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VOLUME 6 I SS UE 12

contents

FAL L 2017

10

19 HOMES MARKET OVERVIEW

5 | The proof is in the pudding

COVER FEATURE

10 | Heartening growth

16

13 21

2017 numbers are up and looking good

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Heartland bustles with new builders, amenities, and infrastructure COMMUNITY

13 | Bigger and better than ever Sports Centre expansion has something for everyone

CULTURE

19 | Christmas town ‘Tis the season to be merry

PEOPLE

16 | Future Flame?

DEVELOPER FEATURE

Cochrane’s Dillon Dube provides a spark at this year’s Calgary Flames rookie camp

With its riverside lifestyle, Riversong remains as appealing as ever

22 | Riversong’s attraction

Source Media Group | Jim Zang ASSISTANT EDITOR | David Shepherd ART DIRECTOR | Jean Faye Rodriguez GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Dave Macaulay, Vivian Zhang CONTRIBUTORS | Jeff MacKinnon, David Shepherd, Carmen Solana-Martin PHOTOGRAPHY | Don Molyneaux PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR | Colleen Leier ADVERTISING SALES | Andrea Glowatsky, Jennifer Mills, Ian Serpanchy ACCOUNTING | Norma Robertson PUBLISHER

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ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

ITEMS

04 | Mayor’s message 07 | Around Town 21 | Events

Cochrane Living® is published quarterly and is available free through select distribution points in Calgary and Cochrane. Material cannot be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publishers. Copyright 2017 Source Media Group Corp. All rights reserved. Source Media Group Corp. agrees to advertise on behalf of the advertiser without responsibility for claims or misinformation made by the advertiser and acts only as an advertising medium. Source Media Group reserves the right to refuse any advertising at its sole discretion. Contact: Source Media Group, 6109 - 6th Street S.E., Calgary, AB T2H 1L9 E-mail info@sourcemediagroup.ca Tel 403.532.3101; Fax 403.532.3109 Toll free 1.888.932.3101; Printed in Canada. Distributed by Gallant Distribution Services, Media Classified, Source Media Group PUBLICATIONS AGREEMENT NO. 41072011 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Source Media Group 6109 - 6th Street S.E., Calgary, AB T2H 1L9

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message from the mayor

This

is an exciting fall for the Town of Cochrane! The new Jayman BUILT Aquatic Centre,

renovated Fireside of Cochrane Fitness Centre and the new curling facility are all fully operational at Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre. There was a great turnout for the community celebration and open house at the beginning of September; if you didn’t get there, make sure to check out this amazing community facility soon. Great fall events are part of Cochrane’s regular routine. Watch for news about golf tournaments, art shows, and sports events in our town, or sign up for a recreation or social program. There are also many local Christmas markets later in the year, and one of our most popular Main Street events: Cochrane Light Up. This fall is also Cochrane’s municipal election. Information on ways to vote, polling stations and voter ID can all be found on Cochrane.ca/ Election. If you have a copy of the Cochrane Collection Calendar in your kitchen, you may have noticed that organics collection changes to every second week in the middle of October (still on the same day of the week). If you don’t have the calendar, you can check your neighbourhood’s schedule at Cochrane.ca/Collection. Please remember that Cochrane’s time-of-day watering restrictions are in effect year-round. After our especially dry summer, you might be thinking about including more native and drought-resistant plants for next year. Fall is when your Town Council and staff are hard at work on the 2018 Town budget. Lots of budget information, including an overview of the process, and a report on the progress of capital projects is on Cochrane.ca/Budget. Council members are always available to hear your thoughts or answer questions; our contact information is on the Town website: Cochrane.ca/Council. And everyone is welcome to come to Council meetings and watch how issues are discussed and how decisions are made. Wishing you a wonderful fall,

Mayor Ivan Brooker On behalf of Town Council and staff www.cochrane.ca 

TownofCochrane 

@TownofCochrane

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homes market overview

The proof is in the pudding

2017 numbers are up and looking good n  By Brandi Holmes

N

umbers don’t lie — and the numbers for new home starts in Cochrane for the month of August are telling a pretty great story. Sometimes it is difficult to decipher Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s (CMHC) housing market data, but in this case, it’s easy. Referring to the chart below, you can see that the total number for new home starts is up 11 starts from August

