gleaming countertops plus the latest appliances create a stylishly well-designed abode. Prices start in the mid $200,000s. “Verve will also have an amenity space on the sixth floor, lounge, party room and a spacious terrace, residents and their guests also get to enjoy a rooftop terrace that offers terrific views of the city and the mountains,” Serrafero says. The modern elegance of Verve’s suites still is just the cherry on top of the exciting, convenient and vibrant lifestyle that awaits you in East Village, and the development’s location is at the very heart of the action. The 25-storey, mixed-use tower with retail stores at the base will go up along The Riff walkway — a unique, European-inspired pedestrian-friendly street that runs diagonally across East Village’s square street grid at a 45-degree angle. “The Riff will have a very European sense of style, it will be like what you see in London’s Soho or Belgravia, with unique shops and restaurants. It will be a big part of life and culture in East Village, and Verve will be at the very heart of it,” says Serrafero. East Village is indeed Calgary’s most ambitious land development plan in recent years and FRAM Slokker is a major partner in the revitalization of this historic community. The Ontario-based developer signed a $300 million land development deal with Calgary Municipal Land Corp. (CMLC) that will see them build approximately 600,000 square feet of mixed-use, multi-family development within the 49-acre master planned community.  n

Fa s t Fa c t s Community: East Village Project: Verve Developer: FRAM Slokker Style:

Apartment style condos, and live-work suites

Size:

From 500 sq. ft.

Price:

In the mid $200,000s

Sales Centre: East Village Experience Centre, 553 Riverfront Ave. S.E. Hours:

Monday to Thursday noon to 6 p.m., weekends noon to 5 p.m., closed Fridays

Website:

www.thenewcalgary.com


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CONDO PROFILE | 

Straight A ‘ ’s

“Our development will spark a rejuvenation of this neighbourhood, as it is bringing a new sense of youthful energy and vigour to the area.” 20 |

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Carlisle hits another home run with Albert Park Station By Pepper Rodriguez

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hen you’re looking for your first home, you always look for the three ‘A’s. That is that the home is accessible, amenable and affordable. And when you’re on a tight budget, it helps when you get all three, but that seldom

ever happens. Carlisle Group’s Albert Park Station is a dream come true for many first time homebuyers, because not only do you get all of the three ‘A’s — you also get to live in a mature neighbourhood on the cusp of a rebirth, says Albert Park Station sales representative, John O’Connor. “Albert Park Station has it all — a central location that makes it accessible to all parts of the city, a stylish contemporary design that is amenable to all lifestyles, and the most affordable multi-family home you’ll find this close to the downtown,” he says. Located in the well-established neighbourhood of Radisson Heights/ Albert Park, Albert Park Station is within walking distance to both the Max Bell and Franklin C-Train stations. It’s also just a five-minute drive to downtown, and has unbeatable accessibility, as it is surrounded by many of the city’s major thoroughfares like Deerfoot Trail, Memorial Drive and Barlow Trail. “We have the best location for a new multi-family project in the under $300,000 price range, in fact most of our homes are under $250,000,” O’Connor says. “It’s perfect for those who work at the airport, in the surrounding business parks, and you wouldn’t even need a car if you worked downtown,” he says. All kinds of amenities surround Albert Park Station, there are grocery stores, restaurants and shopping centres all along nearby International Avenue (17th Avenue S.E.), and schools and places of worship are all within walking distance. The beauty of this location is it doesn’t lose its suburban feel with lots of green space filled with mature trees, parks and pathways surrounding the development. “I believe that our development will spark a rejuvenation of this neighbourhood, as it is bringing a new sense of youthful energy and vigour to the area,” O’Connor says. Albert Park Station consists of 271 two- and three-bedroom suites spread across five buildings between 12 and 14 Avenues at 27 Street S.E., on the site of a former public school in Albert Park/ Radisson Heights.

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CONDO PROFILE | 

Carlisle keeps the amenities to a minimum which allows them to keep condo fees among the lowest in the city. “Of the four buildings that have so far been released, we are 80 per cent sold out, and construction is underway. We are releasing our fifth and final building for sale on February 22, 2014,” he adds. Two-bedroom units start in the $150,000s plus GST, penthouse suites in the $240,000s plus GST. There are several different floor plans ranging from 615 to 1,240 square-feet. Some three-bedroom units with optional dens are also available. Each three and four-story, wood-frame building at Albert Park Station has a slightly different layout. Some have setback units on the fourth floor, personal patios, and balconies. Additionally, many have mountain views or city views. The complex also offers heated underground parking with keyless entry. Hardie board siding is used for the exteriors for a sturdy and stylish look accented by generous amounts of designer stone. Flat rooflines add to its modern look. “Hardie boards are sturdier and are fire-resistant not to mention more stylish, which gives our development a more lasting finish,” O’Connor says.

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Albert Park Station’s contemporary feel extends indoors. All units can upgrade to have granite countertops throughout for only $795. All units come with five appliances standard. Carlisle keeps the amenities to a minimum which allows them to keep condo fees among the lowest in the city. Owners will pay between 35 and 40 cents per square-foot in condo fees, or about $300 a month for a 750-squarefoot unit. With more than 30 years of experience in the real estate business, Carlisle Group has rolled out nearly a dozen new projects in the past year in Alberta. CL

FA S T FAC TS Community: Albert Park/Radisson Heights Project: Albert Park Station Developer: Carlisle Group Style: Apartment-style condos Size: Starts at 615 sq. ft. Price: Two-bedroom units starting in the $150,000s Sales Centre: 325 3rd Street S.E (off Riverfront Ave, across from Bookers) Hours: Monday to Friday noon to 6 p.m., weekends noon to 5 p.m. Website: www.albertparkstation.ca


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ASpeN Gem


| condo ProFile

valmont at aspen stone offers choice west location

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ooking like it should be nestled in the woods of the Rocky Mountains, Valmont at Aspen Stone, by Riverbend Developments, offers a beautiful balance of natural beauty and city life, in the prestigious west-end community of Aspen Stone. “It almost feels like you are in Canmore or Banff, there are so many trees,” says Christina McDiarmid, who recently purchased a home here with her boyfriend, Jay. McDiarmid is a pharmaceutical rep who currently rents in Killarney. She had her heart set on the community of Aspen for her first home because of its ideal location and pristine natural surroundings. “Whether it is day or night, winter or summer, that area is gorgeous,” she says. Located on the corner of 17th Avenue and 85 Street S.W., Valmont at Aspen Stone is an easy 15-minute commute to the downtown core or a quick drive out of town to Bragg Creek or Kananaskis country. “We love the location in Aspen. There was no question we wanted it to be our first home,” says McDiarmid, who expects to take possession early this spring. Surrounded by a preserved Aspen tree forest, Valmont at Aspen Stone pays homage to its surroundings with a Craftsman and Mountain exterior, featuring pitch gable roof lines, natural-toned siding and Colorado stone accents.

StOrY ANd PhOtOS bY jANINe WOrkMAN

The apartment-style condominium development accommodates 247 homes in four four-storey buildings, with prices ranging from $249,900 to $519,000. Homes start at 605 square-feet and grow to 1,375 square-feet. Eight floor plans feature open and spacious layouts with one-bedroom homes, two-bedroom with den homes and three-bedroom, loft-style homes. Options for dual master bedrooms are available and all homes come with one or two outdoor patio spaces. Called the plan B1 model, with two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a southwest facing view, McDiarmid’s 920 square-foot, third-storey home is exactly what she was looking for. “It has a beautiful view,” she says of her patio, which looks out over a forested area. “I love the layout,” McDiarmid says. “It is incredibly open, which I love, and you have your living room right beside the kitchen with an incredible amount of storage.” She says she is considering using her second bedroom as her athome office. Once she chose her floor plan, McDiarmid got right down to business Christina Mcdiarmid of picking her interior décor colours. With four colour packages to choose from, she chose a darker palate, with contrasting beige granite counter tops. “I love that it was brand new and we got to pick out our colour scheme,” says McDiarmid. “I think it’s just really exciting to be able to plan your condo from scratch.” Interiors at Valmont all feature chic, modern designs, with luxurious standards such as granite or quartz counter tops, sleek ceramic tile backsplash, maple cabinetry, vessel sinks and large, bright windows.

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“there is almost a perfect balance, with the proximity to the downtown core and the quiet of a more remote neighbourhood.”

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condo ProFile | 

Floors are a hardwood-style laminate on cork and rectangular ceramic tile, both with in-floor heating. “There is very little to upgrade, we have a wonderful standard package,” says Tom Reisinger, owner of Riverbend Developments. The Saskatchewan-based firm took over Valmont at Aspen Stone from Today’s Communities. Reisinger says visitors to the newly opened show suite have been impressed with the high-specification of standards and amenities the development offers. “There are enough choices that it could be fairly said that, while they are not custom homes, we are really giving people the opportunity to put their own thumbprint on their home,” Reisinger says. Also coming to Valmont will be rent-able guest suites. Available on a reservation basis, these suites are the perfect answer to out-of-town guests. An exercise room will also be available for residents’ use and parking will be underground in a heated parkade, with extra spots available for purchase. Grounds around the building will add to the natural beauty of the site, with meandering pathways throughout tall, original-growth trees and around a large pond, which sits to the east of the development, offering the perfect place for an evening stroll. “We are leaving every tree in place we possibly can and we are planting besides,” says Reisinger. “We see this site as kind of a special site. There is almost a perfect balance, with the proximity to the downtown core and the quiet of a more remote neighbourhood.” And, while Valmont may be in it’s own secluded spot, it also sits kitty-corner to the Aspen Landing Shopping Centre, which hosts most amenities you would need, including banks, restaurants, shops and a grocery store. It even has an organic market and a bakery to pick up fresh bread. A three-minute walk to the new leg of the LRT line, this condominium development is truly connected. “It’s just a fabulous location,” Reisinger says. CL

FA S t FAC tS COMMMUNItY: aspen stone PrOjeCt: valmont at aspen stone deVeLOPer: riverbend developments StYLe: single-level apartment style suites SIze: one-bedrooms from 605 sq. ft., and two-bedrooms from 920 sq. ft. PrICe: starts from $249,900 AddreSS: 45 aspenmont heights s.W. hOUrS: monday to Wednesday 2 - 7 p.m., saturday and sunday 12 - 5 p.m. dIreCtIONS: West on 17th ave s.W. north on 85th st. and follow the signs. WebSIte: www.valmontcondos.ca

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CONDO PROFILE | 

Downtown tranquility The Park boasts of central Beltline location and peaceful surroundings

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By Jennifer Seamone


| CONDO PROFILE

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ith one foot firmly in history and the other striding into the future, The Park condominium by Lake Placid Developments in the Beltline is an exemplary example of traditional and modern merging seamlessly into one. Overlooking beautifully restored Central Memorial Park to the west, historic Haultain School Park to the east, and alongside the nearly completed City of Calgary 13th Avenue Greenway, The Park offers tranquil surroundings, beautiful views, and all the advantages of downtown living in walking distance. “Being next to two historic parks and located in the heart of Calgary, purchasers have access to everything Calgary has to offer,” says Sales and Marketing Manager for The Park, Richard Lobsinger. “It is considered one of the most desirable locations in the Beltline.” Surrounded by restaurants, cafés and shops in every direction, from Mission’s 4th Street to uptown 17th Avenue shopping and entertainment, not to mention the rest of the downtown core and Stampede grounds, they’re all within easy walking distance.

