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Free guide 2016 carnivalgrooves socanews.com

CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 1


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contents

Carnival Grooves 2016

06. FEATURE Notting Hill Carnival: many stories within one 08. FEATURE

Will it be a golden year for mas?

10. MUSIC

Wine to the beat

12. TRAVEL INFORMATION 16. SOUND SYSTEMS 18. CARNIVAL ROUTE MAP 21. EVENTS

Where to party this carnival

26. PANORAMA

Sweet sounds of steel

28. J'OUVERT

Powder pandemonium at dawn

30. CHILDREN'S DAY

A time to shine

32. ADULTS' DAY

The art of the possible

Published By Joseph Charles Publishing, 86 - 90 Paul Street, London EC2A 4NE. Telephone + 44 (0) 333 012 4643 Twitter | twitter.com/socanews Email | info@socanews.com Instagram | instagram.com/socanews Facebook | facebook.com/socanews Website socanews.com This issue of Carnival Grooves was brought to you by: Publisher & Editor Joseph Charles. Sub-Editor Katie Segal Consulting-Editor Stephen Spark. Layout & Design Joseph Charles Contributors Nicole-Rachelle Moore, Natasha Ofosu, Katie Segal and Stephen Spark. Photographers Stephen Spark, Victor Morris, Albert St Clair & Shutter In Motion

The views expressed in Carnival Grooves are not necessarily the views of the editor or the publisher. All material contained within this publication is the copyright of Carnival Grooves. No material, written or photographic may be reproduced in any way without the written permission of the publisher. No liability will be accepted for any errors which may occur within the magazine. CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 5


FEATURE NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

WORDS | NICOLE-RACHELLE MOORE

Notting Hill Carnival has its roots in different beginnings, depending on who is giving their version of, “It started when...”. By the end of the Second World War in 1945, London was a city which had survived, but which had experienced much loss. It was in many ways a drab and wounded place - and one with an acute labour shortage, that invited Britain’s colonial Caribbean citizens to cross the waters and increase the volume of the much needed, if not appreciated, working classes. Mass immigration to these isles was typified by the filmed disembarkation from the SS Empire Windrush at Tilbury Docks of the first post-war arrivals in 1948, who brought with them vibrant colour, energy and a distinctly Caribbean vibe (go online to see the calypsonian Lord Kitchener singing London is the Place for Me, as he steps onto British soil). Certainly by the late 1950s, Brixton in the south and Notting Hill in the west of London had the densest populations of

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Caribbean peoples in Britain. Anti-immigration feeling grew, alongside racist colour bars which made accommodation and employment areas of real difficulty for those arrivals from the Caribbean - who had long been encouraged to think of themselves as bonafide and deserving British citizens. Simmering tensions boiled over into the Notting Hill Race Riots in 1958, and then tragically in 1959 a young Antiguan man, Kelso Cochrane who lived in Notting Hill, was attacked and murdered by a group of white youths. Outraged at what she saw as the Communist Party of Great Britain’s lack of protest at the racist murder, the Trinidadian and committed Communist Claudia Jones made a move which many years later would earn her the affectionate, although sometimes controversial title, ‘Mother of Notting Hill Carnival’. Using her persuasive oratory, Jones brought together


seemingly disparate groups of immigrants to demonstrate, march, hold meetings and to work with other anti-racist and anti-imperialist organisations. Crucially, Claudia Jones used the weapons of art and culture “in the face of the hate from the white racists.” The events she organised (with staunch support from like-minded individuals including Edric and Pearl Connor and Sam King) included beauty contests, talent quests and readings and shows by African-American artists and writers who were being introduced to black British audiences. The acclaimed actor and activist Paul Robeson was amongst her staunch supporters in these efforts. Using the rich culture of carnival, Jones organised and staged the UK’s first ever Caribbean Carnival, which took place at the St. Pancras Town Hall in London on January 30, 1959, and was televised by the BBC. Caribbean -influenced carnival events continued in various indoor venues for a few years after that. Sam King, who had been a passenger on board the Windrush, is cited as the ‘co-founder of Notting Hill Carnival’ in 1964, the year the carnival took up residence in the area (hence the initial 50th anniversary in 2014). The outdoor celebration with which most people are familiar is believed to have begun in 1966 (hence the 50th anniversary in 2016) as the ‘Notting Hill Festival’ and Rhaune Laslett, a social worker at the time, is widely acknowledged as the founder. Laslett worked in collaboration with the London Free School, which she co-founded with Johnny ‘Hoppy’ Hopkins, a photographer and political activist. Active members of the local community with roots in Africa, the Caribbean, Cyprus and India also contributed to making the Notting Hill Festival a reality. The Guyanese activist Andre Shervington was among those approached and consulted by Rhaune Laslett, and the well-known Trinidadian jazz pianist and pannist Russell Henderson was invited to participate. Henderson had played for Claudia Jones’ 1959 event but, in 1966, when together with Sterling Betancourt and Ralph Cherrie he took steel pan to the streets, Caribbean residents poured out of their homes and formed an enthusiastically responsive procession following the “pan men on de road”. It was this unscripted ‘call and response’ dynamic between the three pan men and the residents which unquestionably introduced the uniquely Caribbean flavour into the 1966 festival. In the years following that first outdoor expression of carnival in Notting Hill, there was increasing participation by costumed revellers and organised steel bands on the streets.