2016. It isn’t a huge jump, but it will do. A closer look at the numbers by dwelling type in August 2017 shows that single-family homes are basically on par with the previous August, with only a difference of one home. But in terms of the year to date numbers, 2017 still comes out on top and it isn’t even over yet, more than doubling that of the numbers in 2016. Semi-detached and row starts are also higher than the previous August, really contributing to the staggering difference between 2016 and 2017. According to the numbers it looks as though the housing market is bouncing back in 2017. With an increase in total new home starts that Housing Starts by Dwelling Type is more than double that of new August 2017 August 2016 YTD 2017 YTD 2016 starts in 2016, builders are making Single 20 21 169 155 sure the market is saturated with a wide variety of new homes for Semi-detached 14 6 90 48 the perspective buyer. It’s easy to Row 4 0 103 21 be pessimistic, but with numbers like these it is hard to deny the posApartment 0 0 103 0 itive outlook that comes along with All 38 27 465 224 higher numbers.  n

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around town

Rocking the waves

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t's early, but it's safe to say the Jayman BUILT Aquatic Centre is a success, as it welcomed over 20,000 visitors throughout August. The community celebrated with the Rock the Waves open house on September 9th and 10th. Over 3,000 people attended the event, which featured a free swim in the aquatic centre, tours, drop-in classes, sports demos, and activities in the Fireside of Cochrane Fitness Centre. One of the most popular features? The dunk tank, which attracted participants from across the community, including

Cochrane's young curling and swimming athletes helped unveil the Legacy Donor Wall as part of the Rock the Waves Community Celebration and Open House at Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre

Cochrane Mayor Ivan Brooker sits in the dunk tank to help support Rock the Waves at the weekend event

Cochrane Mayor Ivan Brooker (l) presents a framed photo of the Jayman Built Aquatic Centre to Jay Westman, CEO, Jayman BUILT in recognition of their sponsorship of the new facility.

Transit plan on the move

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lberta Transportation approved GreenTrip funding for a local transit service this summer, allowing Cochrane to move forward with transit planning. “We are pleased that the application for $6 million in GreenTRIP funding has been approved,” says Mayor Ivan Brooker. “This allows us to move forward on this important community service.” The next step is for administration to review the Transit Feasibility Study that was presented last January, and return to Council this fall to discuss the delivery of a phased-in local transit service. Originally, Cochrane received GreenTRIP funding approval for both local and regional transit but amended the application to focus solely on local transit after the Calgary Regional Partnership began plans for regional service. n

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the mayor, members of Council, local media and business owners, and RCMP and Fire staff. Most importantly, the community showed their support for Rock the Waves by contributing nearly $2,000 through Patsy's Place barbecue, Jugo Juice smoothies, and of course, the aforementioned dunk tank. For more information on the Jayman BUILT Aquatic Centre and the rest of the renovations at Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre, check out the feature story. n

Fireside School set to open this November

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ireside School is set to greet approximately 350 students when it opens this November. The school, which will house students from communities south of the Bow River, was initially scheduled to open in September but fell victim to construction delays. Currently, Mitford School / CCA is hosting the students who would’ve started at Fireside. n

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around town

Community supporting local veterans

Electing your future

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C

he Cochrane Legion’s plan to revitalize the cenotaph is moving along quickly, says David Usherwood, the first vice president for the Cochrane Legion, as quoted in the Cochrane Times on July 25, 2017. “It’s going well. The community has been very supportive.” Back in the spring, Town Council agreed to provide $65,000 in funding to the Cochrane Legion to help build a memorial to honour fallen war heroes. The memorial, a life-sized bronze statue of a First World War soldier, is slated to be erected at the existing cenotaph before Remembrance Day — a deadline Usherwood hopes the Legion can beat, thanks to the generous donations of Cochrane residents and businesses. The cenotaph is scheduled to be a two-phase project, with the second phase focusing on landscaping. “My wish is we do phase one and two this year, [but] you just can’t pull these things out of the air,” Usherwood says, as quoted in the Cochrane Times. The Cochrane Legion continues to welcome donations from all individuals and businesses who want to help honour Canada’s veterans. Contact Usherwood at dusherwood@gmail.com for information.  n

