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CONTENTS

PUBLISHER

Danny J. Salchert OFFICE MANAGER

Anita Salchert ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jerry DiChiara jerryd@epsmag.net CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Derek Gaylard CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Pam Fulmer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Bob Crain • Bhavesh S. Patel Vincent R. Miller Jr. • Mark Franks

12 FEATURES 6

New Developments in Cable Management

12

Following Code is a Good Start, but Going Beyond is a Smart Next Step

By Bob Crain, P.E.

By Bhavesh S. Patel

16

Business Risk – Electricity

28

Arc Flash Hazard Analysis

By Vincent R. Miller Jr, CSP By Mark Franks

DEPARTMENTS 24 32 40

Industry News Product Focus Ad Index

ON THE COVER Cover photography courtesy of Cablofil

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

PRESIDENT

Danny J. Salchert Executive and Advertising Offices 3591 Cahaba Beach Road Birmingham, AL 35242 toll free: 800.981.4541 phone: 205.981.4541 fax: 205.981.4544 www.epsmag.net • danny@epsmag.net Electrical Products & Solutions™ is published twelve times a year on a monthly basis by ABD Communications, Inc., 3591 Cahaba Beach Road, Birmingham, Alabama, 35242, USA. Electrical Products & Solutions™ is distributed free to qualified subscribers. Non-qualified subscription rates are $57.00 per year in the U.S. and Canada and $84.00 per year for foreign subscribers (surface mail). U.S. Postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama and additional mailing offices. Electrical Products & Solutions™ is distributed to qualified readers in the electrical contracting industry. Publisher is not liable for all content (including editorial and illustrations provided by advertisers) of advertisements published and does not accept responsibility for any claims made against the publisher. It is the advertiser’s or agency’s responsibility to obtain appropriate releases on any item or individuals pictured in an advertisement. Reproduction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ABD Communications, Inc., P.O. Box 382885 Birmingham, Alabama 35238-2885 PRINTED IN THE USA


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FEATURE • Cablofil

New Developments in

Cable Management

By Bob Crain, P.E.

R

ecent studies have shown building construction has failed to keep pace with productivity improvements found in other segments of the economy. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, non-farm (manufacturing) productivity has improved 200% since 1964 while construction productivity has actually declined. Today, only about one-third of the working day is actual hands-on installation and testing. The rest is overhead activities associated with installation and other nonproductive job functions. To keep pace, electrical contractors must identify new methods that will improve productivity to prepare them for the future. One of the most labor-intensive portions of an electrical installation is the cable pathway. When electrification of homes took hold about 100 years ago, gas piping used for lamps was converted to a cable pathway for power cables. Conduit is widely used in the US with installation methods that are little unchanged from the 1920’s. Installing conduit is very labor in-

tensive, as these projects require many precise bends, specialized parts and equipment to complete an installation.

The Playing Field is Changing The rest of the industrialized world uses open cable management solutions instead of conduit. New methods of productivity are being explored and globalization of manufacturing is becoming a factor in the switch to open cable management systems. Studies have shown these types of systems reduce overall installed costs by 30% compared to conduit installations. This large cost reduction is causing a natural shift to open systems including wire mesh cable management. Wire mesh cable management requires few parts and tools. It adapts to the most complex configurations, and design provides maximum strength with minimum weight. The ease of creating fittings on site, as well as the wide range of accessories gives complete freedom in routing combined with exceptionally fast installation. An electrical infrastructure built

this way is fast, flexible, scalable, and sustainable. Cable management is one of the last considerations in the design and construction phases of a project. Therefore, a solution is required that will allow planning around other building systems, despite not knowing their final destinations and elevations. Wire cable management allows the design of a cable tray system to take place earlier in the planning stage, because contractors have the flexibility to make simple field changes without a change order. In addition, there is no need to provide a parts list of special pieces. This system provides ease of bidding and purchasing for contractors and also limits the number of part numbers for an engineer to specify.

Building for the Future

US sales of open systems sold thru electrical distribution has grown substantially in the past five years.

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

Planners and building owners are constructing buildings with greater emphasis on future needs and upgrades. Designing an infrastructure for future upgrades to data, power and building management cabling is equally important. As new technology emerges, buildings need to be constantly upgraded and the cable management needs to easily adapt to these upgrades. Open cable management systems offer a number of clear advantages over closed systems. For example, wire cable management is considerably less expensive when compared to using standard wiring in EMT conduit. Continued on page 8


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FEATURE • Cablofil

Continued from page 6

A recent study of sample installations comparing the two systems, found savings of up to 30% using wire mesh cable management and MC cable instead of conduit. Substantial savings are also realized during the life of open cable management systems. For the inevitable moves, adds and changes (MAC), open cable management systems allow the modifications to occur in half the time and labor. During facility MAC’s, closed systems rarely have the pathway in the exact right location. Pathway changes are

Open Cable Management Options:

expensive in time and labor. On a complete remodel, replacement of cables becomes fast and easy with an open cable management system. It is also easier on the cables as pulling cables into older conduit installations can damage cable insulation and stress the conductors. Open systems are more flexible and support greater volumes of cabling. Smart building planners design cable management infrastructures that have 50% more capacity than is initially needed. Future cabling moves, adds and changes can easily be facilitated and additional room is available for entirely new system upgrades. LEED certified building practices are a must for future-oriented buildings. Open cable management helps meet LEED requirements by reducing power cable heating. Supporting power cables in “free air” eliminates de-rating of cables and reduces the overall cable size, creating a more efficient power system. Building sustainability is more than just reducing energy needs; wire mesh cable management is also lighter and stronger, pound for pound, supporting more cables while using fewer raw materials and less construction waste.