There’s even the added peace of mind of having the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre at the corner of 12th Avenue and 4th Street S.W. at your doorstep. Life offers an abundance of choice and convenience at The Park. “People who have written off condos are coming back because this project has a lot of suburban amenities such as medical services and groceries nearby,” explains Lobsinger. “The project has attracted lawyers, business professionals and doctors that work in the core; oil and gas professionals; as well as empty nesters that are downsizing out of Mount Royal, Rideau and Elbow Park.” A quiet day or evening in the luxurious surroundings of each open-concept home in The Park is the perfect time to enjoy the upscale modern interiors, featuring euro-styled fixtures and cabinetry, tiled floors, glass mosaic accents, nine-foot ceilings and many floor-to-ceiling windows. Lake Placid recently celebrated the topping off event for The Park, a milestone made even more significant by the fact that they have hit 80 per cent sales in the 18-storey building.

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CONDO PROFILE | 

The Park, on the corner of 13th Avenue and 2nd Street S.W., is modern yet understated in design and features 156 suites with 37 unique home plans. The project includes single level tower homes and townhomes with spacious penthouses located on the upper floors as the building gently terraces upwards. Home sizes range from 700 to 2,200 square-feet, each featuring a generous balcony or patio sized from 150 to 500 square-feet. It will be completed by next winter. “The Park’s timeless architecture and intricate design means our building is not just another high-rise box,” says Lobsinger. Adding to the architectural interest and forward thinking of its design, the building features living green terraces. All along the second level and from the 14th to 18th floors, large green landscaped terraces offer interest, a system of storm water drainage and retention, and a continuation of the surrounding park land. If a picnic or walk in the surrounding parks is not in the plans, there is a variety of amenities within the complex to keep one busy. A private gym with his-and-hers change rooms is located on the main floor of the building. As each home is purchased, the sales team asks for equipment suggestions to help customize the space. On the third floor is a 1,100-square-foot residents’ social area with a bar and seating for casual gatherings or private bookings. Adjacent to the lounge is a 2,000-square-foot patio featuring pergolas, modern outdoor furniture, a gas fireplace and barbeques. If you have guests coming from out of town, The Park has an easy solution to keep everyone comfortable. A one-bedroom guest condo, with full kitchen, can be booked for visitors. This way, everyone can enjoy the incredible location to the fullest, explains Lobsinger.

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Enhancing the functionality, each home includes one titled, heated, underground parking stall, while 16 guest parking spots means entertaining is a breeze. A large storage area per home, a separate bike room, and being pet friendly to a maximum of 30 pounds, make life in the inner city inherently agreeable. A large sales centre is currently located at 300A 17th Avenue S.W. Opening in April 2014, a new sales centre will be located in the actual building at 13th Avenue and 2nd St S.W. Featuring a full show suite, current and prospective homeowners will have a real taste of life in Live on The Park; which should be move-in ready by early 2015. The Park offers its residents the best of all worlds; a quieter, simpler time, or the vibrant life in Calgary’s inner core. No matter what the choice, The Park has everything one could want, inside and outside its elegant front doors. CL

F as t F ac t s Commmunity: Victoria Park Developer: The Park DEVELOPER: Lake Placid Group of Companies STYLE: 18-storey tower with townhomes, condos and penthouses SIZE: From 700-2,200 sq. ft. PRICE: Starting from $399,000 for a two-bedroom, two-bath suite Address: Corner of 13th Ave and 2nd St S.W. Sales Centre: 300A 17 Ave S.W. Hours: Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 7 days a week Website: www.liveonthepark.com


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| CONDO PROFILE

Excellence and opulence

A tale of two developments in Quarry Park By Pepper Rodriguez

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uarry Park is fast fulfilling its vision as a completely self-sufficient minicity of its own, where residents can live, work and play within its confines. A social and commercial hub has emerged in The Market at Quarry Park, even as more and more employers start putting down roots in this 385-acre southeast neighbourhood, making it the ideal modern community. Quarry Park’s developer, Remington Developments, has done a masterful job in not just creating a community to suit a modern lifestyle, but in offering two multi-family developments that personify the genteel sensibilities of the community. Their Champagne and The Gates projects are aimed at the mid- to high-range markets and have both been big hits for Remington. “Response to both developments has been phenomenal,” says Remington Residential Sales Manager Julie Seidel.

She says they ended 2013 with their biggest sales month to date for Champagne with sold homes ranging from $350,000 to over $1.5 million. The Gates is just as noteworthy with lots of interest and already a handful of conditional sales for the 32-unit, three-storey boutique project that is ready to officially launch this spring. “There’s a lot of interest for The Gates, which is filling a demand for mid-range homes in Quarry Park.” Seidel says they are seeing plenty of demand for both developments from young professionals, working couples and empty-nesters – many of whom work for the companies that are moving their head offices to Quarry Park — including Imperial Oil. “The downsizer market is also playing a significant role,” she adds. There’s a bit of urgency in the demand, pushed by corporate interest — firms rushing to arrange housing for visiting executives and employees. “A lot of buyers who were planning to buy their downsizer home here after they retire, are moving up their plans to buy now so they can secure their dream home before it’s too late.” Champagne is a 177-unit, five-building complex with exquisite upscale refinements and a charming French countryside-inspired architecture that blends well with its riverside location. Building 1 is fully occupied while construction is well underway for the next three buildings. Building 4

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CONDO PROFILE |  The Gates

The Gates

Champagne

was just released last month and a few two-bedroom suites remain in the Building 2 for immediate occupancy. The Gates is a 32-unit, three-storey boutique project designed to take advantage of the grandeur of the community’s abundant natural surroundings while providing buyers with the space and style absent in most downtown condos. Champagne sits by the banks of the Bow River and The Gates is close by overlooking a green belt and the river. Residents in both developments still enjoy 92 acres of park space right at their very doorstep including miles of walking paths and bike trails that lead to the river’s edge and beyond. But even if Quarry Park feels like a world apart from

Champagne is impressive both in and out; it’s impeccable “penthouse specifications” finish brings a high standard in its interior design. 38 |

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| CONDO PROFILE Champagne

the city’s bustle, it is only 15 minutes to downtown and its proximity to Deerfoot Trail and Glenmore Trail make it splendidly accessible to virtually any part of town. “Quarry Park is a perfect example of creativity and innovation with a host of amenities within the community including restaurants, Coop, banks and other services,” Seidel says. Any worries about living this close to the river are immediately put to rest, as Quarry Park was unaffected by the historic June 2013 floods. Remington Developments’ flood mitigation design — that includes insulated, reinforced and landscaped rip rap berm built one metre above one-in-100 year flood level — worked to perfection, leaving Champagne, The Gates and the rest of Quarry Park untouched by the rushing waters. Champagne is impressive both in and out; it’s impeccable “penthouse specifications” finish brings a high standard in its interior design. The use of insulated pre-cast concrete for the buildings not only cancels out most sound transfer in each unit, but provides for a better retention of indoor temperatures and a sturdy, virtually fireproof material. The Gates offers buyers numerous exclusive advantages: spacious floor plans; outstanding value and class-leading quality; designer finishings; underground parking; and generous landscaping in a park-like setting. Available are 770-square-foot one-bedroom plus den starting from the $290,000s. There are also two- and three-bedroom units (starting from 1,020 to 1,315 square-feet) from the $360,000’s. Champagne offers one-bedroom units from 910 square-feet, and two-bedrooms from 1,220 square-feet. Price for a one-bedroom starts in the $350,000’s, while two-bedrooms are from $525,000. Quarry Park has quickly become a prestigious, exclusive village for

a very discerning market where there is something to cater to everyone’s taste and lifestyle. From high-end single family manor homes to elegant boulevard townhomes, the addition of Champagne’s luxury river-front residences and The Gates offer something special to the market.  This community is truly one-of-a-kind as distinguished refinement meets urban convenience.  CL

FAST FACTS Community: Quarry Park Project: Champagne and The Gates Developer: Remington Development Corporation Style: Champagne – luxury river-front, pre-cast concrete condos The Gates – boutique one-, two- and three-bedroom apartment style condos Size: Champagne starts at 910 sq. ft; The Gates start at 770 sq. ft. Price: Champagne starts in the $350,000s, The Gates are from the $290,000s Sales Centre: 350 Quarry Park Boulevard S.E. Directions: Head east on Glenmore Trail from Deerfoot Trail and exit on 18th St. S.E. and follow signs Hours: Monday to Thursday – noon to 8 p.m., Friday – Closed, Saturday and Sunday – noon to 5 p.m. Website: www.remingtoncorp.com CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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Competitive advantage Copperfield Park II stands out from the condo crowd By Aaliya Essa

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ith the local condo market stronger than ever, Brad Remington Homes continues to build on their competitive advantage by crafting excellent homes for their buyers in Copperfield Park II. In fact, as demand for affordable housing in Calgary has increased, so has their commitment to providing a variety of affordable lifestyle options. A big part of the plan is their not-so-secret recipe for success; the “Love it, Live it, Afford it” mantra hits the nail right on the head, and it’s the buyers who are the ones gladly reaping the rewards. “It’s this philosophy of designing top-quality homes to suit a variety of lifestyles, and keeping it at an affordable price, that is behind this tremendous success,” says Bryan Logel, VP of Sales and Marking. And, while the price on its own is extremely attractive, Copperfield Park II also stands out from the condo crowd by offering buyers multiple layout options to choose from, making the community a great potential home for any buyer.