Rhaune Laslett’s original vision of an all-inclusive al fresco celebration continued and grew, underscored by progressively strong Caribbean connections and contributions in its organisation and management. Leslie Palmer, from Trinidad, was a young teacher in London in the 1970s, and is recognised as the person who, as the director of Notting Hill Carnival from 1973 until 1975, organised sponsorship for bands, encouraged more steel bands to become involved and invited reggae bands and sound systems into the carnival - even as he reached out to retain the magic of traditional masquerade. Palmer is credited with having included the role of the static sound systems, as discrete from those sound systems used on mobile costume floats. Despite the cultural tension this caused, Palmer defended his decision and later said, “The sound systems were the voice of the youth and the people, and to have a carnival and to leave that out was to ignore the demands of the people, because the sound systems were really the most popular entertainment for the youths.” Under his stewardship of Notting Hill Carnival, Leslie Palmer extended the carnival route for participants and introduced the use of generators. He laid a foundation for Notting Hill Carnival to be better organised, and was indeed a forerunner for other subsequent executives whose task it was to manage the ever-expanding cultural phenomenon. Claire Holder, another Trinidadian, was Chief Executive of Notting Hill Carnival for ten years, and is seen by many as being successful in bringing about long-term stability to the leadership of the event, despite a multitude of challenges. The discipline of costumed masquerade, the music of calypso and soca, the sound systems (mobile and static) and steel bands make up the various arenas of London’s present day Notting Hill Carnival. Innumerable characters have played their part in the Notting Hill Carnival story; it is a tale with many beginnings, and one which continues to draw us in, spellbound, even as it shifts and changes. What remains is the fact that London’s very own worldrenowned carnival, from the outset, very firmly placed Caribbean people in the vanguard of an unstoppable cultural force which keeps on evolving. This unique annual August Bank Holiday weekend event continues to showcase the colour, creativity, irrepressible energy, music, resourcefulness and rhythm of Caribbean and many other diaspora peoples, who all share in the rich, culturally textured expression that is Notting Hill Carnival.

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FEATURE NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

WORDS | STEPHEN SPARK

Notting Hill Carnival has, against all the odds,

survived to reach its half-century, and this year we are celebrating a golden jubilee that surely no one could have imagined in the 1960s. The early carnivals were very different from the spectacle we know today. The event’s unwitting founder, Rhaune Laslett, had envisaged a multicultural community celebration, not a Caribbean-style carnival, so costume (‘mas’) hardly featured. Costume competitions had featured as part of the indoor carnivals organised by Claudia Jones from 1959 to 1964, but they were static stage shows that could hardly be compared with proper mas bands on the road. The big change came in 1973, when Leslie Palmer took over the running of the event and put out an advertisement asking ‘mas men’ to take part. The advert was spotted by a brilliant young designer called Peter Minshall, who had just put on a show at the Commonwealth Institute. The costumes were taken out of store, and ‘Mas in the Ghetto’ took to the grimy streets of West London.

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It set the bar very high for Notting Hill’s mas men, but the competitive spirit was unleashed. Talented individuals such as Lawrence Noel and Arthur Peters, among many others, began to make their own reputations as they laid down ribbons of glorious colour and often challenging mas along the great carnival highway that is Ladbroke Grove. It is impossible here to attempt a roll call of all the names that deserve to be commemorated in this 50th anniversary year. While the mas designer may be the star whose name is prominent on the band’s front banner, we should never forget the specialists in construction, wire-bending and fabric-painting, for example. Their skills and experience ensure that costumes don’t just look good on paper but can be worn or carried for hours on the road without crippling the masquerader and that they remain in one piece despite being buffeted by crowds, rain and wind. This August Bank Holiday we can expect to see mas celebrating both Notting Hill’s special year and the Rio Olympic Games. There is a big question mark, though, about the survival of traditional


‘artistic’ mas as opposed to the bikini-and-beads style party costumes. The party bands, with their professionalism and all-inclusive packages, have proved hugely popular and deserve credit for encouraging participation from people with no previous background in Carnival. As a spectacle, though, they leave something to be desired – ‘seen one and you’ve seen them all’ is a common comment. And of course there is not the sense of community and craftsmanship that emerges from weeks spending weeks together painstakingly sewing, sticking, welding, painting, eating, drinking and liming in a mas camp. Arts grants and sponsorship deals, on which traditional mas bands so often depend, are scarce, however, so continuing to put on a big display is a struggle for many smaller bands. The Carnival Arts & Masquerade Foundation and Notting Hill Carnival organiser LNHCET recognise this and want to revive the ‘traditional mas’ aspect. A CAMF spokesperson told Soca News, “Bands have been encouraged to up their game in terms of their quality and innovation for their presentations.

Everyone is trying to do this, but as funds are always a major issue, any massive change will take time.” If sufficient sponsorship can be found, the organisers hope to offer grants to the mas bands, as used to happen in the past. Getting the whole unwieldy parade past the judges before darkness falls and the bin lorries arrive has been a challenge for carnival organisers for years, but this year LNHCET and CAMF are “slightly adjusting the timings” and will be “grouping the bands according to sector, utilising more of Ladbroke Grove and Elkstone Road to start from”. Parade stewards will be assigned to the Children’s Carnival on Sunday. Will this be a vintage year for mas? The only way to be sure is to see for yourself on Carnival Sunday and Monday. But if there’s one thing better than watching the mas go past on carnival day, then it’s being in a band and playing mas yourself – so sign up now whilst there’s still time!

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MUSIC

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

e beat... uld expect wine toofth the songs you sho Here are some al Sunday and to hear on notting hill Carniv Monday.