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ochrane’s municipal general election will be held on Monday, October 16, as will the rest of the municipal elections in Alberta. In Cochrane, residents will be voting for six part-time councillors and one full-time mayor. Rocky View’s Council’s structure differs slightly and is divided into nine electoral divisions. Council members are responsible for deciding on the direction of the town, setting public policy, adopting bylaws, and setting strategic priorities for the municipal staff. If you’re not around on the 16th, you can vote in advance polls at the Spray Lake Family Sports Centre on October 7 or 14, or at the Cochrane RancheHouse on October 11 or 12. For more information, including on how and where to vote, check out Cochrane.ca/election.  n

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cover feature

APEX HEARTLAND

Heartening growth Heartland bustles with new builders, amenities, and infrastructure

n  By

Pepper Rodriguez

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t has been a busy summer at Heartland, as one of Cochrane’s most family friendly communities welcomed more new residents and is set to introduce two new home builders who share their vision for a fun, modern prairie lifestyle. It looks like an even busier fall and winter. Rohit Communities and Pacesetter Homes by Sterling Homes are joining Excel Homes, Jayman BUILT and Birchwood Properties in Heartland to widen an already impressive array of home offerings in one of Cochrane’s most popular communities. “We are really excited to introduce new show homes from our new builders which will be opening in December,” says Apex Developments’ Kayla-Rae Maurer. She says bringing in new blood in Heartland’s builder group — especially from such esteemed builders — is beneficial as “it means more variety and options for homebuyers.” This recreation-minded, family-friendly community just off Highway 1A on the western edge of Cochrane has been on the fast track to growth. The 250-acre community will have 1,500 homes on build out. There are only limited lots left in Phase 4, Maurer says. “Our two new phases have just been released with new show homes coming soon.” Heartland’s growth is also marked by the opening of a new access road. “The road of Heartland Boulevard off of Highway 1A is now open. Traffic lights have also been installed making access to the community easier and safer than ever,” Maurer says. Apex have prioritized developing Heartland’s parks, playgrounds and pathways first to give residents a sense of belonging to the communi-

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ty and give residents every opportunity to connect with their neighbours. “Residents have already been enjoying these amenities almost as soon as we started the community. We believe that this is the best way to strengthen the bonds of community,” she adds. Single-family front drive homes, semi-detached and laned homes as well as freehold townhomes are all available. Edmonton-based builder Rohit will be introducing semi-detached homes here from the $316,000s. “This will be our first development here in Cochrane, and we chose to launch in Heartland because their vision for a modern country living lifestyle is one we share,” says Rohit’s Scott Garnett.


cover feature

Birchwood Properties

Jayman BUILT

Excel Homes

Pacesetter will be bringing in laned homes, front garage homes and semi-detached homes here as well. “The lower land prices in Heartland allow us to offer our same quality homes at prices that are more attractive to our buyers,” says Pacesetter marketing manger, Michelle Lefurgey. Birchwood Properties has also recently opened new show suites for their hit The Brand townhomes. Inspired by Cochrane’s Western heritage, The Brand offers two- and three-storey townhomes with attached garages from $232,900, plus GST. Excel Homes offers both single-family and multi-family home options in Heartland and they are introducing the duplex option this year.

“We aren’t slowing down here in Heartland,” says Charla Power, area manager for Excel Homes. “This past year has been incredible, the volume of people interested in living here has definitely grown as word of what a great place to live Heartland is gets around.” “We just launched our duplexes in phase 6A,” says Power, “starting from around $324,900 to $334,900 including GST, we have double and single attached garages, and they range from 1,543 to 1,582 square-feet.” Rounding out the builder group very nicely is Jayman BUILT, a name synonymous with quality new home construction and lasting investment value. Jayman’s been building homes for a long time, generations, in fact, and they’ve been one of the region’s leading home builders for years. Jayman BUILT has two show homes here but as of time of press Jayman BUILT had only 18 lots left in phase four, ranging from 1,717 to a luxurious 2,405 square-feet. Affordability is still top of mind with homes starting from the mid $300,000s. Heartland gives residents convenient access to restaurants, shops and services, as well as some of the west’s best recreational amenities, including Ghost Lake, the Canadian Rockies and a host of parks and pathways. “The Town of Cochrane itself is also expanding, there are so many big box stores, boutique shops, and more restaurants for nights out,” Maurer points out. Heartland is also right by the intersection of Highway 1A and Highway 22, which makes travelling to Calgary, Banff and Kananaskis easy. Although the community seems to be on the fast track to growth, the heartfelt connections, family-friendly accessibility and a slower pace of being are still the ways of life in Heartland.   n

