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The

SWAP SHOP A R O TAT I O N A L B O U T I Q U E

RSA: COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION MODULE FILE SOPHIE QUANTICK


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BRIEF: DESIGN A PRODUCT OR SERVICE THAT GETS BETTER OR MORE USEFUL THE MORE PEOPLE USE IT SO THAT SHARING BECOMES MORE ATTRACTIVE AND VIABLE.

KEY WORDS AND PHRASES: Doing more with less Technological advances and changing consumer behaviours mean that sharing and leasing products as an alternative to owning or buying is easier than ever. The rapid explosion in traditional sharing, bartering, lending, trading, renting, gifting, and swapping reinvented through online technology and social networks on a scale we never knew possible before. if many people are sharing a product, how do you design it differently?

Sharing by many people of the same product means a longterm effect of less production and therefore less waste. Sharing is more cost effective than buying something for one use or occasion. Many people in urban areas find sharing increasingly attractive where neighbours are plentiful and storage space is scarce. The many forms of sharing – multiple ownership of one item or space/place, such as the shared ownership of small parcels of land, or single ownership of one product or service that is borrowed and used by many on a time-share basis, and everything in between.

RELEVANT QUESTIONS:

SUGGESTIONS:

What can easily be shared by many people and what are the benefits?

A product that can be used for many purposes, and therefore, can be used by many people in different ways

What role can design play in making sharing more attractive for everyone?

A product that actually improves through multiple users or increased overall use

Why don’t people share as much as they could?

Doesn’t easily fall into disrepair

A communications campaign that effectively highlights the benefits of sharing the particular service or product that you have identified

• •

Why don’t people share as much as they could? are there physical and mental barriers to sharing? How could the experience of sharing be enhanced?

• •

What forms of security, acknowledgement and reward could be designed to further promote sharing?

A communications campaign that encourages sharing at a general level

New or redesigned mode of public transport

A product that improves a particular mode of commuting: walking, cycling, driving, etc


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JUDGING CRITERIA: ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL BENEFIT - 20% How does your design benefit society? RESEARCH - 10% Where did you go to research this issue? With whom did you speak to or interview? What questions did you ask? What did you learn? DESIGN THINKING - 25% We want to know about your thought processes and insights. Your insights might be research based or intuitive, or a combination of both, but the judges want to see you relate the final concept clearly to these insights. What journey did you go through to get to the final result? COMMERCIAL AWARENESS - 20% Does your design make sense from a financial point of view? EXECUTION - 10% We are looking for a design that is pleasing and looks and feels well-resolved. MAGIC - 15% We are looking for a bit of ‘magic’ – a surprising or lateral design solution that delights.


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IDEA GENERATION: MY TRAIL OF THOUGHT WHAT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO GET ‘BETTER’ WITH USE?

Most things degrade with time, and a few are built well enough to not noticeaby decline in functionality when used properly. But how many actually get better after they have been used? I’m mostly thinking of items whose improvement requires use, although age can be a factor too. For example, Chinese zisha (purple clay) teapots are said to improve over time. As tea is brewed in them, the semi-porous clay absorbs some tea particles, and a patina develops on the walls of the pot. This is supposed to enhance flavor when you brew new tea. A modern commericial nuclear reactor, even at 30+ years old, runs more safely and efficiently than it did the first day it was in operation. This fact can mainly be attributed to the constant upgrading of component parts that assist in making more efficient eletricity. Cement tiles. After a while they get smoothed down and with enough walking, buffing and waxing over the years develop a patina. Some things are best when they conform to the usage patterns you subject them to. Since this is highly individual, the best way to sell these are in the “not broken in yet” state. So, while they subjectively appear to improve with age, I don’t know that another person would see it that way. My jeans are way more comfortable than when I bought them new, for example, but I don’t think anyone else would feel that way about them. There’s quite a few things that get better with breaking them in. Most any clothing item, beds, pillows, comforters, cooking utensils. Pretty much anything you put your ass on: chair, sofas, bicycle seats. It’s difficult because physical man made objects generally deteriorate with use. Although, man made objects have the ability to mould and adapt to it’s owner, through general wear and tear; possibly making the object easier to grip or operate/use therefore improving it’s use. However, the effect is not beneficial to multiple users of the object who are different shapes, sizes and strengths. Defining exactly how something will get better with more use will determine what it’s physical properties are.