CALLING IN SICK

BAM BAM BACK HYPA SOUNDS

JAB FOREVER SKINNY BANTON

(WAHJANG RIDDIM)

MONEY WELL SPENT

GOOD MORNING

WAITING ON THE STAGE

MON BON AMI

BIGGIE IRIE

PETER RAM

KING BUBBA

GIRL MEETS BRASS (RR RIDDIM)

PEOPLE

KES THE BAND

ALLEZ

TEDDYSON JOHN

SALTY

MACHEL MONTANO

ANGELA HUNTE

FEAT. BADJOHN REPUBLIC

SCENE

CHEERS TO LIFE

GBM NUTRON

VOICE

TURN ON DE SPEAKER GRYNNER

DIRTY HABITS FADDA FOX

UNFORGETTABLE

KERWIN DU BOIS & PATRICE ROBERTS

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CALYPSO

SOCA

There is a calypso tent that takes place in the weeks preceding Notting Hill Carnival. This stems from a tradition in the Caribbean where calypsonians would perform to their audience in a large tent - but here the term is used euphemistically, as there is a very solid roof overhead. Several nights of performances on weekend evenings culminate in the Calypso Monarch competition; these days, there’s also a Groovy Soca Monarch contest, where artists sing slower, more melodic songs of the genre you mostly hear the trucks play on the road – not quite calypso, not quite frenzied dancing. There are visiting artists from the Caribbean and elsewhere throughout the run, and the final night of the tent, on the Friday before carnival, is a showcase of artists. The Association of British Calypsonians, who produce the London Calypso Tent, was established in 1991. It is the only representative body for British-based calypso singers and composers in both the UK and Europe. They produce a programme of activities based on the traditions and culture of calypso, but with a British focus. For information on the London Calypso Tent and any other activities of the ABC, go to their website at http://www. britishcalypsonians.com/

During the 1970s an up-tempo music developed from calypso. Soca was influenced by gospel, Indian instrumentation, funk, African spirituals and reggae. While calypso focuses on social commentary and humour, soca is more about people having a good time. Ras Shorty I’s Endless Vibrations and Soul of Calypso helped bring soca to an international audience. He experimented with Indian instruments such as the dhantal, tabla and dholak to forge the new sound. Soca soon moved into the more risqué business of wining and jamming as it took over the streets, largely ousting calypso except in the calypso tents. In many ways, soca is to calypso what dancehall is to reggae - the former is more about partying while the latter comments on society and its issues. Artistes have experimented with soca to produce hybrids such as ragga soca, chutney soca, rapso and soca parang. Bunji Garlin broke through some boundaries with his song Differentology, which blended soca with other kinds of music and was then remixed with electronic dance music. Bunji’s style frequently crosses over towards rapso, and some say his freestyling stands up to the best in the world. Machel Montano has long played with different music genres. In 2013 Machel and Kerwin Dubois worked in South Africa with Ladysmith Black Mambazo to make Possessed, and back in 1999 he injected operatic sound into his song with Natasha, Jab Molassie. Just a few of the current soca artistes you could look out for are Fay-Ann Lyons, Kes the Band, Alison Hinds, Lyrikal, Tian Winter, Destra, Skinny Fabulous and Voice, the 2016 International Soca Monarch. And don’t forget the greats from back in time - Kitchener, Sparrow, Shadow and Arrow.

MOBILE MUSIC This is the music you'll hear the trucks playing on the route. Whilst the majority will have DJs playing the music, some will have bands and live PAs from artists, and of course there will also be the steel bands playing pan on the road – 18 of them at last count. There will be over 70 DJs and bands on the road this year, catering for the needs of the multicultural attendance and participants. Most of the trucks will be playing soca most of the time, but there are two schools of samba on the road, and there may be a few other variations to listen out for as well. For more information about the DJs, and for other services relating to mobile sound systems, you can contact the Caribbean Music Association at www.caribbeanmusicassociation.co.uk

SOCANEWS .COM/MUSIC

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TRAVEL INFORMATION

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

MAKE THE MOST OF THE CARNIVAL

The easiest way to travel to carnival and back is by bus or Tube – but be aware that crowds and road closures could slow you down. This page provides helpful information to ensure your experience is not overshadowed by hold-ups or hazards.

TUBE SERVICES Check before you travel The Tube is being transformed by a long-term programme of upgrades. Most of the work takes places at weekends, and some stations and sections of line need to be closed. Please check before you travel. Sunday 26 August Stations in central London will be open as on a normal Sunday except those in the Carnival area. Normal services will run on all lines. Bank Holiday Monday 27 August Stations in central London will be open as on a normal Saturday except Ladbroke Grove, which will be closed. Normal Saturday services will run on all lines except the Central line, where extra trains will run on all sections, and the Hammersmith and City line, where extra trains will run on some sections. Stations in the Carnival area Please note that for safety reasons some stations may close temporarily if they become overcrowded. It may be worthwhile waiting until the station reopens rather than finding an alternative station. In addition, you may not be able to touch out with your Oyster card; if this happens, you should receive a refund in the near future.

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Ladbroke Grove Station closed on Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday. Latimer Road On Sunday and Monday the station will close at 2330. Notting Hill Gate On Sunday and Monday the station will be ‘exit only’ between 1100 and 1900 and Circle and District lines will not stop. Royal Oak On Sunday and Monday the station will be ‘exit only’ between 1100 and 1800. After 1800 the station will close and Hammersmith & City line trains will not stop at this station. Westbourne Park On Sunday and Monday the station will be ‘exit only’ between 1100 and 1800. The station will close at 2330. Bayswater On Monday it may be advisable to use this station as Circle/District line trains will not stop at Notting Hill Gate. Paddington Hammersmith & City line On Sunday and Monday it may be advisable to use this station instead of Notting Hill Gate/ Royal Oak as both these stations will have diversions. Other stations Other stations near to the Carnival: High Street Kensington, Holland Park and Queen’s Park. 4

BUS SERVICES Bus routes 7, 18, 23, 27, 28, 31, 36, 52, 70, 94, 148, 295, 316, 328 and 390 all run close to the Carnival festivities. We’ll be running many extra buses, especially on Monday evening, to get you home quickly and safely. Bus routes 6, 15, 187, 205, 220, 274, 414 and 436 all operate within a comfortable walking distance. Additional buses will operate on some routes; they will appear in Journey Planner as 2X, 36X, 205X and 436X. Night Buses N7, N18, N28, N31, N36, N52 and N207 will operate throughout Sunday night and Monday night. From first bus on Sunday morning, all day Bank Holiday Monday and until about 03.00 on Tuesday morning, bus routes 7, 16, 18, 23, 27, 28, 31, 46, 52, 70, 94, 98, 148, 220, 228, 274, 295, 316, 328, 332, 390, 414, 452, N7, N16, N18, N28, N31, N98 and N207 will be diverted or disrupted owing to road closures in the carnival area. There are changes to most of the bus routes which go close to the carnival area, including diversions, limited routes and hours, and some extra, temporary stops. For more information, please check the Transport for London website or telephone (0343) 222 1234.