The Industrial Evolution • Wire mesh has unmatched flexibility and weight-to-strength ratio

• Cable tray supports the heaviest cables over longer spans

Open cable management concepts are not limited to commercial spaces. With the use of passivated stainless steel materials, open cable management solutions are well suited for most industrial applications. Food processing facilities, petrochemical plants, refineries, chemical and pharmaceutical plants as well as mining all are adopting open cable pathways. They allow for easy wash down of processing equipment with caustic cleaners. Dirt and other materials fall through the cable management instead of building up or being trapped. Physical damage to cables can be seen and rectified with a simple visual inspection. They can be configured on-site to any installation and install in a fraction of the time.

Cable Management in the Workplace

• Slotted trough tray adds aesthetics to data cabling and fiber optic networks

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Daylighting is changing the look and design of the future workplace. Windows and skylights used for open concept offices require that the now exposed cable management pathway be designed in a manner that either hides it or highlights it as an architectural element. Architects

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

have embraced metal finishes and painted cable management for these situations. To keep the clutter in an open office ceiling to a minimum, cable management systems can combine multiple systems in a single pathway. Power and data cables can co-exist in a single pathway, providing the contractor installs barriers and uses proper spacing to prevent signal interference. Building Information Modeling (BIM) bridges the gap between building construction and building management and maintenance. BIM helps create a better, more defined plan for cable pathways at the design stage when issues, such as signal interferences and pathway obstructions can be anticipated. This saves time and money during the installation. Smart contractors have adopted BIM as it helps document their processes and gives them an additional customer service tool to help building owners better maintain their buildings. Satisfied building owners turn into repeat customers and help solidify relationships. New and innovative methods and systems are evolving everyday. It is imperative to stay ahead in this industry, by keeping an eye on ever changing economic world, varying design styles and consumer tastes – these are the primary drivers of change. Planners, contractors and electrical component manufacturers need to embrace these changes and continue to create and innovate with new ideas that help shape the future. ❏ About the Author: Bob Crain, P.E. is a

registered electrical engineer in the state of Illinois with 25 years of experience working for several leading US cable tray manufacturers. Bob is a leading expert on industry standards for the cable tray market. For the past 12 years he has been a member of the NEMA Technical Committee (5CT) and is currently a representative for the North American IEC, focusing on Standard 61537 for cable tray. Over his career, he has lent his expertise to numerous NEC code changes, written articles for industry trade magazines and published many white papers. For the past 8 years, Bob has worked for Legrand/Cablofil in Mascoutah, IL, and currently holds the position of Director of Marketing/Product Development.


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FEATURE • ASCO Power Systems

Following Code is a Good Start, but Going Beyond is a Smart Next Step

By Bhavesh S. Patel

I

n the past few years, multiple so-called “100-year” storms and other extreme weather events around the country have compromised the ability of the energy infrastructure of facilities such as data centers, telecommunications, and healthcare centers that rely on uninterrupted power for business continuity and/or life safety. As the effects of our recent tumultuous weather has shown, designing emergency power systems according to code is not always sufficient in preventing failure of an emergency/backup power system. Prevailing codes and standards are not specific with respect to local conditions and do not include detailed wording regarding placement of electrical components in an emergency/backup power system. Nevertheless, evaluation of the local geography – i.e. proximity to a river, stream, or coastline -

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and weather history should be factored into decisions on location of generators, automatic transfer switches, breaker boxes, building connections, and other critical electrical equipment. Indeed, following code does not always suffice. For example, NFPA 110: Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, 2013 edition, Annex A, paragraph A.7.2.4, states: “EPSS [emergency power supply system] equipment should be located above known previous flooding elevations where possible.” Yet, recent history showed that abiding by that suggestion is not always enough to stave off failure of an emergency/backup power system. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 adversely impacted hospital operations in many areas, including New York City, where management at Bellevue Hospital Center (which functions as a major trauma center) had to evacuate hundreds of patients when the fuel pumps located in the basement to supply the emergency generators on the 13th floor could not operate after floodwaters surged

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

in from the nearby overflowing East River. The inability of the pumps to operate occurred despite the fact that the pumps (and all the emergency/backup power equipment) were installed in accordance with code. Going beyond code with respect to placement of electrical equipment is a smart decision when aiming to ensure that electrical power remains available to critical facilities during natural or manmade disasters. “The location of the electrical equipment should be addressed,” suggests Ken Lovorn, president, Lovorn Engineering Associates, Pittsburgh. “I have encountered many situations where facilities put the electrical switchgear in the lowest level and they get high water, a flood, or a pipe breaks. The electrical equipment ends up getting wet. And water and electricity are immiscible.” David Sandalow, in a presentation at Columbia University, New York, Energy Symposium on November 30, 2012, one month after Hurricane Continued on page 14


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FEATURE • ASCO Power Systems

Sandy battered the east cost of the U.S. (at which time he was acting undersecretary of energy and assistance secretary for policy and international affairs, Department of Energy, Washington, DC), included admonitions along the same lines. “In flood zones, critical electrical equipment such as breaker boxes and building connections should not be in basements or on ground floors. This point may seem obvious, but this basic vulnerability is found in thousands of buildings in low-lying areas. Building codes in general do not address this,” noted Sandalow, who is currently the Inaugural Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. Indeed, in the days and weeks following Hurricane Sandy, water damage to critical electric equipment dramatically slowed electric restoration in many locations, including basements, due to the need for wet components to dry out or be replaced. Here’s an example of recent updating of the NFPA 110 to include suggestions to pay close attention to placement of components, but not specifically where the equipment should be located. NFPA 110: Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, 2013 edition, Annex A, paragraph A.7.2.4, states: “EPSS [emergency power supply system] equipment should be located above known previous flooding elevations where possible.” Annex A, in paragraph A.7.2.5, go on to say, “For natural conditions, EPSS design should consider the ‘100-year storm’ flooding level or the flooding level predicted by the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) models for a Class 4 hurricane.” But these are suggestions - not requirements. 14