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IDEA GENERATION: Anything should get better with greater knowledge and contributions.. It could be the more you use it the more advanced you get in something: Unlocking sections Games Levels Stages Achieving goals Reward Basis Working together, using different skills, combining and helping eachother. Users could get competitive, eager to unlock the next section. This could be helped by some kind of structure and narrative. Bulk buying? incentive to work together for rewards? Face to Face? Some way to help the community network, socialise and share? I need to find out what problems need solving. This research should steer the solution.

THE DIGITAL WORLD The new digital age has allowed us to design things in a non physical space. Therefore, it has a lot more power and room to develop and grow without discintergrating or wearing over time. There are many advantages to ever growing, multiple users, such as networking, and the extent to how much information can be shared and communicated. Analysing what is already out there: Google - Help systems refine their lists after every search depending on where the user clicks and what key words have been used. This is an example of a service that improves the more people that use it Same goes with Amazon, Ebay What about a digital library? Sharing knowledge could be a great way to start > Unfortunately digtial librarys have already been designed and created, to prevent ink in books from fading over years. What about a network? A kind of network where people’s knowledge is beneficial to the rest of the participants. Maybe to cure a problem in society? A Network/Forum/Wikipedia Style?


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KEY WORDS SMALL WORLD, SCALE FREE, COMMUNITY STRUCTURE, CONTROLABILITY, INFLUENCE, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, CIVIC ACTIVISTS, EMPOWERING INDIVIDUALS, WORKING WITH DISADVANTAGED PEOPLE, EDUCATIONAL METHODS. Group work skills Community development exchange? A voice to articulate concerns within communities?

WHAT ARE THE PROBLEMS IN TODAY’S SOCIETY? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Homelessness Hunger Education Over population The cost of everything Wasteful Society Racism Drug abuse Child abuse The environment - carbon footprint Cruelty to animals Celebrity culture influence Obesity Unemployment Underage drinking Financial problems- Debt Teen pregnancy STI’s

What if education wasn’t the only thing being exchanged? What do people want to trade? - Food Swaps - What do we over consume - Who has too much and who has too little? - Blood donations

SWAPPING INSTEAD OF SHOPPING A SWAP SHOP APP A way of networking for a reason. Could people ‘Swap, Rent and Lend’ all kinds of things? Restrictions such as no electrical appliances, food or dangerous items for security reasons. Does there need to be an incentive to share? Rewards for sharing? “75% of Adults woud turn to renting, lending or swapping instead of owning, if it was a more affordable option”


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IDEA GENERATION: MY IDEA NEEDS TO BE MORE SPECIFIC TO A MARKET: Urban areas where neighbours are plentiful and storage space is scarce.

What objects/items have have no benefits for holding on to: Wedding dresses Party outfits - Designer dresses (already done) - Fancy dress Storage; even smaller spaces, growing population Baby stuff - Cots - Bottles - Clothes Suitcases Only used once or twice a year, and take up space Suits for formal events - Hiring suits (Already done) Students getting rid of third year stuff

CONSIDER THE EVOLVING ENVIRONMENT Consider where there are lots of networks available to people, wireless is becoming more and more available to people. Content is starting to be designed by it’s context. Ubiquitos Computing: The act of integrating technology into the fabrics of everyday life. Content is starting to be designed for the context in which the user is in. For example, live streams of bus time arrivals are available at users beck and call depending on their location. Users want a lot more information in an instant manner. Content can be triggered by a whole range of different activities the user might undertake: •

Where they are

How fast they’re travelling

The direction their facing


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The temperature they’re at

The sound that’s in the environment

The devices that we use to have our media delivered have sensors in them that understand the context that they’re in which means you can actually trigger content on the basis of a whole load of different senses inputs. Sensors: •

Camera

Sound/Audio

Location > ‘Google cards’ already achieving this

Movement/speed

Is there anything I can provide people with?

