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VOLUME | 05


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HOW TO US E O U R M AG A ZI N E Follow us:

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downloads further content (gallery etc.) video links

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WIN 2× COLLECTION OF CANDLES MEADOWS! E-MAIL US TO INFO@SOFFAMAG.COM (SUBJECT MEADOWS) AND TELL US WHERE YOU WOULD PLACE THESE CANDLES! WE WILL REWARD TWO OF THE MOST CREATIVE ANSWERS.

The winners from the August issue: Wooden bow tie by BeWooden goes to: Dez Sergeant-Blair, Zane Sime Ziaja cosmetics goes to: Michaela Večeřová, Michaela Tamoková and Eva Staffová

© Copyright SOFFA magazine | All rights reserved. www.soffamag.com | info@soffamag.com Cover photo: Lina Németh

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CONTENT - VOLUME | 05

EDITORIAL ►

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FASHION Bohemian style

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EDITORS’ CHOICE Smart patterns

03 Warm textile

DIY PROJECTS Hanging paper lamp

Natural orange peeling

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LIVING BY SOFFA Pure design and individuality

TRAVEL A walk through Kutná Hora

RECIPES Three-course swedish menu


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PRECIOUS STONES Incredible precious stones

Dramatic look

šestnácterý

14 7. – 12. 10. 12 EVENTS CALENDER Designblok Prague Design and Fashion Week www.designblok.cz

Designblok podporují tyto instituce: UMPRUM, Velvyslanectví Nizozemského království, Francouzský institut v Praze, Velvyslanectví Švédska, Instituto Cervantes, Česká centra, EUNIC, Rakouské velvyslanectví, Rakouské kulturní forum, Goethe - Institut, Polský institut v Praze Oficiální dodavatelé: Parfumerie Douglas, Giorgio Armani Cosmetics, Veuve Clicquot, Heineken, SONBERK, TONI&GUY, fusion hotel prague, Ambiente restaurace, SAMSUNG, NESPRESSO, TONI&GUY HAIRMEETWARDROBE Mediální partneři: H.O.M.i.E., Art+Antique, Architekt, Dolce Vita, Design & Home, ERA21, ELLE Decoration, Flash Art, Marianne Bydlení, Travel Fever, Radio 1, DesignMagazin.cz, Czechdesign.cz, elle.cz, fashionbook.cz, iconiq.cz, ihned.cz, MAUDhomme, protisedi.cz, Dotyk Zahraniční mediální partneři: H.O.M.E., H.O.M.i.E., Atrium, Designum, Flash Art Hlavní mediální partneři:

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LANDSCAPES Stone walls - symbol of Ireland

DB soffa mag 210x297_Sestava 1 1.8.14 13:56 Stránka 1

Partneři:

CREATIVE PEOPLE A glass cutter’s workshop

Hlavní partner:

Generální partner:

TRENDS Emerald green

FRAME HOUSES Best frame houses


RO CK – PA PER – WO O D. . . text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

As the title suggests the topic of this autumn SOFFA issue, which we have prepared for you with endless enthusiasm, is: materials. You often ask us what is important for our job and we realised that materials play an important role in all we do. Therefore, we decided to offer you a close-up on wood, paper, stone, glass and textiles. We believe that we will give you enough inspiration to run your own creative experiments! We believe in democracy and so within our team each of us came up with an idea for this issue. Terezia loves precious stones and minerals – thanks to her you can get to know more about them. Lenka is an architect and prefers wood – her dreams came true in the form of publishing a big special on timber frame houses. Lina likes all the materials (especially when they look good on the camera) but she had been looking for a pendant lamp above her bed and so we made her one from paper! Adéla has a close relationship with glass and so we will present you with the inte-resting work of her uncle – a glass cutter. Do you like our fashion photo-stories? With Adéla Havelková, a photographer, we have prepared Bohemian style outfits for you. If it is recipes you enjoy the most, you can be sure you will like this one: we accepted an invitation to the Swedish Embassy in Prague and so you have the unique opportunity to encounter the Swedish cuisine and to learn how to prepare an autumn three-course menu. Your SOFFA team P.S. Do you know that now you can read SOFFA offline on your iPad? For more information go here.

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SOFFA IS NEWLY AVAILABLE OFFLINE! THANKS TO THE NEW ISSUU APP FOR IOS YOU CAN NOW DOWNLOAD ALL THE SOFFA ISSUES TO YOUR VERY OWN OFFLINE READLIST AND BROWSE YOUR SOFFA ON YOUR IPAD OR IPHONE EVEN WITHOUT THE INTERNET CONNECTION!

DOWNLOAD FROM THE APP STORE!


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FA S H I O N 4 Ă— autumn outfit

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BO HE M I A N S T Y L E model: Nora Barnhart | make-up and hair styling: Marcela Hanke text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Adéla Havelková

THIS IS THE RIGHT TIME TO START SHOPPING FOR WARM AUTUMN CLOTHES. GET INSPIRED BY OUR COLLECTION OF PIECES IN LOOSE BOHEMIAN STYLE: YOU CAN WEAR IT FOR A TRIP, ON A CITY WALK OR FOR GOING TO WORK, AS WELL! We would like to give our thanks to Bono and Žofka, our quadruped models.

ONE OF THE ABSOLUTE NECESSITIES OF THE BOHEMIAN STYLE IS ACCESSORIES. FREE YOUR IMAGINATION AND MIX ETHNO WITH FOLKLORE MOTIVES! Hair bands and necklaces from the Nomade collection, all Samodiva Kilim shoes and Made rings, all Nila White cardigan, chequered scarf and scarf with an artificial fur hood, all Lindex


COMFORT AND WARMTH FIRST! FORGET ABOUT COOL MATERIALS, WRAP UP IN OVERSIZE JUMPERS AND OTHER KNITS. THE KEY TO SUCCESS LIES IN MANY LAYERS! Coat, leather belt and leather gloves, all Boho Vintage Concept Store Dress and tights, both Lindex Jumper, H&M Alain Mikli Glasses, Žilka Optik Studio


DO YOU LOVE NATURE? IF YOUR ANSWER IS YES THEN THE BOHEMIAN STYLE IS IDEAL FOR YOU! NOT ONLY IT IS OFTEN INSPIRED BY FLORAL AND ANIMAL MOTIVES, IT IS ALSO ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY. VINTAGE CLOTHES FOR GOOD PRICE IS NATURALLY A PART OF IT! Scarf with an artificial fur hood and tights, both Lindex Jewellery, all Boho Vintage Concept Store Skirt by Maydafashion, bracelet De la gray, boots Melissa, all Czech Labels&Friends


DO NOT BE AFRAID OF COLOURS. RED, YELLOW, ORANGE, GREEN – THEY ALL BELONG THE TO AUTUMN SEASON. TRY TO COMBINE THEM IN THE FORM OF LITTLE DETAILS SUCH AS A PIECE OF JEWELLERY, A BACKPACK OR ON YOUR MAKE-UP. SOMETIMES LESS IS MORE! Hat, Boho Vintage Concept Store Coat from the Jean Paul Gaultier for Lindex collection, Lindex Backpack/bag, Elajediova Necklace from the Nomade collection, Samodiva


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SOFFA FILMS WE STARTED MAKING SHORT FILMS! DISCOVER OUR FIRST VIDEO ON OUR NEW WEB PAGE VIMEO.COM/SOFFAMAG THIS VIDEO WILL BE PRESENTED AT THIS YEAR’S DESIGNBLOK AND WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE FROM OCTOBER 7TH!

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO PLAY THE VIDEO!


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E DI TO R S ’ C H O I C E What to wish for this autumn


SMART PAT T ER N S styling: SOFFA | photo: companies‘ archives

DO YOU LOVE PATTERNS? NOW IT IS THE TIME TO SURROUND YOURSELF WITH THEM. PATTERNS LIKE FLORAL, GEOMETRICAL, ETHNO AND FOLKLORE ARE THE HITS OF THIS SEASON. WRAP UP IN THEM OR DECORATE YOUR HOME WITH THEM!

KANTHA GOWN Toast

HAND PAINTED ANKLE BOOTS Burberry

WALLPAPER PARATLISI AND NAPINSI Marimekko

CROSLEY X PENDLETON AV ROOM TURNTABLE Urban Outfitters

‘OLD SCHOOL’ CHAIRS Pyrodesign | Sashe

BRAIDED NECKL Zara


SCARF GEOMETRICS Nº1 Shevitza

WOODEN EARRINGS FolkoLoco | Etsy

FOLK CLOCK Champeriko | Sashe

LAVASTONE BOARDS KALURI Made a Mano

D IKKI-

LACE

COLLECTION OF CARPETS AND SEATS BANDAS Gan Rugs | Stockist


WARM T EX T I L E styling: SOFFA | photo: companies‘ archives

THIS AUTUMN GET YOURSELF SOMETHING ORIGINAL AND WARM! BIG PLAID, OVERSIZE SCARF, FELT HANDBAG OR JUST A KNITTED PILLOW! THE RANGE OF TEXTILE MATERIALS IS VAST: ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS TO PICK THE MOST COMFORTABLE ONE FOR YOURSELF!