While Copperfield Park I was a big success in its own right, Remington Homes has nonetheless made a few adjustments based on experience and buyer feedback. “We now have three one-bedroom designs, one two-bedroom one-bathroom plan, three two-bedroom two-bathroom floor plans, and one three-bedroom model available,” says Logel. The A-Plan includes two-bedrooms and two-bathrooms and, at 973 square-feet, is the largest of the three two-bedroom floor plans available. Prices for this model start in the low $200,000s, plus GST. “We added some more square footage to our A-Plan,” says Logel, “making the second bedroom larger and improving the storage space,” he says. The other two-bedroom two-bathroom layouts start at 794 square-feet, and are also priced from the low $200,000s, plus GST.

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There is also a two-bedroom one-bathroom plan available that measures a spacious 767 square-feet, and starts from around $190,000, plus GST. The new one-bedroom one-bathroom layout, referred to as the micro-suite, is a first-time homebuyer’s dream. The F-Plan is 525 squarefeet in size, and starts from the $120,000s plus GST. Yes, you read that right, $120,000! “It really is amazing what we can do with 525 square-feet when every square-foot is accounted for and maximized”, Logel says. The other one-bedroom plans range up to 650 square-feet, with four variations on the basic layout, and are priced to start at around $130,000, plus GST. Last, but certainly not least, there is one three-bedroom two-bathroom layout that checks in at a healthy 860 square-feet and also starts in the low $200,000s, plus GST. Each suite includes a private patio area that, depending on which side of the building it’s on, will have views of either the mountains or the green space located alongside the building. There is also a convenient in-suite washer/dryer, and a titled parking space either underground or on the surface.

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With a grand total of 12 unique layouts to choose from, the abundance of selection is an integral component to what Copperfield Park II has to offer. Variety is the spice of life, after all, and it allows for buyers who may not have had the opportunity to be homeowners in the past to take advantage — there’s that word again — of being able to step into the market and purchase a home that meets both their lifestyle needs and their budget. It should come as no surprise, then, that both Copperfield Park I and II have been popular with a wide spectrum of buyers; from first time homebuyers and single professionals, to young families, and empty nesters too. Or that sales are steady — at present Copperfield Park II is already 50 per cent sold. Outside, the building itself boasts bright colours and is designed specifically with durability and combating Calgary’s notoriously fickle weather conditions in mind. “Creating high quality affordable homes is Brad Remington’s principle mission statement,” says Logel.  “Brad has chosen materials


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“People just fall in love with the show suites that we have right now… They really set an emotional tone in presenting what life can be like here.” and building techniques that will ensure a product that will look great and stand the test of time in our environment. This entails a water prevention building envelope and Super Seal waterproofing wrap that eliminates the chance of moisture getting into the homes and foundation, plus R5-rated Super E windows that will maintain room temperatures whatever the weather outside.” The goal is to have the best of both worlds: a stylish, functional, interior and an attractive, durable exterior — all located in an inviting and distinct community setting — and Brad Remington Homes has nailed it. Living here in the southeast quadrant, the community of Copperfield, developed by Hopewell Residential Communities, makes for a perfect setting. Residents enjoy the easy access to many amenities such as ponds, parks and play areas, all along a series of intertwined pathways. There are outdoor activities for the families, for friends and for neighbours to enjoy together, with a skating rink, toboggan hill, plus tennis courts. Having Highway 22X just around the corner is another asset, perfect for a quick escape for a weekend to Kananaskis, or to simply have a main road nearby to get around the city better, it’s all right there. And now that Stoney Trail South is open getting in and out of community is cinch. Shops and restaurants are also within close proximity, making it easy to pick up a quick meal on the way home, shop for groceries, do your banking, or to have plenty of options for going out with friends and family. Copperfield Park II is launching their newest phase (Building Five) on Saturday, February 1st, and based on the overwhelming positive responses they have received from previous openings, this phase too is sure to be another home run. “People just fall in love with the show suites that we have right now,” says Logel. “They really set an emotional tone in presenting what life can be like here. But the new ones we have planned are guaranteed to set an even higher standard.” And that’s a competitive advantage that’s tough to beat. CL

FA S T FAC TS Community: Copperfield Project: Copperfield Park II Developer: Brad Remington Homes Style: Apartment condos Size: From 525 sq. ft. one-bedroom, to 973 sq. ft. two-bedrooms Price: From $129,900 plus GST Address: 279 Copperpond Common S.E. Directions: South on 52 St. S.E. and east on 130 Ave. S.E. Website: www.copperfieldpark.com CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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Lake appeal

2014 looks to be an even bigger year for Mahogany By Pepper Rodriguez

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uddenly, the deep south doesn’t seem as far anymore. With the opening of the long-delayed Stoney Trail extension to this part of Calgary, accessibility to the new communities here — especially in the southeast — has never been more advantageous. Nowhere else does the impact of this newfound convenience seen more than in the award-winning lake community of Mahogany. This Hopewell Residential community — which boasts a 63-acre lake and a resort-like lifestyle — had been smack in the middle of all the roadway construction that went on for more than a year. But now, the resultant traffic jams on 52nd Street S.E. and Highway 22X that residents had to live with for the duration are a thing of the past.

“Residents were patient, but despite its delay, 25 kilometres of six-lane roadway is a very welcome thing!” says Erin McGregor, Marketing Manager-Development at Hopewell Residential. It almost seems impossible, but it’s now just a 15-minute drive to CrossIron Mills in Balzac from Mahogany, even the airport and all points north are easier to get to than ever before. But even at the height of the construction of the Stoney Trail52nd Street interchange, Mahogany’s popularity had not been affected. In fact, it even soared higher. And things look even better for 2014. “Last year was a record setting year for sales in Mahogany.  We’ve seen 436 third party sales year to date, and with the S.E. portion of Stoney Trail recently opened, I expect the appeal of living Mahogany will only increase,” McGregor says.

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garage show homes (from the $500,000s), three lakeside show homes (from $600,0000s), six lakefront estate show homes (from $1.3 million) and two Sabal attached show homes (from the $300,000s). New multi-family developments also began last year with the opening of three sales centres for Homes by Avi’s Street Towns (from the $300,000s), Jayman Modus’ Ebony townhomes (from the low $300,000s) and Truman Homes’ 51 Oak condos (from the $180,000s). Some of the most anticipated lots in Mahogany are in their Island Collection that will start selling by the second half of 2014.  “There is simply no other location in Calgary that compares to the Island Collection; it is in a class unto itself. Homeowners here will enjoy countless privileges including the freedom to build a custom home, uniquely and exclusively designed for their family,” she adds. The Island Collection will have 22 estate-sized home sites to choose from. All come with priTruman Homes’ 51 Oak condos

“Commute times can be a big concern for someone considering a move to the southeast, but this (road development) offers a significant decrease in time residents will have to spent in their cars.” There’s more to look forward to for Mahogany residents, and those who are considering living here. In October, Hopewell Residential broke ground on the Mahogany Beach Club and main beach site. The beach and surrounding area will include many exciting amenities such as beach volleyball courts, a hockey rink, basketball courts and more. The 19,000-square-foot building includes a 5,200-square-foot gymnasium, two banquet rooms, change rooms with showers, a skate room, two studios, a kitchen, Mahogany Homeowners’ Association administration offices, and equipment storage. “In addition to these fantastic amenities are, a rental kiosk, and a 1,566-squarefoot office and storage building for Homeowners’ Association equipment. We can’t wait to open the doors to this community focal point in early 2015,” McGregor says. Mahogany also opened an “incredible 30 show homes” in 2013, McGregor adds. These include eight laned show homes (starting from the mid $300,000s), eight front

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vate beachfront and lake access, personal dock access, a private, gated neighbourhood entryway, and will be on lot sizes ranging from 56 to 64 feet wide. McGregor says to stay tuned for more information for the release of those lots. Opened in September 2008, Mahogany took home the 2012 community of the year at the annual SAM Awards, it had also won for best new community and best show home parade in years prior. The developer says the 1,200acre community is projected to eventually see some 25,000 homes on build out. It will have and extraordinary mix of home collections, unique shops, restaurants, 265 acres of open space and parks, wetlands and beautiful streetscapes. These capture the four-season lakeside lifestyle that is the enduring appeal of this master planned community. “True lifestyle communities are rare, mostly because many standard communities don’t offer the kind of broad lifestyle support that a community like Mahogany will,” she adds. It’s

not too often that you’ll find a community with outstanding value in homes that also features a 63-acre freshwater recreational lake, 22 kilometres of pathways, 74 acres of naturalized wetlands, an Urban Village shopping and service core, 265 acres of open community space, plus a nearby off-leash dog park!” Its location just on the southern edge of the city has always been one of its most desirable aspects, and now with the added roadway infrastructure improvements, Mahogany residents can only look forward to even better things. CL

Jayman Modus’ Ebony

F as t F ac t s Mahogany’s collection of homes and their builders Boulevard Collection: Attached homes and street towns by Sabal Homes and Homes by Avi; townhomes and condos by Jayman Modus and Truman Homes — priced from the $180,000s. Lakeland Collection: Laned homes by Sabal Homes and Stepper Custom Homes — priced from the $300,000s. Front-garage homes by Jayman MasterBUILT, Sabal Homes, Stepper Custom Homes and Trico Homes — priced from the $500,000s. Reserve Collection: Lakeside estate homes by Baywest Homes, Calbridge Homes and Morrison Homes — all with private Mahogany Lake access — priced from the mid $600,000s. Lakefront estate homes by Baywest Homes, Calbridge Homes and Morrison Homes — with private docks and lakefront lots from $1.3 million. Island Collection: Coming soon For more information, visit www.mahoganyliving.com

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Urban haven

Suburbanite finds the joys in converting to the condo lifestyle Story by Karen Durrie Photos by Don Molyneaux

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or Daniel Sultanov, the journey to his downtown high-rise condo was a matter of getting there by the numbers. Lose some square-footage, two bathrooms, one yard, and a 60-minute commute. Gain more than $200,000 selling the house he built at age 23, an eight-minute commute, and acknowledge that the six or seven years it took his brother to convince him the condo lifestyle was worth a look was good advice. Sultanov, who is in the liquor business downtown, swapped life in the suburbs for the urban mecca after selling the large Evergreen home he built as an investment and buying a 1,123 square-foot, two-bedroom apartment in Castello Tower on 12th Ave. S.W. in Connaught. Life was pretty lonely as a single guy in the suburbs amidst throngs of married couples and families, Sultanov says. His house was full of empty space and it took him a full day to clean from top to bottom. He only really used his bedroom and the kitchen, with much of the house sitting unfurnished and unlived in. But he knew in time that his investment would pay off, and when he did finally decide to make the big move, the house he’d spent $320,000 to build sold for $585,000. After years of getting up at 6 a.m. to get to work by 8:30, Sultanov thought there had to be a better way. After looking at 16 different condos in about a dozen downtown buildings, Sultanov purchased an apartment on the 17th floor of the 19-storey tower in October, 2012, for just under $585,000. It had one previous owner since it’s late-2008 completion.