BACK TO IDEA GENERATION: A SWAP SHOP APP In order to develop my idea I need to be more specific to a target audience and refine it’s purpose and use. I’ve realised my search for a problem is closer to home then I realise. As a young female student myself, I find myself with a wardrobe of ‘going out’ clothing that sits there for ever more and a day because I have already worn it. The amout of times I go out is relative to student living (quite a lot) and I feel a constant need to update my clothing. “New research has found that despite British women spending £83,498 on clothes in their lifetime, 60% struggle to find something to wear for a night out.” Mirror.co.uk http://www.mirror.co.uk/money/personal-finance/british-women-spend-on-average-more-1132888#ixzz2ik1uXM2M

I’ve been researching into how girls need a constant supply of certain ‘going out clothing’ to forfill their needs and calm their insecurities. Unfortunately, this luxury style of living of continuously updating and buying is a drain on money, and only provides a fresh confident feeling for just one night. Yet, this feeling is chased by women every time.


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IDEA GENERATION: HOW CAN I DESIGN A SYSTEM OR SERVICE FOR THIS MARKET? How do I resolve my own problems with this? I swap outfits with other girls, friends and housemates to get back that ‘new outfit’ feeling. It doesn’t matter that it has been worn already before because to me, it’s one i’ve never worn. The grass is always greener in their wardrobe and it seems to be a system that works well! How many girls do the same thing? Or feel the same way about their clothing? I designed a survey to take round to girls in Bristol to find out some of these questions.

I took this opportunity to design a service of how this idea could be done on mass. So when I take the survey round I could also ask for opinions on the service. I directed my audience at female students who tend to follow main stream fashion. This is a large demographic who go out a lot and have very little money to replace old clothes.Those who buy a range of clothing from basics, to vintage to high street and even sometimes lower cost designers such as french connection or whistles. This covers a wide audience and tastes.

THE IDEA The idea would be that women swap their going out clothing that is in good condition with other women for free to replace the ‘brand new outfit’ feeling they crave every time they go out. This is essentially recycling materials, reducing our waste as a society.

THIS IDEA WOULD BE A SERVICE THAT GETS BETTER AND MORE USEFUL THE MORE PEOPLE THAT USE IT, AND SHARING BECOMES ATTRACTIVE AND VIABLE.


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THE SURVEY:

1. HOW OFTEN DO YOU PURCHASE AN OUTFIT FOR A NIGHT OUT? 2. WOULD YOU WEAR AN OUTFIT ON MORE THAN ONE OCCASION? 3. IF YES, WOULD YOU FEEL CONSCIOUS OF WEARING AN OUTFIT ‘TOO OFTEN’? 4. WHAT HAPPENS TO AN OUTFIT THAT YOU DON’T WEAR ANYMORE? 5. DO YOU FEEL YOU SPEND TOO MUCH MONEY ON CLOTHES? 6. DO YOU EVER SELL YOUR UNWANTED CLOTHES? 7. WHAT DO YOU LIKE/DISLIKE ABOUT SELLING THEM? 8. DO YOU EVER BUY SECOND HAND CLOTHING? MAYBE FROM CHARITY SHOPS/THRIFT STORES?

9. WOULD YOU CONSIDER TRADING YOUR USED/UNWANTED OUTFITS FOR OTHER OUTFITS TRADED IN BY OTHERS? IF: ALL ITEMS WERE CLEANED AND IN GOOD CONDITION BOTH TRADERS WERE ANONYMOUS SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW WHO IT BELONGED TO IT DIDN’T REQUIRE ANY MONEY? This service would be designed as an app that you could find on your apple or android app store. Within the app is the option to select your university. Users would create an account under an anonymous name. Traders would post a picture up of the item with a description, and if of interest to someone, asked to drop it off into a location at uni (one main place). This ‘manned’ designated place would be for pick ups and drop offs (such as the SU reception opposite the SU shop – just an idea). When retrieving the item you bagged on the app, it would be in a bag with your user name on it, left by the owner. NO need for postage or involvement of money. Although, postage is available as an option if necessary

10. THIS IDEA IS STILL IN THE PROCESS OF DESIGN. WOULD THERE BE ANY CONCERNS OR REASONS FOR WHY YOU WOULDN’T BE INTERESTED? OR SUGGESTIONS TO BETTER THE SERVICE?


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FEEDBACK I decided it would be a good idea to survey people face to face giving out a pen and paper survey. This gave me a great opportunity to get more personal feedback; where people felt comfortable asking questions and sharing their thoughts. Here are some people’s answers: “Yes, I’d be interested but how would sizes work?” “Yes, I’d be interested but I’d rather get rid of clothes as opposed to getting more clothes”

“Such a good idea!”

