Page 1

0717EPSpC1_Layout 1 7/17/17 8:17 AM Page C1


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:49 AM Page C2

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 1 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:50 AM Page 1

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 4 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp02_Layout 1 7/17/17 3:18 PM Page 2

CONTENTS

PUBLISHER

Danny J. Salchert OFFICE MANAGER

Anita Salchert CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Derek Gaylard CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Pam Fulmer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Tom Shaughnessy • Philip Santoro

18

PRESIDENT

Danny J. Salchert

COVER STORY 6 Facility & Equipment Grounding Practices By Tom Shaughnessy

CASE STUDY 18 Karl Chevrolet Reduces Energy Use 74 Percent with Hubbell Lighting

FEATURE 26

4 Tools that Boost Electrical Contractors’ Success By Philip Santoro

DEPARTMENTS 30 Product Spotlights 40 Ad Index ON THE COVER Photo courtesy of Sonel Test & Measurement

2

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

Executive and Advertising Offices 2009 Eagle Ridge Drive Birmingham, AL 35242 toll free: 800.981.4541 phone: 205.981.4541 fax: 205.981.4544 www.epsmag.net • danny@epsmag.net Electrical Products & Solutions™ is published twelve times a year on a monthly basis by ABD Communications, Inc., 3591 Cahaba Beach Road, Birmingham, Alabama, 35242, USA. Electrical Products & Solutions™ is distributed free to qualified subscribers. Non-qualified subscription rates are $57.00 per year in the U.S. and Canada and $84.00 per year for foreign subscribers (surface mail). U.S. Postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama and additional mailing offices. Electrical Products & Solutions™ is distributed to qualified readers in the electrical contracting industry. Publisher is not liable for all content (including editorial and illustrations provided by advertisers) of advertisements published and does not accept responsibility for any claims made against the publisher. It is the advertiser’s or agency’s responsibility to obtain appropriate releases on any item or individuals pictured in an advertisement. Reproduction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ABD Communications, Inc., P.O. Box 382885 Birmingham, Alabama 35238-2885

PRINTED IN THE USA


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:50 AM Page 3

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 5 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:50 AM Page 4

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 6 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:50 AM Page 5

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 7 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp06,08,12,14_v2_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:09 AM Page 6

cover STORY

SonelÂŽ Test & Measurement

Facility & Equipment Grounding Practices Proper and careful grounding techniques can improve equipment performance and assure safe operation By Tom Shaughnessy

Introduction If concerns about grounding were strictly relegated to power grounding, the topic would be complicated enough. However, specialized grounding techniques have evolved to meet the perceived grounding requirements of electronic equipment. Terms such as single point grounding, multiple point grounding, isolated grounding, and equipotential reference grounding are among a host of terms which reflect varying grounding ideologies. In some cases, grounding practices have 6

evolved out of desperate measures to keep electronic equipment working in the field. So, what worked once or twice in the past can become the de facto approach to all grounding requirements. Grounding need not be complicated, but when a lack of understanding is mixed with folklore and tradition, grounding can become exceedingly complex. Worse yet, the combination of ignorance and misguided installation practices may contribute to interference potentials at a site and actually degrade overall equipment performance.

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

Facility & Equipment Grounding Best Practices The primary goal of grounding throughout a facility is safety. Grounding is implemented to ensure rapid fault clearing and to prevent hazardous voltage rise during a fault. As such, good grounding reduces the risk of fires or injury to personnel. The National Electrical Code (NEC) goes into great detail describing the processes by which a grounding electrode system should be established for a facility. In essence, at the electrical service entrance, the neutral Continued on page 8


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:52 AM Page 7

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 8 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp06,08,12,14_v2_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:09 AM Page 8

cover STORY

Sonel® Test & Measurement Continued from page 6

of the incoming electrical service is bonded to building structural steel, the incoming water pipes, and to made grounding electrodes (commonly – ground rods). In recent releases of the NEC, the steel reinforcing bars of concrete floors are also added to recommended connections. Figure 1 shows the recommended connections to structural steel, incoming water pipes and a made electrode. The bonding ensures continuity between any metallic structure in the facility which might be energized during a fault and serves to “reference” the AC voltage with respect to earth. Establishing the facility grounding electrode system effectively holds the electrical service at earth potential. The term grounding is frequently used in the US whereas outside the US the term earthing may be used. From the electrical service entrance, grounding extends out contiguously and continuously along with power conductors to points of use throughout the facil-