For more information, visit www.heartlandcochrane.com

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community

Bigger and better than ever

Sports Centre expansion has something for everyone n  By Carmen Solana-Martin

B

e prepared to react with awe the first time you visit the newly expanded 340,000 square foot Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre (SLSFSC). The SLSFSC is a state-of-the-art recreation and sports facility that is home to many different user groups from the community of Cochrane and surrounding areas of Rocky View County. Construction on the $48 million, 145,000 square foot expansion began in March 2015. “If you haven’t come out since our expansion you will be taken aback by these amazing new facilities in Cochrane,” says General Manager and Executive Director Robin Mitchell. “We have effectively doubled the size of the overall centre.” People who have used the new facilities since the Jayman BUILT Aquatic Centre opened in July are very excited to have new sport and recreational opportunities available in Cochrane. “It is not the Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre you remember,” he adds. “There is literally something here for everyone.” Cochrane Living was invited to tour the new facility, and we decided to bring you along on the ride. For more information, please visit www. slssportscentre.com.

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“If you haven’t come out since our expansion you

will be taken aback by these amazing new facilities in

Cochrane. We have effectively doubled the size…” COCHRANE LIVING

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community

JAYMAN BUILT AQUATIC CENTRE The new Jayman BUILT Aquatic Centre is an impressive facility that goes far beyond the standard flat water swimming pool. The lap pool is equipped with eight 25-metre lanes for people’s fitness needs. For families and children looking for fun, the aquatic centre has a leisure pool with a lazy river, ‘car wash’ and wave chamber, two water slides, water dumping features, a large hot tub, and an outdoor seasonal spray park. “We love hearing the squeals and seeing the excited looks on the faces of the kids when they play in the aquatic centre,” says Mitchell. There is also a warm water therapy pool which is designed to allow for water wheel chair access. People use this pool for rehabilitation due to ailments, or to aid recovery from surgery. The therapy pool is also beneficial for people looking to increase their range of motion due to mobility concerns.

CURLING CENTRE Another exciting addition to the facility is the Curling Centre which boasts six full curling sheets and three junior curling sheets. It is now home to the Cochrane Curling Club. The SLSFSC offers ‘learn to curl programs’ for adults and youth, and will provide beginner leagues. “The Curling Centre has tons of viewing on both levels that will expose the sport to people who may then decide to participate,” says Mitchell. “We are really excited with the new curling centre and equipment,” adds Curling Bookings & Programs Coordinator Morgan Muise. “We hope to increase visibility of the sport and attract new curling members.”

FIRESIDE OF COCHRANE FITNESS CENTRE The new Fireside of Cochrane Fitness Centre has a variety of strength training options and cardio equipment such as treadmills, bikes, ellipticals, and rowers. “The total fitness workout space has tripled in size and rivals any fitness centre in Calgary,” says Mitchell. A climbing wall that will provide fun and fitness for the entire family is under construction and is expected to open later this year. New restaurants Jugo Juice and Patsy’s offer delicious food and refreshments.

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community

“It is not the

Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre you remember.

There is literally something here for everyone.” HOCKEY RINKS There are three NHL size ice (85 by 200 feet) surfaces. The three Totem Arenas are used for hockey, ringette, figure skating, inline hockey, summer hockey, training camps, and special events such as trade shows and the Summer Kid Zone, with giant inflatables.

GARMIN INDOOR RUNNING AND WALKING TRACK The Garmin Indoor Running and Walking Track is a three lane 225 metre walk/run track that is wheelchair and stroller accessible.

MARTIAL ARTS STUDIO PHILERGOS FIELD The Philergos Field (84 by 180 feet) is a full indoor soccer turf which also accommodates lacrosse, football, carpet bowling and trade shows.

The Martial Arts Studio is a 1,600 square-foot facility used for martial arts, heavy bag, kick boxing and barefoot Zumba.

CHILD MINDING ROOM GYMNASIUM Users of the full-size Gymnasium (75 by 95 feet) can play basketball, volleyball, badminton, and pickleball. In the winter, giant inflatables are set up on the weekends for drop-in and birthday parties.