“Sounds a bit complicated that maybe that’s just the description? I also don’t o w n /p l a n o n o w n i n g a s m a r t p h o n e ”

“If it’s a nice piece of clothing, maybe a well known brand then maybe?” “I want this. I wouldn’t want people coming up to me and telling me it was their ’s before” “I have no suggestions, this idea sounds great. Just as long as advertising didn’t take long! As in advertising your own clothes!”

“It wouldn’t have to be free I would pay a little - not a lot. Love it!”

“Yes, I’d be interested. I have no suggestions it sounds like a good idea, great to have as an app very user friendly”

“No suggestions! I’m interested” “ N o, I o n l y b u y n e w. I m a y use the service if it was of new clothes with tags still on or of a particular designer”

“There would probably be more people taking items than posting them. Maybe a system where only when people have posted an item of theirs they can get one in return”


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“Yes, I’d be interested, but do you both have to like one of each other ’s items to switch? Is there a buy option incase they don’t like one of your items?”

“Yes I’m interested but could be embarrassing if you spot someone at uni selling the item you have sold or vise versa”

“No, unless they were the same quality of item e.g. Cashmere for cashmere���

“Sounds great idea for student target market. Just make sure clothing is presented well and CLEAN!”

“Yes, I’d be interested if it was clothes that were nice! Why does it have to be anonymous? I think it’s a good idea but doesn’t need to be anonymous. The drop off and pick up point would be really good. So much easier :)”

“No suggestions I like the idea! :)” “ D e f i n i t e l y. I h a v e b e e n t o Swap Shop events before. I could definitely use this w e b s i t e /a p p ! ” “No because you’d be buying it off people who you go to uni with so you could see people wearing your old clothes. Rather buy it from a charity shop where you wouldn’t see the person”

“I don’t have any s u g g e s t i o n s . G R E AT I D E A”

“Yes, I’d be interested but what if the person you wanted to swap with didn’t want any of your clothes? Would you just be giving it away for free?”


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HOW OFTEN DO YOU PURCHASE AN OUTFIT FOR A NIGHT OUT?

60% 40% Often!

Not very often

DO YOU FEEL YOU SPEND TOO MUCH MONEY ON CLOTHES?

53% 46% YES!

No

DO YOU LIKE IT? WOULD YOU USE IT?

86% 14% No

YES!


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The idea developed immensely from the feedback it received. A significant contribution was from a fashion design student who recommended the idea using labels to ensure a fair and happy trade. She referenced TK MAXX as an example that works well with labels, to clearly define what time of clothing someone is picking up in the shop. This is an innovative way of separating garments on Swap Shop in a clear and easy way. The same questions and concerns seemed to keep coming up; one in particular about the concern of how nice the clothes were on the site. This is were the labels come in to action. To ensure high standard, happy swaps

CHANGING THE PERCEPTION OF A SWAP SHOP How successful are Swap Shops? My own personal assosiations with Swap Shops are physical Swap Shops held on stools in universities or in public which rarely succeed or have much of a drive or following. People tend to forget to participate / neglect to put ‘nice’ clothes in and generally ignore it altogether. I went down to my local SU reception where I noticed a Swap Shop happening on my door step (which I’d never noticed, regardless of walking past it for a few days). There was about 8 items of clothing on a skinny rail, most that were considered ‘junk’ types of clothes; items that people couldn’t sell. The posters advertising it were florescent green cards with sharpie pen ‘Swap Shop’ scribbled over them, sadly not grabbing anyone’s interest. I went to speak to the runner of the Swap Shop at my university, a worker in the SU reception. She told me it was in aid of ‘Sustainability week’ at UWE. I asked how successful the Swap Shop had been, and it hadn’t been much of a success. She said people don’t notice the stand much and don’t have much interest in it. I asked why this was and she said people are too reserved to take an item and aren’t putting in ‘nice’ enough clothes to attract attention. I then spoke of my ‘collaborative consumption’ brief where I had designed the concept of a free Swap Shop that is a website and an app, and asked what she thought of the concept. She was very positive about the idea, saying people are more likely to contribute and participate if it is an app on their phone that they can access at any time to browse. They can shop in privacy and can choose when they want to shop. I asked if she would help with having the designated place for ‘drop off and pick ups’ at the SU reception. She was very happy to help and we discussed the idea of using a box that people could use to drop off items and take items out. The items could be put in a bag with the username of the person picking it up written somewhere on it. This was perfect.