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Daniel Sultanov

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The space looks through a large glass wall at an incredible panorama of the city sweeping from Canada Olympic Park to the west, over to The Bow building and beyond to the east. Sultanov was picky about his next space, wanting something that felt spacious in its layout. One of the smaller units in the building, his condo in the Castello still hit the right note, with a generous open-concept kitchen and living room at its heart. The space looks through a large glass wall at an incredible panorama of the city sweeping from Canada Olympic Park to the west, over to The Bow building and beyond to the east. “I grew up in houses. Homes weren’t supposed to have elevators. It was a complete change of lifestyle,” Sultanov says. And it was hard to cotton to the concept that with the purchase, he didn’t own any land, just a unit of space in the sky, he adds. It took some adjusting to realize that he hadn’t been using 85 per cent of his suburban house and its land anyway, and the tradeoffs were worth it. Sultanov put his stamp on the space with a fresh coat of paint in a café au lait hue, and decorated with ultra-contemporary furniture, including an artsy Italian leather sofa set. He now enthusiastically embraces the condo lifestyle, loving stepping out onto his oversized glass-paneled balcony to survey the city and the streets below. “I love the view and feeling like I am right in the heart of the city. My neighbours are great, too. And it’s really quiet in these units. If I want to, I can put on my woofer and watch a movie with machine guns, and not bother anyone,” he says, indicating the built-in sound system around the room. His space is arranged efficiently with plenty of storage areas, highend appliances — including a wine fridge in the end of the oversized, granite-topped island — and a large master bedroom that opens onto an ensuite with a long vanity topped with two rectangular vessel sinks, an oversized steam shower, and walk-in closet.

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Sultanov uses the second bedroom as a home office, but it doubles as a guest bedroom with a sleeper sofa. A recent out-of-town guest enjoyed the room and was able to walk right out and enjoy all the city has to offer, unlike if he’d still been out in the ‘burbs, Sultanov notes. A second full-sized bath with a tub is located off the main living space. The area is filled with light with contemporary fixtures and large windows, as well as clerestory windows atop walls that distribute natural light between rooms.


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An appreciator of fine food and drink, Sultanov loves that he can either have friends over for a meal, then wander down to take in area nightlife or hit any number of the hottest restaurants and bars in town and not have to worry about getting home safely, since he can walk home in minutes. Even though he’s got a car — and two underground parking spaces — the amount of driving Sultanov does now is markedly decreased. He walks almost everywhere unless he has to leave downtown — which he will occasionally do on business, to visit family, or participate in his hobby as a comedian (he was a finalist on SCTV’s Next Comedy Legend) and actor (next up in Tony and Tina’s Wedding at the Deerfoot Inn and Casino). Other pluses Sultanov reels off include no door-to-door solicitors, 24-hour building security, and being forced to streamline in a smaller space. “It really makes you appreciate how much stuff you have that you don’t need, and makes you get rid of it all.” Sultanov is happy in his place and secure in the knowledge that as the urban lifestyle becomes increasingly attractive and in demand, the condo will accumulate value before he’s ready to leave the lifestyle. To where? Well, he says, when the time is right — back to suburbia. But next time, it won’t be a lonely life. Sultanov envisions a wife, kids and a dog in that future. CL

“It really makes you appreciate how much stuff you have that you don’t need, and makes you get rid of it all.” CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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The right match Tommy Smythe works magic using old and new design elements By Pepper Rodriguez

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n all aspects of life, finding the right match is what everyone looks for. Whether it’s for a job, a home, or a significant other — ­ finding that personal connection is key to our happiness. But in finding most of these, luck and circumstance play a significant role. Not so in the world of interior design, where an eye in finding the right match is absolutely critical. That’s the hardest part of the job, but to Tommy Smythe, it’s also the most fun. Smythe has been a staple in several hit TV design shows, where he has established himself for his “contagious enthusiasm and fun loving approach to decor and renovating.” His love for combining antique pieces with modern décor has been a particular hallmark of his work. “I do not consider a room complete until it has the right balance of vintage and modern elements. Trends and whimsy are not a focus for me. I strive to create a feeling of timeless elegance and gracious living in soulful environments,” he says.

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“I do not consider a room complete until it has the right balance of vintage and modern elements. Trends and whimsy are not a focus for me. I strive to create a feeling of timeless elegance and gracious living in soulful environments.”

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“…glamour and comfort can exist within the same environment and that good taste alone will not a successful design career make.”

“I’ve always felt that contemporary interiors benefit from the history and soul of antique and vintage furnishings. Rooms containing only new items can feel a bit sterile and lacking in depth.” This is where his talent in finding the fight design match comes into play. “There is a skill involved in combining old and new, but I really feel it’s something everyone can learn to do. As with anything, if you want to be good at it, you’ve got to do your homework and learn about it. There are no shortcuts.” He certainly didn’t take any shortcuts in establishing his career. The Toronto-based Smythe has been working in the design industry for more than 15 years, and has starred or appeared in shows like Design Inc., The Marilyn Denis Show (CTV), Steven and Chris (CBC), and CityLine (CityTV). But it was in Sarah Richardson’s shows — Sarah 101, Sarah’s House, and Sarah’s Cottage — where he became a bonafide star. But even in his early days, Smythe’s skill in finding the right match was evident, after all, he did find the right mentors who were able to help him discover his design identity. “I started out by seeking mentorships. Youssef Hasbani, proprietor of L’Atelier in Toronto was a great teacher. I worked for him during the time he was building the Caban brand with Joe Mimran. Youssef was known as “The Master of the Mix”,” he says. “The late, great John Manuel was a mentor as well. He taught me that glamour and comfort can exist within the same environment and that good taste alone will not a successful design career make. John was a true legend. After a couple of years at L’Atelier under Youssef’s guidance, I left to work for Sarah Richardson…and the rest, as they say…well you know the rest.” Known for his warm and personal mixture of fine art, vintage, antique and modern furnishings pulled together with a cutting edge colour sense, Tommy never lets it all feel too serious. “If it’s not fun, it’s not worth doing!” His style is confidently his own, and he growing up in Tornoto, spending

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summers in Northern Ontario and winter vacations in Palm Beach, Florida, all inform his designs. “Those three influences — the city, the woods, the beach — have always hugely informed my point of view.” Though he credits his early mentors for his development, he says he is “almost entirely self-taught. I read voraciously on the subjects of design, decor, fashion and art. “My relationships with my early mentors taught me a great deal, but the rest I learned through very hard work and trial and error. The trial and error part was mostly learned while renovating and decorating my own homes, so at least when I made a mistake — and I did make them! — I was learning on my own dime.” Smythe is bringing his brand of design to the Calgary Home + Garden Show to be held from February 27 to March 2, 2014, at the BMO Centre and Corral at the Stampede grounds. He will provide tips and tricks that can help any consumer with a décor dilemma. Whether you live in a large home or a small condo, Tommy’s ideas about colour, styling, and product will help and inspire you. Smythe says he is looking forward to connecting with the show’s audience. “My talks are different every time! I take a very familiar and informal approach. There are plenty of visuals to talk about, but for me, the best aspect is the interaction. The Q&A session at the end always yields a hilarious moment or two. Or ten. I can’t wait!” CL


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Top features for 2014 here’s what else you can expect at this year’s show

NU + SMArt hOMe take what it means to be a couch potato to the next level. At the Nu + Smart Home, control the thermostat, window coverings, lighting, entertainment system and so much more, all with the touch of a button. with a home this smart, equipped with the latest in home automation by Nu Automations, there’s no reason to get up off the couch — let alone lift a finger! presented by Nu Automations. better gNOMeS & gArdeNS Inspired by the world-renowned Chelsea Flower Show’s decision to lift a century-long ban on garden gnomes in 2013, Calgary’s movers and shakers will show off their creative flair by turning a plain garden gnome into a whimsical treasure. Guests can bid on their favourites to benefit Grow Calgary, Canada’s largest urban agricultural farm dedicated to providing fresh produce to all Calgarians by way of the Calgary Interfaith Food bank.

ASk AN exPert Stumped on style? Interior decorating experts, professional landscapers and certified contractors will tackle design dilemmas of all kinds with free, 10-minute consultations for beleaguered renters and harried homeowners alike. Come equipped with swatches and sketches to receive the best advice in the biz — no decorating topic denied! presented by Intact Insurance. AbOUt the CALgArY hOMe + gArdeN ShOW: the Calgary Home + Garden Show has been a staple in consumers’ calendars since 1981, attracting more than 60,000 qualified visitors every spring. produced by marketplace events, the show features high-interest exhibits, high-profile industry personalities and the latest home and lifestyle trends. marketplace events produces 34 home shows in 21 markets that collectively attract 1.5 million attendees and another 1.7 million unique web visitors annually. CL adults: (18+) $15, online $12 seniors: (60+) $12, online $9

seniors (60+) Friday before 5 pm $6

children 12 under, Free Buy your tickets at www.calgaryhgs.com or at the gate. online discounts courtesy of www.homestars.com

tICKets

StAte FArM MAIN StAge PreSeNted bY hgtV Spring cleaning takes on a whole new meaning with inspiration from Canada’s top design, renovation and real estate experts on the State Farm main Stage. Armed with insight from past projects and years of on-the-job experience, live presenters including HGtV’s bryan baeumler and tommy Smythe and local design stars the Style Guys will dole out their top tips to take any home from underwhelming to outstanding.

gArdeNS gALOre Gardeners, take heart! experienced green thumbs and budding horticulturalists alike will find inspiration and valuable instruction in two of this year’s stunning new sections: reclaimed Gardens, a collection of found objects recycled into fashionable outdoor planters by local florist Lil’ pink Daisy, and the Garden Stage, where professional planters and garden aficionados will share tips on how to make plots so perfect, every neighbour will go green with envy.

tICKets

ready those renovation plans! the Calgary Home + Garden Show is preparing for its 33rd year from February 27 to march 2, 2014 at the bmO Centre & Corral, with its shortlist of must-see personalities and exhibits. with big names like bryan baeumler, star of HGtV’s Leave It to bryan, tommy Smythe, designer and co-host of HGtV’s Sarah 101 and local favourites the Style Guys Alykhan Velji & Jason krell, plus more than 650 exhibitors and a slew of exciting new features, there’s real advice, real inspiration and real experts at every turn.