Figure 1: NEC-Prescribed Service Entrance Grounding

ity. The grounding must be integral because the inductive effects caused by any grounding conductor placement which is separate and distant from that of the phase conductors could negate fault clearing and

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 40 ON READER SERVICE CARD

8

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

could cause undue voltage rise in faulted equipment. When the US adopted the three-wire system (one live, one neutral and one grounding conductor for Continued on page 12


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:52 AM Page 9

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 9 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:53 AM Page 10

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 10 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:54 AM Page 11

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 11 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp06,08,12,14_v2_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:10 AM Page 12

cover STORY

Sonel® Test & Measurement Continued from page 8

single phase circuits), the intent was to prevent the dual use of a conductor as both a grounding and current carrying conductor. Thus, the National Electrical Code (NEC) refers to intentional current flow in the grounding means as objectionable ground current. In reality, current does flow in the grounding conductor and there exist some very interesting exceptions (e.g., electric ranges and clothes dryers in the past). Two normal sources of current flow in the grounding of a facility are power frequency leakage currents and high frequency emissions from electronic equipment. The power frequency leakage current from any single plug connected device is limited by UL. Note, however, that limits on leakage current do not apply to permanently connected equipment. This applies to both US and European standards. The FCC limits higher frequency emissions but the limits will vary from equipment destined for use inside a home versus equipment used in an industrial application. As equipment density increases in a facility, so does the magnitude of current flow in the grounding of the facility.

Suspect Grounding Schemes The practice of grounding facilities and equipment would be fairly straightforward were it not for electronic equipment. When designers of computers referenced the logic circuits in equipment to the AC safety ground, the Pandora’s box of grounding was opened. With the logic circuits referenced to the equipment chassis ground, any small amount of chassis potential caused by current flow in the grounding of the device could cause reference error in the equipment. During the early days of electronic equipment development, many differing grounding scenarios became popular. Supplemental grounding, isolated grounding and the “one-Ohm-ground” are among the more infamous of grounding schemes which arose during this interval.

Supplemental Grounding In practice, supplemental grounding is frequently achieved by driving a ground rod close by the device and an external grounding conductor then connects the ground rod to the chassis of the “grounded” device. There are myriad potential problems caused 12

Figure 2: Grounding embedded in foundation.

Figure 3: Perimeter ground ring tied to ground rods.

by this practice. Some of the worst problems include the formation of transient current flow through the chassis of the device and the risk of sinking facility fault currents through this grounding connection. Supplemental grounding is a bad idea and should be avoided.

fects of localized electromagnetic interference. In an NEC-compliant isolated grounding system, the receptacles used to power equipment are built without a bond between the grounding screw and the mechanical ground for the receptacle box. The receptacle is grounded with an insulated grounding conductor. The insulated grounding conductor must be installed in the same conduit or raceway as the current carrying conductors. The insulated grounding conductor may pass through one or many electrical panels without attachment to the mechanical ground at those panels, but it must terminate within the derived power source serving the equipment. Problems with isolated grounding systems arise when the grounding conductor bypasses the derived service and terminates, for instance, at the 480 Volt service entrance rather than at the 208 Volt service which powers the equipment. Other problems include elevated chassis potential caused by induced voltage in multiple circuit raceways and the termination of grounding at totally separate grounding points. Isolated grounding systems must be used with intelligence and care.

