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Volume 4, Number 13 | May 10, 2012

Elizabeth and Eli Minor

Amanda and Knox Britz

Amy and Harper French

Erica and Lucia Sparhawk

Brooke, Roman and Silas DeGrasso

Chelsea and Ari Paas

Lindsay and Ivy Cheney

Jen and Jax Moss

Beth and Rosa Maun

Photos by Beth White On the SE Corner of Hwy 133 and Main Street in Carbondale

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Carbondale Commentary The views and opinions expressed on the Commentary page do not necessarily reflect those of The Sopris Sun. The Sopris Sun invites all members of the community to submit letters to the editor or guest columns. For more information, e-mail editor Lynn Burton at news@soprissun.com, or call 510-3003.

How to “ride smart” down Main Street on your bike (Editor’s note: This is the first of two columns. Bonedale Bike Week is May 17-18.) By Darryl Fuller Most of us who ride bicycles, whether daily or occasionally, have some bad habits when it comes to following the rules of the road. Some of these bad habits increase the risk of injury, like “inviting” cars to pass by riding far to the right in the “door zone.” Others make it more likely that we will find ourselves in a serious accident by riding through four-way stops without hesitation, riding at night without lights, riding on sidewalks or against traffic on the wrong side of the road. Some of these habits almost make sense. Well-meaning residents in cars often wave cyclists through four-way stops, creating a habit that makes cyclists feel they rule the intersection. For others, riding on the sidewalk provides a sense of safety (although a false sense as statistics show that riding on sidewalks is more dangerous than riding on roadways). We often rationalize riding at night without a light as no big deal because the town is so small our ride home is over before we know it (ask yourself when was the last time you were driving at night and were surprised by a cyclist). The fact is that state law recognizes bicycles as vehicles, and holds them to most of the same laws and expectations that govern how cars operate. Another important thing to note is that sidewalks are for walking. This is especially true of the downtown core, where cyclists are prohibited from the sidewalks to allow safe space for pedestrians, and because cars often can’t see cyclists on sidewalks. If rules and laws are not the most compelling argument for you, or perhaps you’re a risk taker, read on, there’s a more important reason to ride smart. Riding smart means getting to and from your destination in a safe and exemplary manner. Riding smart provides positive examples to other roadway users and creates allies and enhances driver awareness; in effect it helps drivers see cyclists as legitimate roadway users. While Carbondale is a pretty accommodating place to bicycle, let’s

face it, there’s still room for improvement. To realize these improvements we must demonstrate that we deserve them. OK, coming to a complete stop at a stop sign and losing all of your momentum can be a bummer, especially when there is no traffic around. But slowing and scanning and yielding to other users when they are first might just save your life, and it demonstrates awareness. So, what is the best way to ride smart down Main Street? Often and regularly, and whenever you can in place of driving your car. Seriously though, follow these five steps to better riding and you’ll be well on your way to riding smart! 1. Follow the rules of the road: ride with traffic and obey the same laws as motorists; use the right-most lane that heads in the direction you are traveling; obey all traffic control devices, such as stop signs, lights, and lane markings; always look back and use hand and arm signals to indicate your intention to stop, merge or turn. 2. Be visible: ride where drivers can see you; wear brightly colored clothing at all times; at night, use a white front light and red rear light or reflector; wear reflective tape or clothing. 3. Be predictable: Ride in a straight line and don’t swerve between parked cars; make eye contact with motorists to let them know you are there; do not ride on the sidewalk. 4. Anticipate conflicts: be aware of traffic around you and be prepared to take evasive action, learn braking and turning techniques to avoid crashes, be extra alert at intersections. 5.Wear a helmet: make sure that the helmet fits on top of your head, not tipped back or forward; after a crash or any impact that affects your helmet, visible or not, replace it immediately. Source: League of American Bicyclists “Five steps to better riding;”www.bikeleague.org/resources/better/. (Darryl Fuller is a member of the Carbondale Bikes, Pedestrians and Trails Commission).

Greetings from Floyd’s Pelican Bar, built on a reef off Treasure Beach in Jamaica. From left to right are: Dan Cevette, Dana Hilborn, Julie Cevette, Peggy Wilson and Richard Wilson (all of Carbondale). Courtesy photo 2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Letters exceeding that length may be edited or returned for revisions. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623.

Dandy volunteers needed Dear Editor: Calling all volunteers. Come share in this year’s Dandelion Day and Arbor Day on May 12 at Sopris Park in Carbondale. The festival is a creative community celebration of sustainability and environmental consciousness. It is the perfect time of year to come out and connect with your neighbors in the community, while enjoying a dynamic balance of social and environmental festivities and workshops. It would be great to have a diverse group of volunteers, embracing the idea of sustainability completely. This is why I am reaching out to the masses. Everything at the festival is local. There will be food, a children’s tent, music, compost, beer, and priceless lessons in backyard chickens, beekeeping and companion planting to name a few. Dandelion Day and Arbor Day are a fun celebration full of life and rejuvenation. A day of appreciation for the cooperation in nature that provides the fundamental elements of life for us all! If you’re interested in donating your valuable time to volunteer, please contact me at lacyorton@comcast.net for more details. If you are unfamiliar with sustainability, no problem. This day is meant to be a learning experience for us all to share with one another, as a community. Thanks for your time, Lacy King Carbondale

5Point livens town Dear Editor: Once again for the fifth year – our town was ALIVE with people and we have the 5 Point Film Festival to thank for the activity. Restaurants were filled to the brim, the liquor stores saw major activity, stores had people shopping, coffee shops were kept busy and even the grocery store and shops along Highway 133 were frequented by visitors to our community. For those of you who had the opportunity to join us at the Recreation Center for the films, talks and interaction with the athletes, filmmakers and sponsors, I know you would agree, the atmosphere was festive and fun. We got to see first-hand the amazing talent of local filmmakers, photographers and athletes that call Carbondale their home. For those of you who have never been, you need to put it on the list of things to do. Carbondale is on the global map of places to be. The world is talking about us this week and we have this festival and the hard work of Julie, Justin and Jake, volunteers and sponsors of the 5Point film team to thank. We are proud to sponsor such an amazing cultural film event in Carbondale. In looking forward to next year, we hope other businesses will join us in sponsoring and in-

dividuals will join the amazing group volunteering to help make this event even better. Lynn Kirchner Carbondale

Egg hunt thanks Dear Editor: Another successful town Easter egg hunt is in the basket. Once again town recreation staff hid 3,000 stuffed eggs at Sopris Park for local kids to find. Exactly one minute later, the park was swept clean. We would like to thank everybody that came out to help celebrate a beautiful Saturday morning in April. In addition to the egg hunt, we also did pictures with the Easter Bunny (which can be viewed on our Facebook page). And thanks to the generous spirit of local businesses, we also raffled off nine Easter baskets and an assortment of other prizes. We would like to recognize the following businesses for their contributions: American National Bank, City Market (Carbondale, El Jebel and Glenwood Springs), Target, the Crystal Theatre, Peppino’s Pizza and The Floral Boutique. Thank You! The Carbondale Recreation Department LETTERS page 16

To inform, inspire and build community Donations accepted online or by mail. For information call 510-3003 Editor: Lynn Burton • 510-3003 news@soprissun.com Advertising: Bob Albright • 970-927-2175 bob@soprissun.com Photographer/Writer: Jane Bachrach Ad/Page Production: Terri Ritchie Paper Boy: Cameron Wiggin Webmaster: Will Grandbois Sopris Sun, LLC Managing Board of Directors: Debbie Bruell • Peggy DeVilbiss David Johnson • Colin Laird Laura McCormick • Trina Ortega Jean Perry • Elizabeth Phillips Frank Zlogar

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970-510-3003 www.soprissun.com Visit us on facebook.com Send us your comments: feedback@soprissun.com The Sopris Sun is an LLC organized under the 501c3 non-profit structure of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.


Government, enviro-groups eye Coal Basin restoration Sopris Sun Staff Report A decade after a Mid-Continent Resources-funded reclamation project at Coal Basin ended, the 27-square-mile former coal-mining site west of Redstone has once again caught the attention of local environmental groups, the Forest Service and other government agencies. On May 1-2, the non-proďŹ t Roaring Fork Conservancy and U.S. Forest Service hosted a workshop in Redstone that attracted almost 50 resource experts to develop a strategy for carrying out restoration work at Coal Basin. The effort continues on June 22 with a day-long public tour that will be led by several resource experts.The Colorado Water Conservation Board also awarded the Roaring Fork Conservancy a $40,000 grant to be applied toward a pilot project that will evaluate the use of biochar to enhance watershed restoration in Coal Basin, according to a press release. Pitkin County’s Healthy Rivers and Streams Board contributed more than $48,000 toward the overall restoration project, including funds to host the recent workshop. “Forty years of large-scale coal mining in an area characterized by extremely unstable, steep slopes has resulted in widespread erosion and debris ows that are consistently degrading water quality and stream habitat throughout Coal Basin and contributing to sedimentation issues in the Crystal River,â€?said Roaring Fork Conservancy spokeswoman Sharon Clarke. Coal was ďŹ rst mined in Coal Basin in the early 20th century by John Cleveland Osgood, who founded Redstone as a place to house miners and their families. The mines closed after a few years but Mid-Continent reopened them in the 1950s, then closed them again in the late 1990s. Using about $3 million in funds from Mid-Continent’s forfeited reclamation bond, and additional grant money, the Colorado Department of Reclamation, Mining and Safety completed a series of restoration projects in Coal Basin from 1994-2002.