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Redefining monochromatic Finding inspiration in single-colour design bY PAIge jOhNStON

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monochromatic colour scheme is represented by variations in tones and shades of a single hue. While the idea of a monochromatic room can be very appealing, it is often quite hard to execute. You might find that your space lacks variety and contrast, rendering it dull and boring. From small bedrooms to open concept living rooms, here are a few trade secrets for creating a magazine-worthy monochromatic space!

PLAY WIth PAtterN Layering motifs and patterns will help to create a visually dynamic monochromatic space. When you’re working with analogous hues, you have a lot of room to play with pattern, and an easy way to do this is with your fabrics. From carpets to cushions, patterned toneon-tone textiles can play together to break up the monotony of a monochromatic scheme. If you have an open concept space, introducing a variety of patterns will really help to make each area stand out. A Persian rug could play well with grass cloth wallpaper, or striped drapes could pair with a chevron-upholstered chair. In this condo living room, LUX Design pairs a bold wall print with various patterned cushions, layering them with a geometric printed area carpet. If you’re working within a monochromatic dining room, introduce pattern by upholstering only the two end chairs with a daring fabric in your hues. If you’re working on a bedroom design, layer patterned cushions on the bed. Elements like this really bring character to a monochromatic space.

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Texturize! Texture, characterized by the visual and tactile qualities of a surface, plays a major role in injecting depth into a monochromatic room. Textures, or finishes, include wood, glass, mirror, lacquer, leather, fabric and metal. When not enough textures are used within a space, your eye tends to blend all the surfaces together, reading the room as flat and two-dimensional. Because you’ve already limited yourself to a specific colour palette, don’t be afraid to play around with different textures. When it comes to great design, it’s all in the details and the finishes! Whether you’re in a condo or a house, if

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you’re working on a monochromatic living or dining room, don’t get locked down on a single fabric or finish. Avoid matching furniture sets and look, instead, to vary your pieces, combining different materials and finishes. This will produce a space that looks custom and polished. From cotton blends and silks to velvets and vinyl, fabrics can be layered together. Woods can be mixed too, from espresso finished and driftwood to walnut and reclaimed. If you find your space is falling flat, introduce a reflective material like mirror, glass or metal (anything from gold and brass to nickel and chrome). This monochromatic condo suite (above), by LUX Design, remains visually appealing through a successful interplay between textures. With a subtle motif, the wallpaper adds dimension to the painted walls. Textiles are layered with leather chairs, a fabric sectional, a shag carpet and a linen shade pendant. The white high-gloss lacquer buffet and chrome accents throughout add reflective quality to the space while the natural hardwood flooring adds warmth.


| Feature ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Paige Johnston, a graduate of the Ryerson School of Interior Design, helped expand LUX Design, a successful Toronto-based interior design firm, to the city of Calgary. She is working now in Calgary as the lead interior designer of LUX Design.

Your vision of a monochromatic scheme shouldn’t leave you deterred and uninspired. Remember to play with textures and finishes, introduce a variety of shades, and don’t be afraid of pattern. trY dIFFereNt tONeS When choosing the furniture and accent pieces for your monochromatic space, be sure to vary the shades. A contrast of light and dark will not only add drama to a room, but will help to make the space appear larger, which is helpful in tighter spaces like condos and smaller homes. An easy way to play within a colour range is to go to a paint store, like Ben Moore, and grab a swatch with a grouping of hues on it. A great way to enhance the visual appeal of a monochromatic space is to pick a feature wall to highlight and paint it a darker shade within your colour palette. In your bedroom, the feature wall you choose might be the wall your headboard is against. In your living or dining room, choose the wall that first catches your eye when you walk in or pick a solid wall without windows or doors. This condo bedroom (right), by LUX Design, varied and layered shades of gray to create a dynamic space with great depth, despite its small size. The dramatically dark feature wall is the backdrop for a light gray headboard and a medium gray bedspread. Your vision of a monochromatic scheme shouldn’t leave you deterred and uninspired. Remember to play with textures and finishes, introduce a variety of shades, and don’t be afraid of pattern. These tips will bring life into any space, taking your room from average to the pages of a magazine! CL CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruArY 2014

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SHOPPING | 

Comfy much? Bed sheets and covers are everyday essentials, here’s how to choose the best By Kathy McCormick

Nuvis show home, Innovations by Jayman

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| SHOPPING

B

uying bed sheets used to be as simple as asking for a cup of coffee. Do you want a single or a double sheet; a black coffee or one with cream and/or sugar? The world has changed. Not only are there myriad coffee choices, from Frappuccino to shots of espresso topping up that regular coffee, but sheets, too, have become a complicated business. So much so, that the senior manager of soft side (that is, linens and bedding) at Bed Bath and Beyond advises customers to talk to the experts before buying. “It all comes down to personal preference,” says Carol Jantz. “Today, most people are looking for higher thread counts — but they have a higher price to go with them. And most people don’t know, but the higher the thread count, the wrinklier the sheet will be when washed.” And if the thread count — the amount of threads woven horizontally and vertically in a square inch — is really high, but the price doesn’t reflect that — ask questions, she says. “Some manufacturers will split a thread to label it a higher count — so it won’t be as durable.” Others may add threads — called picks — in the weaving process simply to up the thread count. The highest-quality, softest sheets are made with extra-long fibres, resulting in stronger yarn and that beautiful, lux feel. Some of the more familiar: Egyptian cotton, pima and the trademarked Supima.

Outlook at Waterfront, Anthem Properties

“Egyptian cotton is best because of the spinning technique they use,” says Angelo Purschke, sales manager of gift registry, china, housewares and soft home for Hudson’s Bay. But a lower thread count might be just what you like, says Jantz. “Different cotton comes from different parts of the world — and it has a different texture, which is just as important to you, again going with what you like.” Ask yourself if you like a soft, warm feel or prefer the crisp, cool look and texture of a sheet. That will help determine what you need. The Bay, for example, carries a 600-thread-count sheet from Gluckstein Home Luxe collection — it’s “crisp but soft,” says Purschke. “The longer you have them, the softer they get.” Buying from a well-known brand is a good starting point, says Home and Garden Television on their website, Guide to Buying Sheets. “If you’re watching pennies, try a 200-count combed cotton set from a well-known brand, name brands are likely to have high certification standards for their finishing processes.” In the HGTV article, Jim Symmes, vice-president of Revman International, which manufactures sheets for brands such as Tommy Bahama and Laura Ashley, says an ideal sheet is combed cotton (where the short fibres have been combed out to leave the long ones, making a stronger, soft fabric) of 300 to 400 thread count. Most sheets now are cotton 3— which means they will breathe, as opposed to a polyester sheet or a cotton-poly blend. “The cotton/polyester blend doesn’t wrinkle as much, but it pills easily,” says Jantz. “In fact, even if you sleep in polyester pajamas on a cotton sheet, or wash cotton sheets with anything polyester, the sheets will pill.” Microloft fabric sheets are also polyester, so can be hot because they don’t breathe, even though they are soft and cosy. Flannel sheets, if they are 100 per cent cotton, are another good choice if you are looking for warmth and cosiness; sateen sheets, also a type of cotton, are slippery and cool, if that’s what you like.

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SHOPPING | 

All-natural sheets today are made with modal, eucalyptus or bamboo — another good alternative that’s green. Jersey sheets, the t-shirt material, are made with modal, a material made from beech trees. A new sheet is a type of “performance fabric” similar to what athletes wear today that wicks moisture from the body,” says Jantz. It is a blend of polyester and spandex and one brand name is Sheex. As for top coverings, most people today are buying duvets, says Jantz. “They are versatile, allowing you to change the look by simply switching the cover to redecorate. And you can regulate whether you want a hot or cool feel, as well as the weight, so you have more control. There are options year round.” Down and down-alternatives are numerous, again depending on your needs. Some people want a light blanket feel; others like the feeling of weight. Some want a cool feel; others prefer warmth. “It depends on the fill power, the thread count, and the fill in general. It’s best to talk to someone to know what you are getting,” says Jantz. And ensure you measure your bed before you go shopping. The depth of the mattress will determine the size of top covering you will need. “It used to be 15 inches was the norm,” she says. “Now it’s 18 inches with the regular pillow-top mattress — and the deeper, bigger pillow tops can be 20 to 22 inches deep.” Duvets generally just come in these sizes — twin, full/queen and king — so there is less choice. “Pay attention to your measurements.” And because of duvet covers, people often are looking for single sheets, rather than whole sets,

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All-natural sheets today are made with modal, eucalyptus or bamboo — another good alternative that’s green. Jersey sheets, the t-shirt material, are made with modal, a material made from beech trees. above MARK on 10th,

Qualex-Landmark. left VEN, Bucci Developments.

because they don’t need a top sheet — and those, too, are not as common to find. Quilts and comforters are generally still the favourite of the older set because they are usually 100 per cent cotton, so can breathe and allow you to add another blanket if wanted. “These and the ‘bed-in-a-bag’ are also popular choices for spare bedrooms,” Jantz says. “People really like the convenience of everything together for the spare room so it’s all pulled together easily.” While king-size beds are more and more common, the queen bedding is still the most popular, she says.  CL


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| FEATURE

Ships ahoy Cruise ship condos cater to select clientele By Jim Zang

“A

ll aboard!” Not exactly what you’d expect to hear as you open the door to your new condo. But, then again, these aren’t exactly your average condos. In fact, says Susan Konig, public relations manager for Strategic Vision, the company handling communications for The World, the first cruise ship-sized vessel to truly go totally residential, they would prefer to call them ‘residences’ rather than ‘condos’, and the vessel itself a ‘yacht’. Operated by Residensea, out of Mirimar, Florida. The World — which first set sail in 2002 — is the largest privately owned residential yacht on earth (www.aboardtheworld. com) and the only one currently sailing. According to the company’s press releases, the 12-deck, 196-metre long, ship has 165 units privately owned by people who spend an average of four months aboard the ship each year. Residences include studios and two and three-bedroom suites, plus one six-bedroom penthouse, and range from 337 to 4,184 squarefeet. Most studios feature private verandas. Depending on availability, the 13 different floor plans sell from $825,000 to $7.7 million. Yearly maintenance fees average $160,000. It’s like having a luxury home in just about any port around the globe, as captains and residents determine travel itineraries every year, based on the best sea routes and owners’ interests. This year, the world was scheduled to visit 53 countries, including Barbados, Italy, Madagascar and Peru. Its average port stay is longer than most cruise ships, at 2.5 days, meaning there’s more time to explore and enjoy each stop. Many stops coincide with major events, such as the British Open, the Cannes Film Festival, and the America’s Cup.