SLEEPING BAG TARTAN Cloud7

CUSH FELT BAG Sojka | Darkysnapadem

TABOURET STRIPES The Soft World

CAT CAVE Kivikis | Etsy


BUNNY TOY Anne-Claire Petit LAMP NEON HK Living | Nordic Day

WOOLEN SOCKS My Granny Socks | Etsy

HION HL0825 A HL0813 House Doctor CARPET Madam Stoltz

PLAID NAGANO Mimou KNITTED STOOL Gandía Blasco | Gan


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DI Y PRO J EC T S What to do in autumn

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HANGIN G PA PER L A M P text and styling: Lenka Hlaváčová | photo: Lina Németh

THIS ISSUE IS ON VARIOUS MATERIALS; THEREFORE, PAPER MUST NOT BE LEFT OUT. IN THE ‘LIVING BY SOFFA‘ STYLE WE DECIDED TO MAKE A STYLISH PAPER LAMP FOR YOU. FOLLOW OUR INSTRUCTIONS AND MAKE ONE YOURSELF! DIFFICULTY: medium TIME: 1 hour WHAT YOU NEED: A2 size hard paper lamp hook string/cord template paper punch glue scissors ruler compasses or knife pencil scotch tape

Do you need a lamp next to your bed or above your desk? Lenka, our designer, has prepared a simple manual for you which will help you to make your own original lampshade: all you need is to choose the colour! You can complement your lamp with a smart hanger and create various colour combinations. If you need a bigger lamp, you can simply enlarge Lenka’s template in the adequate scale. Enjoy your own folding! THE TEMPLATE IS TO DOWNLOAD HERE. INSTRUCTIONS: According to the template copy the locations of the holes (dots) and foldings (dashed lines) onto the hard paper. Cut out the shape following the edges. Draw along the dashed lines with the compasses (or with the blunt side of a knife) so that you can fold the hard paper easily. ►


Always bend the folding to both sides. Use paper punch to make holes in the paper where indicated by the dots. Glue both sides of the lamp together on the indicated flaps (hatched areas) – you can also strengthen them by using a scotch tape. The result of this should be almost a tube. Fold the foldings on the sides of the top tips towards the centre of the lamp. Draw a string through the holes in the paper but do not tighten it towards yourself yet. Now you need to pull the hinge through the centre of the lamp, after that tighten the string by pulling it towards yourself so that the folded parts would point directly to the centre. Now finish the lower part of the lampshade. Follow the instructions on the template and fold individual parts so that they either fold inwards or outwards. Once you have folded the entire lamp, arrange it to a nice shape and it is ready to be hung up! ■Bed linen, knitted plaid and table cloth, H&M Home Knitted cushion, stool Oki, bowl Graphic, vase Combi, BoConcept Black & white textil cabel with socket 3 m, Domesi Design, Domesistore


SO F FA T EA M T I PS ARE YOU LOOKING FOR MORE INSPIRATION? OUR TEAM HAS PREPARED SEVERAL TIPS FOR YOU. DO NOT MISS OUT ON THEM. JUST CLICK ON THE IMAGES!

PRAGUE BURLESQUE ROYAL

ZUZANA KUBÍČKOVÁ & SOFFA

The most exciting burlesque show in Prague. Huge stage, supersize props, beautiful costumes and a fantastic atmosphere of the 1920s theatre. Every Friday night!

We love the work of fashion designer Zuzana Kubíčková and we are happy to wear her models at this year‘s Designblok! More information about Zuzana here.

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WIN STYLISH BUTLERS ACCESSORIES!

NEW PAC GALLERY IN PRAGUE

E-mail us at info@soffamag.com (subject: Butlers) and tell us which article in this issue you like the most; you will get the chance to win a tray and a bag by Butlers!

We have absolutely fallen in love with the PAC gallery premises. It specialises mainly in contemporary photography. Currently it houses the exposition by Miro Minarovych.

GIVE - AWAY


NAT U R AL O R A N G E PEEL I N G text, styling and photo: Bára Perglová

THE AUTUMN WEATHER CALLS FOR RELAXATION. RUN YOURSELF A HIT BATH, LIGHT SCENTED CANDLES AND IMMERSE YOURSELF INTO THE WORLD OF WARM NATURAL FRAGRANCES. OUR TIP FOR A HOMEMADE PEELING WITH ORANGE AND CINNAMON WILL DELIGHT MORE THAN ONE OF YOUR SENSES! DIFFICULTY: very easy TIME: 10 minutes WHAT YOU NEED: sealable container 50 g cane sugar 3 spoons of olive oil 1 teaspoon of jojoba oil 1 teaspoon of orange zest (or orange oil) ½ teaspoon of ground cinnamon bowl spoon

We believe that natural ingredients are the best for skincare. You will definitely find all the ingredients for our homemade peeling in your kitchen. Already in the Antiquity the Romans appreciated the positive specificity of olive oil, especially for its anti-ageing effects. If you add the recommended jojoba oil into the peeling mixture as well, you will make yourself feel like being treated in spa. Jojoba oil is rich in nutrients, minerals and vitamin E. It also contains a natural protective UV filter and regulates the skin moisture; therefore it is quite literally liquid gold. It is readily available in drugstores and in shops with organic products. INSTRUCTIONS: Mix well all the ingredients so that they connect properly. In case you are making just a small amount of the peeling, we recommend you use fresh orange zest; for larger amounts use orange oil instead (it will remain fresh for longer). ►


The final consistence should be well spreadable: not too watery and not too thick. If not prepared properly, the application might be more difficult. Move the mixture to the container with a lid so that it would not be affected by the contact with the fresh air. Use a clean spoon to mix and manipulate with the mixture so that it does not get contaminated and stays fresh for longer. Apply on wet skin with circular massaging movements. Rinse with water and dry. Your skin will be soft and elastic. TIP: Store the peeling mixture away from direct sun which could jeopardize the precious oils’ positive effects. â–


OUR PEELING IS SUITABLE FOR ALL TYPES OF SKIN! YOU CAN USE IT FOR BOTH FACE, HANDS AND BODY!


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L I V I N G BY S O F FA Living room


P U R E D E SIGN A N D I N DI V I DUA L I T Y text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

WITH THE UPCOMING AUTUMN WE RETURN INSIDE OUR HOMES. WE SPEND MORE TIME IN OUR LIVING ROOMS, WATCHING TELEVISION, READING A BOOK OR WITH A TABLET. WE DECIDED TO SHOW YOU THE WAYS IN WHICH YOU CAN ARRANGE YOUR LIVING ROOM AND HOW TO ADD THE INDIVIDUALITY. WE HOPE YOU WILL LET YOURSELF BE INSPIRED TO IMPROVE YOUR HOME! The base of our living room is a big module, neutrally grey sofa. As a contrast to this massive piece we chose wooden tables on subtle legs so that they would make the space feel lighter. We also chose the lamp in the same subtle style. We wanted to add a little fun in the interior and so we added a garden rocking chair. It looks great, does it not? Your living room will feel warmer if you add textiles: therefore, a sufficient amount of cushions is necessary! A proper living room should also have some storage so we designed an original display cabinet with weed door which represents the hottest trends in the field of interior design. The individual spirit is contained in the SOFFA-style poster. ■ For the photoshoot premises we would like to give our thanks to the PAVILON company.


GREY COLOUR IS IDEAL TO BE COMBINED WITH OTHER COLOURS. IT WORKS AS A LIGHT BASIS ESPECIALLY WHEN FOUND IN LARGE AREAS. WE PUT BROWN LEATHER ON THE FLOOR. THE COMBINATION OF LEATHER, FELT AND BLACK AND COPPER METAL WITH WOOD IS FUN AND YET HAS AN ELEGANT LOOK! Rocking armchair Click by Houe, sofa Mags by Hay, floor lamp Lampadaire Droit by Serge Mouille, side tables Bowl by Mater and rectangular cushion Dot Divina by Hay, all Stockist Pendant lamp GM 15 Pendant by Menu, glass cover Ivalo by LSA, wooden candlesticks Lumberjack by Normann Copenhagen, plaid Betty Tourterelle, teapot Kettle by Menu and vase Lotta by LSA, all Esuperstore Beef skin Koldby and Display cabinet Nornäs, both Ikea Flower, Mario Wild Flowers Grey quilted pillow case and rose pillow, both H&M Home Poster Go Ahead and display case door, both designed by SOFFA


DO NOT FORGET ABOUT TEXTILE, ACCESSORIES AND FLOWERS AND PLANTS WHICH WILL MAKE YOUR HOME FEEL HOMELY. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE A SIMILAR SHOW CASE, WE WILL TELL YOU HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN IN OUR NEXT MINI ISSUE (COMING OUT AT THE START OF NOVEMBER). YOU CAN BUY THE GO AHEAD POSTER (DESIGNED BY SOFFA) AT THIS YEAR’S DESIGNBLOK. Rocking armchair Click by Houe, sofa Mags by Hay, floor lamp Lampadaire Droit by Serge Mouille, side tables Bowl by Mater and rectangular cushion Dot Divina by Hay, all Stockist Pendant lamp GM 15 Pendant by Menu, glass cover Ivalo by LSA, wooden candlesticks Lumberjack by Normann Copenhagen, plaid Betty Tourterelle, teapot Kettle by Menu and vase Lotta by LSA, all Esuperstore Beef skin Koldby and Display cabinet Nornäs, both Ikea Flower, Mario Wild Flowers Grey quilted pillow case and rose pillow, both H&M Home Poster Go Ahead and display case door, both designed by SOFFA


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SOFFA MAGAZINE MINI ISSUE WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE A DISPLAY CASE OF OUR AUTHENTIC SOFFA DESIGN? REGISTER ON OUR WEB SITE AND IN OUR MINI ISSUE WE WILL TEACH YOU HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN! REGISTER HERE.