The new Child Minding Room has proven to be a very well utilized service for SLSFSC members. The SLSFSC has three birthday party rooms and various meeting and program rooms used for Zumba, Spin, Bootcamp, Pound, and personal training.  n

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people

Cochrane’s Dillon Dube provides a spark at this year’s Calgary Flames rookie camp

Future Flame? n By Jeff MacKinnon

T

he dream of playing hockey professionally starts at an early age. For Cochrane’s Dillon Dube, it officially began when he left town for Saskatchewan at the age of 14. It’s ironic that now, at a time when most young men his age a re leaving the nest, it looks like hockey will bring Dube back home to are the loving arms of his family. If things work out within the next couple of years, he will become a member of the Calgary Flames. Once that happens, he will be more than an occasional attendee at important family events that occur when he’s home for the summer. “I was able to take a break from camp and go to my Grandma’s birthday yesterday, which was nice,” Dube says during a small scrum interview at the Flames prospect training camp at Winsport. A 20-minute ride from the rink and the 19-year-old was eating cake at home in Cochrane, where his family has resided since he was 10. With former Flames winger Mason Raymond’s National Hockey League career appearing to be complete, Cochranites can turn their attention to watching Dube climb the ranks from junior to professional and, if all goes as planned, a spot on the Flames roster. Dube will likely spend one more season with the Kelowna Rockets of the Western Hockey League before beginning his professional career in the fall of 2018. He signed an entry-level contract with the Flames last winter and played one playoff game last spring with their top minor league team, the Stockton Heat of the American Hockey League. So how does a kid from Cochrane end up at a prospects camp for the Flames? The journey takes longer than the 40-minute drive to the Saddledome. Dube and his family moved to Cochrane from Golden, B.C., where he first got a taste of hockey playing house league. In Cochrane, he played two years at the highest level of minor hockey — Atom Tier 1 with the Cochrane Rockies then Peewee AA with the Bow Valley Timberwolves. After a year with the Bantam AAA Airdrie Extreme, Dube left home for Wilcox, Sask., to attend school and play for the famed Notre Dame Hounds for a year of Bantam AAA and Midget AAA. “I didn’t play much in Cochrane, but I’ve lived there longer than anywhere else. I’m away except for two months in the summer, but I consider it my home,” he says. The family moved to the Bow Valley at the tail end of the school year, so Dube didn’t have the luxury of relying on school and hockey to make

Dube will likely spend one more season with the Kelowna Rockets of the Western Hockey League

before beginning his professional career in the fall of 2018.

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people

friends. Sports writers are met by a smiling, friendly 19-year-old, which belies a social, easily-befriended fellow. The hockey memories from Cochrane are very good ones. “My first year I was able to win a championship there,” Dube says. “We had a great year and to be able to go to the provincials was unbelievable. Every team I played on in Cochrane we won. Those were the best memories I’ve had playing hockey because the guys I played with back then, I’m still hanging out with them to this day.” Dube became the property of the Flames when he was plucked out of the second round of the 2016 NHL entry draft from the Rockets of the Western Hockey League. Dube is expected to spend one more year in the WHL and leave junior for good in the 2018-19 season, whether that’s with the Flames themselves or in Stockton, California. His summer of 2017 also included a trip to

the Canadian national junior team camp in August in Plymouth, Michigan (Dube was a member of Canada’s world junior silver medalist last January). Dube then returned to Calgary in September to take part in the Flames main training camp and show that he can handle himself with the big boys. “I’m going to push hard to make (the Flames) decision hard, but if I go back to Kelowna, I’m going to try and be a leader. It’s the oldest I’ve ever been on a team — 19. I’ve always kind of been a rookie, so to really learn how to be a leader is going to be huge for me,” Dube says. Being drafted into the NHL, but specifically by the Flames, was a dream come true. “Nothing against other clubs but all my friends think the Flames are higher than all the other teams. It’s all they know. So, for myself to go there was more exciting for everybody, especially my parents,” he says. “I moved away when I was 14. So, to have that chance to play at home would be huge.” n

“I’ve always kind of been a rookie, so to really learn how to be a leader is going to be huge for me.” COCHRANE LIVING

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Christmas town

culture

‘Tis the season to be merry

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n  By Carmen Solana-Martin

f you want to learn the true meaning of Christmas, look no further than Cochrane, otherwise known as Christmas Town. Throughout November and December, the town’s festive folks, organizations, and charities host many holiday events full of cheer that will appeal to the child in all of us. If you’re looking to see beautiful Christmas trees, hop on a sleigh ride, or purchase some last minute gifts, you can find all of these things without leaving town!