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FEATURE | 

The residents of the 981-foot (297-metre) condo cruise ship Utopia, will travel the globe for New York Fashion Week, Monaco Grand Prix, Cannes Film Festival, America’s Cup, British Open, Royal Ascot, and other world-famous events.

The 2014 journey promises to be one of the most exhilarating in the ship’s history as residents will enjoy an extensive exploration of New Zealand and southeast Asia, an unprecedented overland visit to north korea from beijing and two exceptional expeditions to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands and the Sea of Okhotsk. The private community-at-sea will also undertake a deep exploration of French Polynesia, Cook islands, China, Japan, and South Korea, sailing 44,000 nautical miles and visiting 123 new ports. It’s definitely a lifestyles of the rich and famous crowd, with amenities such as a 12,000-bottle wine cellar, four major restaurants, a nightclub, theatre, gourmet grocery shop, full-size tennis court and paddle tennis court, golf facilities and a retractable marina for water sports. A “call-a-chef” program allows for chefs to prepare meals from start to finish inside owners’ homes. The average resident/owner (if there is such a thing, with residents coming from 19 different countries) is 64, with about half under the age of 50. Some residents live on the ship year round and some don’t, so that, on average, occupancy at any given time is around 150 residents or so. The concept has proven popular but, of course, cruise ships aren’t exactly built in one day, so it’s taken several years for anything similar to appear on the market. Which is why The World is the only one currently sailing. Indeed, a quick google search reveals just a handful of cruise ship condos currently in the construction and/or sales phase. One, the Magellan, originally boasted it would be even

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larger and more luxurious than The World. When finished it would be a full third longer, stretching more than 260 metres. With 11 different floor plans ranging in size from 1,000 to 2,256 square-feet, Magellan was marketed to appeal to a broader range of buyers. Prices were listed from $1.4 to $8.2 million with annual fees of $96,000-$240,000. Unfortunately, even some of the best laid plans can end up in stormy seas (just ask Gilligan and the Skipper) and web postings regarding the Magellan basically just stop in about 2011. Magellan’s own website, www.magellancruisecondos.com, has precious little information and attempts to request further information resulted in a link to an unrelated website. Phone calls to the last available phone number reached a ‘not in service’ recording. The 981-foot (297-metre) condo cruise ship Utopia, built by the same technical team that worked on The World, will be delivered in three years. Its residents will travel the globe for New York Fashion Week, Monaco Grand Prix, Cannes Film Festival, America’s Cup, British Open, Royal Ascot, and other world-famous events. The ship will be home to 200 residence owners. In addition to luxury ‘estates’ ranging from


| FEATURE

Some residents live on the ship year round and some don’t, so that, on average, occupancy at any given time is around 150 residents or so. 1,450 to 6,100 square-feet (prices range from $3.9 to $30 million), Utopia includes signature restaurants, bars and lounges, luxury retail boutiques, a casino, full-service spa, gymnasium, swimming pools, indoor and outdoor theatres, business and medical facilities, plastic surgery clinic, golf center with putting green and simulators, and 165-suite hotel. Utopia also will feature a philanthropy concierge and will host philanthropic galas and humanitarian summits. The ship will stay in port nearly 270 days a year. Those who have already secured residences come from Australia, China, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas. Residents on Utopia will pay lower maintenance fees The World

than on The World,” says Chrystal Haahrt of Utopia Residences. “This is because Utopia will have a hotel and other revenue sources to help pay for the ship’s maintenance and operating costs.” Sales offices with full-scale walkthroughs of interiors are located on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, California. Another project worth mentioning, the Marquette, has 180 residences, ranging from 500 to 3,000 square-feet. Prices run from $310,000 to $1.8 million for full ownership, and from $160,000 to $275,000 for half-ownership. Monthly maintenance fees average $1,200 to $2,000 for studios and two-bedroom units. Built by river cities

» The World

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FEATURE | 

It’s definitely a lifestyles of the rich and famous crowd.

condos inc. At an estimated cost of $110 million, it will be the largest inland passenger vessel in the world and will ply the waters of select U.S. Rivers and coastlines. In fact, this five-story community will actually be four barges which combine to make two 600-by-54-foot boats with separate engines. When navigating narrower waterways — such as new orleans-area locks and the intracoastal waterway — the ship will divide in two, then rejoin in wider waters. Amenities will include a concierge, spa services, high-speed internet and voice-over ip telephone services, in addition to a medical center and two helipads.

The Marquette, has 180 residences, ranging from 500 to 3,000 square-feet. Prices run from $310,000 to $1.8 million for full ownership, and from $160,000 to $275,000 for half-ownership.

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“We are currently 30 per cent sold,” says David Nelson of River Cities, “and we will start construction at 90 per cent pre-sold. Unfortunately we had to go into a marketing “pause” mode during the recession. However, we have once again resumed marketing and anticipate floating our first vessel in 18-24 months.” For more information, visit www.rivercitiescondos.com. And then there’s Utopia (www.utopiaresidences.com). For people who like to have all the luxury and comforts of their own vacation home, but don’t want to be tied down to any one destination, setting sail on your own luxury liner could be the perfect option. Landlubbers need not apply. CL


feature | 

Wintry respite Even in the coldest months, there’s plenty to do in the inner-city by Elizabeth Chorney-Booth

O Courtesy Talisman Centre

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ne of the most attractive perks of inner-city living is that there are always plenty of things to do close-by. Going out to a major city attraction doesn’t require a full day of planning or worrying about where to park when you already live downtown — you can usually hit the most exciting places in town by hopping on transit, taking your bike, or by just walking a few blocks. We all know that with its parks, pathways, and cultural festivals Calgary’s inner-city is a hotspot during the summer, but there are also plenty of indoor activities and attractions to take in throughout the colder months, whether you have a family to entertain or you’re a childfree adult looking for a way to spend your leisure time. Many Calgarians enjoy an active lifestyle and our inner core offers plenty of ways for those who enjoy outdoor amenities in the summer to stay active over the winter months. You can’t go too far downtown without spotting a handful of high-end gyms, yoga studios, and other exercise facilities, offering activities ranging from martial arts to ballet-inspired workouts. If you’re looking for a one-stop shop, Talisman Centre (2225 Macleod Trail South) is conveniently located and offers a number of group fitness classes, public gym and swim times, personal training options, and registered programs. It also has a Fitness Centre featuring cardio and weight training equipment teaching a variety of activities for people of all ages. It’s one of the most high-profile sport training facilities in western Canada and it wouldn’t be a surprise to


| feature

Aurora Kids School Programs 2013. Photo courtesy Glenbow Museum

Courtesy Talisman Centre

be training alongside Olympians. Though it was heavily damaged by the floods last summer, Talisman Centre was able to fully re-open last November after $10 million was spent in restoration, repairs and new equipment. The City of Calgary also operates several aquatic and fitness centres in many inner-city neighbourhoods. The proximity to other inner-city amenities allows users Julie Van Rosendaal to make a day out of a trip to the pool or fitness class. “I love the small inner city swimming pools — we go to the Inglewood pool, which is never as packed as the big leisure centres in the more suburban areas,” says Julie Van Rosendaal, who lives in the inner-city neighbourhood of Ramsay. “It’s within walking distance, so if it’s not so cold that our hair will freeze, we do a little window shopping up and down the 9th Avenue strip in Inglewood, and maybe stop for lunch or hot chocolate at one of our favourite cafes.” Of course, living a full life is about more than just physical activity, and urban dwellers also have ample opportunity to exercise their minds. There are many museums and interpretive centres located either right downtown or elsewhere within the inner-city to feed whatever kinds of interests you may have. The Glenbow Museum

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Courtesy Glenbow Museum

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feature | 

People often miss the opportunity to play tourist in their own city, but living downtown makes it easy to just pop into the very attractions that drive outsiders to visit Calgary.

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(130 - 9th Avenue S.E.) is a huge facility that features art as well as artifacts and historical documents. It’s large enough that you can spend a full day exploring and also regularly holds special events and brings in new exhibitions. “My eight-year-old son loves to go to the Glenbow Museum,” Van Rosendaal says. “It’s nostalgic for me — I remember going on field trips there in elementary school and eating lunch around the aurora borealis. No matter what exhibits are on display we have a good time. We get a bit of exercise going up and down those stairs, and inevitably learn something too.” If you’re looking to explore beyond the Glenbow for some historic fun, the interpretive centre at Fort Calgary (750 - 9th Avenue S.E.) is open year-round and the Lougheed House (707 - 13th Avenue S.W.) offers a unique glimpse of what Beltline living would have been like in the early 1900s. As our city grows more modern every year, both of these sites are a great way for Calgarians to feel connected to inner city residents of the past. For a more scientific take on learning, visit the Telus Spark Science Centre (220 Street Georges Drive N.E.) or the Bow Habitat Station (1440 17A Street S.E.) in Inglewood, which features an indoor Discovery Centre as well as a working fish hatchery. People often miss the opportunity to play tourist in their own city, but living downtown makes it easy to just pop into


the very attractions that drive outsiders to visit Calgary. On a sunny winter day, take the opportunity to ride the elevator up the Calgary Tower (101 9 Avenue S.W.) to experience a bird’s eye view of the city, take a tour of the keyboard collection at the National Music Centre (134 11 Avenue S.E.), or experience the indoor oasis at the newly renovated Devonian Gardens (400, 317 7 Avenue S.W.). These are just some of the permanent attractions and facilities that urban Calgary has to offer — various organizations and arts groups are constantly putting on special events and festivals, even throughout the winter, so be sure to keep on top of what’s going on in your inner city neighbourhood. With the cold season lasting so long in Calgary, you can’t let a little bit of cold weather stop you from getting out there and having fun.  CL

Courtesy Glenbow Museum.