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What are your souvenirs of Carnival? Maybe aching feet, a sore head and some shaky photos. But wouldn't it be great if you could capture all the colour, excitement, costumes and atmosphere of carnival to enjoy all year? This year you can - with London's first-ever carnival souvenir magazine. The Golden Jubilee Edition of Carnival Grooves has every angle of Notting Hill carnival covered. Order your copy at just ÂŁ5, including p&p. Visit socanews.com/shop, email sales@josephcharlespublishing.com or call + 44 (0) 333 012 4643 14 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016


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SOUND SYSTEMS NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

1. MASTERMIND ROADSHOW Upfront R&B, hip-hop, soul, old skool, reggae (Canal Way) 2. G I ROADSHOW Reggae, bashment, salsa, R&B (Adella Street) 3. SSP SOUND SYSTEM (Alderson Street) 4. 4 PLAY across the board (West Row nr junction with Kensal Road) 5. G.T. FLEX / MAYHEM CREW (Middle Row / Conlan Street) 6. MARK ROSS SOUND SYSTEM funky/soulful house, RnB, rare groove, slow jam, reggae (Southern Row / West Row) 7. ABA SHANTI roots rock reggae, dub (Southern Row/East Row) 8. ROUGH BUT SWEET reggae, R&B, revival, lovers, garage (Hazelwood Crescent) 9. BLACKSTAR SHOWTIME reggae, soca, soul (Southern Row corner of Bosworth Road) 10. LOVE TKO reggae, R&B, soca, hip-hop (Golborne Gardens / Hazelwood Crescent) The footprint of 11. SIR VALDEZ R&B, hip-hop, ragga (Golborne Road o/s Prince Arthur PH) Notting Hill Carnival is peppered with sound 12. KCC & THE ROCKING CREW US house (old & new), house anthems (Wornington Road) 13. NATURAL DEZIRE (used to be Mellotone) soul, ragga, R&B and revival (Telford Road nr Lionel Mews) systems, which have a wide variety of music 14. ARTS A LIGHT hip-hop, classic garage (Bonchurch Street / Portobello Road) policies. Luckily, they 15. LATIN RAVE STREET JAM Latin, salsa (o/s 318 Portobello Road) publish both those 16. SAXON SOUND ragga, reggae (St Lawrence Terrace / Chesterton Road) and their locations, 17. GLADDYS WAX ROAD SHOW roots & culture, reggae, ska (adj to 304 / 306 Portobello Road) and we have that information for you, 18. HIGH GRADE reggae (Oxford Gardens / St. Lawrence Terrace) and our annotated 19. VIRGO INTERNATIONAL reggae, bashment, soca (Oxford Gardens nr Portobello Road) map. With music from 20. LORD GELLYS reggae, R&B, soca (o/s 47 Cambridge Gardens) reggae to RnB, hip hop 21. CMC / MATRIX drum & bass (All Saint's Road opp The Red Lemon PH) to electronica, even 22. KILLER WATT across the board (St Luke's Road / Tavistock Road) if you’re not a soca 23. SIR LLOYD R&B, reggae (o/s 54 Leamington Road Villas / Tavistock Road) lover or masquerader 24. RAPATTACK soul, funk, R&B, hip-hop, garage (o/s 23 All Saint's Road) you’ll still be able to find somewhere you’ll 25. DIFFERENT STROKES reggae, R&B, revival, hip-hop (St Luke's Road corner of Lancaster Road) love to be. Notting 26. PEOPLE’S SOUND SYSTEM ragga, R&B, hip-hop ((o/s 11 All Saint's Road) Hill Carnival has long 27. MANGROVE / VOLCANO SOUND soca (o/s 3 All Saint's Road) been the biggest 28. CHANNEL ONE strictly roots & culture (Leamington Rd Villas / Westbourne Park Rd) weekend of the year in 29. METRO GLORY ragga, R&B, hip hop, house, garage (Ledbury Road / Westbourne Park Road) all sound men’s diaries, 30. KING TUBBY’S reggae, dancehall, bashment, R&B (Clydesdale Road o/s Clydesdale House) as sound systems have 31. DISYA JENERATION across the board (Powis Terrace) been an integral part of the atmosphere at 32. GAZ’S ROCKIN’ BLUES classic ska, revival, New Orleans R&B (o/s 103 Talbot Road) carnival since the early 33. SOLUTION SOUND reggae (Ledbury Road / Talbot Road) days. If you would like 34. THE FUNBUNCH R&B, hip-hop, garage, boogie (Talbot Road / Sutherland Place) further information 35. DISCO HUSTLERS electro tech (Powis Square - east side) about sound systems 36. NASTY LOVE MIXING LAB ragga, dancehall, R&B, hip-hop (Colville Gardens) at Notting Hill Carnival, 37. PINEAPPLE TRIBE techno break beats (off Ledbury Road road opp The Walmer Castle) you can contact the British Association 38. I-SPY - THE PEOPLE’S SOUND SYSTEM (Colville Square (tbc) of Sound Systems at www.bassline.org.uk 16 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016


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NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL ROUTE MAP

SOCANEWS.COM 18 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016


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EVENTS

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

You are strongly advised to check with the event promoter, as details sometimes change and cancellations may occur; all information was correct at the time of going to print.