The “One Ohm Ground” A frequently mentioned criterion, the establishment of a grounding system with one-Ohm of resistance to earth, is found in many equipment installation specifications. The NEC requires only 25 Ohms of resistance for made electrodes and ANSI/IEEE Standard 1411986, Electric Power Distribution for Industrial Plants (IEEE Red Book), specifies a grounding resistance of 1 to 5 Ohms for large commercial facilities. In truth, the resistance of the facility grounding electrode system is important primarily because excessive resistance would lead to a large voltage rise during fault conditions. But, one Ohm of resistance at what frequency? If a facility has one Ohm of resistance as measured with a DC measurement device at the service entrance, the impedance of this grounding system will hardly be the same at a megahertz! The value of resistance at the service entrance is less important when the impedance between the equipment and the service is considered. Finally, the leakage currents of equipment do not return to the earth - power frequency leakage currents return to the derived source and high frequency leakage currents return to the equipment which generated the currents.

The Grounding Dilemma

The dilemma facing those attempting to ground equipment is complex. What happens to the power frequency leakage currents? What happens to the high frequency leakage currents? Is conduit ground adequate? How many devices can be “grounded” with a single conductor? How can one avoid chassis potential? Do data networks have any effect? What can Isolated Grounding Systems be done to limit the effects of ground refThe NEC allows the use of isolated erenced interference? The list of quesgrounding systems to help reduce the ef- tions goes on. Continued on page 14

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:56 AM Page 13

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 12 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp06,08,12,14_v2_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:10 AM Page 14

cover STORY

Sonel® Test & Measurement Continued from page 12

Grounding for Equipment Performance If there is any simple truth about equipment grounding, it is the fact that equipment grounding is won and lost at the system. External changes in grounding may affect the ultimate functionality of the system, but changes in external grounding cannot correct grounding problems which are inherent in the equipment itself. This does not mean that efforts to improve equipment grounding are fruitless. On the contrary, improving the grounding for equipment can make quite a difference. For instance, the reference grid originally described in FIPS PUB 94 (Federal Information Processing Standards Publication— Guideline on Electrical Power for ADP Installations) and now contained in the IEEE/ANSI standard (The Emerald Book) works well for equipment contained within the confines of a computer room. Unfortunately, reference grids cannot be implemented everywhere.

Good grounding for a facility establishes the base for better equipment operation within the facility. It entails a low ohmic value for earth reference at the service entrance. And it also requires that reference be maintained throughout the facility without compromising fault clearing. 1. Parity sized grounding conductors throughout 2. Grounding symmetry in all parallel feeders 3. Zones of equipment with localized transformation to isolate the equipment and to control leakage currents 4. Limiting the quantity of devices grounded by any single grounding conductor 5. Faraday cage design concepts for facility construction 6. Use of differential networks throughout the facility as opposed to single ended data networks 7. Reference grids in all computer, data processing, and information technology rooms

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD

14

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

8. Perimeter ground ring bonded to service entrance structural steel 9. Intentional continuity of structural steel 10. Bonding all communications cables to structural steel (telephone, cable TV, security systems, data networks) at the immediate point of entrance into the facility 11. Architectural steel treatment for lightning control 12. Concrete encased grounding electrode treatment per NEC for all main vertical steel footers (formerly called a Ufer ground). 13. Grounding grid below moisture barrier 14. Bonding horizontal steel pans to structural steel If care and attention are given to the grounding of a facility and the equipment within the facility, then the facility will take care of you: Ignore facility and equipment grounding and the grounding gremlins will TAKE CARE OF YOU! ❏


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:56 AM Page 15

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 13 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:56 AM Page 16

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/18/17 8:39 AM Page 17

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp18,20,22_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:11 AM Page 18

case STUDY

Hubbell Lighting

Karl Chevrolet Reduces Energy Use 74 Percent with Hubbell Lighting Project Challenge – Budget & Performance: The Best of Both Worlds At 30-acres, Karl Chevrolet is one of the largest single-line Chevrolet dealerships in the United States. The saying, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” is incredibly appropriate when discussing the scale of this massive lighting project. The success of Karl Chevrolet is predicated on its ability to have one of the largest selections of new and pre-owned vehicles in the Midwest and lighting the 30-acres at the high light level requirements is no easy task. Providing this performance in a cost-effective manner makes it even more challenging, especially when the founder, Carl Moyer, has a sharp eye for achieving and proving an acceptable return on the investment 18