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T R AV EL Day in Kutnรก Hora | Czech Republic

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A WAL K THRO UG H K U T N Á H O R A text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

COLOURFUL AUTUMN DAYS ARE AN IDEAL OPPORTUNITY FOR VARIOUS TRIPS. FORGET WORK AND EXPLORE THE BEAUTIES OF BOHEMIA. IF YOU HAVE A DAY-OFF, GO TO KUTNÁ HORA! Do you wonder where you can go for one day in the vicinity of Prague? You should definitely visit Kutná Hora, a significant town jewel which also happens to be on the UNESCO world heritage list. Let yourself be overwhelmed by the history of this town which is also known as the silver treasure chest of the Czech Kingdom. A town which once used to be the second important town of the kingdom (right after the royal capital of Prague) and which has preserved some of its fame until nowadays. WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO IN KUTNÁ HORA: The history of Kutná Hora is closely connected to silver mining and to the development of monetary economy. (The name Kutná Hora is derived from the Czech words “kutat” – to mine, and “hora” – hill, mountain.) The origins of the ore mining reach back to 10th century; nevertheless, its significant development did not start until 13th century when several mining settlements were founded in the surroundings of present Kutná Hora. In 1300 King Wenceslas II issued a new mining law Ius Regale Montanorum which established royal rights over the silver mining. It also established unified currency and Kutná Hora became the site of the Central Mint of the Czech Kingdom. At Vlašský dvůr, where the Central Mint started to operate, the Prague sou began to be produced. Thus, Kutná Hora became the second (to Prague) most important town of the state. At the end of 14th century this rich city found itself in the conflict with the cloister in the nearby Sedlec and consequently with the Church. Therefore, the citizens of the town – mainly the miners and merchants – decided to ►


fund the building of St. Barbara’s Church from their private sources! The church is built in the late gothic style and was designed by the best builders of those times. The Hussite wars during the reign of Emperor Zikmund the face of the town was severely influenced. The Sedlec cloister burnt down and the mining economy collapsed and was restored many years after that. During the times of Kutná Hora’s flourish it was mainly the Vlašský dvůr that was the centre of all important state events. In 1409 Dekret kutnohorský was signed here and in 1471 a vote took place here in which Ladislaus II Jagiellon was elected the Czech King. After this Kutná Hora flourishes and so does the mining industry; this lasts until the defeat of the peasants at Bílá Hora at the beginning of 17th century, which led to re-catholicisation and arrival of Jesuits (see the Jesuit College, nowadays GASK) to Kutná Hora. Then there was another hard time for the town during the ThirtyYears’ War. In 1727 the Mint was closed which basically ended the era of Kutná Hora as a mining site. In 1995 the town was added to the UNESCO world cultural and natural heritage list. The best place to understand the glory and fortune of Kutná Hora, which is based on the hard work of miners, is undoubtedly the church of St. Barbara. It is the very first cathedral in Europe which was financed by the town’s citizens: that is miners and not the Church. This fact is manifested by the statue of a miner in his traditional clothes inside the church. The church is dedicated to the St. Barbara, the patroness of all miners. The building process of the church commenced in 1388 with the participation of one of Parléř family members. Other important figures ► LEFT: You say that blues does not go well with gothic style? Sure it does! This Blues Café in the very heart of Kutná Hora is a living example of it.


THE PANORAMA OF KUTNÁ HORA WITH THE SIGNIFICANT FEATURE OF THE ST. JAKUB’S CHURCH TOWER. THE INTERIOR DECORATION OF THIS GOTHIC CHURCH IS OF LATE BAROQUE STYLE AND COMES FROM THE END OF 17TH CENTURY.


WHEN WALKING THROUGH THE STREETS DO NOT FORGET TO LOOK DOWN AS WELL – THE DETAILS AND PATTERNS ON THE PAVEMENTS AND COBBLE STONES ARE WORTH THE ATTENTION!


participating on the building of the church are Matyáš Rejsek and Benedikt Rejt. Similarly to the St. Vitus Cathedral at the Prague Castle, ‘Barbara’ (as it is the church’s familiar nickname) was being built a very long time – until 1905. The original plans for the church show that it was meant to be twice as long; yet, when you enter, you will be overwhelmed by the majestic atmosphere of the place. Nevertheless, it is not only ‘Barbara‘ that is worth seeing among the religious buildings in Kutná Hora. Once you are in the town you should definitely pay a visit to the cloister in Sedlec, the Church of the Assumption of Our Lady and the St. Jakub’s Church. The cathedral of Our Lady in Sedlec is approximately one kilometre away from the centre and it is definitely worth the walk! On the verge of 13th and 14th century the local cloister was one of the most important ones in the Czech Kingdom and the cathedral, with its hugeness, did not have an equal! On the way from the centre towards the Cathedral you should definitely stop at Hrádek and in Kamenný Dvůr – both are the sites of the Czech Museum of Silver. Kamenný Dvůr, with its remarkable front is one of the most eminent objects in the town. Its history reaches far into the pre-Hussite era. If you happen to crave more history and beautiful architecture, go to Vlašský dvůr. Among its other purposes it used to be a temporary site of the Czech Kings (such as Wenceslas IV). The aforementioned Dekret kutnohorský was signed here: it was a document specifying the rights and influences of foreigners at the Charles University. ► LEFT: St. Barbara’s Church is of the late Gothic style and together with the early Baroque building of the Jesuit College (now GASK) it has become a symbol of Kutná Hora.


WE ARE CRAZY ABOUT HATS AND GOOD COFFEE AND SO WE SIMPLY HAD TO PAY A VISIT TO THE HAT STORE MELUZÍNA AND THE COFFEE SHOP NA KOZÍM PLÁCKU.


IN THE STYLISH COFFEE SHOP WE HAD A DELICIOUS HOT CHOCOLATE SPRINKLED WITH CHILI AND A RASPBERRY SHAKE WITH VANILLA ICE CREAM. OUR MOUTHS ARE WATERING WITH THE SIMPLE MEMORY OF THAT!


The local ossuary is a must! Nevertheless, we skipped it this time :) We remembered the obligatory school trip to this remarkable place and we decided that one visit is more than enough. Nevertheless, the story of the ossuary in Sedlec is interesting and you can read about it here. We spent the most of our time in Kutná Hora (as always) in the Gallery of the Central Bohemian Region (GASK). The gallery houses modern art and resides in the Baroque building of the Jesuit College in the monumental neighbourhood of the Cathedral. There is a promenade connecting the GASK and the Cathedral which resembles the ‘royal route‘ connecting the Prague Castle and the Klementinum. The statues in front of the GASK definitely refer to those on the Charles Bridge. It is this very contrast of the modern (often abstract) art exhibited in the gallery and the old architectonic styles that we enjoy the most about this place! WHAT AND WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK: If you are gourmets, you will definitely enjoy Kutná Hora. You can find various small cosy cafés, traditional pubs and even one Middle Age tavern. After an hour spent in the Kutná Hora Antique shop a glass of homemade lemonade and a cake in a non-traditional Blues Café was a real spot on! While sipping your cup of coffee not only can you listen to music but you can also choose from a vast range of vintage CD and vinyls. If you fancy a traditional meal, definitely go to eat to the legendary brewery Dačický which gained its name after Mikuláš Dačický from Heslov (1555 – 1626). It is not only the food and beer that you should come here for (they have several types of beers on tap and also a selection of local wines) but also ►

RIGHT: Do not forget to keep looking up as well. The local old houses are decorated with house: some of them are proper mystical masterpieces.


THE HISTORY OF KUTNÁ HORA IS CLOSELY LINKED TO SILVER MINING AND SILVER COINS. IF YOU WANT TO GET A SOUVENIR, IT SHOULD BE A MEMORIAL COIN!


because of the unique oak interior design. Similar design can be found in another famous tavern called U Kata. After the entire day spent on walking and photography, we ended our trip at Kozí plácek café which we fell in love with. We could sit in those retro comfortable chairs and talk for hours. You just must not miss out on this place! WHAT AND WHERE TO BUY: Silver and coins are inevitably a part of the culture in Kutná Hora. If you want to get yourself an authentic souvenir, get a coin with one of the Czech Kings. We are not huge fans of souvenirs and so we preferred the Kutná Hora Antique shop at Jungmann’s Square and the famous Felix Jenewein Antique on Barborská street. HOW TO GET HERE: Kutná Hora is easily accessible all by car, train and bus. The journey from Prague takes approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes (it is about 70 kilometres). The best option is to go by train from Prague for it takes less than an hour. You can also go by bus but it takes slightly longer (about 1,5 hour). For train and bus times go here: jizdnirady.idnes.cz/vlakyautobusy/spojeni/ WHERE TO STAY: Kutná Hora is a rather small town and one day is enough to have the experience. However, if you would like to fully enjoy all the local cultural events, we recommend a weekend stay. The aforementioned Kozí plácek café provides a unique attic accommodation or you can also rent a sty-lish room at the family hotel U Kata, which also has a wellness centre and a tavern. If you are looking for a splendid view, definitely go to the Vila U Varhanáře. For more info go to www.kutnahora.cz,whc.unesco.org/en/list/732, www.kutnohorsko,cz, www.pruvodcikutnahora.cz ■


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R EC I PES Swedish Cuisine

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THR E E- CO U R SE S W EDI S H S T Y L E M EN U text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

WE LOVE SCANDINAVIA AND SO, WHEN WE GOT INVITED TO A DINNER AT THE SWEDISH EMBASSY IN PRAGUE, WE DID NOT HESITATE FOR A SINGLE SECOND! YOU CAN NOW LEARN SEVERAL TRADITIONAL SWEDISH CUISINE RECIPES AND PEAK INTO THE INTERIOR OF THE SWEDISH EMBASSY. WE WERE GUIDED BY HELENA, THE CULTURAL REFERENT, AND SHE WAS WEARING THE TRADITIONAL SWEDISH FOLK COSTUME. You say you know nothing about the Swedish cuisine? The Swedes love food and can actually enjoy it. During the three-course meal composed by the Swedish Embassy in Prague, which we present you, you will get to learn about the most typical ingredients. Apart from the term ‘Swedish table‘, which is unnecessary to explain, the secret of the Swedish cuisine lies in the close relationship with nature and in the attitude to the fresh local ingredients. Fish are a major part of the Swedish cuisine (represented by zander on our menu) and they are prepared in any kind of way, often in the combination with dill. No Swedish table should miss potatoes (here represented by potato puree with Västerbotten cheese). Very frequent in the Swedish cuisine are cranberries and chanterelles: for example as sauces or soups. The Swedes also love sweet. It is common to accompany cakes with mulberry jam or mulberry topping. And never they miss out on a good cup of coffee! ■ We would like to give our special thanks to the SWEDISH EMBASSY IN PRAGUE for the cooperation on creating the menu and for making the premises for the photoshoot available.