A solution to changing people’s perception could be in the branding; when a brand seems well established, marketed well, has a large following and looks simular to or just as high standard as it’s other competitors, people begin to accept and trust it.


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SECOND HAND SOCIETY It has become a lot more socially acceptable in our society to trade second hand items.

Here are examples of how second hand trading is starting to become a trend:

• Ebay is an example of a successful and popular way to recycle and purchase other people’s second hand and unwanted items.

• Freecycle • Charity shops - which seem to be experiencing a resurgence in people buying • Gok Wan’s recycled fashion work shop • Marks & Spencer’s Joanna Lumley’s ‘Shwopping’ which asks people to bring in their unwanted clothes to M&S stores and they will pass them on to Oxfam, so far they have received

The current economic climate, less resources and the awareness of the dangers to our environment means recycling has become much more of a socially acceptable and encouraged thing to do. People have less disposable income, and my idea of a free way to swap and shop is the way forward in the market.


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ANALYSING HOW IT WILL WORK

1. SWAP SHOP IS A MEMBERS ONLY SITE Swap shop is for female students. Sign in, and select your university. Members will only browse what other members at their university have put up, making it a university-thing. This ensures the ‘no money needed swaps’ with directing members to their drop off and pick up point.

2. ONLY MEMBERS WHO CONTRIBUTE ITEMS CAN SWAP Contribute an item to one of four labels and Swap Shop is happy for you select one back from that label!

3. LABELS SIGNAL WHAT SECTION YOU CAN SWAP IN The item you contribute to Swap Shop will recieve one of four labels: Designer, Vintage, High Street and Basics. Your label will determine what kind of clothing you have contributed. You are free to browse and select an item in the same label to recieve in return.This guarantees a fair and happy swap!

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YOU MAY LIKE THEIR DRESS BUT THEY DON’T LIKE YOUR TROUSERS. NO PROBLEM! Swap Shop doesn’t operate on a swap with one partner system. You mix within a label your given. Labels have different sizes, types of garmets, but the same standard of clothing.

5. THE ITEM YOU SWAP IS NO LONGER YOURS.. BUT! You get another lovely item to replace it that you have chosen! Imagine giving up a lovely french connection dress for a - just - as - lovely Whistles dress. There’s no loosing out! There is a no - return policy. Members are welcome to report any bad swap cases to Swap Shop.

6. MEMBERS GET RATED Is the item your dropping off clean? Have you dropped it off in good time? Does your description of it match up to the real life piece? Member’s will receive feedback on their swaps to ensure a trust worthy system. Bad swappers could receive a ban if necessary. Members are welcome to send in complaints to Swap Shop if unfair items are recieved that aren’t as they described or unclean. These items will be returned back to the owner and not to come back on the website.

7. MAINTENANCE COSTS 50p to upload an item. Unfortunately, the cost of running and maintaining a website is substantial and I would have to ask for a small contribution.


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ANALYSING HOW IT WILL WORK: LABELS

3. LABELS SIGNAL WHAT SECTION YOU CAN SWAP IN The item you contribute to Swap Shop will recieve one of four labels: Designer, Vintage, High Street and Basics. Your label will determine what kind of clothing you have contributed. You are free to browse and select an item in the same label to recieve in return.This guarantees a fair and happy swap!

DESIGNER The gold member section. Swap brands such as: Ralph Lauren,

VINTAGE The blue member section. Swap one off vintage items found anywhere!

HIGH STREET The red member section. Swap brands such as: Topshop, Zara, Urban Outfitters, Asos, etc

BASICS The green member section. Swap brands such as: Primark, New look, H&M etc

NOTES: The feedback I received made me realise how much ifs and buts are possible. I need to think of every fault that could happen so that I can find a solution quickly.

Initially I was going to make the service completely free, but I received feedback regarding concerns of how the service would support itself.


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BRANDING SWAP SHOP Understanding the current market and what works.