Coal Creek ows down from the former Mid-Continent coal mine site and empties into the Crystal River at Redstone, bringing with it unwanted sediment. Photo by Lynn Burton Rain and snow runoff feeds Coal Creek, which in turn empties into the Crystal River at Redstone. During the recent workshops in Redstone, participants addressed the need to coordinate the Coal Basin efforts with projects already planned for the downstream conuence area where Coal Creek meets the Crystal River, Clarke said. The workshop brought hydrologists, soils scientists, geomorphologists, ďŹ sh biologists, water quality analysts, plant ecologists and other technical experts together with highway engineers, mining reclamation experts, recreational planners and other key stakeholders from multiple federal, state and local government entities, as well as local nonproďŹ ts and private interests. Through a series of work sessions and site visits, workshop participants identiďŹ ed a framework of site assessments,

speciďŹ c types of restoration projects and potential funding opportunities that would allow them to collaborate on a longterm comprehensive restoration initiative. Despite earlier reclamation efforts, nearly 650 acres of disturbed area directly connected to the Coal Basin stream system remains. This area was targeted for “Urgent Actionâ€? in the Roaring Fork Conservancy’s recently completed Roaring Fork Watershed Plan. Clarke said the restoration effort will involve a series of projects staged over a number of years, as data and study gaps are closed, funding is obtained and individual project sponsors are identiďŹ ed. Roaring Fork Conservancy will coordinate the restoration effort with the assistance of a working group consisting of multiple stakeholders, including the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Colorado Department of Transportation, Pitkin County, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Coal Creek Cattleman’s Association, private landowners, and the Crystal Valley Environmental Protection Association. “A comprehensive public outreach and communications plan will be a critical component of this initiative, as speciďŹ c projects are scoped and prioritized for implementation,â€? Clarke continued. “We are privileged to have been selected to coordinate this multi-faceted restoration effort,â€? said Rick Lofaro, executive director of Roaring Fork Conservancy.“We built a strong network of partners, associates and volunteers during our years of work on the Roaring Fork Watershed Plan and we are excited to have another opportunity to use the full scope of our combined expertise. Like our Forest Service partners, we see this as a very signiďŹ cant, high-proďŹ le project for the Roaring Fork watershed. In Coal Basin we have a real-world laboratory to study, develop, and demonstrate restoration techniques that can potentially be used in many degraded areas of the western United States.â€?

CCAH adds development director to sta Sopris Sun Staff Report For the ďŹ rst time in its 38 years, the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities has hired a director of development. She’s Gabrielle Greeves and she’ll be working part-time for CCAH. Greeves is also the part-time development director for WindWalkers Equine Assisted Learning on Missouri Heights. “Gabrielle has extensive knowledge in all aspects of fund-raising and her skills will allow CCAH to expand its contributed support,â€?said CCAH Executive Director Amy Kimberly. Kimberly said the director of development is responsible for planning and executing the organization’s strategic and operational development. “She will work closely with the board of directors, CCAH staff, local, regional and na-

tional foundations, corporate and individual funders, and the Carbondale community to identify and grow the resources to support CCAH’s vision, arts education programs and strategic organizational development,â€? Kimberly continued. Greeves joins CCAH after several years as an independent fund-raiser, consulting on a variety of projects for non-proďŹ t organizations in the ďŹ elds of music, dance, arts, human rights, women rights and adaptive sports. “More importantly, she comes to us with experience and enthusiasm that will be a perfect match for the challenges of maintaining and garnering the additional support CCAH needs,â€? Kimberly said. Prior to her years as an independent fundraiser, Greeves was principle of fund-rais-

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ing for the Man Up Campaign in New York, and director of foundation and corporate relations for the Achilles Track Club in New York. She holds a degree in business administration and marketing from Boston University and was amended a certiďŹ cate in the ďŹ eld of philanthropy and fund-raising strategy from New York University. “It is truly exciting to take on this important role to sustain and grow a vibrant cultural arts community,â€?Greeves said.“At CCAH, we are not merely teaching a child to play piano, to produce a ďŹ lm or to dance. We are shaping meaningful, passionate lives. Working with such a dedicated, creative history to achieve this excites me.â€? Greeves said she calls herself a fund-raiser,

Gabrielle Greeves has joined the CCAH staff as its ďŹ rst director of development. Her hiring comes as CCAH continues to offer art education in Carbondale schools. Photo by Jane Bachrach

CCAH page 14

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Submitted press release The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office has responded to multiple indecent exposure calls on the Red Hill, Lorax and Rio Grande Trails. Three separate reports of a naked man running or hiding in the brush, all three suspect descriptions are similar. One incident was of a male masturbating in the bushes just off the Rio Grande Trail, this suspect description is not consistent with the other reports. As we continue to review and investigate similar sightings in the Carbondale area, The Garfield County Sheriff’s office is asking citizens to be vigilant with their safety, carry a cell phone in case of emergency and report any suspicious occurrences immediately. Never, Never, Walk alone! Always have at least one partner, be aware of your surroundings at all times, look, listen and do not become complacent, do not put yourself in harm’s way if you witness something inappropriate. It’s important to be confident, loud and not willing to be a victim of any crime. Together with your involvement, your eyes and ears we can address these troubling instances as a community. Do not put your safety in jeopardy, call 9-1-1 immediately. Remain anonymous and earn up to $1,000 by calling 945-0101 or visiting www.garcocrimestoppers.com.


From humble beginnings: Dandelion Day turns 14 By Sue Gray Special to The Sopris Sun From a humble beginning to a mighty force for environmental consciousness, Dandelion Day has come a long way since 1999. Originally begun as an opportunity for community volunteers to pull weeds in Sopris Park rather than see it sprayed with toxic herbicides, the annual springtime festival has blossomed into a beautiful expression of love for our planet. After concerned citizens successfully lobbied the town trustees to end the use of herbicides in our parks, the dandelion was adopted as the town flower and given its day of recognition. This little yellow flower has been detested by homeowners for many years, but it was once a highly regarded vegetable brought to America on the Mayflower, which incidentally was what dandelions were called in Europe centuries ago. All parts of the plant are edible and nutritious, as well as providing nitrogen to the soil and aerating lawns and fields better than any mechanical device. Conversely, the herbicides used to eliminate weeds have been linked to cancer, and when applied to parks and sports fields get tracked indoors and can be detected in carpeting over a year later. This fact warrants non-elimination or manual removal of dandelions, which is the town of Carbondale’s policy regarding its parks. Now Dandelion Day, like the flower it celebrates, blooms every spring. The fourteenth annual “creative community celebration of sustainability and environmental consciousness” will find Sopris Park filled with ecologically friendly booths, plant vendors, workshop demonstrations, a kid’s art project, beer garden, yummy local food and

musicians galore. The events begin on Friday, May 11 at 12:30 p.m. with a tour of Clean Energy Collective’s Solar Garden at 401 Tree Farm Rd. in El Jebel. That evening at 8 p.m. there will be the Songwriter’s Showcase at Steve’s Guitars where local composers will compete for the 2012 Dandelion Day theme song. The winner will perform his or her song on the Sopris Park stage on Saturday and will also receive a half-day recording session courtesy of Cool Brick Studio. The morning of May 12 begins with the Crystal River Cleanup hosted by Elk Mountain Expeditions. Volunteers are needed and should gather at The Learning Tent in Sopris Park at 8 a.m. Next comes yoga in the park with Coredination Movement Studio and tree planting at Second Street and the Rio Grande Trail, led by the town of Carbondale Tree Board. For the second year in a row, the Tree Board and Environmental Board are partnering and combining Dandelion Day with Arbor Day (see sidebar). The beloved Parade of the Species down Main Street begins at 10 a.m. Participants should come dressed as their favorite animal or plant and gather in front of KDNK on Second Street at 9:45 a.m. This is a non-motorized parade, but bicycles, wagons, dogs, horses, goats and whatnot are welcome (no dogs in the park, please). At 10:30 a.m. the opening ceremony will feature Mayor Stacey Bernot declaring May 12, 2012 as Arbor Day. The Order of the Dandelion award will also be given to two outstanding citizens for their contributions to the community in regard to sustainability (vote at http://apps.facebook.com/my-polls/ 38ctnmhq). Beginning at 11 a.m., an assortment of

JAS Band Battle serves up 14 groups Sopris Sun Staff Report The Dandelion Day Band Battle in Sopris Park serves up 14 student bands from Aspen to Rifle, including Ska Mitzvah, Wall of the Fallen, No Joes and Z Squared. The battle is presented by Jazz Aspen Snowmass. “It is one of the most exciting community events that JAS produces throughout the year,” said JAS President Jim Horowitz. “To be able to sit outside and enjoy such eclectic music from so many of

our valley students is a great way to spend the afternoon. We highly encourage the community to come out and support these fantastic young musicians.” New this year, audience members will be able to vote for their favorite performance throughout the event by posting the band’s name to @jazzaspen on Twitter or on the JAS In-Schools Facebook page. JAS will present a special prize to the fan favorite at the end of the day.

workshops will be held at The Learning Tent. These include Backyard Chickens, Beekeeping, Tree Pruning, Teaching Children about Sustainability, Garden Pest Management, and Building with Natural Plaster. The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities hosts a children’s art workshop where kids can paint cloth shopping bags to give to mom for Mother’s Day. In addition to music by local performers, Jazz Aspen Snowmass’s Bands Battle will take place on stage. The beer garden will feature local microbrews. Bring your own cup for a discount. Dandelion Day sponsors include: CLEER (Garfield Clean Energy), ECOS, Evergreen Events, KDNK, Belinski Tree Care, CORE, Sunsense Solar, the Roaring Fork Transit Authority and Alpine Bank. To become a sponsor, contact Candace at 963-2043. If you would like to help out with the festivities, contact Lacy at 379-4617. For more information visit www.facebook.com/carbondaledandelionday.