CHANT ER EL L E TOA S T text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

DO YOU NEED A HEALTHY STARTER FOR YOU AUTUMN FEAST? THIS TOAST WITH CHANTERELLES ACCORDING TO THE SWEDISH RECIPE IS THE IDEAL CHOICE FOR YOU. GIVE IT A TRY! TIME: 20 - 30 minutes PORTIONS: 4 toasts INGREDIENTS: 500 g chanterelles toast bread 1 pack of arugula (or any lettuce) 1 pouring cream (30%) 1 onion or shallot 50 g butter cherry (few drops) 1 teaspoon fine flour pinch of salt and pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: Chop shallot or yellow onion to fine pieces; chop chanterelles to bigger pieces, add salt and pepper. Slightly simmer onion on butter, add chanterelles and dust with a spoonful of fine flour. Leave to rest and pour over the cream. For better taste, add several drops of cherry. Toast bread and cut out the inner part of the toast. Pour the chanterelle sauce over the cut-out bread circle and add a few fried chanterelles. Serve toasts with arugula or lettuce. TIP: Chanterelles are decorative enough on their own. It will look great if you place a bowl with the rest of them on the table as a decorative feature. ■


CUT OUT A CIRCLE OR A DIFFERENT SHAPE FROM THE TOASTED BREAD. IT IS A FUNNY DETAIL!


AT DESIG NBLO K (Octo ber

7

BLOGGERS TALK October 8th, 12:00 Superstudio Evropa

SOFFA VIDEO FOR IKEA Superstudio Evropa

-

12 th)

SOFFA SHOWROOM Openstudio U Minuty

BLOGGERS WORKSHOP October 7th Openstudio U Minuty

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Z AND E R WI T H POTATO PU R EE text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

YOU JUST HAVE TO TRY THIS RECIPE ON ZANDER WITH POTATO PUREE AND VÄSTERBOTTEN CHEESE! IT IS NOT DIFFICULT AT ALL. GET INSPIRED WITH THE STYLING OF THE TABLE AS WELL. TIME: 45 minutes PORTIONS: 4 portions INGREDIENTS: ZANDER WITH BEETROOT 4 portions of zander fillet 1-2 big beet-root 1 pack of baby spinach 2 lemons butter thyme salt and pepper POTATO PUREE 4 big potatoes 1 dcl milk Västerbotten cheese 1 eggs butter

INSTRUCTIONS: Get the zander rid of the scales, slice on the individual portions, add salt and pepper. Add few drops of lemon zest. Fry the fillets on butter, first from the side with skin: for approximately three to five minutes on each side (depending on the thickness of each fillet). Serve zander with a slice of lemon. Boil beetroot and then peel it under water. Chop beet-root, add salt, pepper, thyme and lemon. Fry it on a pan with oil and butter. The preparation of potatoes is easy: boil them in salt water then mash them with yolk, milk, butter and Västerbotten cheese. Divide the mixture into baking forms; grate more Västerbotten cheese on top and bake for approximately 20-30 minutes on 200°C. Meanwhile you can prepare cold sauce. Mix sour cream with high content of fat with finely chopped red onion and coarse-grained ►


SAUCE 1 sour cream (high content of fat) 1 red onion coarse-grained mustard salt and pepper

mustard. Add salt and pepper according to the need. TIP: Västerbotten cheese might be difficult to get so you can try to substitute it with Präst cheese (which you can get in IKEA), or any other strong and mature cheese. If you do not have enough time, you can get a pre-boiled beet-root. ■


SMÅL AN D C H EES EC A K E text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

THIS OLD RECIPE COMES FROM THE SOUTH OF SWEDEN AND IS VERY POPULAR ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. USUALLY IT IS SERVED AT SPECIAL OCCASIONS SUCH AS WEDDINGS OR BIRTHDAYS. TIME: 90 minutes

INSTRUCTIONS: Whisk eggs with sugar.

PORTIONS: 8 portions

Mix in flour, milk, soft cheese and almonds. Add few drops of bitter-almond essence.

INGREDIENTS: 500 g soft cheese (preferably cottage cheese) 200 ml milk (or milk with cream) whipped cream (for decoration) mulberry jam (for decoration) or any other jam (e.g. strawberry or blackcurrant) 50 ml fine flour 50 g chopped almonds 3 eggs 2 spoons sugar bitter-almond essence

Pour into a buttered baking form. Bake for approximately 60 - 70 minutes for 175°C. The cake is best served with strawberries or jam (preferably mulberry) and with cream. You can also add vanilla ice cream. TIP: Mulberry jam you can get in IKEA. It is brilliant on pancakes or waffles. ■


07

P REC I O U S S TO N ES Beautiful, precious and magical

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WONDERS

název:

tvrdost:

02

AZURIT výskyt:

typ krystalů:

XXXXXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXXXXX

OF NATURE


INCR E D IBL E PR EC I O US S TO N ES text: Adéla Kudrnová and Mineralia | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

AS A PART OF THE ISSUE DEDICATED TO MATERIALS, PRECIOUS STONES WERE AN OBVIOUS CHOICE! WE CHOSE FOUR KINDS OF STONES OF INTERESTING FORMS AND STRUCTURES IN THE MINERALIA SHOP. WE WILL ALSO SHOW YOU JEWELLERY AND VARIOUS ACCESSORIES MADE OF THEM! Minerals are mainly inorganic homogeneous natural products whose contents can be expressed by a chemical symbol or a formula. Minerals then compose heterogeneous rocks. There are several characteristic of minerals according to which they are categorised. The most basic ones are colour, gloss and hardness. Hardness is defined by the ability of one mineral to engrave into another. Friedrich Mohs scale is used to establish the harness of minerals: the softest minerals are marked by 1 and the hardest one, diamond, is marked by number 10. Another characteristic of minerals is the geometrical shapes of the minerals’ crystals. Therefore, in the table of minerals we also mention the respective crystalographic systems. ■ Special thanks to MINERALIA for their help with this article.


name: hardness:

7

C RY S TA L where:

Brazil, Alps, Madagascar, Russia, China

system:

trigonal

esotheric it emphasises the effects of meaning: other stones


CRYSTAL (SILICON DIOXIDE SIO2) IS A COLOURLESS VARIANT OF FLINT. FLINT IS ONE OF THE MOST COMMON MINERALS LOCATED IN THE EARTH’S CRUST. CHEMICALLY, CRYSTAL, THE TRANSPARENT AND COLOURLESS VARIANT, IS A CLEAR SILICON DIOXIDE. IN THE ANCIENT GREECE IT WAS BELIEVED THAT CRYSTAL IS A FOREVER FROZEN ICE. ONLY A SMALL AMOUNT OF IMPURITIES OR IRRADIATION CAN CAUSE THE CHANGE OF CRYSTAL’S COLOUR. SINCE THE ANTIQUITY CRYSTAL HAS BEEN USED FOR JEWELLERIES, NOWADAYS IT IS MAINLY USED IN LASER TECHNIQUE. Crystal – geode, crystals and bracelet; all Mineralia


name: hardness:

7

A M ET H Y S T where:

Brazil, Uruguay, Russia, Bohemia

system:

trigonal

stone connecting secular esoteric meaning: and spiritual worlds


AMETHYST (SILICON DIOXIDE SIO2 AND IRON) IS A PURPLE VARIATION OF FLINT. ITS COLOUR IS GIVEN BY THE QUADRIVALENT IRON, WHICH IS ADDED TO THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE DURING THEIR GROWTH. IT IS ONE OF THE MOST FREQUENT SEMI-PRECIOUS STONES AND IS FOUND IN VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN THE WORLD. ITS LOCATION IS CLOSELY CONNECTED TO THE POST-VOLCANIC ACTIVITY. SMALLER LOCATIONS OF AMETHYST CAN ALSO BE FOUND IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC AND THE CZECH REPUBLIC. AS A DECORATIVE STONE, AMETHYST HAS BEEN KNOWN SINCE ANTIQUITY WHEN IT WAS USED FOR SEALS IN SUMER AND MESOPOTAMIA. PEOPLE USED TO BELIEVE IN ITS POWERS AGAINST THE STATE OF DRUNKENNESS. IN THE MIDDLE AGES AMETHYST WAS USED FOR DECORATION OF CHURCHES. AMETHYST GEODES ARE VERY ATTRACTIVE (HOLLOW ROCKS WITH CRYSTALS INSIDE) AND THEY CAN GROW TO THE HEIGHT OF SEVERAL METRES. Amethyst – stone pieces and necklace; all Mineralia


name: hardness:

5 – 5, 5

L A PI S L A ZUL I where:

Afghanistan, Russia, Chile

system:

cubical

esoteric the stone of friendship, meaning: wisdom and love


LAPIS LAZULI IS NOT A MINERAL BUT A ROCK (SEMI-PRECIOUS STONE) WHICH CONSISTS OF 3 MAIN MINERALS: CALCITE (CALCIUM CARBONATE CACO3), PYRITE (IRON DISULFIDE FES2) AND LAZURITE (TECTOSILICATE MINERAL WITH SULFATE, SULFUR AND CHLORIDE (NA,CA)8(ALSIO4)6(SO4,S,CL)2). THE ULTRAMARINE COLOUR OF LAPIS IS CAUSED BY THE PRESENCE OF LAZURITE. LAZURITE IS A TECTOSILICATE MINERAL WITH SULFATE, SULFUR AND CHLORIDE AND ONLY RARELY IT CREATES INDIVIDUAL CRYSTALS (IT EXISTS MAINLY AS A PART OF MARBLE). LAPIS LAZULI IS VERY POPULAR IN JEWELLERY MAKING AS WELL AS IN INTERIOR DECORATING. BEING A DECORATIVE STONE AND A SOURCE OF BLUE PIGMENT (ULTRAMARINE) IT WAS USED ALREADY IN ANCIENT EGYPT AND MESOPOTAMIA. WHILE LINES OF CALCITE AND GOLDEN CRYSTALS CONTAINED IN LAPIS LAZULI ARE NOT CONSIDERED A FLAW. Lapis lazuli – a stone block and a necklace; both Mineralia


name: hardness:

3, 5 4

A ZU R I T E where:

Namibia, France, USA, Morocco

system:

monoclinical

esotheric stone of patience, concenmeaning: tration and memory


AZURITE (ALKALINE COPPER CARBONATE CU3(CO3)2(OH)2) IS ONE OF THE FREQUENT MINERALS OF COPPER WHICH IS FORMED BY THE INFLUENCE OF WATER AND ATMOSPHERIC GASES ON ORE MINERALS CONTAINING COPPER – I.E. EROSION. AZURITE CREATES THIN RAIDS AND SMALL LAYERS ON ROCKS; BIGGER CRYSTALS ARE HIGHLY VALUED BY COLLECTORS. MAINLY THE MASSIVE LAYERED VARIANT WHICH OVERGROWS WITH MALACHITE IS USED IN JEWELLERY MAKING. UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AZURITE CHANGES INTO GREEN MALACHITE. IT ALSO EXPLAINS WHY ON SOME FRESCOS THE SKY OR SEA IS DEPICTED IN GREEN: IN THE MIDDLE AGES AZURITE WAS USED AS A BLUE PIGMENT. Azurite – investment collectable and earrings; both Mineralia


n šestnácterý

7. – 12. 10. Designblok

14

Prague Design and Fashion Week www.designblok.cz

Designblok podporují tyto instituce: UMPRUM, Velvyslanectví Nizozemského království, Francouzský institut v Praze, Velvyslanectví Švédska, Instituto Cervantes, Česká centra, EUNIC, Rakouské velvyslanectví, Rakouské kulturní forum, Goethe - Institut, Polský institut v Praze Oficiální dodavatelé: Parfumerie Douglas, Giorgio Armani Cosmetics, Veuve Clicquot, Heineken, SONBERK, TONI&GUY, fusion hotel prague, Ambiente restaurace, SAMSUNG, NESPRESSO, TONI&GUY HAIRMEETWARDROBE Mediální partneři: H.O.M.i.E., Art+Antique, Architekt, Dolce Vita, Design & Home, ERA21, ELLE Decoration, Flash Art, Marianne Bydlení, Travel Fever, Radio 1, DesignMagazin.cz, Czechdesign.cz, elle.cz, fashionbook.cz, iconiq.cz, ihned.cz, MAUDhomme, protisedi.cz, Dotyk Zahraniční mediální partneři: H.O.M.E., H.O.M.i.E., Atrium, Designum, Flash Art Partneři:

Deloitte Pražská správa nemovitostí Galerie hlavního města Prahy Meet Czech Design CzechTourism

Hlavní mediální partneři:

Hlavní partner:

Generální partner:


08

CR EAT I V E PEO PL E Vít Major

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A GL ASS CU T T ER ‘S WO R K S H O P text: Adéla Kudrnová | styling: SOFFA | photo: Lina Németh

WHEN WE WERE THINKING ABOUT PRESENTING GLASS AS A MATERIAL IN AN INTERESTING WAY, WE CHOSE TO GIVE YOU VÍT MAJOR, A GLASS CUTTER FROM NOVÝ BOR. COME WITH US INTO HIS WORKSHOP AND PEEK UNDER THE VEIL OF SECRETS OF THIS BEAUTIFUL, YET DEMANDING, CRAFT. LET YOURSELF BE CARRIED AWAY BY HIS FASCINATING STORY! Vít’s workshop in Nový Bor is the birthplace to many beautifully cut vases, glasses, chandeliers and other luxurious products crafted for various palaces and VIP clients. Nevertheless, Vít Major, the maker of such beauty remains a humble artist loyal to the craft’s tradition. He is a successor to the family tradition of Czech crystal glass cutters, which was founded by Václav Major in the 19th century. Vít opened his own workshop in 1991. The beginnings were not easy but thanks to his skills and hard work the most important clients, such as the Viennese Lobmeyr company and the Foundation for restoration of Prussian and Bavarian castles and chateaus found their way to his work. At the present Vít predominantly works for these big clients. However, he manages to find some time for his own authentic work; he also focuses on utility glass, for which he was given several design awards. We talked with Vít about his craft and glass as such: ►

LEFT: The prefabricates are all over Vít’s place: even in the garden.


IN VÍT‘S WORKSHOP HE SHOWED US SOME OF HIS DESIGN SKETCHES. THE TOP ONE IS HIS SKETCH OF A WAVE EFFECT DESIGN FOR WHICH HE WAS AWARDED SEVERAL PRIZES.


HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD THE INCLINATION TO GLASS AND WANTED TO BE A GLASS CUTTER? Of course not; neither I liked school much, nor was I good at it. My parents chose an artisanal education focused on glass cutting in Josefodol. Fortunately, I started to enjoy working with glass and glass cutting and so I also went for the secondary school with maturita exams in Světlá nad Sázavou. There I was at the right time to still meet with the old masters, my role models, whom which I learnt what I know now. BUT GLASS CUTTING IS YOUR FAMILY TRADITION... Precisely. My dad’s dad, the founder of the family tradition, studied in Josefodol. Václav Major settled down in the area of Nový Bor after the war. I have many of his notes and sketches here and even after all these years I still make use of them. CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR JOB? WHAT IS GLASS CUTTING ABOUT? I just remembered the definition of glass cutting which they taught us at school: “Glass cutting is a process during which the particles of a harder material remove particles of a softer material,” but I guess you don’t want to hear that :). ►

LEFT: Vít‘s workshop is full of cute authentic still-lives. Not even the best stylist in the world would ever think of putting together a crystal vase (Vít’s own design), chestnut animals (by Vít’s children) and a luxurious flacon Nr. 8 from the Collectables collection (which was made by Vít for the J. & L. Lobmeyr company according to the design of Josef Lobmeyr from 1840). NEXT PAGE: The good foundation for glass cutting consists of grinding wheels. A good glass cutter should be able to make them himself: Vít’s workshop is full of them.


My work starts at the very beginning of the glassmaking. I make a sketch according to which a wooden (mainly beech) form is made into which the metallurgical master blows melted glass. I also need to agree with the master on the parameters of the glass and on what the prefabricate should be like. The ready prefabricate often needs to be smoothened on a grinding stone. Before cutting I draw a raster according to which I plan to cut. Then it depends on me how I grasp the material space-wise. Using grinding stones of various sizes and profiles I cut the material so that I would make the maximum use of the glass’s optical potential. First I use rough grinding stones to create the main shape of the decorative pattern and then I create the details by smaller and smoother stones. After having done the decor the product is smooth but has a frosted look. Therefore, there comes the process of polishing: it has three phases. In the first two I use water and pumice and in the third one I use water with cerox. For polishing I use the same grinding stones as for cutting. The suspension is applied onto the polishing stone at high speed. The quality of polishing depends on the temperature between the grinding stone and the glass. The higher temperature the better polishing quality. WHAT DOES A GOOD GLASS CUTTER HAVE TO KNOW? The basic element of this craft is a grinding stone (from electret, natural sandstone or diamond). A good glass cutter should be able to make grind stones himself according to the glass cutting needs. That is the main problem today. You don’t get to learn to make them at school. Furthermore, at school the diamond ones are used predominantly and you can’t make them yourself. By the way, diamond grinding stones were invented in Nový Bor. Naturally, it is also necessary to have the skills, experience and feeling for glass to know when the glass is getting too hot and is going to break. ►


LEFT – A FINISHED WINE GLASS FOR THE LOBMEYR COMPANY RIGHT – BEFORE CUTTING: A NET IS DRAWN ONTO THE GLASS. THE GLASS CUTTER CAN THEN FOLLOW IT.


HOW TO CUT A GLASS LIKE THAT? FIRST YOU DRAW THE NET ON THE GLASS. WHEN CUTTING DECORATION SEVERAL GRINDING WHEELS ARE NECESSARY: FIRSTLY THE ROUGH ONE FOR THE BASIC DECOR, THEN THE SMOOTHER ONE FOR FINISHING THE DETAILS.


IN THE NEXT STEP YOU NEED TO POLISH THE GLASS: IT CONSISTS OF THREE PHASES. IN THE FIRST TWO WATER WITH PUMICE IS USED; IN THE THIRD AND FINAL PHASE THE GLASS IS POLISHED WITH WATER AND CEROX.


WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MANUAL POLISHING AND THE CHEMICAL ONE WHICH IS USED IN GLASSMAKING INDUSTRY? During the chemical polishing the edges of the product are etched. The product is then very glossy but as opposed to the manual polishing, it loses its glitter. Thanks to manual polishing the sharp edges, glitter and original optical effects are preserved. YOU DO GLASS CUTTING FOR IMPORTANT CLIENTS SUCH AS THE LOBMEYR COMPANY OR GERMAN RESTORERS. WHAT ARE THESE PROJECTS ABOUT AND WHAT DO YOU LIKE THE MOST ABOUT THEM? I cut glasses, bowls, flacons and other utility glass for Lobmeyr. It is all about realisation of difficult patterns according to very old designs of the company; for example it is the realisation of the so-called ‘impossible‘ designs of Josef Hoffmann. Very often the products are very expensive pieces and the work on them takes weeks to finish. For the Foundation for restoration of Prussian and Bavarian castles and chateaus I do, among others, replicas of Baroque chandelier parts. WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO THE MOST FROM YOUR AUTHENTIC CREATIVE WORK? I work both with clear crystal and with double-layer colourised glass. I like the unexpected optical effects which are created by cutting of the colour layer through to the clear crystal. For more information go to www.vitmajor.cz ■

LEFT: Wave-effect vase; designed and made by Vít Major, lead-free clear, awarded the first place at the “Řemeslo a Umění ve skle” (Glass in Craft and Art) triennial in Nový Bor 2009.