SHIPWRECKED CARNIVAL LONDON

DJ MARKEE

@ Harper's City Bar, 14 New London Street, EC3R 7NA. DJs DJ Boots, DJ Markee, DJ Dale & D Raskal. Time 6.30pm. Price Free b4 9pm £10 after. T 07990 587 333

@ EGG London, 200 York Way Kings Cross, N7 9AX. Time 3-9pm. Price £41.50.

UV VIBE

ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CALYPSONIANS

@ Carnival Village, Tabernacle Powis Square, W11 2AY. Host Coco P. Time 8pm. Price £8, £10 & £12, T 07712 894 518

@ Shoreditch Platform, 1 Kingsland Road, E2 8AA. DJs Triple M, DJ CJay, DJ Bajie, Shep Beats, Danny D & DJ Kashi. Time 9pm. Price £15.71.

RELEASE D RIDDIM

GET MAD ENTERTAINMENT @ Dogstar, 389 Coldharbour Lane, SW9 8LQ. Host Headback. DJs DJ Scooby, DJ Shakit & Jamo Star. Time 10.30pm-3.30am. Price £5.

SOCANEWS.COM /EVENTS

@ Fire Club, 39 Parry Street, SW8 1RT. Hosts Vinny Ranks & Martin Jay. DJs Credable, Mr Hardwine, DJ Bliss, QT 2Hype, DJ Tate, Mr Mention, Shaker HD, Matchiz, Digga D & Hyper Spice. Time 10pm-6am. Price £12 / £15.

CARIBBEAN SESSIONS

@ The Old Bell, 38 High Road, NW6 5UA. DJs DJ CJay, Super Trini, Danny D & Mr Whyte. Time midday-8pm. Price free, kids welcomed until 6pm.

@ St Katharine Pier, 50 St. Katharine's Way, E1W 1LA. DJs DJ Tate, Credable, FIREKID Matchiz, Shaker HD, Almighty Soundz, DJ Sonic & DJ Boots. Time 2-8pm. Price £25 incl. food.

EBONY STEELBAND @ Emslie Horniman's Pleasance, Kensal Road, W10 5EH. DJs DJ Janeene, Dan Bean & DJ Larni. Time 2-8pm. Price free. T 07737 947 238.

SOCA LOCO @ Arbor City, 12-20 Osborn Street, E1 6TE. DJs Shep Beats, DJ Majikal, DJ Remstar, Jah Eyez & DSI. Time 10pm. Price £10/ £15 / £20, motd. T 07506 663 128. CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 21


EVENTS

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

SOCAHOLIC & UCOM ONE ISLAND @ Indigo at the O2, Peninsula Square, SE10 0DX. Time 7-11pm. Price £40 / £50.

@ Ruby Blue, 1 Leicester Place, WC2H 7BP. DJs DJ Chris Vee, DJ D Francis, DJ Knightz Beatz, DJ Jamzy & DJ Silverfox. Time 6pm4am. Price £5 / £8 / £15 door.

SYNC PARTIES

@ Undersolo, 22 Inverness Street, NW1 7HJ. Host Sekon Sta. DJs DJ Chris Vee, DJ Cinde Rella (Dame Du Show), CheInTheMiXX & Clyde The Outlaw. Time 6pm-1am. Price £10 adv., £15 door.

@ Luxe, 1 Shavers Place, SW1Y 4SP. DJs D Raskal, Big Tunez & BacktoBasics. Time 6pm-3am. Price £15.

ONE ISLAND

@ Westminster Pier, Victoria Embankment, SW1A 2JH. DJs DJ Tate, Triple M, Prince Vern, Barrie Hype, Creeks Mx & DJ Payton. Time Boarding 7pm; sails at 7.45pm. Price £15 / £20 / £25. T 07770 729 988

@ Proud Camden, The Horse Hospital, Stables Market, Chalk Farm Road, NW1 8AH. Host Konata. DJs DJ Markee & Shep Beats. Time 6pm-2am. Price first 100 tickets free, £5 thereafter.

EUPHORIA CARNIVAL @ EGG London, 200 York Way Kings Cross, N7 9AX. DJs Shep Beats, DJ Puffy, DJ Markee & Konata. Time 6pm-midnight. Price £10 / £15 / £20.

MANGROVE STEELBAND @ All Saints Road, W11 1HA. Info Soak up the vibes as they build for Notting Hill Carnival; go and listen to Mangrove Steel Orchestra running through their paces. This is the final polishing off of their pieces before the Panorama steel pan competition on Saturday; well worth a listen, a lime, and a debate as to whether they have what it takes to win. Time 7.30pm. Price free. 22 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016

D'REMEDY

ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CALYPSONIANS

@ Carnival Village, Tabernacle Powis Square, W11 2AY. Host Coco P. Time 8pm. Price £8 / £10 / £12. T 07712 894 518

RELEASE D RIDDIM

GRACE FOODS @ Windrush Square, SW2 1EF. Time 11am-7pm.

SHIPWRECKED CARNIVAL LONDON @ M.V Jewel of London, Festival Pier, SE1 8XZ. Time 2-6pm. Boarding at noon. Price USD $40.

ONE ISLAND @ The Prince Of Wales, 467-469 Brixton Road, SW9 8HH. Time 4pm-midnight. Price £15 / £20.

MANGROVE STEELBAND @ All Saints Road, W11 1HA. Info Soak up the vibes as they build for Notting Hill Carnival; go and listen to Mangrove Steel Orchestra running through their paces. This is the final polishing off of their pieces before the Panorama steel pan competition on Saturday; well worth a listen, a lime, and a debate as to whether they have what it takes to win. Time 7.30pm. Price free.

ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CALYPSONIANS

@ KONNECT, Terminus, London Victoria SW1V 1JR. Host Vinny Ranks. DJs Dr Jay, DJ Stephen & Mr Mention. Time 9pm-3am. Price £10 / £12 / £15 on door.