Continued from page 12

The body of NFPA 110 is, in fact, less forceful about flooding. Chapter 7: Installation and Environmental Considerations, in paragraph 7.2.4, says, even less emphatically, “The rooms, enclosures, or separate buildings housing Level 1 or Level 2 EPSS equipment shall be designed and located to minimize damage from flooding, including that caused by the following: (1) Flooding resulting from fire fighting (2) Sewer water backup (3) Other disasters or occurrences. And these references to flooding appear in section 7.2.2: Outdoor EPS [emergency power supply] Installations, but are not referenced at all in 7.2.1: Indoor EPS Installations. Engineers and contractors looking for direction for indoor installations certainly might miss the reference completely. A good rule of thumb would be that in areas prone to severe flooding, the generators, automatic transfer switch, main fuel and day tanks, batteries and battery charger, generator controls, and circuit breakers should be located above the base flood elevation. And determining that should take considered aforethought on the part of electrical contractors, specifiers and other with a stake in the long-term success of the electrical installation.

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

Which is just what happened on a large building project in Texas after a tumultuous tropical storm devastated Southeast Texas several years ago, causing severe damage to hospitals and businesses. “We do a lot of thinking about disasters based on our experience here in Houston with Tropical Storm Allison,” noted Tom Devine, senior engineer and project manager, Smith Seckman Reid, Inc., engineering consultants in Houston. That storm drenched Texas in June 2001, with more than 40 inches of rain, with the worst flooding in Houston, where floodwater inundated the downtown area, severely damaging hospitals and businesses. After that storm, Divine did a project (a hospital) that involved putting 2 million square feet in a better situation to cope with a disaster. “We took a reference level of 47 feet above sea level as being the nominal flood plain. After we picked the nominal flood level, we looked for anything [electrical] that was below it that served something above it,” Divine explained. “For example, the main service entrance was at about 16 feet. That’s 30 feet deep in water if the 47-foot nominal flood level is reached. We elevated that service entrance to 49 feet. We elevated the second service entrance from 30 feet to 68 feet. We tried to get above what we saw as the 500-year flood plain,” he noted. “Tropical storm Allison defined that flood plain because it had never been seen before. We relocated anything that was below the flood plain. We built new service entrances and then disconnected portions of the hospital and reconnected them to the new service entrances.” In projects where uninterrupted reliable power is a paramount goal, going beyond code and taking local conditions into consideration when determining placement of electrical components of an emergency/ backup power system is well worth the effort. ❏

About the Author: Bhavesh S. Patel is director of marketing and customer support at ASCO Power Systems, Florham Park, NJ, a leading manufacturer of emergency and standby power transfer solutions, and a business of Emerson Network Power. He is an accomplished public speaker with deep expertise in power system markets and is sought by organizations for his perspectives on their future. For more information, e-mail Bhavesh.patel@emerson.com or visit www.emersonnetworkpower.com/asco, 800-800-ASCO (2726).


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FEATURE • Miller Safety Consultants, Ltd

Business Risk – Electricity

By Vincent R. Miller Jr, CSP

E

lectricity is the most common commodity for business operations, yet is the least understood of all the processes. It can have devastating consequences if we have a loss of the service due to a failure in the infrastructure. We assume that it will always be available to us. We hire qualified electricians to install or modify our needs to meet our business requirements and maintain our infrastructure when business is good. We expect that these qualified companies and individuals will provide us with the service that is needed. We expect that all standards and rules of law, such as installation procedures and employee safety requirements will be met. Business is based on property, employees and processes. Any loss in these three areas will result in a business loss. But there is a risk to our business in this field. Our installation process follows the guidelines of the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) standards – NEC (National Electrical Code) 70; NFPA 70B – maintenance guidelines and the NFPA 70E – Electrical Safe Work Practices along with the OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) 29CFR1910 (General Industry); 29CFR1926 (Construction) standards. Incidents of loss of electrical service can have devastating effects on our property and personnel if not maintained in a safe mode or not upgraded with the latest technology for property and employee protection. As we look at two areas of electricity, compare the items to the principles of risk management, we will have a better understanding of controlling this

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risk and potential business loss. Within electrical power, we will look at voltage – the stabilizing force of electricity and the current – the fluctuating energy needed to make things work. When we obtain power from the energy grid through a transformer to our building equipment, we obtain the necessary voltage for our operation. This will remain a consistent amount. The current that will be needed to operate everything in our facility will be determined and a set value for normal operation is determined. The primary issue is how much additional current can reach our facility during a adverse incident before the circuit opens and disconnects the source of electricity for us. This incident we will call a fault. In a fault, either the power company protective devices will operate or within our building equipment, it will operate interrupting the power from our operation. Since we are an Alternating Current (AC) society, we refer to cycles or Hertz to translate to time to determine the interruption time it will take for the equipment to open and remove the fault current. This fault current will produce an event called an arc flash. The longer it takes to open, the more current will be allowed to reach our facility. By using equipment that will operate quickly in an incident, we will greatly reduce or eliminate the damage potential to our facility and our employees. This equipment protection, commonly referred to as over-current protection devices, must be properly engineered and installed so that we do not have false operation due to equipment current draws. In the past, the requirements for overcurrent protection was not emphasized within the NEC 70 standards or OSHA