Arbor Day Arbor Day (from the Latin word meaning “tree”) originated in Nebraska City, Nebraska on April 10, 1872 as an event to involve the public in the care and planting of trees. An estimated 1 million trees were planted that day. Many countries now observe a similar day. In America, National Arbor Day is the last Friday in April, but anyone can use the term “Arbor Day” as well as hold the celebration on a date that corresponds with a suitable planting season in their area. Thanks to the cooperation between Carbondale’s Environmental Board and Tree Board, Arbor Day 2012 corresponds with Dandelion Day, held the Saturday before Mother’s Day.

Band Battle schedule

1:00 p.m. – Rewind (Aspen Middle School) 1:15 p.m. – Wake (GSHS/RFHS) 1:30 p.m. – Glenwood MS Jazz (GSMS) 1:45 p.m. – Karla Sanchez (GSHS) 2:00 p.m. – Ska Mitzvah (Yampah HS) 2:15 p.m. – Wall of the Fallen (RHS) 2:35 p.m. – Rifle High School Jazz 2:55 p.m. – Karyme Meixuerio (GSHS)

Dandelion Day schedule

Friday, May 11 12:30 p.m. – Clean Energy Collective’s “solar garden” tour at 401 Tree Farm Dr. (948-7732) 8 p.m. – Songwriter’s Showcase at Steve’s Guitars, $10 for non-songwriters Saturday, May 12 in Sopris Park 8 a.m. – Crystal River Cleanup Sponsored by Elk Mountain Expeditions (volunteers meet at The Learning Tent) 9 a.m. – Yoga with Coredination Movement 9 a.m. – Tree Planting at Second Street and the Rio Grande Trail 10 a.m. – Parade of the Species (gather at 9:45 a.m.) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Compost Judging (bring your samples to CRMPI booth) 10:30 a.m. – Opening Ceremony and the Order of the Dandelion award presented 10:45 a.m. – Beer booth opens 10:45 a.m. – Music with Slidewhistle 11 a.m. – Workshop: Backyard Chickens 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Kids Art Tent (paint a reusable shopping bag) Noon – Slow Bike Race at the Sopris Park stage; also, a Beekeeping Workshop 12:15 p.m. – Music with The Dandy Ladies 12:40 p.m. – Music with the winning contest songwriter 1 p.m. – Workshop: Tree Pruning Basics 1:30 p.m. – Workshop: Using Children’s Literature to Teach Sustainability 1-5 p.m. – Music with JAS Band Battle 2 p.m. – Workshop: Garden Pest Management with Companion Plants 2:30 p.m. – Smokey Bear 3 p.m. – Workshop: Clay and Lime Plasters 4 p.m. – Workshop: Bicycle Maintenance 5 p.m. – Closing

3:10 p.m. – Boomtown (Aspen Elem./MS/Country Day) 3:25 p.m. – Levi Hoselton (GSHS) 3:40 p.m. – No Joes (Waldorf/ Montesori/RFHS) 4:00 p.m. – Glenwood High School Jazz 4:15 p.m. – JAS Select Band (RFHS/GSHS) 4:30 p.m. – Z Squared (RFHS) 4:50 p.m. – Awards ceremony

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Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to news@SoprisSun.com.

In honor of Kelly Osborn Beth Broome is organizing a Livestrong fund-raiser in honor of Kelly Osborn at Carbondale Beer Works at 7 p.m. on May 19. Here’s part of a message she sent to The Sopris Sun. “I am in my ďŹ fth year as a amateur long distance triathlete. In previous years I have raced for myself because I enjoy the challenge. This year I have decided to race for a cause larger than myself. I chose to race to raise money for Livestrong, in conjunction with Ironman events around the country. “ ‌ As opposed to other foundations that raise money for cancer research, which is needed, what people may not know is that Livestrong uses money raised to help cancer patients ďŹ nd the support they need: appropriate doctors, clinical trials, support groups, funding for bills and more. “Oz was truly a force, a hardworking, kind, and fun loving man. Kelly lost a short and difďŹ cult battle with cancer earlier this year. His infectious smile will be so greatly missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing him. “On May 19, Mile Markers, Sector 7G, and the Starlets will be taking the stage during the night to keep the party going. There’ll be a silent auction (including a signed and framed bike jersey by Lance Armstrong) a Kona Africa bike, gift certiďŹ cates and more. Come out and enjoy the celebration and help make a difference in the lives of those who need it most.â€? See you there.

bles team; Glenwood Springs High School’s Sadie Dickinson and Tessa Ebert are also playing in the state tourney as a No. 2 doubles team. The Roaring Fork Rams and Basalt Longhorns girls soccer teams headed to the front range for state tournaments on May 9. Roaring Fork played The Academy and Basalt played Colorado Academy. Scores were unavailable at press time. On a related note, several Roaring Fork boys are playing on the area Grand Gents rugby team, which is also headed to the state tournament.

Sol kick-starts Sol Theatre Company has started a $10,000 fund-raising campaign on kickstarter.com. The new children’s theatre company’s ďŹ rst production (“Jacob and the Technicolor Dream Coatâ€?) is coming up soon. The Roaring Fork Lacrosse Club (formerly Carbondale Lacrosse) recently returned from a tournament in Grand Junction. The team is comprised of seventh and eighth graders and the entire club has 48 players from Glenwood Springs to Basalt. The seventh and eighth graders are coached by Joe Lang and Tripp Sutro. Their season concludes in early June in Denver. Courtesy photo

Emerson and Eller win Incumbents Bob Emerson and Lou Eller were re-elected to the ďŹ ve member Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District board of directors in Tuesday’s mail-in election. Emerson chalked up 840 votes, followed by Eller with 601. Challenger Kathryn Wright Ortiz recorded 527 votes. Emerson and

Eller will serve four-year terms. The other ďŹ re board members are Gene Schilling, Mike Kennedy and Mark Chain.

Headed to state Roaring Fork High School’s Zarate Yaritaz and Shaeley Lough are headed to the state tennis tournament as a No. 3 dou-

American Legion poppies available American Legion poppies are available through May at City Market and other locations. Funds raised go to helping disabled and hospitalized veterans.

They say it’s your birthday Birthday greetings go out to: Kay Bell (May 10), Camy Britt and Mark Chain (May 11), Megan Cook and Bill Jochems (May 13), Doc Philip (May 14), Greg Masse (May 15) and Cynthia ButterďŹ eld (May 16).

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6 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012


We salute our wonderful nurses DURING NURSES WEEK

OUR NURSES, LISTED BY YEARS OF SERVICE

40 Judy Burke, RN Trish Cerise, RN 39 Patty Yount, RN 38 Nancy Frizell, RN 36 Donna Tasler, RN 35 Roger Yoder, RN 34 Karen Miller, RN Pat Trauger, RN 33 Alice Brouhard, RN Barbara Cebula-McCune, RN Anne Grosholz, RN Linda McFarland, RN Rosa O’Leary, RN 32 Katie Connifey, RN 30 Berdean Madsen, RN Terry Nightingale, RN 29 Barbara Likely, RN 27 Karen Crowley, RN 26 Carol Bagen, RN Carolyn Fox, RN 24 Elaine Hallett, RN 23 Joyce Ball, RN Cheri Frank, RN 22 Julie Dunn, RN Joy Kor, RN Cindy Revesz, RN Lori Zehring, RN 21 Gabriella Haftel, RN Jean-Marie Hegarty, RN Willa Higuera, RN Karen Kalous, RN 20 Ann Martin, RN Nancy Schreiner, RN 19 Kathy Falkenberg, RN Joan Green, RN Lynn Roe, RN Vickie Smith, RN Eric Wiepking, RN 18 Anne Andersen, RN Barbara Kollar, RN Camille Schuman, RN Nancy Smith, RN Mary Wentzel, RN 17 Eileen Gielow, RN 16 Deb Wiepking, RN 15 Phyllis Coop, RN Kim Martin, RN

14

13

12

11

10

9

Suzy McCutchan, RN Jennifer McPherson, RN Laura Bradshaw, RN Robyn Burns, RN Laurale Cross, RN Tim Gay, RN Kristine Hanson, RN Eric Hanson, RN Andrea Mitchell, RN Janet Osteen, RN Ruth Belda, RN Lanea Orgill, RN Karen Schwenk, RN Judy Sluga, RN Irma Starbuck, RN Elayne Turner, RN Gretchen Wettlin, RN Tina Cox, RN Jill Garling, RN C.J. Gredig, RN Ann Johnson, RN Deb Meader, RN Kristy Stark, RN Debra Wolf, RN Cathy Zarlengo, RN Lisa Collins, RN Cathy Goodman, RN Linda Jones, RN Michelle Krelovich, RN Bonnie Nielsen, RN Maureen Nuckols, RN Lesa Russo, RN Debbie Schick-Lawrence, RN Sheri Tonozzi, RN Nancy Villegas, RN Sharon Close, RN Lauren Gueriera, RN Kris Hubbell, RN Lori Hubbell, RN Patti Miely, RN Lena Walton, RN Marilyn Winders, RN Michele Zywiec, RN Susan Anderson, RN Amanda Brooke, RN Brenda Hanson, CNM Sarah Hughes, RN