The

SWAP SHOP A R O TAT I O N A L B O U T I Q U E

In order for Swap Shop to succeed it needed a powerful brand image to mark it’s place amongst the other clothing brands. It needed to be neat, conscise and aesthetically pleasing. It needed to attract the target audience and represent what it was all about (the tag line helped, a lot!). It also had to be original and have that stand out factor, which it certainly does with the yellow band across the top.

The

SWAP SHOP A R O TAT I O N A L B O U T I Q U E

The logo needed to illustrate what it does. The logo features an arrow in the O representing a circular, rotating effect with references to recycling; which incorporates the ‘collaborative consumption’ concept. In additional feedback regarding the logo, my peers were concerned about using the name ‘swap shop’ because of it’s sometimes negative associations. I considered using ‘The Rotational Boutique’ as the name and tried many other simular phrases but struggled with communicating it’s purpose. Nothing communicates a swap shop like the words swap shop, so I made the decision to keep the name but make sure it was classy and branded well.


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In terms of the look of the Swap Shop I based this upon the target market of who liked the concept. Most were girly girls either based in fashion in Bower Ashton or academic students based on Frenchay campus of Bristol’s UWE university. I wanted to make the branding as classy and established looking as possible; when I first speak of a Swap Shop concept sometimes people’s initial negative associations with the traditional swaps cloud their judgement on my concept. I recognised, as soon as I showed the branding / website and explained the innovative design of this certain Swap Shop people are far more enticed and positive of the concept. I also recognised the kinds of girls that were buying outfits for nights outs and occasions were those who dress more towards high street fashion; which differs to the current ‘hipster’, arty look that a lot of creative students in Bower Ashton would wear. I took inspiration from Asos in particular, a very successful online – only high street style clothing shop. Asos is always bang on trend and I wanted to study the style of their website design; what is it that looked ‘fashionable’, and why are they so successful if they don’t have a physical shop. I recognised their branding was very strong; the logo was bold, short and sweet, with a simple tag line, and their website resembled a magazine. I also looked at Topshop, Miss Selfridge, Urban Outfitters, Zara and other big successful high street brands. To make my ‘Rotational Boutique’ effective I had to design a brand that covered all of the brands above under one logo. I also had to represent designer and vintage fashion, as well as basic clothing, and appeal to all audiences. I did this by making it look as simple and established as possible, with striking colours that are currently on trend; such as the florescent yellow and monotone shades.


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MY MOODBOARD WHEN DESIGNING Contemporary fashion design/graphic design. Classy, sleek and aesthetically pleasing


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MY MOODBOARD WHEN DESIGNING LABELS

High Street


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H I G H

S T R E E T

The

BASICS

The

VINTAGE S E C T I O N

S E C T I O N

The

The

DESIGNER S E C T I O N

HIGH STREET S E C T I O N


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PREVIOUS EXPERIMENTS

SWAPSHOP SHARING IS THE NEW SHOPPING

The

The

SWAP SHOP

SWAP SHOP COLLECTION

The

ROTATIONAL

BOUTIQUE THE PROFIT IN SHARING

SHARING IS THE NEW SHOPPING

The

The

The

SWAP SWAP SHOP SHOP COLLECTION

SWAP SHOP

COLLECTION

SWAPSHOP THE ROTATIONAL BOUTIQUE

SHARING IS THE NEW SHOPPING

The

SWAP SHOP A R O TAT I O N A L B O U T I Q U E

NEW IN

B R O W S E C LOT H E S

S W A P C LOT H E S

Dresses Skirts Blouses & Shirts To p s & T- s h i r t s Shorts

Th e

HI STR GH EET SE

Playsuits Coats & Jackets Accessories Bags & Purses Shoes

HOW IT WORKS!

CT

IO

N

HOW IT WORKS

HELP


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HOW WOULD THE DESIGN WORK ACROSS COLLATERAL?

Imagery plays a large part in communicating the idealistic view of what I imagine Swap Shop to become and look like. The images help establish the brand and are specific to the kinds of clothing the audience wears themselves. So far, the effect has been powerful; changing people’s traditional negative views of Swap Shops into positives!


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HOW WOULD THE DESIGN WORK ACROSS COLLATERAL? Here are screen shots of my experiments


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THE FINAL PIECES


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THE PITCH DOCUMENT Screen shots of the experiments that went into making the document.


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QUANTICK SOPHIE QUANTICK DESIGN


Swap Shop Research File