09

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T R EN DS We know what is chic


E ME RA L D G R EEN text and styling: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: companies’ archives

THE COLOUR OF THIS AUTUMN IS DEFINITELY EMERALD. IT IS THE COLOUR OF LUXURY AND WISDOM BUT ALSO PEACE AND INNER BALANCE. GET ON THIS GREEN WAVE WITH US!

NAIL COLOUR SHALLOON CONIFER & Other Stories

RAGS2RICHES VIVIAN POUCH Anthropologie

TABLE LAMP LEAF Muuto | Stockist

HANGER BEAM Hay

ARMCHAIR BANJOOLI Moroso

WALLPAPER KASHGAR EMERALD Designers Guild | Dream House

WATCH DAY-DATE Rolex


D R AM AT I C LO O K text and styling: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: companies’ archives

WHAT IS ‘IN‘ IN THE FIELD OF INTERIOR DESIGN? WE INQUIRED AT THE SEPTEMBER MAISON&OBJET FAIR. THIS SEASON YOU CAN BET ON: DARK WOOD, BLUE OR BLACK PAINT, FURNITURE À LA 1970S, NATURAL MATERIALS, VARIOUS TEXTILES AND GOLDEN ACCESSORIES!

CANDLE HOLDERS NAPPULA Iittala ARMCHAIR COAT Materia FRANKLIN TRIBECA SERIES Menu

WALLPAPER CONCRETE WALL Mr Perswall | InFrame

BOOKCASE 50200127 Bloomingville

RAFT STOOL &Tradition | Designville


In the Ferm Living AW 14 catalogue you will find endless inspiration in neutral earthy colours. photo: Ferm Living


IF THERE IS A PLACE WHERE EVERYTHING SHOULD BE PERFECT, IT IS YOUR HOME. THANKS TO BUTLERS YOU CAN EASILY DO IT. YOU WILL FIND MANY INTERESTING IDEAS FOR YOUR KITCHEN HERE, MANY STYLISH PIECES OF FURNITURE AS WELL AS INSPIRATION FOR GIFTS TO YOUR BELOVEDS. DISCOVER THE WORLD OF BUTLERS!

www.butlers.cz | stores in Prague: Flora, Chodov, Černý Most


10

L A N DS C A PES Stone Ireland

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S TO NE WAL L S - S YM B O L S O F I R EL A N D text: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: David Trčka

DAVID TRČKA, A PHOTOGRAPHER, SPENT ONE YEAR IN IRELAND. DURING HIS STAY HE KEPT TAKING PICTURES OF STONE WALLS AND OTHER STRUCTURES SO TYPICAL FOR IRELAND. WE PRESENT YOU WITH THE MOST INTERESTING ONES! The stone walls in the pictures are located on the western coast of Ireland: more specifically on the Inishmore Island which is a part of Aran Islands and in The Burren karst landscape area. Limestone and a huge amount of loose stones are typical for the inhospitable area of the Aran Islands and the Burren. The combination of the rocky coastline and megalithic chamber tombs, dolmens, churches and the wild ocean is fascinating. For centuries the Irish have been using the stone not only for building their houses but also for building walls which served predominantly as fences for cattle and as borderlines dividing properties. In the Burren area these walls were mainly built during the 19th century under the phenomenon of “hunger walls”. The Irish stone walls are built the dry way: without any grout and the stones are laid on top of each other. Despite this the walls are strong and stable. For more information about this particular area go to www.burrennationalpark.ie and www.aranisland.info. ■ All the photographs were taken on a cine-film with Mamiyu RB 67 camera.


THE PLENTEOUS WALLS ON THE ARAN ISLANDS, WHEN PUT TOGETHER, ARE OVER 1.000 KILOMETRES LONG AND THEY OFTEN SERVE AS A SHELTER FROM HARD WIND.


ONE IS OFTEN AMAZED BY THE SKILLS AND IMAGINATION OF IRISH STONEMASONS. DRY LIMESTONE WALLS CREATE FASCINATING AND DRAMATIC SHAPES!


SOME OF THE WALLS ARE MAINTAINED LESS OFTEN AND DUE TO THEIR LENGTH AND HUGENESS THEY HAVE AN OMINOUS LOOK. EVEN THE INDESTRUCTIBLE MATERIAL NEEDS MAINTENANCE.


SOME WALLS ARE TWO METRES HIGH; THEY USED TO DIVIDE PROPERTIES AND SERVED AS WINDBREAKERS. WHEN THE SUN IS OUT, THE RAYS SHINE THROUGH THE CRANNIES IN A VERY MYSTICAL WAY.


THE SCENERY LOOKS LIKE SOMEBODY COMBED IT WITH A HAIRBRUSH. THE NATURALLY CORRUGATED LIMESTONE BEAUTIFULLY CONTRASTS WITH THE GEOMETRICAL STONE STRUCTURES.


THE LANDSCAPE OF THE ARAN ISLANDS AND THE BURREN AREA ARE STARK AND DESERT BUT IT MAKES YOU WANT TO GO FOR A HIKE AND DISCOVER MORE AND MORE STONE STRUCTURES AND TREASURES.


IF YOU STAY IN THE AREA FOR A LONGER PERIOD OF TIME, YOU MIGHT START TO FEEL AS IF YOU HAPPENED TO BE IN THE STONE AGE YOU MIGHT SOON START MISSING TREES, FORESTS AND LAKES.


ON THE ARRAN ISLANDS AND IN THE BURREN AREA IT SEEMS AS IF THE LAND WAS GIVING BIRTH TO MORE AND MORE STONES; THE TIME SEEMS TO HAVE STOPPED HERE.


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GENEROUS MODERN LIVING FOR PEOPLE WHO LOVE COMFORT AND SAFETY BUT ALSO THEIR OWN FREEDOM AND LIFE IN HARMONY WITH NATURE! www.vilytroja.cz


11

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FR A M E H O US ES Big world-wide special


BE ST FR A M E H O U S ES text: Adéla Kudrnová

WOOD IS THE BASIC BUILDING MATERIALS AND IT DESERVES SPECIAL ATTENTION (NOT ONLY IN THIS ISSUE). WE LOVE FRAME HOUSES AND SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE A LIST OF TOP FIVE RECENTLY BUILT FRAME HOUSES FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. WAIT TO SEE THEM – YOU WILL WANT TO LIVE THERE! We tried to make the selection as colourful as possible and so we put together a family house in Jizera Mountains (by the Czech architectonic studio Prodesi) and a wooden cottage with sauna in Sweden (designed by the Parisian studio Septembre). We also wanted to show you the case of additional wooden extension so we chose the Håbakka project (by the Norwegian 3RW Architects). Furthermore, by another team of Norwegian architects from the Saunders Architecture studio, we will present you with the design of the Bridge artistic studio located on the Fogo Island by the Canadian province of Newfoundland and we did not even forget about the praised Black Tea House by the Czech team of architects from the A1Architects Atelier. Because we wanted our special to be as beneficial as possible we invited the Prodesi/Domesi architectonic studio, which specialises exclusively on the construction of frame houses, and asked Pavel Horák, as their representative, several questions: WHAT ARE THE MAIN ADVANTAGES OF WOODEN HOUSES? Among the indisputable advantages of the wooden houses there are: easy realisation and the short time needed for the construction of the building. Small weight and easy manipulation are also two of the big advantages, especially if you plan to keep working on the house or if you are planning ►


an extension to an already built object. Another great advantage is the energy costs: a well-built wooden house saves you money for heating and the overall operational costs. Heating in the family houses and other buildings built according to the modern wooden-based constructions with sufficient isolation will secure that the immediate energy losses are minimal. Even the heating time needed is significantly shorter. Most of the modern frame houses match the criteria to be classified as low-energy or passive. Here it is important to precisely follow the well-prepared design and the successive execution. What is important is the isolation and the prevention of the so-called ‘thermal bridges‘. If the wooden building is of high quality, you do not have to be afraid of cold, heat or even possible catastrophes such as fire. Frame houses are even less prone to burning to ashes than other buildings. The low proneness to fire is caused and influenced by the usage of large-scale materials. WHAT ARE THE MAIN ADVANTAGES OF WOOD AS A BUILDING MATERIAL AS OPPOSED TO OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS? I should probably have the answer to this well-trained and it should be: “Frame houses are ecological, fast to built, and energetically economical...” Nevertheless, I perceive frame houses as the new lifestyle of the new generation of investors. Wooden houses offer a unique mixture of positive characteristics and at the same time they allow a completely new attitude to architecture due to the investors’ feelings about the result. Wood as such is a unique material which keeps growing in sustainable economic forests. Furthermore, it has amazing static characteristics and it looks great. It also evokes positive energies in people and the feeling of homeliness. What is there more to wish for from a building material? USAGE OF WOODEN CLADDING IS VERY FREQUENT. WHAT ARE ITS BENEFITS AND HOW TO MAINTAIN IT? Yes, wooden cladding is often used in the modern architecture: not only on the houses with wooden construction. The crucial advantage of it is, ►


paradoxically, its easy maintenance and possible replacement. The individual parts of the facade are often screwed to the foundation grid and so it is easy to replace or repair them: be it decking, planks, or pickets. Another thing that is very convenient for modern wooden houses is the installed suspended aired facade. It is due to the building physics: majority of the modern compositions of circumferential walls is diffusion-open. A wooden facade can be naturally left to grow old and the house then gains a silvery grey patina. WHAT ARE THE COSTS OF A TIMBER FRAME BUILDING COMPARED TO OTHER TYPES OF BUILDINGS? It always depends on what you compare it with. Regarding the vast spectrum of advantages of a frame house there are many other arguments different from the cost of it. I consider it wrong to choose a frame building over any other only because it is cheaper to built: if we compare what is comparable, we will find that the prices are similar and the differences between the technologies would be the matters of really small percentages. CONSIDERING AN ENERGETICALLY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING, WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF TIMBER FRAME BUILDINGS? The phenomenon of frame buildings is composed on the philosophical base of the circumferential casing and it is only a step from energetic sustainability. Frame buildings are easier in matching the principles of low-energy or passive building. It is given by the fact that the supporting construction is relatively subtle. In the case of a column form construction we even place a significant amount among the supporting features. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE WAY THE BUILDING IS FITTED TO THE SURROUNDINGS? The way the building is fitted to the surroundings, or rather the choice of the surroundings already, is absolutely crucial. The appropriate orientaâ–ş