@ Carnival Village, Tabernacle Powis Square, W11 2AY. Hosted by Coco P. Time 8pm. Price £8/ £10 / £12. T 07712 894 518

SPECIALIST ENTERTAINMENT

SOCA I LOVE AND SOCA FRENZY

@ Club Valbon, 23 Lewisham Way, SE14 6PP. DJs Private Ryan, DJ Puffy, DJ Mejustik, QT 2Hype, DJ Bliss, Mr General, Triple M & DSI. Time 11pm-5am. Price £10, £15 door.

@ The Scala, 275 Pentonville Road King´s Cross, N1 9NL. Hosted by DJ Matchiz. Live Acts Lavaman, Asa Bantan, Problem Child, Tian Winter, Pumpa, Scrappy, Terrah Dan & Olatunji Yearwood. DJs DJ


CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 23


EVENTS

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

Tate, Shaker HD, DJ Bajie, Soca Mafia, DJ Bones & QT 2Hype. Time 10pm-6am.

BUSSPEPPER PROMOTIONS LTD @ Electric Brixton, Town Hall Parade, SW2 1RJ. Hosted by Patrick Anthony – THE HYPE MAN of Nuphoric & Konata. DJs Private Ryan, DJ Puffy, DJ Markee, Shep Beats & BacktoBasics. Time 10pm-5am. Price £15 / £20.

FLAGZ @ Coronet Theatre (Elephant & Castle), 28 New Kent Road, SE1 6TJ. DJs Private Ryan (Trinidad), Walshy Fire & Barrie Hype (Miami). Time 10pm-6am. Price £15 / £20. T 07946 634 747.

GET MAD ENTERTAINMENT @ Surya Bar, 156 Pentonville Road, N1 9JL. Hosted by Headback. DJs DJ Frey, DJ Shakit, Mr General & Supa Nytro. Time 10pm-4am. Price £10 / £15 / £17 / £20.

MAGNUM OPUS EVENTS @ Beach East - Private Beach, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, E15 2DU. Time midday-11pm. Price £6 / £10 / £12.50 / £15.

24 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016

THE GRENADA HIGH COMMISSION @ The Gurnell Leisure Centre Sports Grounds, Ruislip Road East Ealing, W13 0AL. Time 1-7.30pm. Price £15 family ticket (two adults + two children under 12). £5 adults, £3 child (0-12 yrs).

TRINI JUNGLE JUICE @ Westminster Boating Base, 136 Grosvenor Road, SW1V 3JY. DJs Private Ryan (Trinidad), Nuphoric, BacktoBasics, Shep Beats & DJ Markee. Time 2-8pm.Price £20.

SUN BAILANTE @ EGG London, 200 York Way Kings Cross, N7 9AX. Live Act Benjai. DJs Jay Sun Bailante, DJ Jamzy, Lyrical Louix, DJ Bones. Guest & DJ Stephen. Time 3-10pm. Price £10, motd. T 07921 891 611.

BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF STEELBANDS

@ Emslie Horniman's Pleasance, Kensal Road, W10 5EH. See p26.

SHIPWRECKED CARNIVAL LONDON

@ One Embankment, 8 Victoria Embankment, WC2R 2AB. DJs Private Ryan (Trinidad), BacktoBasics, DJ Markee, DJ Puffy & DJ Dale. Time 6pm-midnight. Price £75 adv., motd. T 07990 587 333 or 07779 296 651

BUSSPEPPER PROMOTIONS LTD

@ Dutch Master, Time midday4pm. Price £25. T 07889 703 034

@ Revolution, 140-144 Leadenhall Street, EC3V 4QT. Host Patrick Anthony - The HYPE MAN of Nuphoric. DJs Private Ryan (Trinidad), DJ Puffy, BacktoBasics, DJ Markee & D Raskal. Time 10pm-4am. Price £15 / £20.

BIG PAPPY

EBONY STEELBAND

@ Festival Pier, South Bank, SE1 8XZ. Host Martin Jay. DJs Dr Jay, DJ Hendrik (Berlin), DJ Nels (Geneva) & Credable. Time 5.309.30pm. Price £25 incl. food. T 07950 407 199.

@ Venture Centre, 103A Wornington Road, W10 5YB. DJs DJ Janeene & Dan Bean. Time 10pm-3am. Price £5. T 07947 300 393.

ICE BOX ENTERTAINMENT


FLAGZ SOCA FETE @ Indigo at the O2, Peninsula Square, SE10 0DX. Time 10pm5am. Price £26.50.

@ area bounded by Harrow Rd (N), Chepstow Rd (E), Westbourne Grove (S) and Ladbroke Grove (W). Price free. Time 11am-7pm. See p30.

SOCA MAFIA

GENUINE INTEREST

@ Cavendish Banqueting Suite, Edgware Road, NW9 5AE. Host Martin Jay & Giselle The Wassi One. Live Acts Kerwin Du Bois, Voice, Skinny Fabulous, Triniboi Joocie, Ms Desire & Terrah Dan. DJs Vinny Ranks, QT 2Hype, Dr Jay, DJ Stephen, DJ Spice (NY) & DJ Tate. Time 10pm-4am. Price £25 / £30. T 07939 238 735.

@ The Warehouse Leeds, 19-21 Somers Street, Leeds, LS1 2RG. Hosted by Seani B. DJs DJ Toro, DJ Fluid & Tigga. Time 9pm-2am. Price £10 / £15, motd. T 07912 075 898.

GET MAD ENTERTAINMENT @ Camden Centre, Judd Street, WC1H 9JE. Host Headback. DJs Allan Brando, Matchiz, Djahman, DJ Shakit & Jullergz Sound (Germany). Time 10.30pm-4am. Price £12 /£15 / £17 / £20.

BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF STEELBANDS

@ area bounded by Harrow Rd (N), Chepstow Rd (E), Westbourne Grove (S) and Ladbroke Grove (W). Price free. Time 11am-8pm (sound systems shut down at 7pm). See p32.