COCHRANE LIGHT UP Saturday, November 19 from 5 – 7 p.m. — First Street, Historic Downtown Cochrane Cochrane Light Up is the kick-off to Christmas in Cochrane. “Light Up gets us into the spirit of Christmas and brings our community together,” says Co-organizer Marni Fedeyko. Dignitaries help celebrate the start of the holiday season by lighting the 30-foot Christmas tree. Festive activities include horse-drawn hay rides, visits with Santa, a Children’s Zone, face painting, and a photo booth. Holiday revelers can snack on hot dogs and warm up with hot chocolate served at 20 fire pots that will line Main Street. “Throughout the night we give away Random Acts of Kindness bags that include goodies and gift certificates donated by local businesses,” says Fedeyko. “We cap off the night with Fireworks by Global Pet Foods Cochrane.” Cochrane Light Up hosts a silent auction with proceeds used for their annual Adopt a Family which helps make Christmas wishes come true. visit www.cochranelightup.com for more details.

“There is something for everyone on your Christmas list,” says organizer Roz Edge-Kossowan. “The market gets everyone thinking of Christmas shopping and supporting small and local businesses.” Proceeds from Photos with Santa go to the Boys and Girls Club of Cochrane. The Cochrane Activettes will be accepting donations for their food bank. A complimentary Shuttle Service will run from St Timothy’s High School and the top of the parking lot.

SECOND ANNUAL COCHRANE CHRISTMAS ARTISAN & GIFT MARKET November 25, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. — Frank Wills Memorial Hall If you’re looking for yummy treats, handmade jewellery, cozy leggings, or kitchen gadgets, you’ll find them at this market that features 30 artisans and small businesses. Visitors are encouraged to bring a non-perishable food donation for the Cochrane Food Bank. For more information, take a look at www.tangledtreearts.com.

WINTER WONDERLAND SLEIGH RIDE November 26, 1 – 4 p.m. — Historic Cochrane Ranche Site Get your tickets for $10 at www.cochrane.ca or by calling 403-851-2534. Tickets must be purchased in advance.

COCHRANE CHRISTMAS MARKET

COCHRANE FESTIVAL OF TREES

November 19, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. — Cochrane RancheHouse $2 admission, children 12 and under are free Head to the 7th annual Cochrane Christmas Market to find more than 70 vendors showcasing one-of-a kind items such as pottery, jewellery, home furnishings, decorations, clothing, and photography. You can also get your photo taken with Santa.

Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre The Cochrane Festival of Trees, hosted by the Cochrane Lioness Club, begins on December 2. Local businesses and organizations sponsor and decorate the Christmas trees. The trees are displayed near the main entrance of the SLSFSC from December 2 to December 28 and the public can vote for their favourites.

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culture

The Cochrane Activettes will be on hand collecting non-perishable food items and new, unwrapped toys for their Share Your Christmas Campaign. If you want a photo with Santa, you can find him in Santa’s Cabin at the Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre at the following times: December 2, 9, 16, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m in Cabin. December 3, 10, 17, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m in Cabin, Skating from 1:15 – 2:15 p.m.

COCHRANE FARMERS’ MARKET LAST MINUTE CHRISTMAS MARKET Saturday, December 9, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. — Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre The first Last Minute Christmas Market was hosted by Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre (SLSFSC) in 2010. With over 70 vendors, Market Manager Valerie McCracken calls the market a one stop shopping experience. “You can find everything you need for your Christmas celebration — the turkey, tasty baked goods, sweet treats, a bottle of wine, and all your gifts.” SLSFSC coordinates Skate with Santa, photos with Santa, and a Kid Zone with bouncers on market day. Non-perishable food or cash donations to the Cochrane Food Bank are encouraged. Visit www.cochrane-environment.org, and the Cochrane Farmers Market on Facebook.

traits done with a holiday theme,” says Fund Development Officer Jaimie Anton. There are also raffles and prizes. “We’ve had a great turn out over the past years, and the holidays can be a nice time of year to adopt a new furry family member,” says Anton. “People are often home more around the holidays, so it’s nice to have some extra time to spend with a new animal while they settle in.” During the day, donations are accepted and go to support the care of the animals, including medical and overall sheltering costs. Visit www.cochranehumane.ca for more details.