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

regulations. As the codes have been revised, there has been an emphasis placed on these regulations and standards. Many of us feel that we have not modified our facilities to meet these newer requirements or the local jurisdiction having authority (the local code enforcement agencies) have not adopted the newer standards and therefore we do not need to invest in our business infrastructure to meet these needs. Unfortunately, this is not the case. The 2011 NEC code, articles 110.9 and 110.10 provide for interrupting ratings, circuit impedance, short-circuit ratings and other characteristics for the equipment protection. For employee protection, article 110.16 states (in part)electrical equipment, such as switchboards, panelboards, industrial control panels, meter socket enclosures, and motor control centers, that are in other than dwelling units, and are likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized shall be field marked to warn qualified persons of potential electric arc flash hazards. The markings shall be located so as to be clearly visible to qualified persons before examination adjustment, servicing, or maintenance of the equipment. There is an informational (non-mandatory) reference to the NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace for guidance. The guidance for proper over-current determination is provided in 110.9 and in a new article 110.24 – Available field marking and Modifications to the electrical installation. So, both equipment and employee protection is Continued on page 18


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FEATURE • Miller Safety Consultants, Ltd

Continued from page 16

1910.303(b)(4) Interrupting rating. Equipment intended to interrupt current at fault levels shall have an interrupting rating sufficient for the nominal circuit voltage and the current that is available at the line terminals of the equipment. Equipment intended to interrupt current at other than fault levels shall have an interrupting rating at nominal circuit voltage sufficient for the current that must be interrupted.

tween two or more of the circuit conductors, or between any circuit conductor and the grounding conductor or enclosing metal raceway Marking of equipment is more general but would include arc flash rating requirements in the “other ratings as necessary” reference:

1910.303(b)(5) Circuit impedance and other characteristics. The overcurrent protective devices, the total impedance, the component short-circuit current ratings, and other characteristics of the circuit to be protected shall be selected and coordinated to permit the circuit protective devices used to clear a fault to do so without the They also mirrored the information occurrence of extensive damage to the contained in the NEC regarding interrup- electrical components of the circuit. This fault shall be assumed to be either betion rating and over-current protection:

The following addressed over-current protection and employee protection: Overcurrent protection — 1910.304(f)(1) 600 volts, nominal, or less. The following requirements apply to overcurrent protection of circuits rated 600 volts, nominal, or less.

addressed within the code. Providing a safe work environment for employees is addressed in the OSHA regulations. These regulations are more general, based on employee hazards than the technical equipment requirements. OSHA states, in the General Duties Clause: (a) Each employer — (1) shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees; (2) shall comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act. OSHA defines the parameters into two classifications: (1)600 volts and below and (2)greater than 600 volts.

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

1910.303(e)(1)(ii) Other markings giving voltage, current, wattage, or other ratings as necessary.

1910.304(f)(1)(i) Conductors and equipment shall be protected from overcurrent Continued on page 20


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FEATURE • Miller Safety Consultants, Ltd

Continued from page 18

in accordance with their ability to safely § 1910.305(j)(4)(vi) for group operation of conduct current. motors, and a single disconnecting means is permitted for fixed electric space-heat1910.304(f)(1)(ii) ing equipment. Except for motor running overload protection, overcurrent devices may not in1910.304(f)(1)(iv) terrupt the continuity of the grounded Overcurrent devices shall be readily acconductor unless all conductors of the cir- cessible to each employee or authorized cuit are opened simultaneously. building management personnel. These overcurrent devices may not be located 1910.304(f)(1)(iii) where they will be exposed to physical A disconnecting means shall be pro- damage or in the vicinity of easily igvided on the supply side of all fuses in cir- nitable material. cuits over 150 volts to ground and cartridge fuses in circuits of any voltage where ac1910.304(f)(1)(v) cessible to other than qualified persons so Fuses and circuit breakers shall be so that each individual circuit containing fuses located or shielded that employees will can be independently disconnected from not be burned or otherwise injured by the source of power. However, a current- their operation. Handles or levers of cirlimiting device without a disconnecting cuit breakers, and similar parts that may means is permitted on the supply side of move suddenly in such a way that persons the service disconnecting means. In addi- in the vicinity are likely to be injured by tion, a single disconnecting means is per- being struck by them, shall be guarded or mitted on the supply side of more than one isolated. set of fuses as permitted by the exception in Circuit breakers used for overcurrent

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

protection of three-phase circuits shall have a minimum of three overcurrent relays operated from three current transformers. On three-phase, three-wire circuits, an overcurrent relay in the residual circuit of the current transformers may replace one of the phase relays. An overcurrent relay, operated from a current transformer that links all phases of a three-phase, three-wire circuit, may replace the residual relay and one other phase-conductor current transformer. Where the neutral is not grounded on the load side of the circuit, the current transformer may link all three phase conductors and the grounded circuit conductor (neutral); and 1910.304(f)(2)(i)(B) If fuses are used for overcurrent protection, a fuse shall be connected in series with each ungrounded conductor; 1910.304(f)(2)(ii) Each protective device shall be capable Continued on page 22 of detecting and

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FEATURE • Miller Safety Consultants, Ltd interrupting all values of current that can occur at its location in excess of its trip setting or melting point; 1910.304(f)(2)(iii) The operating time of the protective device, the available short-circuit current, and the conductor used shall be coordinated to prevent damaging or dangerous temperatures in conductors or conductor insulation under short-circuit conditions; and 1910.304(f)(2)(iv) The following additional requirements apply to feeders only: 1910.304(f)(2)(iv)(A) The continuous ampere rating of a fuse may not exceed three times the ampacity of the conductors. The long-time trip element setting of a breaker or the minimum trip setting of an electronically actuated fuse may not exceed six times the ampacity of the conductor. for fire pumps, conductors may be protected for short circuit only; and 1910.304(f)(2)(iv)(B) Conductors tapped to a feeder may be protected by the feeder overcurrent device where that overcurrent device also protects the tap conductor. As shown above, both the NEC and OSHA have established guidelines. OSHA’s changes within the regulations have basically eliminated any grandfather clauses previously allowed. Reference: 1910.302. NFPA 70E - Electrical Safe Work Practices, provides to continuity between the NEC 70 (electrical code) and the OSHA regulations (29CFR1910 Subpart S- Electrical). In Part 1, the emphasis is to determine the hazard risk to the employee based