(“ROI”). This is likely one of the reasons why he was a finalist for the TIME Dealer of the Year award in 2017. Since its founding in the 1970’s, Karl Chevrolet has always had a progressive outlook on new technology, proven by its willingness to demo and pursue solutions that would ultimately impact the bottom line. Management knew they wanted to replace the legacy 1,000w MH fixtures but needed a proven 1:1 replacement AND a controls solution that was both affordable and compliant with the local utility’s program requirements to qualify for a custom rebate. Balancing the need for financial and energy savings, management insisted that there be no sacrifice to light levels and uniformity. Karl Chevrolet is located close to one of the busiest stretches of interstate in the Midwest and maintaining a profes-

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

sional appearance has always been a priority for Carl Moyer. The slightest nuance is noticed, be it a single bulb that is out or malfunctioning controls. While performance and cost were important driving factors, the solution had to be dependable and work 100 percent as planned.

Hubbell Lighting’s Solution – A Product & Technology Solution Tailored for Automotive Dealerships

Tesdell Electric, Karl Chevrolet’s longtime electrical contractor, has been paying close attention to the advances that have been made in lighting Continued on page 20


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 19

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp18,20,22_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:11 AM Page 20

case STUDY

Hubbell Lighting Continued from page 18

Comparison between Karl Chevrolet and neighbor dealership

technology over the years. Tesdell had entertained numerous lighting proposals but none accomplished 100 percent of Karl Chevrolet’s goals. It wasn’t until fairly recently that the technology was available in a cost-effective solution. John Temple, Director of Corporate Lighting Technology at 3E, and Doug Olson at Lighting Solutions Iowa, developed a lighting solution that included Spaulding Lighting’s Arceos™ ARA3 and Hubbell Control Solutions’ wiSCAPE platform. The ARA3 is an ideal fixture for automotive dealerships. It was designed to create an inviting environment for cus-

tomers, while keeping them safe during their shopping experience. It is also flexible enough to accommodate different patterns of traffic flow on a typical dealership lot and implement precise lighting where it is needed most. The Arceos ARA3 was designed for mounting heights of up to 50 feet, features the latest LED technology, precision optics, thermal management and controls, while providing excellent lighting and uniformity for large area/site applications. Most importantly, the ARA3 is a 1,000w HID replacement with over 50 percent energy savings, offers three lumen options

Testimonial – “If the initial results are indicative of what’s to come, the return on this investment in luminaires and controls will be much better than initially predicted. We feel great about our decision to upgrade to LED technology and new lighting controls, especially when we see that waiting would have cost us almost $2M in savings over the next ten years. Finances and energy savings aside, the appearance of our entire property is simply outstanding at night.” – Shaun Rydl, Facilities Manager, Karl Chevrolet

20

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

for design flexibility and backlight control to reduce light trespass. To further increase energy savings, the lighting team elected to use wiSCAPE to create and control the lighting scenes. The wireless control system brings smarter, more flexible performance, providing even greater overall savings. With wiSCAPE, the controls installation was non-invasive and non-disruptive, allowing engineers to avoid a lengthy wiring process and avoid installing relay panels. The wiSCAPE module is supported by wiSCAPE View™, a graphical system management software platform that can configure, control, monitor and meter the facility’s lighting systems. The wiSCAPE View software empowers facility managers with real-time monitoring, instant alarm notifications from faulty lighting equipment, and increased network efficiency and maintenance operations – all from a smartphone or tablet.

Solution Benefits – Tangible Payback & A Good Looking Lot The end result – the function of the lights, controls and the ROI for Karl Chevrolet – is stunning. Continued on page 22


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 21

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp18,20,22_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:11 AM Page 22

case STUDY

Hubbell Lighting Continued from page 20

Not only is the dealership enjoying significant monetary returns, the facility is literally being seen in a whole new light and gone are the disappointing shadow spots that also posed as security risks.