COCHRANE SANTA CLAUS PARADE December 9, 5 p.m. — Historic Main Street Watching the Cochrane Santa Claus parade creates childhood memories that last a lifetime. The 45-minute parade includes up to 25 floats which are decorated with lights and festive colours. Last year, between 10,000 to 12,000 people attended the Christmas-themed parade according to organizer Mick Gee. “The parade gives the community a real boost and sets up everyone for Christmas,” says Gee. “The look on the kids’ faces is absolutely priceless.” Local businesses are encouraged to put on events before and after the parade so people will shop locally in the historic downtown and enjoy the restaurants. For more details, visit www.cochranesantaclaus.ca.

MARTIN PARNELL’S NEW YEAR’S EVE ANNUAL RUN/WALK December 31 — Spray Lake Sawmills Family Sports Centre. Registration begins at 8 a.m. It might be the dead of winter, but you can still get out there and run for a good cause. “Last year, 100 people participated, and we raised money for Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan for a kayaking expedition,” says Martin Parnell. Runners can choose between a marathon, half marathon, 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre, and a 2-kilometre cookie run. Visit www.martinparnell.com for more details.

BACH TOTS PERFORMING ARTS NUTCRACKER IN A NUTSHELL

COCHRANE & AREA HUMANE SOCIETY CHRISTMAS PARTY OPEN HOUSE Saturday, December 9 from noon – 5 p.m. Experience the spirit of Christmas with some of the animals at the Cochrane & Area Humane Society’s annual Christmas Party Open House. “As part of the day, we have a bake and craft sale, and have professional pet por-

December performance dates TBA — Cochrane RancheHouse Theatre. For children up to age 6. $12 general admission tickets, free for babies 18 months and younger. Artistic Director Jenny Peters says Nutcracker in a Nutshell is a whirlwind comedic rendition of the Nutcracker ballet. The show is specially designed for little ones with performance run times of 30 minutes. “There is an interactive part after the show, where children can be part of the performance, and come to the stage to dance with the sugar plum fairies,” says Peters. Visit www.bachtots.org for more information.

COCHRANE HOME TREASURES KIDS CHRISTMAS SHOPPING EVENT Volunteers help children 12 and under to select up to five Christmas gifts for a $5 donation per child, with all donations going to support the Home Treasures Christmas Wish Program. Call 403-851-9974 or visit www.cochranehometreasures.ca for more information.  n

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events n  To list your event email your information

to jim.zang@sourcemediagroup.ca. For more listings and further information check www.cochraneevents.ca or www.cochrane-tourism.ca

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

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FOOTHILLS ART CLUB ANNUAL FALL SHOW AND SALE from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Andrews United Church, 128 1 Street East. Free admission, free draw for an original painting.

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COCHRANE HUMANE SOCIETY FALL BOOK SALE from 12 to 4 p.m. 62 Griffin Industrial Point.

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ANNUAL SPRINGBANK ARTS AND CRAFTS SALE at the Springbank Community High School Gymnasium, 32226 Springbank Road. Runs from Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free admission.

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STOCKMEN’S MEMORIAL FOUNDATION ANNUAL DINNER & AUCTION at the Cochrane RancheHouse. Doors open at 5 p.m. and dinner starts at 7. Tickets are $75 per person. All funds support the Stockmen’s Memorial Foundation Bert Sheppard Library & Archives.

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ARTIST IN RESIDENCE at the Visitor Information Centre. Karen Orser will be painting a scene from Big Hill Park, 521 1st Street West. Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sunday from 12 to 4:30 p.m.

COCHRANE HUMANE SOCIETY FALL PETICURE from 1 to 3 p.m. Get your pet’s feet ready for winter! Minimum $10 donation per pet. Dogs must be on a leash and cats in a kennel. 62 Griffin Industrial Point.

COCHRANE ROTARY YOUTH TALENT FESTIVAL at Cochrane Toyota, 8 River Heights Drive.

COCHRANE ART CLUB FINE ART SALE at St. Andrew’s United Church, 128 1st Street East between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Admission is free.

CANADIAN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE FESTIVAL at the Cochrane Public Library.