8

7

6

5

Michelle Long, RN Arla Carver, RN Michael Dehan, RN Heather Knott, RN Kathryn Laven, RN Amy May, RN Carla Ober, RN Shari Smith, RN Tara Telinde, RN Rosslynn Worley, RN Jodi Ahlstrom, RN Sarah Bell, RN Sara Carter, RN Naomi Halonen, RN Sandra Hyra, RN Heather LaMarque, RN Alane Locastro, RN Tom McCorkle, RN Cheri Bichon, RN Ellen Casey, RN Misty Cumings, RN Nolan Cumings, RN Wendy Doll, RN Cindy Doss, RN Tiffany Duncan, RN Aubrey Glenn, RN Tanya Jambor, RN Hans Lindbloom, RN April Parr, RN Fred Paulsen, RN Shelly Tellio, RN Wendy Wampler, RN Tammy Bambic, RN Karen Barbee, RN Heidi Burt, RN Joan Erpestad, RN Maureen Hanle, RN Carol Heinrichs, RN Michele Kingman, RN Jackie Lohman, RN Jordan Maguran, RN Kelly McQueen, RN Kate O’Leary, RN Kyle Orcutt, RN Katherine Passenti, RN Angela Persons,RN Leslie Riddel, RN

4

3

Michelle Schuckman, RN Elizabeth Stoffel, RN Jennifer Stowe, RN Ashley Stueber, RN Heather Taylor, RN Lee Aklinski, RN Becky Antonelli, RN Autumn Bair, RN Misty Betts, RN Beth Chow, RN Krystal Cordova, RN Heather Fochesato, RN Ashlie Gates, RN Kristi Gill, RN Dee Kirkland, RN Karlene Lambuth, RN DeEdda McLean, CNM Paula McNeil, RN Catherine Mlnarik, RN Katie Munch, RN Melissa Obuhanik, RN Brandy Pannier, RN Sarah Place, RN Catherine Plough, RN Danielle Reschke, RN Mirta Reyes, RN Gail Rounce, RN Annemarie Schiereck, CNM Susan Slater, RN Maria Anne Stallings, RN Kim Windsor, RN Jacqueline Wood, RN Elizabeth Amlie, RN Niki Arnhold, RN Karin Bannerot, RN Jeanine Cervantes, RN Gloria Classen, RN Ross Corwin, RN Douglas Folk, RN Molly Garland, RN Margaret Gloor, RN Carolyn Hagist, RN Rachelle Hall, RN Theresa Hall, CNM Sue Hanson, CNM Jeff Holt, RN Sara Houston, RN

2

1

Deborah Hume, RN Tina Jurmu, RN Caren Lindfors, RN Martha McBride, RN Christine Page, RN Mary Ross,RN Karen Sanson, RN Courtney Schlegel, RN Lynne Schleper, RN Janiele Schumm, RN Connie Selzer, RN Mary Jo Smith, RN John VanNostrand, RN Jessica Varela, RN Becky Allmon, RN Karen Courtney-Gerbaz, RN Valerie Curry, RN Gina Dipasquo, RN Lisa Domer,RN Amanda Durham, RN Ashley Gilley, RN Diane Heald, RN Lee-Anne Hewitt, RN Pamela Hitchcock, RN Ann Lewis, RN Trish Martin, RN Shannon McMahon, RN Sandra Morris, RN CeciliaSilfverskiold, RN Peggy Vidakovich, RN Deborah Willet, RN Carley Abbott, Rn Tammy Baxter, RN Debra Chapman, CNM Laurie Cohen, RN Elizabeth DeMarco, RN Eli DeSouza, RN Julie DeVilbiss, RN Holly Eckhart, RN Caroline Field, RN Joel Fisher, RN Tina Fitch, RN Diantha Fitzgerald, RN Dharam Friedberg, RN Juana Garcia, RN Amy Gillette, RN Kelley Hill, RN

Joleen Incze, RN Ketrah Kerst, RN Trish Kramer, RN Jennifer Lang, RN Rebecca Lundin, RN Stephanie Miller, RN Jessica Morton, RN Jennifer Nelson, RN Norine Oelrich, RN Elizabeth Owen, RN Jennifer Pokorny,RN Monica Rodriguez,RN Mandy Rooks, RN Maggie Seymour, RN Justin Shavalier, RN Bonnie Sihler, CNM Katherine Spry, RN Tasha Sternberg, RN Jennifer Tighe, RN Amy Turley, RN David Turner, RN Sheila Van Valkenburg, RN Bethany Van Wyk, RN Lindsay Vara, RN Sarah Weatherred, RN Heather Westcott, RN <1 Lynn Ames, RN Breanna Bouris, RN Tasha Faubion, RN Jennifer Fotorny, RN Tonya Golden, RN Reed Krause, RN Shana Light, RN Natalie Markuson, RN Janice Martin, RN Alyse Poll, RN KristinPrice, RN Emily Smith, RN Barbara Stirling, RN Stephanie Sugars-Morsett, RN Catherine White, RN Catherine Wontor, RN

VALLEY VIEW HOSPITAL 1906 Blake Avenue, Glenwood Springs * 945.6535 • www.vvh.org


BLM accepting comments on proposed Sutey exchange Sopris Sun Staff Report The Bureau of Land Management is seeking public comment on the proposed Sutey Ranch land exchange in Eagle, Garfield and Pitkin counties. Maps and details about the potential land exchange, which is being facilitated by Western Land Group, are available at www.blm.gov/co/crvfo. The BLM will host a public open house meeting on May 31 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Carbondale Town Hall to provide information and answer questions about the proposal, according to a press release. Under the proposal, BLM would acquire the 557-acre Sutey Ranch adjacent to the popular Red Hill Special Recreation Area north of Carbondale, including the historic water rights from the ranch. BLM would also receive 117 acres in Pitkin County along Prince Creek Road adjacent to The Crown area southeast of Carbondale. “This private parcel is a highly popular area with mountain bikers and is used to access BLM roads and trails,”said the BLM spokesman. The BLM would exchange three parcels totaling 1,268 acres in Pitkin County south of Carbondale that are mostly surrounded by private land and are difficult for the public to access. These parcels would be transferred to the Two Shoes Ranch. In Eagle County, the BLM would exchange three parcels totaling 195 acres on Horse Mountain southwest of Eagle, which has little public access.This parcel

would be transferred to the Lady Belle Ranch. Conservation easements that would prevent development from occurring on the lands that would become private would be placed simultaneously at closing by Two Shoes Ranch and Lady Belle Ranch. The BLM would also receive a $1.1 million donation from the land exchange proponent— $100,000 to cover BLM’s cost to develop a site-specific management plan for the newly acquired parcels and $1 million for their longterm management. “BLM will only go forward with a land exchange if it is in the public’s interest,” said BLM Colorado River Valley Field Manager Steve Bennett. “We’ll take a broad range of interests into account as part of our detailed evaluation process, and we need to hear about any specific concerns or issues. The more specific the feedback, the more effective it will be.” After the public comment period closes, the BLM will begin an environmental assessment of the proposal. A final decision is currently expected in 2013. “It’s important to remember that BLM land exchanges are evaluated based on the value of the lands involved – they are not straight acre-for-acre exchanges,”Bennett said. Comments can be mailed to the Bureau of Land Management, 2300 River Frontage Road, Silt, CO 81652 or e-mailed to BLM_CO_SI_CRVFO_Webmail@blm.gov.

A gunman robbed the Wells Fargo Bank on Highway 133 at about 4 p.m. on May 5 and got away with an undisclosed amount of money. Carbondale police and the FBI are investigating. The robber (shown here) is believed to have been wearing a black wig and fake mustache. He is described as approximately 5’8” tall and about 150 pounds. He forced five employees and one customer behind the bank counter and tied them up. Then stole a bank employee’s car to make his getaway. The car has since been recovered. Within minutes of the suspect leaving the bank, an employee was able to break free. The employee ran out of the bank and told a family member, who was waiting in the parking lot to pick him up.

ALOHA MOUNTAIN CYCLERY a l PRESENTS

! A Z O O L A P A E Free K I B nu n a nd o c e s the

Saturday & Sunday, May 19 & 20 580 Highway 133

mountain bike demo rides from Kona, Cervelo, Rocky Mountain and Niner Sat. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m

Free food & beverages, music and plenty of bike centric fun!

Call 963-2500 for further information 8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012


Trustees OK solar swap By Lynn Burton Sopris Sun Staff Writer The Carbondale trustees on Tuesday night did something theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never previously been asked to do. The board voted 7-0 to waive the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;energy off-setâ&#x20AC;? requirement for a house under construction in River Valley Ranch. In return, the home owners (Charlie and Megan Cook) will contract with the Clean Energy Collective to become part of one of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solar arrays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to purchase renewable energy and feel the best way to provide clean energy is in a utility scale system that has long term maintenance and allows us to play a meaningful role in reducing the (electric) utilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dependency on fossil fuels with renewable energy,â&#x20AC;? wrote the Cooks in a memo to the town. The El Jebel-based Clean Energy Collective sells individual solar panels in its multipanel arrays. Local utilities, such as Excel Energy or Holy Cross, buy the electricity produced by the array and credit the solar-panel ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bills. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone in the community with a utility bill can participate,â&#x20AC;?said a Clean Energy Collective memo to the trustees. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solar arrays are located around the state, including the Blue Lake area along Highway 82 and the GarďŹ eld CountyAirport. Other local arrays slated for completion this year or next will be located outside Carbondale at the LaFarge gravel pit on County Road 109 and across from RiďŹ&#x201A;e High School.