tion to the geographical directions is important for the final energy cost. I do not think it is necessary to mention the fact that it is the best to have the main entrance to the building from the North and on the South I would recommend the maximum of windows with the possible shading equipment for the summer months. It is also important to realise that the presence of tall trees or a thick forest on the southern side of the building can negatively influence the solar benefits; and so do deep valleys which also have their say in the energetic balance. IF ONE DECIDES FOR A WOODEN HOUSE, WHAT ARE THE THINGS TO BE CAREFUL WHEN DESIGNING AND REALISING THE PROJECT? Designing wooden houses is a completely different discipline which can be compared to construction rather than to projects. Therefore, it is good if you leave it to the specialists in this field of technology. We recommend having a proper documentation of realisation done for any type of building. If one starts building a project (be it stone or constructed) only on the base of a simple building permit, he or she always end up risking the fact that some of the details may not be realised to a high-quality standard. Nowadays buildings must meet strict energetic criteria and that is where it is crucial to care about the professionally realised details. WHICH TYPES OF WOODEN HOUSES CONSTRUCTIONS ARE THE MOST COMMONLY USED AND WHY? Without any doubt it is the light wooden column form constructions (two by four system). There are also many alternatives, of course: for instance, massive panels with cross laminated timber (CLT) which is a construction growing in popularity. Nevertheless, vast majority of frame houses is built with the technology of column form construction. WHAT ARE THE TRENDS IN THE TIMBER FRAME HOUSING? The technology of frame houses has noted a real revolution in the past twenty years. Much has changed and various new materials have replaced â–ş


the old traditionally used ones. The question among the specialists in the field is ‘where next?‘. I strongly believe that in the near future the timber frame houses will demonstrate their advantages even on the scale of larger projects. HOW CAN WE SECURE A WOODEN BUILDING AGAINST FIRE AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE? The most common and also the least probable myth about wooden buildings and constructions is about fire. As any technology, even wooden houses have to meet certain (often very strict) criteria, which are sometimes even more severe to the wooden constructions than they are to other buildings. Across the entire spectrum of fire safety regulations wood does not have bad results at all. A frequent example of comparison with other materials and their resistance to fire is steel: it is difficult to be set on fire but when it reaches certain temperature, it collapses completely. Whereas wood has the same characteristics at any temperature. WHAT ARE THE MOST SUITABLE MATERIALS WITH WHICH TO COMBINE WOOD WITH RESPECT TO ITS NATURAL CHARACTERISTICS? It depends on the perspective: if we look at it from the point of aesthetics or construction. If we look solely for the harmony between aesthetics of the materials and their structures, the best combination is wood and stone. From the technical point of view it is wood and concrete, which also is the ideal solution to for many bigger projects. Wood and concrete ceilings have been taught at schools for many decades. IS THERE ANYTHING ONE SHOULD DEFINITELY NOT FORGET WHEN DESIGNING A TIMBER FRAME HOUSE? The details. ■ For the cooperation we would like to give our thanks to Prodesi/Domesi company.


ERMITAGE Trossรถ Island, Sweden 2013 20 m2 SEPTEMBRE ARCHITECTS Paris, France www.septembrearchitecture.com


ALO NE I N T H E F O R ES T text: Adéla Kudrnová photo: company’s archive / Alphonse Sarthout, Lina Lagerström

ERMITAGE, THE WOODEN COTTAGE, WAS DESIGNED BY THE PARISIAN STUDIO SEPTEMBRE FOR A SWEDISH COUPLE FROM A CITY WICH LOVES TO SPEND THEIR WEEKENDS ON THE NEARLY DESERTED TROSSÖ ISLAND IN THE SOUTH OF SWEDEN. THERE IS ONLY ONE ROOM IN THE COTTAGE BUT, QUITE NATURALLY, A SAUNA IS A NECESSARY PART OF IT. THE MASSIVE WINDOWS QUITE LITERALLY FRAME THE BEAUTIFUL POETIC SURROUNDING AND RESEMBLE BEAUTIFUL PAINTINGS WITH THE VIEW OVER THE VAST SEA. THANKS TO THE SLIDING DOOR, THE TREES BUILT IN THE FLOORING. AND THE DARK COLOUR OF THE PAINT THE COTTAGE PERFECTLY FITS INTO THE SURROUNDINGS. WE GOT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE PROJECT FROM THE SEPTEMBRE ARCHITECTS THEMSELVES: WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT DESIGNING TIMBER FRAME HOUSES? Wooden houses provide great flexibility both with planning and with the realisation of the building. Wood is an easily transportable material. For example, in the case of Ermitage it was necessary to transport all the material on boat and then carry manually because of the position of the cottage in the Swedish archipelago. Another advantage of wood is also the fact that it is a locally renewable source of material. In the case of Ermitage it was obvious we would use the local Swedish wood. YOUR STUDIO IS BASED IN PARIS; WHAT IS THE ATTITUDE OF THE FRENCH TO WOODEN HOUSES? The French are curious. They view wooden housing positively, even though they are slightly sceptical. The tradition of French building stems mainly from stone and concrete constructions. ■


BRIDGE STUDIO Fogo Island, Newfoundland, Canada 2011 30 m2 SAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE Bergen, Norway www.saunders.no


THE AR T I S T ’ S AT EL I ER text: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: company’s archive

IN ITS WORKS, SAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE, THE NORWEGIAN ARCHITECTONIC STUDIO, IS TRYING TO CONNECT THE TRADITIONAL SCANDINAVIAN ARTISAN METHODS WITH NEW MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES EXPERIMENTS. THEY MANAGED TO DO SO IN THE PROJECT OF SIX ARTISTIC STUDIES SCATTERED AROUND THE HARSH NATURE OF THE FOGO ISLAND LOCATED BY THE CANADIAN PROVINCE OF FOUNDLAND. THE BRIDGE STUDIO IS ONE OF THE ATELIERS. IT IS A SIMPLE COMPACT CUBE AND IS POSITIONED ON THE STEEP SLOPE OVERLOOKING THE PEACEFUL WATER SURFACE. TODD SAUNDERS, THE FOUNDER OF THE ARCHITECTONIC OFFICE, INTRODUCED US TO THE PROJECT: WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT DESIGNING TIMBER FRAME HOUSES? We design buildings from other materials as well, such as concrete and metal. What we love about wood is its availability and adaptability. It is easy to work with and adapt it to specific conditions; be it in Scandinavia or Canada. Wood is also quite cheap – especially in Scandinavia. HOW DO YOU WORK WITH THE POTENTIAL OF THE SURROUNDINGS AND THE NEARBY NATURE WHEN YOU DESIGN TIMBER FRAME HOUSES? In the case of the Bridge Studio as well as with other buildings we try to use the potential of the surrounding nature to the maximum. Here we designed a window which frames the view of the outside nature. In countries such as Norway and Canada it is also the harsh natural and terrain conditions that we have to deal with; therefore, it is necessary to do a sufficient research before we start realising the project. ►


IN WHAT ASPECTS OF YOUR WORK DO YOU FOLLOW THE TIMBER FRAME HOUSES TRADITION IN SCANDINAVIA? We try to gain information and advices from the older craftsmen who have great experiences with wood in Scandinavia. These are often in the form of information passed from one generation onto another. WHAT WAS UNIQUE ABOUT DESIGNING THE BRIDGE STUDIO? We decided to grasp the atelier as if it was one big piece of furniture. As if it was a peaceful place designed for inspiration where all you need is a desk, place for books, fireplace and wood. The view is inspiring on its own. â–


A HOUSE IN JIZERA MOUNTAINS Jizera Mountains, Czech Republic 2012 66 m2 PRODESI Prague, Czech Republic www.prodesi.cz


W ITH R E SP EC T TO T R A DI T I O N S text: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: company’s archive / Lina Németh

THIS FAMILY HOUSE IN JIZERA MOUNTAINS IS A MODERN FRAME HOUSE BUT WITH ITS SHAPE, MATERIALS AND COLOURS IT REFLECTS THE ORIGINAL ARCHITECTURE OF THE LOCAL REGION. IT REFERS TO SIMPLE BUILDINGS WITH GABLE ROOFS AND TRADITIONAL TIMBER COTTAGES WHICH USED TO BE TYPICAL WITH THEIR COMBINATIONS OF DARK GREY, WHITE AND STONE. THE DOMINANT FEATURE OF THIS BUILDING IS THE TOP WOODEN CUBE WITH THE FACADE MADE OF LARCH PLANKS WHICH ADVANCES OVER THE LOWER STONE PLINTH. WOOD LARGELY USED IN THE INTERIOR OF THE HOUSE AND THE HEARTH IS THE ACTUAL HEART OF THE HOUSE. PAVEL HORÁK, THE AUTHOR OF THIS PROJECT AND THE FOUNDER OF THE PRODESI COMPANY, TOLD US MORE ABOUT IT: WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT DESIGNING FRAME HOUSES? Generally I can tell that wood has become our passion. The thing I definitely like the most on designing frame houses is the connection between nature and high technology. It is the most palpable in the case of cross laminated timber design where the entire process of designing a house happens on a computer in the form of a 3D model. Then on the CNC machines the individual parts are made and after that they are assembled with the millimetre precision at the building site. The entire house can be assembled in a day or two. The majority of the material comes from purely Czech sources and always from carefully maintained forests. I also like the community which has evolved around frame houses during the past ten years: be it architects, investors, or just supporters of the technology – they are always interesting, open-minded people with colourful experiences. ►