cost, and that was before wiSCAPE was up and running. While that’s good news, the headline is the annual energy savings of $143,465. It is estimated the total reduction in energy use will be 74 percent when it is cut more than 1.5M kWh per The ROI year. Added to this figure is an annual In the first full month of operation the maintenance savings of $11,988. In sum, team saw a $12,500 reduction in energy the payback period is 3.4 years and the

internal rate of return is 33 percent. 1. Energy cost ($) = 0.0850/kWh; Annual energy cost escalation (%) = 2.50 2. Energy costs are averaged over 10 year analysis period

The combination of energy savings and controls enables Karl Chevrolet to qualify for a $262,000 rebate from MidAmerican Energy. By selecting the powerful Arceos ARA3 Type IA distribution fixture in the front row applications, the team was able to actually reduce luminaire count by 60 heads where two existing 1000w MH (1100w each with ballast load) could be replaced with one 580w fixture that ultimately did a better job. For automotive dealerships the front row is one of the most critical selling areas. This new solution decreases the amount of light spilling onto the streets at night without losing the visual impact of product on the front row.

Lighting and Controls Performance Karl Chevrolet can now dim all fixtures for closed business hours, rather than turning off roughly 50 percent of the poles, resulting in much better uniformity after hours. The front row is dimmed to 30 percent and the interior poles dimmed to 20 percent. The dimming also fades to dim to make the change less noticeable. The fixtures have been strategically staggered when turning on to help eliminate inrush. Because of the higher light levels observed after installation, the team decided to apply a 10 percent high end trim to max light levels. This will result in even higher energy savings than originally estimated. In a nod to the quality of the light, at 10 percent light levels it still exceeded those of the old system. A surprising byproduct of the success of the new installation included the elimination of dark spots on the lot. The uniformity of the light was instantly better due to advantages associated with LED technology. The security team at Karl Chevrolet noted that the clarity of the nighttime footage is ten times better than it was before. It is now easier to see plate numbers and follow automobiles through the lot. ❏ FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 42 ON READER SERVICE CARD

22

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 23

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 17 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 24

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 18 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 25

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 19 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp26_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:15 AM Page 26

feature ARTICLE

Schneider Electric

4 Tools that Boost

Electrical Contractors’ Success By Philip Santoro

E

lectrical contractors today are

2. Keeping Projects On Track taking on more, diversified work. and On Time

While traditional electrical projects will always be in demand, contractors are expanding their businesses into new and existing markets, and installing integrated systems for power, safety, communications and more. This shift has come at a time when the industry as a whole is facing a critical shortage of skilled labor, including increasing numbers of electrical contractors who are considering retirement and eligible workers who are choosing to enter college instead of the trades. With more, diversified work ahead of them and fewer workers to take on jobs, electrical contractors are turning to technology to streamline their workflows, improve efficiency and cut down on costs.

1. Improving Efficiency with BIM Architects have been using building information modeling (BIM) for several decades, but more recently, electrical contractors have started to use the technology as a way to improve both efficiency and productivity. With BIM, electrical contractors can use 3D visualization capabilities to see entire projects from every angle, greatly improving accuracy of the entire building design process. Beyond the physical representation, BIM provides access to information regarding specifications and performance data that go beyond just the shape and size of individual products. When electrical contractors use the tool, they can easily simulate building performance changes to test systems and structures, and make adjustments before they lay a single wire. With improved workflows and accuracy, electrical contractors are finding BIM enhances efficiency, accuracy and productivity while reducing their overall project costs. 26

As with any other business, customer satisfaction is critical to the success and growth of electrical contracting businesses. Keeping projects – both large and small – on track and on time is imperative to ensure happy customers. Not to mention, when a project runs long, it creates a myriad of other challenges, including reduced hours and budget to complete the job. Unfortunately, project delays are often largely out of contractors’ control. Most of the time the materials and parts electrical contractors work with aren’t available directly off the shelf, so they turn to outside manufacturers and distributors to fulfill orders for the parts they need. The good news is digital tools that address this challenge are entering the market, giving electrical contractors more visibility into the status of their orders, including shipment carrier information for easy tracking and live production data for real-time updates. And, since this information is now accessible via mobile apps, electrical contractors don’t have to halt the progress of their projects while they track down updates on their orders, further enhancing project efficiency.