Clean Energy Collective (CEC) was founded by Roaring Fork Valley native Paul Spencer. The Carbondale Board of Trustees passed an ordinance a few years ago that applies to new homes of more than 3,000 square feet that requires owners to install a small renewable energy system on site or pay a fee. According to the ordinance, options for complying with the minimum renewable energy system are:â&#x20AC;&#x153;two panel solar hot water for domestic hot water for houses between 3,0005,000 square feet; or solar electric system for houses over 3,000 square feet; or pay a fee; or other system exceeding this performance.â&#x20AC;? The fee options range from $3,000 to $20,000 depending on house size up to 10,000 square feet, according to a memo from town manager Jay Harrington. The Cooks concluded their memo by saying community solar such as Clean Energy Collective is a better ďŹ nancial investment than on-site solar.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only do we get more power and credits for the same price as a roof-top system we get maintenance and better equipment.â&#x20AC;? After the meeting, trustee Allyn Harvey said â&#x20AC;&#x153;I appreciate the Cooks and CEC for bringing this idea forward. Giving homeowners another option for meeting the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy goals makes sense.â&#x20AC;? In other business from Tuesday night, the trustees approved special event liquor licenses for Bonedale Bike Week and PAC3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming Music in the Mountains and heard several updates.

    



        

    

                





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THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ MAY 10, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 9


Community Calendar

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Saturday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted. For up-to-the-minute valley-wide event listings, check out the Community Calendar online at soprissun.com. View and submit events online at soprissun.com/calendar.

THURSDAY May 10

SATURDAY May 12

LOVINS SPEAKS • Amory Lovins gives his talk “Reinventing Fire: Creating a Future Beyond Fossil Fuels” at Thunder River Theatre at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 at cleanenergyeconomy.net or at the door (students are free with an advance ticket). The talk is sponsored by CLEER. Info: 704-9200.

PLANT SALE • The Colorado Rocky Mountain School plant sale takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on May 12 and noon to 3 p.m. on May 13. There’ll be a great selection of organic tomatoes, herbs, vegetables and perennial and annual flowers. Info: 963-2562.

LATINO WRITERS READ • The Aspen Writers’ Foundation presents an evening of stories, discussion and music centered around the themes of immigration, immersion, alienation and assimilation at 6 p.m. at PAC3. The night features Pulitzer prize nominee Luis Alberto Urrea (“Devil’s Highway”) followed by Grammy nominated singer/songwriter Perla Batalla (“Bird on a Wire.”) Tickets are $15 for students and teachers, $20 for the general public. Info: pac3carbondale.com. ROTARY • Roaring Fork Rotary meets at Mi Casita every Thursday at noon.

FRIDAY May 11 MOVIES • The Crystal Theatre presents “The Kid with a Bike” (PG-13) at 7:30 p.m. May 11-17 and “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” (PG-13) at 5:15 p.m. May 11-15. SECOND FRIDAY • S.A.W. holds a group show and seconds sale from 6 to 9 p.m. S.A.W. (Studio for Arts and Works) is located at 978 Euclid. Info: 963-0201. LIVE MUSIC • Steve’s Guitars in the Dinkel Building presents music every Friday night.

DANDELION DAY • Carbondale celebrates Dandelion Day all today. For details, see the article in this week’s Sopris Sun. RIVER CLEAN UP • A Crystal River cleanup takes place as part of Dandelion Day, with registration from 9 to 10 a.m. at Sopris Park. Best Trash prizes will be given out. GYMKHANA • The season’s first gymkhana is held at the Gus Darien on County Road 100 east of Carbondale at 1 p.m. (check in is at noon). Each event is $5 and all ages (starting at 7) and abilities are welcome. For details, call Mike Goscha at 274-3223. The gymkhanas are held the second Saturday of the month through September. LIVE MUSIC • White House pizza presents Porchlights (sweet vocals and rippin’ guitar) on May 12, followed by Greg Masse (everyone’s favorite Carbondale rocker) on May 19 and Ananda Banks (local talent with

blues, rock and folk influences) on May 26. Info: 704-9400.

SUNDAY May 13 SEAN JEUNG SPEAKS • A Spiritual Center presents Sean Jeung as its guest speaker at 10 a.m. Tana and Jill will speak on May 20 and Jan Garrett on May 27. A Spiritual Center is located at the Third Street Center. In June Estaryia Venus gives a workshop.

MONDAY May 14 ELECTRIC CAR FILM • CORE and CLEER presents the film “Revenge of the Electric Car” at 7 p.m. at the Glenwood Springs Community Center and at 7 p.m. on May 15 at the Third Street Center. There’ll be free food and drinks plus T-shirts for the first 10 people.

TUESDAY May 15 GOLF TOURNEY • The River Valley Ranch Ladies Golf Club holds a tournament today. The signup is May 14 by noon. All abilities are welcome. Info: 963-1775.

WEDNESDAY May 16 RFHS ART SHOW • The annual Roaring Fork High School student art show takes place from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on May 17-18. It kicks off with music by student musicians, food, drink and silent auction from 6 to 8

p.m. on May 16. SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL • Roaring Fork High School holds a Shakespeare festival with an authentic Renaissance meal, games from the era and an abbreviated version of “Hamlet” from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets for the dinner ant play are $10 for adults, $5 for students and $20 per family. Info: 618-7178. “MISS REPRESENTATION” SHOWN • The film “Miss Representation” is shown at Dos Gringos at 7 p.m. and is followed by a panel discussion. ROTARY • The Rotary Club of Carbondale meets at the Carbondale Firehouse on Highway 133 Wednesdays at 7 a.m. Info: 927-0641.

Save the date FRIDAY May 18 LAMM SPEAKS • The Roaring Fork Cultural Council presents former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm at 7:30 p.m. at Thunder River Theatre. The two topics of discussion will be immigration and health care. Peggy DeVilbiss will be the moderator. Tickets are $15 at www.rfculturalcouncil.org. STUDIO TOUR • The Roaring Fork Valley Studio Tour features artists from Aspen to Glenwood Springs in their environs. The tour kicks off with an artist’s reception at 6 p.m. on May 18 at the Carbondale Community School. Tickets are $30 in advance/$35 at the door. RSVP at 963-9647. The tour itself is May 19-20.

CALENDAR page 11

Treat Mom to a Labels SHOPPING SPREE on Mother's Day! AT RED ROCK PLAZA 774 HWY 133 CARBONDALE (Next to the Co-Op) 970-510-5030

BRAND NEW MERCHANDISE AT DISCOUNT PRICES! Open Daily 11AM - 7PM, Sundays Noon to 5PM

Labels Announces Random Acts of Daily Sales (RADS)! We're picking a random item each morning for sale – could be a brand, a color, or the whole store! CHECK IN DAILY AND LET'S HAVE SOME FUN! 10 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012


Community Calendar Further Out

continued from page 10

Hold the presses

MAY 17

SATURDAY May 19

ENERGY AWARENESS • Davi Nikent presents “Energy Awareness: Awaken Your Untapped Mind” with Glenn Hartelius and Michaela Aizer from 7 to 8:30 p.m. For the venue, go to davinikent.org.

LIVESTRONG BENEFIT • A benefit for Livestrong (in memory of Kelly Osborn) takes place at Carbondale Beer Works on May 19. Osborn lost his battle with brain cancer a few months ago.

FRI. & SAT. May 18-19

SATURDAY June 9

River district gives Colorado update

WHIMSICAL WOMEN • The Whimsical Women of the West’s spring show takes place at Four Mile Creek bed and breakfast (outside Glenwood Springs) from 4 to 9 p.m. on May 18 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 19. There’ll be fiber art, jewelry, baskets, pottery, yard art, vintage fabrics, collectibles, container gardens and more. For details, call 945-4004.

HAPPENING LUAU • The Roaring Fork Rotary Foundation’s annual Happening Luau takes place at the Gathering Center on Snowmass Drive at 5 p.m. There’ll be dinner, dancing (with Big Daddy Lee), complimentary beer and wine, and live and silent auctions. Casual Hawaiian attire is optional. Tickets are $125. Info: rotarycarbondale.org.

The Colorado River Districts updates the public on expected summer conditions on the Colorado River at 6:30 p.m. on May 10 at the Eagle County Community Center in El Jebel. For details, call Martha Moore at 945-8522.

Ongoing

Crystal River Caucus meets The Crystal River Caucus holds a regularly scheduled meeting at 7 p.m. on May 10 at the Church at Redstone. The agenda includes: a presentation on the proposed Aspen airport expansion, a presentation on the recently completed Roaring Fork Watershed Plan and an election to fill a vacant caucus position. For details, call 963-2143.

Cooper holds a tea A Mother’s Day tea takes place at the Gordon Cooper Library at 2 p.m. on May 12. For details, call 963-2889.

CBW presents live music

ZUMBA • Paola Valenti gives Zumba Blast classes at 1014 Grand Ave. in Glenwood Springs Tuesdays and Thursdays. Info: 9458822.

MAYOR’S COFFEE HOUR • Chat with Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 a.m. at the Village Smithy, located at 26 S. Third St. KID’S SHOW CONTINUES • The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities Kid’s Show continues at the Third Street Center through May 18. Info: 963-1680.

VOICES FOR CHANGE • Lisa DancingLight and Annie Flynn present Voices for Change at Steve’s Guitars from 7 to 8 p.m.

Monday evenings through May 21. The suggested donation is $10 per session. Info: lisadancinglight.com.

Carbondale Beer Works on Main Street presents Our Mutual Friends at 7:30 p.m. on May 12 and an old time jam session at 7:30 p.m. on May 14.

Community meditation

CCC • The Carbondale Clay Center at the

A community meditation takes place at the Third Street Center from 6 to 7 p.m. on May 12. For details, call 963-9182.

east end of Main Street presents its kid’s show through June 1.