on the available fault currents, considering any over-current protection devices. So, how does all this data translate to business risk? Any loss, due to an electrical incident can affect our business through loss of property and employees (contractors) or both. Performing a risk analysis to determine if you have the protection and safe work procedures established to maintain your business performance is a key factor. An example of the use of current limiting devices for our facilities is shown below, including the proper labels on equipment, warning signs and signals. Please note the reduction of heat (calories per centimeter squared) when placing the equipment in maintenance mode. This significantly lowers the incident energy to a more manageable level.

The process to follow (as identified in ANSI-Z10 (American National Standards Institutes) after identifying your hazards (based on the electrical code requirements and OSHA regulations) is as follows: • Elimination • Substitution • Engineering Controls • Awareness • Administrative Controls • Personal Protective Equipment Proper over-current protection does not totally eliminate the hazard, but it significantly reduces the damage potential to property and people. This should be our first choice in sustaining our business. ❏

Vincent Miller is the owner of Miller Safety Consultants, Ltd, a provider of arc flash clothing and electrical insulated tools. He has been providing business clients with employee personal protective equipment and consultative services. He can be contacted at info@millersafetyltd.com or through his website: www.millersafetyltd.com.

Warning Label Warning System

Current Limiting Equipment

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

Warning Label


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Industry NEWS

Conergy Launches Solar Power Financing Program for Commercial Businesses Global solar energy company establishes $100 million fund to finance construction projects Conergy, one of the world’s leading solar photovoltaic service and solution providers, launched its Conergy Fund I (The Fund) program today. The program, which provides financing to large-scale construction projects in the United States, makes the use of and savings from solar power a possibility to businesses. With an initial target volume of $100 million and backing by Conergy’s main investor, Kawa Capital Management, The Conergy Fund I provides financing for solar power plants and qualified commercial projects with renewable energy capabilities between 500 kilowatts and 25 megawatts of power. The Fund streamlines the financing process by managing the financial analysis, credit rating, administration and finance, billing, and collection of power purchase agreements (PPAs) on behalf of the project. “The Fund is ideal for mid-to-large size organizations such as municipalities, school districts, utility companies, and investment-grade corporations because the savings achieved last for decades,” said Anthony Fotopoulos, CEO of Conergy Americas. “Not only are these entities re-

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ducing energy consumption, but the fixed energy prices secured through the PPAs are significantly lower than market prices for conventional grid power, providing additional savings to the end-user.” Access to competitive financing that can monetize local and federal incentives is a key barrier to the widespread adoption of solar photovolatics (PV) via PPAs

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

– only about 40 percent of commercial buildings or power plants are able to secure this financing. The Fund bridges this gap by removing the funding barrier that has historically hampered organizations from installing photovoltaic (PV) systems on their facilities. Through The Fund, Conergy and its partners also provide project development and engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) services, including engineering, design, and subsequent operations and maintenance management. Kawa Capital Management acquired Conergy in August 2013 to create a globally unique player in the solar energy industry. Conergy’s expertise in providing complete solar energy solutions and Kawa’s established financial and management strategies were the groundwork for the Conergy Fund I program and will serve as the foundation for future financial solutions in the US electricity market. “The Conergy Fund I program is the first step in a long relationship with Kawa. We already have five projects in the United States utilizing The Fund and expect to develop and acquire projects in other growth markets in 2014,” said Fotopoulos. ❏


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Industry NEWS

Columbia Lighting Delivers Perfect Illumination in Low Ceiling Areas with New LED Wraparound and Lensed Striplight Fixtures With lighting design flexibility in mind, Hubbell Lighting launched today three new LED fixtures from Columbia Lighting—the LWC Premium Wraparound, LPT Premium Lensed Striplight and LRO Lensed Striplight. The company’s new energy efficient fixtures seamlessly illuminate kitchen or dining areas, work or utility spaces, hallways, restrooms, and other areas with lower ceilings. Setting the new performance standard, Columbia Lighting’s LWC Premium Wraparound fixture is available in lumen packages ranging from 2,400 to 4,700 nominal lumens with an efficacy up to 96 LPW—exceeding current products on the market today. Plus, the LWC is designed with an attractive acrylic prismatic lens and overlay to provide smooth LED lighting without pixelation. Combined with softly glowing ends, these features make the LWC a uniquely practical and attractive wraparound. Available in 2’ or 4’ lengths, the LWC delivers 50,000 hours of illumination at L80 and features a high-

efficiency driver with options for 0-10V continuous dimming, step dimming, and fixed on/off. Heavy gauge steel housing gives the luminaire rigidity. The LED light engine is accessible and replaceable for future maintenance or upgrades. Columbia Lighting’s LPT Premium Lensed Striplight matches the LWC (LED) and WC (fluorescent) in appearance and is the perfect replacement for outdated fluorescent fixtures. Equivalent to the LPT in performance, the company’s LRO Lensed Striplight is the design match for Columbia lighting’s LAW (LED) and AWN (fluorescent) fixtures. Both the LPT and LRO are available in 4’ and 8’ lengths, in eight lumen packages (2,700, 5,000, 6,400, and 9,600, 5,400, 10,000, 12,800 and 19,200), and are rated for 50,000 hours at L80 lumen maintenance. A solid-state driver provides options for 0-10V continuous dimming, step

dimming, and fixed on/off. With up to 106 LPW, the LPT and LRO far exceed the efficacy of similar lensed striplights on the market today. All three of Columbia Lighting’s new LED fixtures are available in multiple color temperatures (3500K and 4000K), can be surface mounted or suspended, provide excellent color rendering (82 CRI), are offered with an optional 1,400 lumen battery pack factory installed, and come standard with a five-year warranty. To learn more about Columbia Lighting’s LWC Wraparound, LPT Premium Lensed Striplight and LRO Lensed Striplight, please visit http://www.columbialighting.com/. ❏