CARIVOG INTERNATIONAL

SUN BAILANTE

@ O2 Academy Islington, N1 Centre, 16 Parkfield Street, N1 0PS. DJs Jay Sun Bailante, Supa Nytro, DJ Jamzy, Djahman & DJ Majikal. Guest DJs Private Ryan & DJ Jairo. Time 11pm-6am. Price £12 / £15.

GET MAD ENTERTAINMENT @ Dogstar, 389 Coldharbour Lane, SW9 8LQ. Host Headback. DJs DJ Nate, DJ Fearless, DJ Spawny, Selecta Neko, QT 2Hype, DJ Kiki & DJ Shakit. Time 10pm3am. Price £15 / £17.

@ Ladbroke Grove, W10 & W11. Price free. Time 6-9am. See p28.

@ The Polish Centre, 235-246 King Street, Hammersmith, W6 0RF. DJs Rebel D, DJ Black Coffee. Time 6pm. Price £25 adv., motd. T 07958 336 694.

ONE THE BAND @ Nambucca, 596 Holloway Road, N7 6LB. Live Acts Triniboi Joocie, Terrah Dan, Sunshine & Nadiva, Natia Daniel, Giselle Carter & Sophia. Backed By One The Band. DJs DJ Markee, Vinny Ranks & Trevor Davis. Time 8pm2am. Price £8.50 / £12.50.

TALK YUH TALK IN ASSOCIATION WITH CARNIVAL VILLAGE TRUST @ Carnival Village, Tabernacle Powis Square, W11 2AY. Time 7pm. Price Free

SOCANEWS.COM /EVENTS CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 25


PANORAMA NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

SAT URDAY 27 AUGUST

sweet sounds of steel

WORDS | KATIE SEGAL

In 1966, steelpan turned Notting Hill’s first parade into

a Caribbean carnival. You’ll find out why at Panorama, on Saturday 27 August. It’s a fiercely fought competition between Britain’s best steelbands, and the perfect occasion to experience the majesty and subtlety of this extraordinary instrument. If you’ve been to Panorama once, you probably won’t need persuading to go again. If you haven’t – well, one of the best of all carnival experiences is still waiting for you. The sound of some of Britain’s premier steel orchestras at full strength is not easily forgotten; a simple ‘ting tingting’ at the start heralding a thrilling aural explosion that takes over the senses. The distinctive atmosphere is composed of the smell of roasting chicken, carnival camaraderie and barbecue smoke from the stalls that flank Horniman’s Pleasance. The eight competing bands have been practicing hard for at least six weeks, trying to hone their skills enough to beat the opposition and win the much-coveted ‘Champions of Steel’ title. These and more bands will be on the road on carnival days as well. Panorama starts at 6pm and finishes at ten (although it often over-runs), and takes place at Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance, Kensal Road, W10 5EH. It’s free, and the nearest tube station is Westbourne Park. For more information about steel bands at Notting Hill Carnival, you can contact the British Association of Steelbands via www. panpodium.com. Many of the bands practice in public places in the days running up to Panorama, including several within the carnival footprint itself; for more information, check our events listing or contact your local band.

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2016 FINALISTS CROYDON STEEL ORCHESTRA Different Me (5Star Akil) Arranger David Ijaduola CSI STEELBAND TRUST Pan By Storm (Designer) Arranger Brent Holder MBE EBONY STEELBAND Cheers to Life (Voice) Arranger Duvone Stewart ENDURANCE STEEL ORCHESTRA Different Me (5Star Akil) Arranger Marlon Hibbert LONDON ALL STARS Soca Ruption (Simon Superville) Arranger Phil ‘DBL’ Rollock MANGROVE STEEL BAND Different Me (5Star Akil) Arranger Andre White METRONOMES STEEL ORCHESTRA Different Me (5Star Akil) Arranger Annise ‘Halfers’ Hadeed REAL STEEL Nostalgia (Carlton ‘Panman’ Harewood) Arranger Leroy Clarke


CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 27


J'OUVERT NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

SUNDAY 28 AUGUST

powder pandemonium at dawn WORDS | STEPHEN SPARK

They come out of the darkness, a skulking, sinister

crew, preparing for battle on the unsuspecting streets. Little groups coalesce, with combatants in outlandish garb, some of it soiled with multicoloured streaks and splatters. Others don plastic coveralls, as if preparing for biological attack. The talk is conspiratorial, the glint in their eyes furtive, but the police van parked discreetly nearby doesn’t move. Ladbroke Grove is as quiet as the grave. Some residents have fled; those that remain are enjoying the last moments of sleep before the storm breaks. For very soon mayhem will be unleashed in explosions of steel and powder, paint and mud. This, is J'Ouvert. The daytime carnivalgoer expects to see the bright colours of the costume (masquerade, or ‘mas’) bands. Ten thousand camera lenses focus on the feathers, glitter, wings and flowers of ‘pretty mas’ moving to the amplified soca beat. But few people get up early enough to witness what has been called “the dark, demonic flip side of mas”. This ‘Jour Ouvert’ is the daybreak opening of the two days of Carnival. At 6am, as the first of a handful of steelbands emerges out of the gloom, revellers equipped with devil’s horns and chains, or sporting crude and humorous costumes, or simply looking disreputable in old clothes, set off from the roundabout at the

28 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016

top end of Ladbroke Grove. To the irresistible sound of steelpan melodies plus the odd bottle and spoon, they chip down the road whilst covering each other in powder and paint, turning the tarmac into a highway of avante garde art. The old clothes make sense, but the mess does all wash off – eventually. J'Ouvert’s joyous, anarchic freedom, the lack of police and barriers, and the sheer, uncomplicated fun of it all make it a unique part of Carnival. Set the alarm early (or go straight from an all-night party), grab your powder and go!