3. Providing Electrical Contractors with the Information They Need In today’s always-connected world, it’s no surprise electrical contractors have come to expect information to be provided almost instantaneously. In addition to being able to track orders and shipments, they expect access to product or customer support at their fingertips. With more work to do and compressed construction timelines, electrical contractors are quickly learning efficiency is key. To manage – and even improve – project workloads, contractors can find the information and support they need via digital portals that provide prod-

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

uct specification sheets and catalogs, technical drawings and installation guides. These online portals provide electrical contractors with expert support services and training materials all in one place, making it easier to access the information they need so they can quickly get back to the job at hand.

4. Enhancing Maintenance with Collaborative Tools It’s hard to break away from tried and true methods that have worked for so long. Traditionally, electrical contractors have relied on paper and spreadsheets to schedule reminders, log maintenance operations and equipment data, and create reports. For contractors who service facility equipment, paper-based communication is no longer effective. Today, cloud-based smart applications make the ability to share maintenance log books with contractors and communities of users even easier. These collaborative, connected systems give electrical contractors out in the field continuous contact with their maintenance community, whether it be managers, customers, contractors or peers, enabling faster and more effective communications. With more access to the information they need, electrical contractors can make fast and effective interventions and can follow up on preventative maintenance, create reports and integrate remote alarming. These tools not only improve efficiency, they enable contractors and facility managers to shift maintenance from reactive to preventative. As the nature of the electrical contractor workforce continues to shift, workers across the industry will turn to digital tools to increase efficiency, save time and reduce costs. The proliferation of mobile technology, cloud-based tools and digitization means electrical contractors will have access to new technological capabilities, which are bringing enhanced tools to the market to help improve efficiency and, ultimately, allow electrical contractors to take on more projects to expand their business. ❏ Philip B. Santoro is Electrical Contractor Segment Manager at Schneider Electric. He has over 22 years of experience in sales, operations and price management, with a specific focus on the construction industry.


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:57 AM Page 27

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 20 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 28

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 21 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 29

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 22 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp30,34,40_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:16 AM Page 30

new PRODUCTS HyLite Retrofit Lamps Now Available in 347V & 480V Models HyLite LED Lighting, a division of ARVA, LLC, is excited to announce the expansion of its retrofit lamp product lines with new 347V & 480V options. These new high voltage models are available in the HyLite LED Omni-Cob™, Arc-Cob™, & Lotus™ series sizes 20W and up. The new models replace metal halide and high pressure sodium lights up to 1000W. HyLite LED Retrofit lamps allow customers to retrofit their existing fixtures with a low initial investment and installation cost while saving up to 80% in energy with years of maintenance-free operation. The new High Voltage models will expand the range of applications for these lamps. Facility managers can now replace outdated HID/MH/HPS lamps in areas where it wasn’t previously possible. HyLite LED Lighting, a division of ARVA, LLC prides itself on designing innovative and cost-effective lighting products for commercial and industrial applications. HyLite is dedicated to the preservation of our planet by offering eco-friendly, energy-saving LED lamps, retrofits, and fixtures. For more information, visit www.HyLiteLEDLighting.com

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 43 ON READER SERVICE CARD

30

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 43 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 31

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 23 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 32

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 33

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 24 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp30,34,40_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 8:16 AM Page 34

new PRODUCTS Die Cast Pocket Level Milwaukee is pleased to announce a heavy-duty solution for quick leveling and angle finding – the new Die Cast Pocket Level with 360° Locking Vial. As you may recall, late last year we announced Milwaukee Tool’s new torpedo levels with the industry’s strongest magnets and a 360° vial locking mechanism. Now we’ve taken that same magnetic strength and functionality, and have applied it to this new Pocket Level. The Amplified Rare Earth Magnet Technology utilizes magnetic circuits to redirect and focus the magnetic field for industry-leading holding power. Providing functionality similar to a protractor, a Locking 360° Adjustable Vial secures the vial in place so users can identify and repeat any angle needed. A locking screw protects the accuracy of the vial whether it’s taken in and out of pockets or pouches. SHARPSITE™ Vial Technology magnifies the bubble so it’s easier to read, and the vial is engineered with high-impact acrylic for ultimate durability that will protect accuracy over the life of the level. For more information, visit www.milwaukeetool.com