Platinum Tools® Appoints Blake Tally Regional Sales Manager The Fast Growing Company for the Security, DataCom, Telecom and Electrical Wiring Markets Strengthens it Distribution Support Platinum Tools® (www.platinumtools.com), the leader in solutions for the preparation, termination, and testing of network wire and cabling, announced Blake Tally, with experience in sales, marketing and business management, has joined the company to support its growing portfolio of regional and national accounts. “Blake’s diverse entrepreneurial background gives him a unique perspective on the sales cycle, and an appreciation for the importance of proactive customer service and sales support,” said Lee Sachs, Platinum Tools, Inc. president and general manager. “He will add additional support for our growing list of Platinum Tools distributors.” Sachs continued, saying that Tally’s experience, integrity, and knowledge will make him a key addition to the Platinum Tools sales and support team. “We view his appointment as another indicator of our commitment to being a leading company in the security, datacom, telecom, and electrical wiring markets. I’m confident Blake will play a key role in our continued growth.” Added Tally, “I am excited and look forward to working with their great

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team to further develop Platinum Tools’ large distribution network. I am fortunate to be joining such a respected company that prides itself on top quality products and service.” For more information, please visit www.platinumtools.com, call (800) 749-5783, or email info@platinumtools.com. ❏ About Platinum Tools: Platinum Tools, founded in 1997, was created based upon two very simple objectives. First, develop the absolute best possible solutions for the preparation, installation, and hand termination of wire and cable. Second, implement an operational infrastructure that can deliver these products in an efficient, timely, and high quality manner.All of our products must absolutely satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…utility of function; quality of function; and economic value. Our people are our company. They, too, must be focused on and work to satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…customer satisfaction; product knowledge and expertise; and willingness to learn and adapt.


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FEATURE • AVO Training Institute

Arc Flash Hazard Analysis

By Mark Franks

M

any locations are experiencing changes in operational procedures necessary to address the levels of energy identified in the arc flash hazard analysis.” In 1989, OSHA promulgated a muchneeded regulation in the General Industry Regulations; 29 CFR 1910.147, the control of hazardous energy, or lockout/tagout. Analysis at the time indicated that more than 14,000 injury incidents were occurring annually in industry as a result of “accidental activation.” This regulation was nicknamed the “machine lockout standard,” due to the fact that the regulations did not have specific provisions for the control of electrical energy for electrical work on utilization installations. Almost parallel to 29 CFR 1910.147, the control of hazardous energy, OSHA established 29 CFR 1910.331-.335 (Electrical) Safety-Related Work Practices in Subpart S of the General Industry Regulations. Included in this new standard announced in 1990 were the requirements for electrical lockout/tagout for “qualified electrical workers” working on de-energized electrical utilization installations. The addition of the requirements specific for electrical work to the requirements in 1910.147 has equipped industry with the requirements to address the majority of the hazardous energy control issues encountered. Exceptions usually arose where the industry was involved in co-generation of electricity and also in owned power transmission lines, substations, or distribution facilities that were utility-like in design. These installations required procedures that were not totally addressed in 1910.147 or 1910.333, and industry was forced either to create or to borrow from utility organizations’ effective procedures. Finally in 1995, OSHA was successful in promulgation of regulations for utility installations and utility-like installations of industrial facilities. 29 CFR 1910.269, electric power generation, transmission, and distribution, contained comprehensive regulations and addressed control of hazardous energy sources for power plant locations and also the much needed 1910.269(m),

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deenergizing lines and equipment for employee protection, which codified and clarified the use of “clearances” for hazardous electrical energy control in utility-like and utility installations. By late 1995, industry in the United States had comprehensive regulations for the control of hazardous energy sources covering utilization, utility-like, and utility installations. In addition to these performance-oriented regulations for hazardous energy control, OSHA decreed in 1910.335 the requirement for protecting workers from

electrical arc flash and burning from electrical explosions. OSHA further expanded the requirements to protect workers from arc flash hazards in 1910.269 by prohibiting a worker from wearing clothing that could be ignited and continue to burn, thus increasing the extent of injury to the worker. Certain fabrics or blends of fabrics that would burn readily or melt when exposed to flames or electric arcs were prohibited. The NFPA 70E 1995 Edition formally identified the arc flash hazard and promoted the analysis of Continued on page 30

Figure 1: Special equipment, such as remote racking devices, remote open/close, personal protective equipment (PPE), arc flash blankets, and rescue equipment, could spur a reevaluation of how energy control for de-energized work is performed.