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CHRISTMAS MARKET at the Cochrane RancheHouse from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. See story on page 19.

COCHRANE LIGHT UP. First Street. 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. See story on page 19.

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COCHRANE LIONESS CHRISTMAS CRAFT MARKET at St. Andrew’s United Church, 128 1st Street East, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. $2 admission.

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BEAUPRE COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS CRAFT SALE from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Beaupre Community Hall, 15 minutes west of Cochrane. Free admission. Food concession. Vendors tables still available for $15. For more information, please call 403-932-3203.

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ARTIST IN RESIDENCE at the Visitor Information Centre. Gwen Stickels will be painting the Bow River, 521 1st Street West. Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sunday from 12 to 4:30 p.m. COCHRANE LIVING

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DECEMBER For Christmas-related events see story page 19.

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COCHRANE STUFF-A-BUS in the Canadian Tire Parking lot from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Cochrane Activettes’ Share Your Christmas Hamper Program provides food, clothing, and gifts to over 200 Cochrane families in need during this special time of year. The following items would be graciously appreciated: unwrapped toys, gifts for adolescents and teens, non-perishable food, and monetary donations. n


developer feature

TAMANI

Riversong’s attraction With its rich riverside lifestyle, Riversong remains as appealing as ever n  By

Pepper Rodriguez

W

ith the lush Bow River Valley at your feet, and the tantalizing views of the nearby Rockies just outside your window, Riversong by Tamani Communities offers a relaxed lifestyle that connects you to the surrounding natural landscape. But with some 1,000 homes already built in Riversong, the opportunities to live in this dream riverside community is fast dwindling. “We are heading into the final community within Precedence in Riversong,” says Cam Hart, Vice-President of Tamani Communities, Riversong’s developer. Precedence will be available in fall 2018 with single family, townhomes, and semi-detached homes. “This is the final community within Riversong, and we have left the best for last. This community will be nestled on the ridge above the Bow River and will feature both mountain and river views,” he says. Riversong is made up of three segments. The original Riversong; Riviera, which runs along the valley on the southern shore of the Bow River; and Precedence, a new element slated for servicing in 2018 that is located on the bench lands! Sales currently are for Riviera in Phase 9 with lots that back onto river or woodland. The four new single-family show homes that opened in spring — from Jayman BUILT and Trico Homes — have some of the most impressive views backing onto the Bow River. “This is the last detached home phase in Riversong,” Hart says. As for multifamily homes, Riversong is down to only the four townhomes left at Jayman BUILT’s The Rise. Hart says there is also land dedicated for a multi-family within Phase 9, along the river. “We are currently selling the land.” The success of Riversong can be attributed to its extraordinary closeness to nature, after all, not many communities can claim having the Bow River at its backyard. Riversong also has 19 kilometres of pathways winding through the community, two large playgrounds, 100 acres of

natural preserve lands, and they are the only new community that has direct pedestrian access to Cochrane’s downtown. “Riversong is also home to a portion of the TransCanada Trail. The TransCanada Trail, also known as the Great Trail, connects Canada’s many coasts,” Hart says. Jayman BUILT offers homes from the $430,000s. The Halcyon is their starting model with 1,977 square-feet and three bedrooms. Trico Homes offers homes from the $520,000s. Its 2,065-square-foot Berkley is popular with three bedrooms and two-anda-half baths. Ronaele Pound, Jayman BUILT Area Sales Manager says Riversong’s charms are obvious. “With the blue waters of the Bow River outside your backdoor and the Rocky Mountains as your playground just an hour away, Riviera remains the prettiest community in Southern Alberta with unprecedented low prices.” Her counterpart at Trico Homes, Kelsey Clarke, agrees, “Riviera offers homes to families who enjoy an active outdoor lifestyle. With 100 acres of natural reserve, four kilometres of paved pathways and children’s play grounds our residents can enjoy outdoor living while being close to Cochrane’s many amenities. With easy access to Calgary and Banff our residents get the best of both worlds!” “The value of the scenic amenities in Riviera is timeless,” Hart says, “and there will always be customers looking to pay a premium for homes nearby. Proximity to the amenities has ensured the home prices meets the expectations of our home buyers.”  n

For more information, visit www.riversongcochrane.com

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Cochrane Living - Fall 2017  
Cochrane Living - Fall 2017  
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