HOW DO YOU WORK WITH THE POTENTIAL OF THE SURROUNDINGS AND THE NATURE WHEN YOU DESIGN TIMBER FRAME HOUSES? With all the houses we built (and we often build them in open areas or at the edges of villages) we aim to respect the given surroundings. For example, when a building is supposed to be located on a slope, we design it so that it would sensitively blend in. We do not like it when a big amount of soil has to be moved. We believe that the ideal is when a house is built in the way as if you took a wooden box and carefully placed on the designed spot. This is the case of the house in Jizera Mountains. Following and respecting of the local building traditions is also important to us. We do not want to copy but we always study the history of the building engineering in the given region. We get inspired by various proportions, materials and details of old houses. It is the old houses what shows you what your house will be like in tens or hundreds of years. WHY ARE TIMBER FRAME HOUSES POPULAR IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC? Generally I believe that the popularity of frame houses has two reasons. The first one is that people re-discovered the tradition which had been disrupted for many years. People realised that wooden houses are not as bad as they thought them to be. The second reason is that the majority of investors are young or open-minded people who like modern and environment-friendly lifestyle. Last but certainly not least is the love of Czech people to hobbies such as skiing and alpinism and their frequent stays in mountains where many traditional as well as modern buildings are built. It is interesting that we keep finding out that many people had their first encounter with timber frame houses when they were on such holiday. â–


BECO ME O U R PA R T N ER www.soffamag.com terezia@soffamag.com | +420 775 555 035

WE LIKE TO COOPERATE AND PARTICIPATE IN INTERESTING PROJECTS! EVEN YOU OR YOUR COMPANY CAN BE IN OUR NEXT ISSUE, MAKE YOURSELF SEEN ON OUR WEB. DO NOT HESITATE TO CONTACT US. WE WILL BE LOOKING FORWARD TO HEARING FROM YOU!

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BLACK TEAHOUSE Česká Lípa, Czech Republic 2011 3,5 + 10 m2 A1ARCHITECTS Prague, Czech Republic www.a1architects.cz


LE V ITAT ING,WA I T I N G F O R T H E G UES T S text: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: company’s archive

THE BLACK TEAHOUSE, WHICH WAS AWARDED THE GRAND PRIX OF THE ARCHITECTS IN 2012, IS LOCATED ON THE BANK OF A POND IN A LARGE GARDEN IN THE VICINITY OF ČESKÁ LÍPA. IT IS DESIGNATED FOR REUNION WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY OVER A GOOD CUP OF TEA. THE HOUSE PERFECTLY FITS INTO THE ITS GARDEN SURROUNDINGS – ESPECIALLY WITH ITS GRASSY ROOF, BLACK SMOKED LARCH CLADDING (HENCE THE NAME OF THE HOUSE) AND ITS SLIDING DOOR. THE IMPORTANT PARTS OF THE INTERIOR ARE: SISAL ROPES CEILING, FIREPLACE AND ROUNDED WHITE CLAY WALL WITH THE VIEW ON THE FLOWERS. MORE ABOUT THE BLACK TEAHOUSE YOU WILL GET KNOW HERE.


HÅBAKKA Rosendal, Norway 2004 24 m2 3RW ARCHITECTS Bergen, Norway 3rw.no


SE NSIT I V E EX T EN S I O N text: Adéla Kudrnová | photo: company’s archive

THE HISTORICAL HÅBAKKA FARM COMPLEX IS LOCATED ONLY FIVE KILOMETRES FROM THE TOWN OF ROSENDAL. IT CONSISTS OF FIVE BUILDINGS BUILT INTO A SLOPE FORMING A FARMYARD WITH HOUSES DESIGNATED FOR LIVING IN ITS CENTRE. THE NORWEGIAN ARCHITECTONIC STUDIO CALLED 3RW ARCHITECTS WAS GIVEN A TASK BY THE OWNER OF THE FARM TO CONNECT THE HOUSING UNITS WITH AN EXTENSION WHILE PRESERVING THEIR ORIGINAL CHARACTERISTICS. THE EXTENSION WAS DESIGNED TO CONTRAST WITH THE TRADITIONAL SMALL BUILDINGS. THE OUTBUILDINGS IS FULL OF LIGHT THANKS TO THE LARGE WINDOWS, WHICH ALSO ALLOW THE VIEW IN BOTH DIRECTIONS. WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT DESIGNING FRAME HOUSES? We like to work with frame houses just as much as with other types of building typologies, but with frame houses we appreciate the idea of working within a local building-tradition – that is with local materials and craftsmanship, placing our work into a bigger picture. HOW DO YOU WORK WITH THE POTENTIAL OF THE SURROUNDINGS AND THE NATURE WHEN YOU DESIGN TIMBER FRAME HOUSES? Sight specific qualities are very important for our design, and they are also an issue we work a lot with. The infill-addition at Håbakka is built in between the two housing units. The adjacent housing units are extremely small with low ceilings and very little daylight. This generated an ambition to develop an open, multi-purpose linking-structure that enables the inhabitants to utilize the two housing units in a more flexible way. The existing housing units were to be kept in their present condition, and a gentle approach to these old and valuable structures was engaged. The ►


infill-addition is therefore slightly disconnected from them, only touching them with two extruded doorways. Before the addition was built, the gap between the two housing units created a visual connection between the central farm-yard facing the fjord, and the hillside behind the farm. This quality was kept through constructing the addition as an open structure providing both daylight and view in these directions. The interior reflects the topography of the sloping site with different levels and stairs. In this way the former gap retains the quality as a point of orientation and identity in relation to the surrounding landscape. WHY ARE TIMBER FRAME HOUSES SO POPULAR IN SCANDINAVIA? Timber frame houses are traditional for constructing vernacular housing in Scandinavia. You can trace the history of the timber frame houses back at least 1000 years. In one way it is a very simple way to build houses, placing one log upon the other, but at the same time it is a building-technology that requires a high degree of knowledge about wood, different qualities of wood and how to connect the logs. In this context the timber frame houses are products of an excellent craft developed over many generations. IT IS A CHALLENGE TO COMBINE A TRADITIONAL HOUSE WITH A MODERN EXTENSION. WHAT WAS THE MOST INTERESTING ABOUT THE PROJECT? It is never easy to combine different buildings, but that is one of the reasons why we find it so interesting and challenging to work with. One has to treat the existing environment with respect and dignity, as well as adding structures that correspond with the lifestyles we lead. Traditional building environments, like the one at HĂĽbakka, is not (and has never been) a static environment, but has been under constant changes so that it would support the needs of the family in the best possible way. We like to view the traditional buildings as pragmatic environments, and we want our work to take part in this tradition. â–


12

E V EN T S C A L EN DER Events you can not miss!

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OCTOBER PRAGUE / CZECH REPUBLIC Designblok / Prague Design and Fashion Week / October 7. - 12. 2014

LONDON / GREAT BRITAIN Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963 – 2010 / Tate Modern / October 9. February 8. 2015

VENEZIA / ITALY Venice Architecture Biennale / June 7. - November 23. 2014

LODŽ / POLSKO Lodz Design Festival / October 9. - 19. 2014

VIENNA / AUSTRIA Vienna Design Week / September 26. - October 5. 2014

NEW YORK / USA Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs / MoMA / October 12. February 8. 2015

BELGRADE / SERBIA Belgrade Design Week / October 6. - 11. 2014 STOCKHOLM / SWEDEN A Way of Life. Swedih Photography from Christer Strömholm until Today / Moderna museet / September 6. 2014 – February 15. 2015

VIENNA / AUSTRIA Miró: from Earth to Sky / Albertina / Vídeň / September 12. 2014 January 11. 2015 PRAGUE / CZECH REPUBLIC Věci a Slova / UMPRUM / September 12. - November 6. 2014


PARIS / FRANCE David Altmejd: Flux / October 10. 2014 – February 1. 2015

VIENNA / AUSTRIA Arik Brauer / Leopold Museum / November 14. 2014 – February 16. 2015

JABLONEC NAD NISOU / CZECH REPUBLIC Mezinárodní trienále skla a bižuterie / Muzeum skla a bižuterie / June 29. - October 28. 2014

NEW YORK / USA Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor / The Museum of Modern Art / October 4. January 18. 2015

NOVEMBER PRAGUE / CZECH REPUBLIC Edita Pattová: Facebook / Fotografic / October 21. - November 23. 2014 ISTANBUL / TURKEY Istanbul Design Biennial / November 1. - December 14. 2014

LJUBLJANA / SLOVENIA BIO 50 / September 18. December 7. 2014 BRNO / CZECH REPUBLIC Nejkrásnější české knihy roku 2013 / Moravská galerie v Brně / October 2. 2014 – January 18. 2015


E D ITO R I A L S TA F F www.soffamag.com

ADÉLA KUDRNOVÁ editor in chief

LINA NÉMETH photographer

adela@soffamag.com

info@soffamag.com

LENKA HLAVÁČOVÁ art director | designer

ANTONÍN CÍFKA production manager

lenka@soffamag.com

antonin@soffamag.com

KATEŘINA KREJČÍ english translation

MARTINA SULKOVÁ social media

n TERÉZIA BĚLČÁKOVÁ marketing & PR terezia@soffamag.com | +420 775 555 035

CO N T R I B UTO R S BÁRA PERGLOVÁ baraperglova.com

PRODESI / DOMESI prodesi.cz

DAVID TRČKA davidtrcka.com

ADÉLA HAVELKOVÁ adelahavelkova.com


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SOFFA 05 / MATERIALS, English edition  

ISSUE 05: MATERIALS |SOFFA: The first Czech slow living magazine | Order the printed issues and an annual subscription at www.soffamag.com |...

SOFFA 05 / MATERIALS, English edition  

ISSUE 05: MATERIALS |SOFFA: The first Czech slow living magazine | Order the printed issues and an annual subscription at www.soffamag.com |...

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