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ACOA OWNERS’ CORNER ALBERTA CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION (ACOA)

Your Condo, Your Investment What every condo owner should know (Second of two parts)

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ylaws are technically a contract between the owners and the Condominium Corporation. This means the owners agree to live by the bylaws and the board agrees to operate in accordance with them. This technicality is what gives the Board the power and responsibility to enforce bylaws. When bylaws do not serve the majority of the owners or they are simply outdated and no longer current with the legislation and current case law it is imperative that the bylaws are updated. To do this the owners are required to vote. In Alberta, it has been my experience that this is one of the most difficult things to achieve, yet there are many costly consequences that impact the property value when a condominium does not have appropriate bylaws. As an owner, get involved when you receive a notice regarding the change of amendment of bylaws. Annual Budget/Condo Fees This is the hot topic for all condo owners. Fear of the dreaded monthly condo fee! A condominium fee is, in reality, each owner’s “contribution toward maintaining their investment”. Every condominium owner has a share in the responsibility for maintaining the common property. The common property is comprised of all areas that are not contained within the boundary of the individual units. This varies from one condominium type to the other. However, typically this includes the yards, landscaping, building exteriors, mechanical, interior lobbies, elevators, corridors, parking garages, exterior

parking lots, and more. Add to this that the board also needs to manage and maintain insurance, financial matters, and provide the services owners expect such as snow removal and janitorial services. The quality and care of the management of the property has a large impact on property value and impacts the use and enjoyment of each owner. When the focus of the board and the owners is to keep expenses low, the result often is deferred maintenance, deferred reserve fund saving and ultimately a need for a cash injection. The solution is to budget appropriately for the current needs and for future capital needs. Do not support budgeting that is so limiting that there is no ability for the board to keep the property maintained. I am not suggesting over saving either. Follow the advice of qualified professionals and have a plan that is practical. Fees (contributions) should increase yearly as inflation does. Holding back and letting a shortage accumulate does not provide confidence to lenders, insurance providers or buyers who are reviewing the condominium documents. In short, to protect your investment you need to take an interest in the condominium operation. • Read the Duties of the Owner and the Use & Occupancy restriction sections of

your bylaws and govern yourself by these bylaws. • Attend the AGM, elect a board you have confidence in and vote for bylaws changes. • Read the newsletters and communications sent by the board. • Ask questions, expect reasonable responses and remember that board members are fellow owners doing their best on behalf of all owners, as volunteers. • Get involved by serving a term on the board. You will then have confidence in the corporation you have your money invested in. • Become a member of the Alberta Condo Owners Association. Membership is only $20.00 per year. Know that your voice counts in making change for all condominium owners in Alberta. CL This month’s article by Bernice M. Winter, ACOA co-founder.

The Alberta Condominium Owners Association (ACOA) is a non-profit

association intended to represent ALL Alberta condominium owners and give them a concerted voice in issues that affect living in a multi-family environment. Co-Founders are Bernice M. Winter and Dr. June A. Donaldson, Calgary based business women who have diverse and extensive condo, business, entrepreneurial and academic experience to bring to this most necessary initiative. Visit www.Albertacoa.com for more information and how to become a member. CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruARY 2014

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CoNDoSCAPES By richard White

HIStOrICAL eAu CLAIre

the estate may have inspired vancouver’s townhouse podium style

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algary’s first high-rise condos were built at the end of the ‘70s early ‘80s boom. Eau Claire 500 was built along the Bow River before there was the Eau Market, the Eau Claire Y and the Bow River Promenade. The Estate was built as part of the Ranchmen’s Club’s extensive renovations in 1982. In many ways The Estate is the model for current condo development with its street level townhouses integrated into the design. Today townhouses at street level are the norm, but in the late ‘70s new townhouses in the Beltline were quite unusual. It is perhaps ironic that The Estate was designed by Vancouver architect David Tom who is now a partner in one of Vancouver’s most influential architectural firms BingThom Architects. In 2007, they were the architects for the SAIT Master Plan and in 2009, the architects for the new SAIT parkade which is an amazing work of art and architecture. The proposed condo tower at 26 floors was way in excess of the ‘80s zoning height limit of 17 floors. The design also called for no balconies, which was also precedent setting urban design for the time. The city agreed to transfer the density (floors) that would be allowed above the Ranchmen’s Club site if it were to torn down to the land to the west for the condo. The city also accepted the lack of balconies; given the design included internal climate-controlled conservatories and the street level townhomes along 13th Avenue SW. Could it be that Calgary was the inspiration for Vancouver’s

plethora of townhouse podium with high-rises tower above that were built starting in the ‘90s? In 2014, the Ranchmen’s will be celebrating its 100 anniversary in its R.E. Donnell designed three story Renaissance Revival brick and terra cotta building. The interior features extensive highly detailed dark woodwork that creates an immediate sense of history, character and charm. The club is a reminder that Calgary’s original economic engine was ranching, not oil and gas. Together with the historic Lougheed House and gardens across the street, this area is a hidden gem of Calgary’s history. The Estate reflects both the past and the present. There is a sense of timelessness in the extensive use of brick as the main exterior material. Yet, without balconies and any other ornamentation the design reflects modern minimalism. However, it avoided the boxy look of most late 20th century high-rises by placing the tower on a diagonal to the street to create visual interest and maximize the views for each apartment.  CL

condo name: the estate architect: david tom

richard White is the urban Strategist at Ground3 Landscape Architects. He has written about urban living, urban development and urban design for 25 years. He can be followed @ everydaytourist or you can view more of his blogs, rants and essays at www.everydaytourist.ca CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruArY 2014

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Editor’s note: Readers are encouraged to ask their most confounding condo questions to our resident condo specialist: Maria Bartolotti.

ASK MARIA By maria Bartolotti

tO tweet, Or NOt tO tweet? that is the question

Q:

Dear Maria, should condominium management companies use social media?

A:

The answer to that question is a resounding YES! I’m a strong believer that anytime you can enhance communication between a condo board and its members, the better. If it, in the end, can save the condominium corporation money, then go for it! Social media has evolved over the last few years, and with Twitter, Facebook, blogs and condo websites, there is no reason not to take advantage of these tools to help the condo board and condo management companies to better communicate with residents. About 40 per cent of all condo residents complain about not being informed of what is happening with their condo. Residents feel they are being kept in the dark by the boards, while condo managers may feel overwhelmed with the amount of work before them. The days of mailing out notices and posting notifications on a bulletin board is slowly becoming obsolete. In the condos we manage, most — if not all — of our residents have access to the Internet in some form, via a desktop computer, laptop, tablet or a smart phone. There’s no reason condo boards can’t take advantage of all these handy tools to better inform their residents. Notifications such as spring cleaning, annual general meetings, special events, budgets, water shut down etc. can be better communicated in this manner. For many residents, checking the

ZZZ

website or email from the comfort of their home or phone, is more convenient then wandering the common hallways or lobby or wherever a bulletin board or notice may be posted to read it. It takes less than 15 minutes to type an email to the residents, then to put together a notice that would need to be mailed and/or delivered to each unit owner/resident in a building, which is very time consuming. The great thing about Social Media is that it is instant and fast communication to the residents. How do you and your Board of Directors communicate with your residents? Until next time… CL

Maria bartolotti

is the owner-manager of New Concept management Inc. She has developed a strong reputation for rendering timely and efficient services to the condominium industry. maria believes that her company’s success hinges on her hands-on approach to condominium management as well as maintaining open lines of communications with her clientele. maria is actively involved in her industry. For more information, visit www.newconceptmanagement.com CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruArY 2014

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HoPE AT LARGE By marty hope

kISS ON YOur LISt chalet’s simplified process is key to success

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n the 1960s, the KISS principle was presented to the world. The acronym for “keep it simple, stupid” candidly says that most systems work best if they are kept simple rather than complex. Therefore, simplicity, not complexity, should be the key goal in design. Attributed to U.S. aircraft engineer Kelly Johnson, the KISS principle has found its way into various design fields and is the backbone of many business ventures. Here in Calgary, one of the newest reincarnations of the decades-old principle has been rolled out by Sabal Homes’ sales and marketing manager Brenda Kelly as a way to further enhance the appeal of the company’s 99-unit Chalet townhouse condominium project currently selling in Copperfield by Hopewell Residential Communities. So, keeping everything simple, here is how the process works. Opening up an iPad, potential buyers begin to select a main floor layout from a list of three — and add a fireplace if they want, then choose from a variety of second floor plans (two beds, three beds, two and a flex room), then click another button to bring it all together. That’s all there is to it — a custom-designed interior with just a click here and a click there. But wait, that’s not the end of the KISS process. A separate page lists all relevant information such as the plan that has been selected, the square footage of the home, the base price, the cost of floor plan upgrades and fireplace (if chosen), and then presents the price. As well, the GST cost and final purchase price (less any additional upgrades such as design selections) are

given. Hey, the process even displays the amount needed for a five per cent down payment and the estimated monthly condo fees. And then with one final cool click, the completed floor plan and information will be emailed to the would be buyer-designer for their records and to show off to friends and family. “They can play with the computerized floor plans till they’re happy,” says Kelly. “It helps to simplify the whole decision-making process and makes it a more pleasurable, fun experience.” From the beginning of the thought process to unveiling the program took five months or so and last fall was rolled out into the show homes. Since then, more than a couple of dozen reservations and sales have been recorded. “From what we’ve seen, people love it, especially the younger, first-time buyers who are in the techie crowd. It’s very cool,” Kelly says. The success of the touch-screen design program has Kelly considering entering it into the upcoming Canadian Home Builders’ Association’s annual SAM Awards competition in the category for best new idea. For the time being, the design program is

Sabal homes’ Chalet show home

only available for the Chalet series of townhouses but due to the success of it, expansion is likely. “It’s only going to get bigger,” says Kelly, adding that it will become part of the sales and marketing process when Sabal opens its Chalet show home in Edmonton this spring. The show homes and sales centre are open from 2 to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and noon to 5 p.m. weekends and holidays. The sales centre is located at 514 Copperpond Boulevard S.E. For more information on the Chalet series, visit www.sabalchalet.com. CL

Marty hope. For more than two decades marty Hope has been reporting on the housing and development industry in Calgary, throughout Alberta, and across Canada. In march, he was presented with the maple Leaf Award from the Canadian Home builders’ Association which is given annually to a non-builder member in Canada for contributions to the industry. CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruArY 2014

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ARoUND ToWN By Pepper rodriguez

avalon Builds hoPe From the Feet uP

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valon Master Builder in partnership with The Mustard Seed has raised funds to stuff over 300 stockings full of basic necessities and extra treats to help the homeless and disadvantaged of Calgary. For two months leading to the holidays, the sock-thermometer on the Avalon website steadily rose as trades, suppliers and staff generously donated $50.00 per sock. The goal was 300 stockings, and $15,000 dollars, by December 20th, the goal was beat. Colorful and festive stockings stuffed to the brim were delivered to The Mustard Seed ensuring more warm feet and hope this holiday season. Celebrating 30 years of building homes people love to live in, Avalon decided to return some of the support and generosity it has received over the years. “To say Alberta has been good to us would be an understatement. It’s given the people at Avalon 30 some years of doing what we love day after day, which is why it’s so important for us to

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state oF the housing nation

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give a little back”, says CEO Ryan Scott. Partnering with The Mustard Seed was a natural fit for Avalon who is in the business of providing affordable, innovative and sustainable housing. In Calgary alone over 3,500 people sleep in shelters or on the streets each night. “Giving back to the community isn’t something we do. It’s something we love to do,” says Scott. “Under the circumstances a card just wouldn’t do our gratitude justice. We’ve chosen The Mustard Seed to show our gratitude,” Scott says.