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014


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FEATURE • AVO Training Institute the hazard in the workplace. Following 1995, industry in the United States had studied, tested, invented, tried, failed, succeeded, and moved forward in addressing the complex issues of arc flash hazard analysis. Successive NFPA 70E standards and the IEEE 1584 IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations of 2002 have catapulted the process of calculating and analyzing arc flash energy. Protective equipment innovations have generated numerous options for protection of workers in wearing apparel, as well as arc flash protective suits ranging from 15 cal/cm2 to 100 cal/cm2 of incident energy. Fast-forward to 2013, and most industries know about arc flash hazard analysis. Many companies have completed the comprehensive engineering-supervised studies required to produce the results and have undertaken the hazard labeling of equipment, training of personnel, and application of arc-rated protective wearing apparel and arc-rated flash protective suits necessary to

Continued from page 28

protect employees. Much of industry today has completed the analysis or it’s currently in progress or the analysis is planned for the near future to meet the compliance requirement and to stave off the possibility of a severe arc flash incident. Arc flash hazard analysis has a significant impact on the energy control program and specific equipment procedures for lockout/tagout. Many locations are experiencing changes in operational procedures necessary to address the levels of energy identified in the arc flash hazard analysis. Staff training, qualifications, safety backups, and maintenance of PPE are just a few of the issues being addressed (Figure 1). Today, industry in the United States is experiencing: • Significant expense associated with the engineering studies necessary to identify arc flash hazards in the workplace • The necessity of integrating the results of arc flash hazard analysis with current energy control procedures • The need to train and re-train operational

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Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014

and maintenance personnel in arc flash hazards, PPE, and changes in energy control procedures • Significant expense in special equipment for remote operation, racking, and grounding, especially in locations identified with dangerous energy levels • Increased supervision and auditing responsibilities required to meet OSHA compliance requirements regarding electrical hazards and energy control. In summary, competent engineering analysis, well-written energy control procedures integrating arc flash hazard analysis, training of personnel, PPE, and special equipment are requirements today and will continue to be addressed in future years. ❏ Mark Franks is an AVO Training Institute instructor, an authorized OSHA instructor, and a member of FOA, NFPA, IAEI, ASSE, and ASTM. Contact AVO Training Institute at info@avotraining.com.

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Product FOCUS Cree Extends Breakthrough XSP Series Street Light Performance to Outdoor Area Lighting New Area and Wall Pack Options Obsolete Legacy HID and Cut Energy Use by 65 Percent Cree, Inc. (Nasdaq: CREE) is expanding its outdoor lighting portfolio with the new XSP Series Area LED luminaire and the XSPW™ Wall Pack LED luminaire, which cut energy consumption by 65 percent* and nearly eliminate maintenance costs to easily replace the millions of outdated HID luminaires currently installed in North America. Leveraging the breakthrough innovations from the industry changing Cree® XSP Series LED street light, the Cree XSP Series Area LED luminaire and the XSPW Wall Pack LED luminaire provide unmatched performance at an affordable price that makes the switch to LED lighting the clear choice. “The Cree® XSP Series Area and XSPW™ Wall Pack luminaires represent the latest examples of Cree’s mission to replace inefficient technologies with LED alternatives that provide the price, quality and energy savings that dramatically improve the lighting experience and save customers money,” said Norbert Hiller, Cree executive vice president, lighting. “These new luminaires provide high performance, nearly maintenance-free lighting for up to 100,000 hours, ending the need for compromised metal halide alternatives.” Featuring Cree’s NanoOptic® Precision Delivery Grid™ optic technology, the XSP Series Area LED luminaire and the XSPW Wall Pack LED luminaire deliver better optical control and more uniform, white light than metal halide fixtures. Both the XSP Series Area LED luminaire and the XSPW Wall Pack LED luminaire offer multiple mounting and optical options to support a variety of installations and applications. Both luminaires are backed by Cree’s 10-year limited warranty. For more information, visit www.cree.com/lighting/xsparea

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Product FOCUS ICC Introduces a New CAT 6A Patch Panel ICC introduces a new Category 6A (CAT 6A) patch panel featuring 110-Type Insulation Displacement Connectors (IDCs) terminals on the rear. The terminals are in-line vertically and separated specifically to make wiring easier and to improve performances. IDC terminals can also withstand termination impact using a 4 pair punch-down tool. The CAT 6A patch panel is built to perform. It’s UL® listed and supports IEEE 802.3an standard for 10GBASE-T network performance. It also supports PoE and PoE+IEEE 802.3at and is backwards compatible with CAT 6 and CAT 5e structured cabling systems. The patch panel has gone through rigid testing to exceed the ANSI/TIA-568-C.2 industry standard showing data transmission beyond 500MHz. Results also reveal Permanent Link headroom up to 7.1dB NEXT and Channel Link headroom up to 9.1dB NEXT using ICC Premise Cables. ICC designed the panel for unparalleled quality. All contacts in each port have ICC’s signature 50 micro inch gold plating to protect from corrosion. The outer frame is made of 16 gauge steel with black powder coated paint for maximum protection. Twenty-four (24) RJ-45 ports with silk-screen port numbers and labeling areas are available on the front of the panel. Color wiring diagrams on the rear of the panel show both T568A and T568B wiring schemes. The patch panel is perfect for telecom room and data center applications. The panel fits one rack mount space and is designed to mount onto wall mount brackets, distribution racks or cabinets with standard 19” EIA widths. Use ICC CAT 6A premise cable, 22 to 24 wire gauge, and the structured cabling system is eligible for ICC’s 15 Year or Lifetime Performance Warranty. For more information, visit www.icc.com/distributor

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Product FOCUS

Milwaukee® M18™ Blower Delivers the Fastest Jobsite Cleanup Milwaukee Tool Corporation continues to expand its M18™ LITHIUM-ION system with the introduction of the new M18™ Compact Blower. Optimized for common construction debris, the new compact blower offers a faster, more efficient way to clean up the job site. “This is an extremely versatile tool that can improve productivity for users across all trades,” says Tom Simeone, Group Product Manager for Milwaukee Tool Corporation. “It has the power and run time to clean up large areas, yet is still compact enough to clear out confined spaces.” Delivering 100 CFM and 160 RPM, the 0884-20 is the most powerful compact cordless blower in its class. With power control features such as a 3-speed electronic switch, variable speed trigger and optional lock-on switch, the tool delivers maximum versatility to clear a variety of materials while minimizing the amount of airborne dust and debris. The M18 Compact Blower also features a compact and lightweight design with a shock-absorbing polymer body and a crush resistant nozzle for maximum durability. For added ease of use, the unit includes a 9” extension nozzle to clear dust and debris easily from the ground or overhead without excessive bending or back strain, as well as a universal inflator/deflator for use on or off the job. Powered by any Milwaukee M18™ LITHIUM-ION battery*, the new Compact Blower is compatible with the entire M18™ System, now offering over 50 cordless Lithium-Ion products. Milwaukee® is committed to the ongoing development of this platform and will continue to provide innovative solutions that offer industry leading reliability, performance and ergonomics. For more information, visit www.milwaukeetool.com