Silt Historical Park opens

WYLY • The Wyly Community Art Center in Basalt presents its Young Artist Studio exhibit through May 25. Included are: Emily Adams, Ashton Albright, Daniel Barnes, Harley Calbasini, Savanah Cheatham, Adele Craft, Cade Erickson, Julia Gutierrez, Jacqueline Henriquez, Jack Huggard, Brooklyn Koski, John Lehman, Lily Orben, Sirlenis Ramirez, Alyssa Szczelina, Stxio Vazquez and Jess Wiley. Info: 927-4123.

The Silt Historical Park holds Chautauqua Days from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 11-12. There’ll be demonstrations of blacksmithing, weaving, quilting, bread baking, flint napping, butter churning and more. Volunteers will be dressed in period clothing. It’s free. The park is located at Eighth and Orchard. For details, call 876-5801.

Redhead Express performs The Redhead Express, from Branson, Missouri, performs at Glenwood Springs High School at 7 p.m. on May 11. Admittance is by Glenwood Springs Community Concert Association subscription only. For details, call 945-8722.

Affordable Mothers Day gifts plus 15% off all Rose Quartz. Come find something special for Mom. GEODES, MINERALS AND CRYSTALS GLASS ART ORIGINALS AND BLOWN GLASS PAINTINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND SCULPTURES JEWELRY AND CUSTOM MADE HATS G L A S S A RT A N D G I F T S F R O M N AT U R E

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ART@RAVENHE ARTGALLERY.COM THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012 • 11


Community Briefs Food Policy Council meets

Hospice accepting volunteers

The Roaring Fork Food Policy Council hosts a Farm-to-School meeting from 2 to 5 p.m. on May 16 at CMC’s Lappala Center in Carbondale. The meeting will bring together food service directors from regional school districts, local food producers and donor foundations related to children’s health and education. To sign up, contact dawnevrabel@gmail.com. The monthly local food meet-up will also take place May 16 at the Basalt Library from 5 to 7 p.m. Topics are tower gardening and an introduction to biodynamics.

Hospice of the Valley is accepting volunteers. For details, call 927-6650.

Waldorf School open house The Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork hosts an open house for parents of students from preschool through eighth grade from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on May 10. RSVP at 963-1960.

Meditation cushion workshop Jill Scher presents a workshop on making your own felted meditation cushion at True Nature Healing Arts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 12. The cost is $70. Register at truenatureheals.com.

Snow-cone slingers needed Senior Matters is looking for volunteers to work at its Wild West Rodeo snow-cone stand starting on June 7. The rodeo takes place every Thursday through August. For details, call Dee at 963-2653.

12 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012

Lemonade Day coming The Gordon Cooper Library is accepting registration for Lemonade Day from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on May 16 and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 19. For details, call 963-2889.

Register to vote May 12 There’ll be a voter registration drive at the City Market in El Jebel from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 12. Volunteers are needed. Call 704-9535.

Jobs for young adults offered The Rocky Mountain Youth Corps is hiring 14 young adults for summer jobs. Crew members must be 18-22, a U.S. citizen, available for work June through August, in good physical condition and motivated to work outdoors with a diverse group. Crew leaders are also needed. For details, call 970-879-2135, ext.1.

Sexual abuse prevention class The Family Resource Center at Fourth and Sopris offers “Preventing Sexual Abuse: 10 Tips Every Parent Should Know to Protect your Child from Sexual Abuse” from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 15. Child care will be provided with registration. Call 319-2182.

Fishing guides point the way to their clients and some of them respond in kind. This photo was taken on the Frying Pan over the weekend. Photo by Lynn Burton

Basalt library offers classes The Basalt Regional Library offers “iPad for Beginners” at 5:30 p.m. on May 15,“Selling Your Gold Jewelry” with Murray Reynolds at 5:30 p.m. on May 23 and “The World of Terrariums” with Mountain Greenery at 5:30 p.m. on May 30. Every Monday from noon to 1 p.m. is “Mac Monday.”

Bear Aware training Colorado Parks and Wildlife holds a

Bear Aware training session at the department's new office at Canyon Creek from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 14. This group of volunteers will work in and around Glenwood Springs and eastern portions of Garfield County helping Colorado Parks and Wildlife provide information to the public about coexisting with bears. For details, call 947-2920. To get there, exit I-70 west of Glenwood Springs at Canyon Creek.

The Roaring Fork Cultural Council presents In partnership with THUNDER RIVER THEATRE IN CARBONDALE

Former Governor

Richard Lamm TECHNICIANS & INSTALLERS

Topics of discussion will be Immigration and Health Care. Two important issues that he has researched and written on extensively.

Friday, May 18 • 7:30 pm Tickets: $15 Purchase tickets online at www.rfculturalcouncil.org Or call 970-379-0114


IT’S MOTHER’S DAY! 3 DAY S

50% OFF

SUSHI PACIFIC FUSION HAWAIIAN VEGAN CATERING

568 Highway 133 Carbondale

Mother’s Day

Special MAKE MOM FEEL GOOD, TREAT HER TO A HEALTHY MEAL

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Mom’s Dinner! Includes Dinner Entrees or Our Special 3 Course Meal

Friday, May 11 - Sunday, May 13 • 5 pm - Close Dinner Reservations Are Strongly Recommended Call

970-704-0889 For Reservations Proceeds Benefit Our non-profit Community Newspaper

Take Mom Out for Dinner to Say “I Love You!”


T H E

S C H O O L

O F

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

Melanie Doskocil, Director

Now enrolling for summer ballet classes! Classes begin June 11, 2012! Ages 3-9 June 11 - August 3rd Aspen | Basalt | Carbondale Ages 10-15 June 11- July 6 (week-long workshops) Aspen

Bonedale Bike Week rolls out again May 14-18 Submitted Press Release The fifth annual Bonedale Bike Week, May 14-18, celebrates the greatest way to get around Carbondale — on a bicycle. Bonedale Bike Week volunteers will host bike-related events for kids, adults and everyone who wants to put the fun into biking. The week promotes bike awareness and knowhow to new riders young and old, strengthens the community of cyclists and promotes car-less transportation in Carbondale and beyond. Bonedale Bike Week’s generous sponsors will provide give-aways at each event, including the grand-prize Xtracycle. A kids’ bike rodeo kicks off the week’s events at 4 p.m. on May 14. Attend all the events to increase your chances of winning the Xtracycle at the Pedal Parade on May 18.

Bonedale Bike Week Schedule

May 14 7-9 a.m. – Free coffee for cyclists on the corner of Fourth and Main 4-6:30 p.m. – Kids bike rodeo at the Carbondale Recreation Center 7:30-9:30 p.m. – Spoke’N Word Limerick and Poetry Contest at Carbondale Beer Works May 15 7-9 a.m. – Free coffee for cyclists on the corner of Fourth and Main 5:30-7:30 p.m. – Happy hour and clinics at the Third Street Center 6:30 p.m. – Bike cargo design competition at the Third Street Center May 16 7-9 a.m. – Free coffee for cyclists on the corner of Fourth and Main 8:30 p.m. – “Bike-In” movie at Crystal River Meats on Fourth Street May 17 7-9 a.m. – Free coffee for cyclists on the corner of Fourth and Main 5-8 p.m. – Biking scavenger hunt at Aloha Mountain Cyclery May 18 7-9 a.m. – Free coffee for cyclists on the corner of Fourth and Main 5:30 p.m. – Pedal Parade at the Carbondale Recreation Center 6:30 p.m. – Bike Bash grand finale party at the Carbondale Recreation Center Carbondale's celebration of all things bicycle coincides with National Bike to Work Week and keeps Carbondale on the pulse of the national cycling movement. For more information, call Tracy Wilson at 970-710-1083.

CCAH continued om page 3 grant-writer and even a “shadow artist,” but what she really will be doing for CCAH in the coming months is making connections, telling CCAH’s story and requesting funds from national and local foundations, corporations and individuals to continue to support artistic expression. “The common thread running though my career has been a commitment to making the world a more just and compassionate place to live combined with a belief in the inherent ability for the arts to teach deep and lasting social change,” Greeves said. Kimberly pointed out that CCAH stepped up its arts education focus in Carbondale public schools in 2012 and is now involved in

PLEASE REGISTER FOR SUMMER CLASSES ONLINE:

0245 Sage Way, Aspen, CO 81623

www.aspensantafeballet.com

phone 970-925-7175

14 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012

Melanie@aspensantafeballet.com PHOTO: ROSALIE O’CONNOR

providing a middle school drama class, a curriculum-based marionette history experience that allowed the students to raise $500 for an orphanage in Zimbabwe, free after-school art classes for elementary school aged students and a collaborative sculpture project involving students from all schools. Earlier this year, CCAH nominated the town of Carbondale for the 2012 Governor’s Arts Award, which the town shares with Lafayette. CCAH programs include the Carbondale Mountain Fair, shows at its R2 Gallery in the Third Street Center, Summer of Music free concerts and the Green Is the New Black Fashion Extravaganza.


Lamm talks immigration, health care at TRTC

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Youth

Luis Alberto Urrea (shown here) reads from his books and vocalist Perla Batalla performs at the kick off to the Aspen Writer’s Foundation “The Great Read” at PAC3 on May 10 at 6 p.m. Urrea is a Pulitzer prize finalist and Batalla was nominated for a Grammy. Tickets are $20 ($15 for students and teachers) at pac3carbondale.com. “The Great Read” is focusing on modern Latin America and the Caribbean. For a reading list, go to aspenwriters.org.

Register Now!