PiXel PeoPle

little over two years after breaking ground, residents are now beginning to move in at Battistella Development’s hit PIXEL condominium in Kensington. The concrete, mid-rise building with 100 units sold out in the fall, and has had an amazing architectural impact on the community, with residents and casual passers-by impressed especially by the colourfully lit, vaulted lobby fronting 9A Street N.W. The visual is quite stunning at night and adds to the neighbourhood’s cheery and welcoming air. “We will be starting possessions for PIXEL in February, where we expect 80 per cent of the building to be moving in that month too,” says Battistella’s Traci Wilson. Their follow-up project, LIDO, just down the block, is also doing well since its sales launch this year. “We are 25 per cent sold at LIDO, and we start construction this spring!” Wilson adds.

anada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) released the 2013 Canadian Housing Observer, its detailed annual review on the state of housing in Canada. Among the 2013 Observer highlights of important housing statistics, include: • According to the recently released 2011 National Household Survey 19 per cent of condominium owners in Canada were under the age of 35 and 29 per cent were seniors 65 or older. Women made up 65 per cent of condominium owner-occupants who lived alone including 76 per cent of those aged 55 and older. • Households in Canada continue to get smaller, shrinking from an average of 3.5 persons in 1971 to 2.5 in 2011. People living alone accounted for 28 per cent of households in 2011, more than double that of 1971. • The rate of Canadian residential mortgages that were three months or more in arrears continued to trend downward; declining to 0.31 per cent (below one-third of 1 per cent) in June 2013, compared to the average of 0.41 per cent in 2011. The Observer provides analysis of housing finance, housing markets, demographic and socio-economic influences on housing demand, recent trends in housing affordability and core housing need, and sustainable housing and communities — industrialized housing. CL

www.cmhc.ca/observer CO N D O L I V I N G Feb ruArY 2014

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| advertising Feature |

TrUe MiSSiON tela brings easy living convenience to Mission

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ela completes the fabric of life that weaves around the vibrant inner-city community of Mission, as its stylishly functional homes bring a contemporary yet affordable lifestyle in this most enviable part of town. This 51-unit by cdh Developments illustrates the undiminished allure the prime inner-city location of Mission. “The response has been great so far,” tela marketing and sales manager Louise Jefferies says. “Traffic to our new Sales & Information Centre on 23rd Avenue S.W. remained strong throughout the Christmas season, people really love the neighbourhood.” tela offers a stylish lifestyle that matches the easy village vibe and walkable nature of Mission. “You’re close to the action of 4th Street, you can walk to 17th Avenue or downtown, and you’re surrounded by conveniences, yet tucked away in a quiet part of the neighbourhood,” Jefferies says. With one- and two-bedroom units available in a wide variety of floor plans, Jefferies says the four-storey tela offers easy convenience and stylish living. “We have two elevators, including one dedicated to a loading dock that makes moving in a breeze, and everyone gets a parking stall in our heated underground garage and the opportunity to add another.” Available suites range from 584 to over 1,100 square-feet and start from the $280,000s. “Our homes on the fourth floor have soaring ceilings throughout with skylights over the kitchen island that give a feeling of spacious freedom. All our units also have

tall, ceiling-height windows that add to this allure.” Main floor suites have 10-foot ceilings, and those on the second and third floors are nine-feet high. “The suites are finished with modern and contemporary upgraded cabinets, allergenic-friendly flooring, stainless appliances and include a fullsized, stacked washer and dryer. And you can choose from three distinct design treatments to personalize your home.” tela also incorporates leading insulation and sound-proofing technologies offering inherent strength and durability,” she adds. “The exterior is brick and stucco and tela has beautiful green-scaping”. Each unit comes with a separately titled secure, heated underground parking stall as well as a storage space, plus bicycle storage. Additional parking stalls are also available for purchase, while still providing ample underground secure visitor parking. For more information, visit the tela sales and information centre at 104, 320 - 23rd Avenue S.W. or go to www.telacondos.ca. n

tela offers a stylish lifestyle that matches the easy village vibe and walkable nature of Mission. 96 |

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calgary map | North West, North East and Inner City MAP LEGEND

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High Volume Roads

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North West, North East and Inner City | calgary 4

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Evanston Square Red Haus Galleries Renfrew Highland Park Panorama West Kincora Summit Viridian Prospect Rise 43 Park The Post Village at West Springs Sage.Stone Estates of Valley Ridge Brownstones SageHill Village Swan Landing

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Inner City Projects

17 University City 18 Wildstone

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20 Villas at Watermark

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21 Groves of Varsity

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22 Albert Park Station

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23 Emerald Sky 24 Sonoma at Sage Hill 25 Eighty5Nine 26 Landings at Cougar Ridge 27 Arrive @ SkyView Ranch 28 Kintalla at Redstone

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29 Ginger Park

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30 IndigoSky 31 Mosaic Bridgeland

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32 Aspen Highlands

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Vogue MARK Avenue West End VEN The Montana Drake The Park First Riverfront Pointe Alura Keynote 3 Eau Claire The Guardian Verve District PIXEL by Battistella Evolution 6th and Tenth Waterfront

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increase your advertising visibility take advantage of premium positions contact:

al donegan 403.542.1347 al.donegan@sourcemediagroup.ca

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calgary map | South West, South East and Calgary Area 2

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South West, South East and Calgary Area | calgary 1 ZEN Auburn Bay 2 Ebony 3 The Gates 4 Einstein 5 Harvest Mosaic 6 The Gala 7 Stonecroft Auburn Bay

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12 Victoria Cross 13 Aura in Copperfield

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ADVERTISERS INDEX |  6th and Tenth Bel Calgary page 59 43 Park Vericon page 86

Carlisle Group pages 102-103 Chalet N0 5 Sabal Homes page 47

1912 Cross M2i page 92

Champagne Remington Development Corp. page 36

The Alexander Assured Communities page 66

CHBA – Calgary Region page 104

Arrive @ Redstone Partners Development Inc. page 24

Copperfield Park II Brad Remington Homes IFC Gatefold, pages 101 & 108

Aura Aldebaran Enterprises page 107 Avenue West End Grosvenor/Cressey page 42 The Block Avi Urban pages 30 &60 Briston Townhomes Birchwood Properties page 64 Brownstones Genesis Builders page 11

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Einstein 2 The Providence Group page 25 The Gates Remington Development Corp. page 19

Mahogany Sabal Homes page 31

The Range Birchwood Properties page 85 River Reach Jayman Masterbuilt page 17 Sawyer Silverado Avi Urban pages 30 & 60

tela condominiums pages 96-97 Toupee for a Day page 46 Valmont Riverbend Developments page 29

Glas Avalon Master Builder page 48

MARK Qualex-Landmark page 40

The Groves of Varsity Statesman page 76

Market Place Events page 81

Steps Bridgeland Giustini Bridges Inc. page 4

Mission 34 Assured Communities page 5

Stonecroft Auburn Bay page 70

Verve Fram/Slokker Developments FC, pages 14-16 & 75

Mosaic Cranston Brookfield Homes page 18

Stonecroft Copperfield page 71

Outlook at Waterfront Anthem Properties page 3

Stonecroft Highland Park page 71

Villas at Watermark MacDonald Development Corp. page 58

The Guardian Hon Towers Centre Spread Insert

Cranston Ridge Cardel Lifestyles page 9

Hunter House Streetside Developments page 6

The Edge Streetside Developments page 105

Kincora Summit Cove Properties page 88

Edison at Walden Avi Urban page 30 & 60

Kintalla Streetside Developments page 41

Einstein The Providence Group page 53

The Landings at Cougar Ridge Statesman page 52

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LIDO Battistella Developments page 65

The Park Lake Placid Development Corp. page 35 The Post Avi Urban pages 30 & 60

Stonekeep at King’s Heights Merge Developments page 66 Sunset Ridge Innovations by Jayman page 23

VEN Bucci page 90

Vogue LaCaille Group page 94 Zen, Auburn Bay Avalon Master Builder page 54


FEATURE | 

Tales from the condo zone The poop detectives Story by Jim Zang Illustration by Lama Azhari

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ave you heard about the company that some condo boards and managers are using to help track down irresponsible dog owners? You know, the ones who leave their squishy, bacteria-laden surprises on the common green spaces. It’s true, they’re called PooPrints, and dog owners who don’t pick up — beware. Not only is not picking up a huge environmental, water and health concern, it’s just plain rude. PooPrints offers a solution to the problem by collecting and storing a DNA sample from pets living in the condominium building or community. If someone spots some poop on the lawn, or a culprit in the act, all they’ve got to do is scoop it, send it to the BioPet Vet Lab, and they’ll analyze the evidence. Kind of like CSI for dogs. “If the evidence was left by your pet,” says Julie Kavanaugh, General Manager of the Calgary based company that actually has the distribution rights for PooPrints in Canada, “we can prove it”. Already, in both the U.S. and Canada, condominium management companies and homeowner associations are availing themselves of this new tactic in the ongoing war against doggie doo doo. “I call it the $500 cue-tip”, says Kavanaugh, because in some cases, boards have legislated a $500 fine in their bylaws to owners who are caught, um, empty handed. And if you think it sounds silly, just consider the fact that in Calgary area, says Kavanaugh, some parks have actually been closed due to canine fecal build-up. In other words, too much poop. “That’s the next step”, says Kavanaugh, who has been interviewed on Global News recently, “to take the idea to the city.” Got a problem with poop? For more information check out www.pooprintscanada.com. CL

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Condo Living February 2014