Mitsubishi Electric Introduces 400 Volt Uninterruptible Power System for High-Density Data Centers New 50 and 60 Hertz 500kVA UPS System Supports Energy Efficient 400 Volt Installations Mitsubishi Electric, an industry leader in designing and manufacturing reliable, environmentally friendly uninterruptible power systems (UPSs), today announces its new 9950A UPS that provides mission-critical operations with an efficient UPS design for 400 volt power distribution infrastructures. Widely adopted in Europe and Asia, the 230/400 volt power distribution approach has gained traction in high-density data centers in North America due to significant increases in energy efficiencies – reducing a facility’s operating costs and carbon footprint. Like all other Mitsubishi UPSs, the new 9950A is a three-phase, on-line double-conversion system and features Mitsubishi’s world-renown Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) technology for enhanced UPS performance and reliably. Offering over 96 percent efficiency, the 500kVA UPS supplies clean, continuous power to connected data center and other mission-critical equipment. The 9950A UPS was specifically designed for systems incorporating 380VAC, 400VAC, and 415VAC four-wire installations at 50 or 60 Hz. The 230/400V electrical distribution infrastructure eliminates the need for expensive, heavy transformers and extra circuit breakers required for 120/208V power distribution. The higher 230/400V power scheme has additional advantages such as eliminating possible failure points (circuit breakers), occupying less overall floor space (no transformers required), and increasing efficiency through increased power delivery. “Our new 9950A UPS will help our customers running mission-critical applications reduce costs, weight and floor space while increasing efficiency,” said Dean Datre, general manager, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products’ UPS division. “More and more data centers – especially those running dense servers - are incorporating the 230/400 volt power distribution scheme in order to take advantage of inherent power efficiencies. Our new 9950A UPS will give these users a dependable power protection solution – reducing total cost of ownership and carbon footprint.” For more information, visit www.meppi.com 36

Electrical Products & Solutions • March 2014


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Product FOCUS AEMC® Introduces the NEW Ground Resistance Tester Models 6416 & 6417 The Ground Resistance Tester Models 6416 and 6417 measure ground rod and grid resistance and impedance without the use of auxiliary rods. Clamp-on ground resistance testers can be used in multi-grounded systems without disconnecting or de-energizing the ground system under test it. The Models 6416 and 6417 simply clamps around the grounding electrode or conductor and measures the resistance to ground. By performing measurements on intact ground systems, the user also verifies the quality of the grounding connections and bonds. Resistance and continuity of grounding loops around pads and buildings may also be measured. Three new features unique to AEMC® are: • Test frequency selection provides more accurate results in inductive environments • Touch voltage indication indicates the voltage on the display along with a warning buzzer when the voltage derived from current and resistance measurements detect a potentially dangerous touch condition • Loop resistance indication alerts the user to the fact that the measurement may not be ground resistance Both models include a high sensitivity measurement function enabling measurement of leakage current flowing to ground or circulating in ground loops from 0.2mA to 40A and resistances from 0.01 to 1500 . Both models offer battery life information at power-up and Auto Power Off power management. The Buzzer and Auto Power Off features may be disabled at any time. Both offer an alarm function and a data storage function. The alarm settings and stored data are saved when the ground tester is turned off. For more information, visit aemc.com

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Advertiser INDEX This advertisers index is compiled as a courtesy to our readers. While every effort is made to provide a complete and accurate listing of companies, page numbers and reader service numbers, the publisher is not responsible for errors.

Company

PG#

RS#

Company

AEMC INSTRUMENTS ALBER CORPORATION AVO TRAINING INSTITUTE BATTCON 2014 CONFERENCE BYTE BROTHERS CABLOFIL CONDUIT REPAIR SYSTEMS CONTINENTAL INDUSTRIES COPPER DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION COPPERWATCHER E-Z METER GARDNER BENDER GENERATOR INTERLOCK TECHNOLOGIES HB BRACKETS HIOKI USA ITOOLCO KRENZ & COMPANY MEGGER

IBC 33 21 34 9 BC 4 23 35 40 38 39 7 11 3, 15 25 20 IFC

2 24 17 47 9 3 6 18 25 52 50 28 8 11 5, 13 19 43 1

MH RHODES / CRAMER COMPANY MILLER SAFETY CONSULTANTS, LTD MINUTEMAN UPS MP GLOBAL PRODUCTS LLC NEPTUN LIGHT, INC. PATRIOT ALUMINUM PRODUCTS PHASE-A-MATIC PLATINUM TOOLS POWER & TEL SMALLPC.COM SOKKIA STEELMAN INDUSTRIES STRIP-TEC THE HOME DEPOT TYNDALE COMPANY UNDERGROUND DEVICES UTILITY METALS

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PG#

RS#

30 19 31 1 17 37 20 29 27 38 5 40 18 13 30 32 10

48 15 23 4 14 27 44 22 20 51 7 53 42 12 49 46 10

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EPS Magazine March 2014  

March 2014 Issue of EPS Magazine