Sustainability

“Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmenting of America” (1985) and “The Challenge of an Aging Society: The Future of U.S. Health Care” in 2005. Articles include “Indicators of Decline” for Futurist magazine in 1993. In his book “Megatraumas: America at the Year 2000” he predicted “The U.S. economy will be debt-ridden, with structural unemployment nearing 20 percent. The U.S. will have the lowest percentage of capital investment and lowest growth in productivity and savings of any major industrialized country. The middle class will be wiped out by these inter-related economic predicaments. … The U.S. has the most expensive and inefficient health-care system in the world.” Lamm unsuccessfully ran for a seat on the Board of Directors of the Sierra Club in 2004. He urged that the Sierra Club advocate immigration controls as a way to limit environmental degradation due to population growth. During a 2011 interview, Lamm clarified that he believes “legal immigration has been good for America. The success of Silicon Valley shows we need entrepreneurial immigrants with skills to bring to our country.” Lamm serves as the chairman of the advisory board of the Federation for American Immigration Reform and on the board of directors of the Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America.

Transfer-Level

Former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm speaks on immigration and health care at Thunder River Theatre at 7:30 p.m. on May 18 as part of the Roaring Fork Cultural Council’s ongoing lecture series. Tickets are $15 at the door and also at www.rfculturalcouncil.org. Lamm, 76, was selected as one of Time magazine’s “200 Young Leaders of America” in 1974. In 1972, as a member of the Colorado General Assembly, Lamm led the movement against Denver’s hosting of the 1976 Winter Olympics. Running as a Democrat on a platform of limited growth, he was elected governor in 1974 and served until 1987. His dire predictions for the future of Social Security and health care earned him the nickname “Governor Gloom.” In 1996, Lamm criticized both his own Democratic Party and the Republican Party, saying, “I think both political parties are controlled by special interest money, and I’ve had enough of it.” He continued, “The Democrats are too close to the trial lawyers and the National Education Association. The Republicans are too close to the radical right.” In the same year, he ran for the Reform Party’s nomination for president but was defeated by party founder Ross Perot. Before running for office, Lamm was a certified public accountant and later a lawyer. He has written numerous books, including “Population and the Law” in 1972,

give your brain a nice, healthy glow.

Personal Interest

Sopris Sun Staff Report

summer, This summer r,

THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012 • 15


Letters continued om page 2 Support Udall’s bill

Similarities

Dear Editor: I am writing to express my support for Sen. Udall’s Central Mountain Outdoor Heritage proposal. This proposal would add areas in mid-elevation locals that are crucial to wildlife, watershed protection and air quality. This proposal is based on a decade of work already done by a coalition of conservation groups who have met with landowners and recreation groups and other stakeholders. The proposal stands at 340,000 acres, less than half of what it was in the beginning of the process. I am proud of the work that these groups have accomplished and now is the time to get this legislation passed. I had the good fortune to fly over some of the areas that are in our valley with Bruce Gordon of Ecoflight. I was able to see how important these areas are to protect. There are no “do-overs” when it comes to protecting the wilderness. Once they are gone, they cannot be replaced. I urge you to contact Sen. Udall’s Web site (markudall.senate.gov) and read more about this and tell the senator how you feel about protecting our lands. To find out about Ecoflight and their mission to educate citizens by showing them what is at stake from the air, go to ecoflight.org. Sally Norwood Carbondale

Dear Editor: The big similarities between the economic problems of the United States and Europe are: exploitation of a crisis, an attack on social programs, draining of wealth from the general population and excessive flows of capital. “The committee that really runs the world,” as a Colorado columnist likes to joke (no joke), has its fingerprints all over this. There is only one class of people that benefit under these conditions. The very wealthy become wealthier. It is no accident that those with the greatest potential tax liabilities (under a progressive tax structure) are the very same people that finance the efforts to not only reduce tax rates, but to eliminate the very kinds of government enterprises that exist on those same tax revenues. That is why in Colorado, Anschutz and Coors (et al) back (successfully) propositions to limit property tax collections. Doing so leads to cuts in education, health care, unions and pensions. Nationally, we have seen the firing of hundreds of thousands of teachers and other government employees, with attacks on their collective bargaining agreements. An organization known as A.L.E.C. has provided the strategies and prepared the legislative bills needed. A.L.E.C. is funded by multi-billionaires

16 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012

like the Koch brothers and a host of large corporations. In Europe, the reigning financial managers have all forced similar “austerity” measures on their respective countries in response to the same screams of “debt crisis” that have been heard here. The financial root is as follows: Capitalism is the accumulation of capital; only so much capital can be created and taken by conventional means; therefore, the major lenders have contrived a scheme that transfers wealth from the lower to the upper classes. Essentially, loans are made — to individuals and nations as well — that cannot be maintained. In the case of individuals, their property is confiscated and they are left bankrupt and without assets. In the case of countries, the taxpayers are stuck with the bill and they receive no benefits for it. In fact, they lose benefits. The general public is defenseless because they must rely on representative governments to protect them. The representatives have been bought or scared off. We are looking at the biggest crime, and the biggest transfer of wealth, in human history. Six decades of prosperity and earnings of citizens worldwide are now being reversed. From his grave, Marx is saying: “See!” Patrick Hunter Carbondale

Di Campo thanks Dear Editor: Steve Di Campo was diagnosed with lung cancer in July of 2010. In December 2010 a benefit was held to help Steve with his battle. I talked several times with Steve after the benefit and he was so overwhelmed with the outpouring of support that he was struggling with putting his gratitude in words. The monetary help was great but what really blew him away was the number of friends that showed up for him. We would like to thank everyone who donated the 59 silent auction items. For the food and drink we would like to thank Roaring Fork Anglers, Alpine Anglers, Big Sid’s Bottles, Cisco Foods and Rivers Restaurant. Thanks to the Brian Long, Kendell Spiker and all the musicians that participated in the music jam. Thanks to all the people who bid and donated, and most of all thanks to everyone who showed up in support for Steve. Please join us at noon on May 19 at the base lodge of Sunlight Mountain Resort for a barbecue and party to celebrate Steve’s life. Eric Anderson Carbondale

Spellebration thanks Dear Editor: Many volunteers work together to make Spellebration the major fund-raiser benefitLETTERS page 19

Thursday, May 17, 7:00 pm Thunder River Theater Carbondale, Colorado TICKETS [$15]:

cleanenergyeconomy.net or at the door Students FREE with advance ticket

INFORMATION: 704-9200


Shopping | Dining | Culture | Recreation

VISIT BASALT & EL JEBEL At the confluence of Frying Pan and Roaring Fork Rivers THURSDAY, May 10

MONDAY, May 14

RIVERSIDE GRILL, BASALT • SALSA NIGHT has returned, every Thursday night from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. Be here early for free casual instruction by Tere and Ricardo Hernandez (formerly Jimmy’s Salsa DJ’s and local Salsa Dance instructors). They will begin every Salsa Night with free instruction from 8:30 to 9 p.m. All are welcome.

BOY’S ART CLUB, BASALT • The Wyly Art Center offers Boy’s Art Club Part III with Nicole Nagel-Gogolak. The class focuses on basic drawing, painting and sculpture, and the concepts of space, line, proportion and scale. This course for boys only will use action figures, bugs, blocks and includes all the art materials to create artwork boys will love. The Wyly Community Art Center is located at 99 Midland Ave., Basalt.

SUNDAY, May 13

TUESDAY, May 15

CUVEE WORLD BISTRO, BASALT • Enjoy Mother’s Day brunch at Cuvee World Bistro from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For the menu, go to www.cuveebistro.com.

FRYING PAN ANGLERS, BASALT • Frying Pan Anglers in downtown Basalt offers a class in fly tying Tuesdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10. Sign up at Frying Pan Anglers. For details, call 927-3441.

BASALT 970-927-6650

EDWARDS 970-569-7455

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SHOOTING RANGE OPEN The Lake Christine Shooting Range remains open until further notice. Construction of sound enclosures (originally scheduled from April 25th through May 1st) has been temporarily delayed to resolve specific design issues. Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the Town of Basalt will inform the public about future closures at Lake Christine as soon as construction has been rescheduled.

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The Green Thumb Guide

The Green Thumb Guide is printed the second Thursday of each month. If you’ve got a farm photo or tip to share, let us know at news@soprissun.com.