VENUE AND TIME: junction of Ladbroke Grove and Canal Way, 6am to 9am, Sunday 28 August PRICE: free; though packages including food and coveralls are available – check the web TOP TIPS: wear old clothes and maybe take a hip flask to keep yourself warm.


CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 29


CHILDREN'S DAY NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

SUNDAY 28 AUGUST

a time to shine

WORDS | STEPHEN SPARK

They’ve been looking forward to this day all

year. The excited chatter in community halls, schools and front rooms across the capital has been rising as the end of August draws near and days ticked off the calendar. Now, after months of preparation, discussion, occasional frustration and lots of anticipation, the moment has finally arrived: it’s Children’s Day at Notting Hill Carnival. The costumes are on, the face paint has been applied, the music truck is in place, the banner unfurled and the children lined up behind it. The mas band is ready for the road. "It’s like Christmas and New Year and birthdays all rolled into one” is the comment you hear from young masqueraders talking about why they love Carnival. It’s their time to shine, as stars of the show. For 50 years, children have been at the heart of Notting Hill’s celebrations. While she was organising the very first carnival, Rhaune Laslett said that the week-long community festival would be a treat “for the children, who see very little colour and gaiety. It would give them something of their own.” In recent years, Sunday has become rather dominated by mud and chocolate bands and adults’ T-shirt bands, with a diminishing children’s presence. It’s a trend the current organisers have repeatedly said they want to reverse, though with little success so far. That needs to change, because children are the lifeblood of our carnival; they are the designers,

30 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016

band-leaders, pannists and DJs of the future. Sunday should belong to them, so go along and give them the support they deserve.

VENUE: Most of the costume groups and steelbands start on Harrow Road and Kensal Road. They go clockwise, past the judging point on Great Western Road, turn left into Westbourne Park Road, right into Chepstow Road, right to Westbourne Grove and right again to Ladbroke Grove. TIMINGS: In theory, Sunday’s events start at 10am, though last year it was closer to midday. The judging point closes at 6.30pm, static sounds have to be switched off at 7pm, and everything should be over by 8.30pm. TOP TIPS: Go early and leave early, for comfort. Take water, snacks and a carnival map that shows which roads are blocked and where to find toilets and transport). Leave the buggy or pram at home. If it all gets too crowded, chill out in the family area at Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance (Kensal Rd/Bosworth Rd) or listen to brilliant calypso and soca at the World Music Stage in Powis Square.


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ADULTS' DAY NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

MONDAY 29 AUGUST

the art of the possible WORDS | STEPHEN SPARK

It’s too big, too noisy and in the wrong place. There aren’t enough toilets. And the costumes aren’t as good as they were in 1983. You’ll find no shortage of people complaining about Notting Hill Carnival, but for all its faults it’s Britain’s most amazing free event. Every year a million people vote with their feet by squeezing themselves into a baffling maze of Victorian streets that for a few hours every year reverberate with energy, excitement and endless possibilities. Part of the frustration is being unable to experience it all – you constantly find yourself wanting to be in six places at once, but unable to reach any of them because of the crowds, the barriers and distractions on the way. But instead you stumble across other sights and sounds and people you’d never have encountered had you not taken a wrong turn somewhere under the Westway. So, just go with the flow… It would be quite possible to ignore all the music and costumes and treat Notting Hill as a huge food festival. Despite what the media would have you believe, it’s not all jerk chicken. In fact, there’s probably no other day when you can sample so many of the world’s cuisines in such a small area. The same goes for the music. There’s steelpan, of course, thrilling new audiences with a 50-year tradition. The mas bands’ trucks will be pounding out soca sounds, keeping masqueraders’ energy levels high hour after hour. The samba bands will be playing, well, samba. But listen out too for bouyon, soukous, zouk and chutney. Then there are nearly 40 static sounds, each with its own niche, from garage to dubstep to ska to grimecore, plus music so new it’s

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being created while you're listening. Don’t miss the World Music Stage in Powis Square, where the Britishbased artists cover all bases, from serious social commentary calypso to seriously infectious soca. At the heart of Carnival is masquerade, the world turned upside down, the people’s own theatre of the street. Mas lets you to transform from officeworker chrysalis to carnival butterfly. The party bands have become hugely successful, with their slick, all-inclusive packages of well-made, glamorous costumes, copious food and drink, and an after-party too. If it seems like everyone’s having more fun behind the truck, you’ll want to sign up next year. Traditional mas, though diminishing, is still to be found, and it’s in these groups that you see the real artistry of skilled designers interpreting a theme in costume. It’s not all pretty glitter either – one band’s theme last year was ‘Oil Slick’, proving there’s still a place for mas that’s thought-provoking as well as sexy and exciting. The surest way to have a great time at Notting Hill is to take part. Carnival is not for spectators standing on the sidelines, but a totally immersive experience so plunge in, and enjoy! TIMINGS: Monday’s action is meant to begin at 11am. Otherwise, as per Children's Day. TOP TIPS: Comfortable shoes are essential; bicycles, buggies and big bags are madness. Mobiles may be unreliable as networks get overloaded, so prearrange time and place if you need to meet friends.


CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016 | 33


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What are your souvenirs of Carnival? Maybe aching feet, a sore head and some shaky photos. But wouldn't it be great if you could capture all the colour, excitement, costumes and atmosphere of carnival to enjoy all year? This year you can - with London's first-ever carnival souvenir magazine. The Golden Jubilee Edition of Carnival Grooves has every angle of Notting Hill carnival covered. Order your copy at just ÂŁ5, including p&p. Visit socanews.com/shop, email sales@josephcharlespublishing.com or call + 44 (0) 333 012 4643 36 | CARNIVAL GROOVES 2016

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Carnival Grooves 2016  

Your guide to Notting Hill Carnival 2016

Carnival Grooves 2016  

Your guide to Notting Hill Carnival 2016

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