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 45 ON READER SERVICE CARD

34

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 46 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:58 AM Page 35

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 26 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:59 AM Page 36


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:59 AM Page 37

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 27 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp30,34,40_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 3:05 PM Page 38

new PRODUCTS Heavy-Duty Wire Stripper Klein Tools, for professionals since 1857, introduces the Heavy-Duty Wire Stripper, which is forged from the company’s U.S.-made proprietary steel and four times stronger than traditional Klein wire strippers. The breakthrough design of the American-made HeavyDuty Wire Stripper (Cat. No. K12055) stems from many of the same processes used in the production of Klein Tools’ industry-leading pliers. Starting with the heritage of our forged Klein pliers, the Heavy-Duty Wire Stripper is designed specifically for stripping, cutting, and twisting 10-18 AWG solid and 12-20 AWG stranded wire. The stripping holes are precision-ground and the cutting knives are induction-hardened for longer life. Another unique feature is the thicker, knurled jaw that can twist up to three wires at a time. “We are confident that the tried-and-true process used to make Klein Tools pliers will be just as successful bringing strength and durability to our wire strippers,” says David Klein, associate director of product management at Klein Tools. “Wire strippers are used in tough situations and can take a beating over the years. Forging them in the best steel available means they will be around for years to come – and might even last as long as your Klein Tools pliers!” The Heavy-Duty Wire Stripper has a hot-riveted joint to ensure smooth action and no handle wobble. It also has 6-32 and 8-32 bolt shearing holes and Klein-Kurve™ comfort grip handles. For more information, visit www.kleintools.com

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 49 ON READER SERVICE CARD

38

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 3:07 PM Page 39

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 28 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSp30,34,40_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 3:06 PM Page 40

advertiser INDEX

JULY 2017

This advertisers index is compiled as a courtesy to our readers. While every effort is made to provide a complete and accurate listing of companies, page numbers and reader service numbers, the publisher is not responsible for errors.

Company 2017 NECA SHOW ADVANCED TEST EQUIPMENT AEMC INSTRUMENTS AMTEC PULLING GRIPS AUTAC, INC. BOLT STAR LLC CONDUIT RAT CONDUIT REPAIR SYSTEMS COPPER DEVOLPMENT ASSOCIATION DABMAR LIGHTING EMERGENT SAFETY SUPPLY FACILITY RESULTS GENERATOR INTERLOCK TECHNOLOGIES GRADY RESEARCH, INC. GREAVES USA HERCULES INDUSTRIES, INC. HIOKI USA KRENZ & COMPANY

PG#

RS#

32 25 14 41 IFC, 21 1, 16 28 21 36, 37 27 31 23 33 24 4 6 17 14 34 46 27 20 34 45 23 17 24 18 8 40 40 48 BC, 9, 25 3, 9, 19 30 44

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 47 ON READER SERVICE CARD

40

Electrical Products & Solutions • July 2017

Company MEGGER MILLER SAFETY CONSULTANTS, LTD ORBIT INDUSTRIES, INC. PLATINUM TOOLS POWER & TEL RANDL INDUSTRIES RONK ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES, INC. SONEL TEST & MEASUREMENT INC. STARLINE STOUT TOOL SYLVANIA TCP TENMAT INC. THE HOME DEPOT TOPAZ UEI TEST INSTRUMENTS UTILITY METALS VOLT LIGHTING

PG#

RS#

IBC 3 38 19 15 39 16 7 11 40 1 35 29 13 22 5 10 30

3 5 49 15 13 28 14 8 11 47 4 26 22 12 42 7 10 43

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 48 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:59 AM Page C3

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 2 ON READER SERVICE CARD


0717EPSpFullPages_Company Spotlight 7/17/17 7:59 AM Page C4

FOR FREE INFO, CIRCLE 3 ON READER SERVICE CARD

EPS Magazine July 2017  

July 2017 Issue of EPS Magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you