Some gardens tell stories if we’ll just listen To me, gardens are stories, not just a colThe following autumn, running the dogs lection of plants. You visit somewhere and on their stretch of Thompson Creek, I saw there’s an ineffable quality, an invitation that the remnants of an old car — nothing left then moves into you. It is obvious it’s special but the rusted shell just aging in the brome. and you want to stay, to bask in the atmos- What an opportunity; two stories came to phere. I think it’s time mind. One is grand, that of and history, the stories installation artist, Andy behind gardens, that genGoldsworthy, and the erate this multi-layered, sapling around which he soul-grabbing richness. built a stone cairn. The Few places have this other takes place right here By Geneviève Joëlle spirit; most do not. in Carbondale, involving an Villamizar Friends of mine live old car. I don’t know on a working ranch. Their little boy gets to Goldsworthy’s story, but I do know hints of grow up in the same home his daddy did. the old car’s. They still have manuals for farm impleIt was three or four decades ago, at a ments that are now lichen-covered artifacts “woodsy,” a secret party in the boondocks, returning to the very earth they worked. when an old man told a young girl the story After six generations, the place is a legacy. of a Model T, sentimental only to him. He Last summer, honor of all honors, the had planted a crabapple in it so no one mama asked me to help with the design of a could ever move the car. Years later, explorfront yard around their new decks. So when ing the banks of the Crystal River with her I visit, be it a toddler soirée or marg-soaked children, they stumbled upon it. She had adult play date, I’m harvesting . . . gleaning forgotten the shared moment with that old the details of not just her aesthetic preferences, man all these years, until just then. but how they live and play; the family stories; Yesterday, my own little one, Juniper, the history of their ranch. As a landscape de- and I went to find it. signer, I get to help create new stories; through It was magnificent. The crabapple was our friendship, I get to become a part of those now gnarled and in resplendent full bloom. stories. How righteous is that?! White petals drifted down on us, stirred by

Getting Grounded

ranch history. By the swing set? Parked in front by the fence? I already see the new tree, spreading a lacey canopy above; beneath, the grassy floor, so cool and inviting within the sun baked metal walls. I see daffodils in May, heady roses in June. I imagine the silken rustle of Big Bluestem blowing outside the passenger window and honeysuckle in a head on collision with the fender. I see our children playing games, sharing a first kiss; their future kids climbing Legend has it a man planted a crab tree in this carcass that tree and sneaking of a car so that it could never be moved. Photo by their first sips of bourbon “behind the wheel.” Genevieve Villamizar A sense of place, the the afternoon breeze. Juniper walked in the rootedness of a history. We spend our time driver’s door and explored the grassy floor, retelling stories and planning events to bring touched the tree trunk, grabbed the steering about new ones. My friends are terrific; rock wheel. She and her Minnie Mouse got lost steady and solid. Visiting their place feels so quickly in that enclosed little world. like coming home to me nowadays. In deLeaving, I knew we would be back. signing their garden, I’m thrilled to be a part I look forward to working with my in the creation of new tales … in a place alfriends, placing their own rusted shell of ready dense with them.

.

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18 • THE SOPRIS SUN • MAY 10, 2012

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Spring brings memories of homemade kites Having just returned from a short vacation there is something I noticed that leaves me puzzled.Where are the kites and the kite ďŹ&#x201A;yers this spring? When I was a kid you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep me indoors at this time of year. My allowance would have been saved to buy a kite at the ďŹ ve-and-dime store, replaced nowadays by the dollar store. Not that we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to make our own kites. That was a pre-requisite and fairly easy to do back in the 1950s. First you obtain the necessary material: balsam wood used to make models (but light dowels will work), glue and a By Bill Kight spool of sturdy string. You need two sticks to form a cross. The longest stick forms the upright and should be about 26 inches and the cross piece about 24 inches. Attach the shorter stick tightly with string to the longer upright stick about two inches above the middle point of the

Common Ground

Letters continued î&#x2C6;&#x2021;om page 2 ing Literacy Outreach and Colorado Mountain College Learning Labs, a success. Spellebration would not be possible without the help of creative and dedicated individuals (too numerous to mention all here). I would, however, like to offer special thanks to Enchanted Forest Creator Mindi Cabe, Team Coordinator Mary Lou HaďŹ&#x201A;inger, Silent Auction Expert Penny Farquhar and all the lovely CMC ladies: Malevolent Millicent Cynthia Cyr, Red Riding Hood Emcee Adrian Rippy-Sheehy and Fairy Godmother Steve Shute. (Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: there are others, too many to mention here). Angie Wiederhold Literacy Outreach Advocate Glenwood Springs

longer stick. This creates the kite frame in the shape of a diamond. Cut grooves in the four ends of the frame deep enough to hold string without sliding out. Pull the string through all four grooves in the wood so that you create a diamond shape where the string forming the outside of the diamond is tight. While tight, tie off the string to one of the pieces of wood. For the paper frame you can use butcher paper or thick wrapping paper. Lay the kite frame onto the paper and trace the shape of the kite onto the paper. Now go back and measure at least an additional inch or two around the shape you just traced and cut the paper on this outer line. Fold the paper over the string and glue it to create a tight body on the frame. When the glue is dry turn the kite over so that the wood frame is facing you. Tie a piece of string from your spool tightly in the groove on one end of the shorter stick and pull it across to the other end groove of the same stick. You want to make a slight bow in the shorter stick so that you have at least an inch between the paper and the string you are pulling tight. Tie off the tight string in the groove of the opposite end of the short stick. Turn the kite over so the bowed paper side faces you.Wrap

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With over 50 years of kite-ďŹ&#x201A;ying experience, Bill Kight, of Carbondale, shares his stories with readers every other week. Send him an email about your experiences with kites at bkight@rof.net.

Thanks to Udall

We need non-proďŹ ts

Dear Editor: The chance to make a real and lasting impact in the world comes along rarely. Sen. Randy Udallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement that he is proposing new wilderness for Colorado, including lands in the Roaring Fork Valley, is one of those moments. The lands in his proposal, if designated as wilderness, would be distinct among other wilderness lands in our area. They are low elevation lands, which are crucial for wildlife and are rarely protected within the Wilderness System. I applaud Sen. Udallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts and strongly encourage him to add more lands to his proposal. Katey Buster Aspen

Dear Editor: One way to appreciate our local nonproďŹ ts is to imagine a day without them. On such a day, one-half of our preschools would be closed. Young people would be without their mentors; seniors would spend yet another day alone. Our hiking trails would begin to deteriorate; our lecture halls would be dark and our music halls silent. And, of course, taxes would need to increase dramatically. Happily this is not the case. If one were to measure the overall generosity of a community by counting the number of nonproďŹ ts that its citizens support, we are a very generous populace. Aspen Community Foundation works

Service Directory nto . . . Sp r i n g i n â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I

the loose end of string from your spool around and through the notch in the wood at the top of your kite. Tie the string off at the bottom notch in the longest stick leaving a loose bridle on the outside of the kite. This is used to control the kite. Make a loop in the bridle a few inches above the center of the kite and tie the end of your spool of string onto this loop. Find some rags and make two-inch wide strips tied together for a kite tail no longer than six feet. Tie it to the bottom of your kite and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to test your creation. Find an open ďŹ eld away from any overhead electric lines and have fun. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to spend with your kid making a kite? Then buy one at a fancy kite store or where ever. The point is to get outdoors and enjoy some quality time with your children. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve told my daughters never marry a man who kicks the dog and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ&#x201A;y a kite. By the way, the name is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kightâ&#x20AC;? pronounced â&#x20AC;&#x153;kiteâ&#x20AC;? just so you know.

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Dr. Benjamin Mackin

$BS 8BTIJOH &YQSFTT %FUBJMJOH 970 963 8800 2VJDL -VCF Open Mon-Sat 8 am - 6 pm 5JSFT Sundays 9 am - 4 pm 745 Buggy Circle in Carbondale 3BDLT www.sunburstcarcare.com

with non-proďŹ ts from Aspen to Parachute that are actively working to sustain and improve the quality of life in our communities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our health, education, cultural life, and general social welfare. If you are a ďŹ nancial supporter of one or more of these non-proďŹ t organizations, thank you. If you are a staff member, thank you for your hard work and dedication. Which non-proďŹ t beneďŹ ts you or someone close to you? Tamara Tormohlen Executive Director Aspen Community Foundation

Mon., Tues., Thurs., Friday 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Wednesday 10:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.

Got Conflict? Need resolution? Quick Mediation Services 970-402-7816 Call or Email:

quickmediationservices@gmail.com

Submit Unclassifieds to unclassifieds@soprissun.com by 12 p.m. on Monday. $15 for up to 30 words, $20 for 31-50 words.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for Carbondale nonproďŹ t, part time. Be part of our exciting museums, programs, tourism and events. Are you enthusiastic? Creative? Apply at mtsoprishistoricalsociety.org. SALES PERSON WANTED part time sales opportunity with the Sopris Sun newspaper based in Carbondaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Third Street Center to sell print and web ads in the mid valley area. Previous sales experience preferred. Good customer service skills necessary. Contact Bob Albright: bob@soprissun.com 927-2175. GET THE WORD OUT IN UNCLASSIFIEDS! Rates start at $15. Email unclassiďŹ eds@soprissun.com. *Credit card payment information should be emailed to unclassiďŹ eds@soprissun.com or call 948-6563. Checks may be dropped off at our ofďŹ ce at the Third Street Center or mailed to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. Call 618-9112 for more info.

1/10 the cost of a lawyer Willing to travel Servicing all areas THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ MAY 10, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 19


AN LO D M OK AP FO IN R A NE RT XT IST W EE DIRE Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S C SO TOR CARBONDALECOMMUNITYSCHOOLPRESENTSTHETHANNUAL CARBOND ALE COMMUNIT Y SCHOOL PRESENTS THE TH ANNU AL  PR Y IS SU N! TH

MAY-

ACELEBRATION A CELEBRATION & & TOUROFART

Growing creativity!

Growing creativity!

Also look for the artist directory and map online at www.RoaringForkStudioTour.org and in newspapers Valley-wide, Wednesday, May 16th.

Growing creativity! OPENING

NIGHT: GALA silent auction, tapas, live music, art

FRIDAY, MAY 18TH, 6-10 PM AT THE CARBONDALE COMMUNITY SCHOOL CAMPUS $35 at the door, $30 purchased in advance at www.RoaringForkStudioTour.org

ALL VALLEY: TOUR SATURDAY, MAY 19TH, 10 AM-â&#x20AC;&#x2030;5 PM & SUNDAY MAY 20TH, NOON - 5 PM The Roaring Fork Studio Tour brings art lovers and artists together to engage the public in the art-making process. This year the tour spans the entire Valley from Aspen to Glenwood Springs. Meet artists in their studios and discover the exciting range of creative endeavors taking place in our Valley. Get on your bike, blades or bus and be a part of art in the making! Free

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May 10, 2012