Page 1

/

/ / 1


S/oA PROSPECTUS_MAKING /

/

2

LANDON ROBINSON _ EDITOR + DESIGNER


/

/

/

/ /

/

SCHOOL of ARCHITECTURE

UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHARLOTTE 3


T/oC /

/

/

4

/

TABLE of CONTENTS


DEAN’S WELCOME

6

DIRECTOR’S INTRODUCTION

8

ACADEMIC PROGRAM INDEX

12

FACULTY & STAFF

14

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

18

BACHELOR of ARTS in ARCHITECTURE

20

BACHELOR of ARCHITECTURE

/

/

148

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

182

MASTER of ARCHITECTURE I

184

MASTER of ARCHITECTURE II

206

MASTER of URBAN DESIGN

258

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

292

STORRS HALL

304

5


DEAN’S WELCOME

/

/

The College of Arts + Architecture is dedicated to transdisciplinary conversation and collaboration, design innovation, creative leadership development, and research and communication using our sense of imagination. We are intensely focused on process. We seek to frame new ways of looking at the world we live in to prepare for the one we are now making. Ken Lambla Dean and Professor

6

/


/

/

/

COLLEGE of ARTS + ARCHITECTURE PAVILION / LANDON ROBINSON _ DESIGNER

7


DIRECTOR’S INTRODUCTION

PROSPECTUS_MAKING chronicles our ambition in the School of Architecture through the lens of student work produced in recent years. The sheer delight in making, in organizing matter with intentionality, creativity and sensibility is what draws us together as a community of impassioned thinkers and makers. Our extraordinary faculty leads this effort. During the last few years, we have strengthened a number of areas in our program. This includes new and revised courses in architectural theory, design computation and building performance; increased research support to students and faculty; expanded facilities in a new downtown location; inauguration of a new graduate degree program in urban design; strengthened connections with the professional community; new international programming in China; and successful study abroad programs in Rome, Spain-Portugal, Switzerland and Central Europe. We’ve also welcomed an expanded faculty in building technology, computational design and history/theory. “The only thing constant is change itself.” (Heraclitus) Change is abound. Arguably, the profession and discipline of architecture is experiencing change as never before. New energy mandates, expanding role of technology, globalization, social and environmental equity, new media, and rapid urbanization are but a few of the dominant forces driving this change. We strive to make sense of our changing world. We reflect on these forces with equal measure of promise and caution. Complexity flourishes. As a program, we continue to evolve and grow in the face of change while striving to meet the needs of our talented and motivated students. As the pace of change accelerates in the 21st century, a new and more empathetic modern world is unfolding before us, a 8


period giving way to a more fundamentally integrative way of thinking, visualizing and practicing, a new modernity, a new spirit of entrepreneurialism associated with a more just, sustainable, socially-conscious, diverse and information-saturated world, one that is in the process of emplacing building into a more cohesive social and environmental vision, with increased collaborative teaming and social networking, applying fields of information that promotes empowerment and new possibilities for design professionals. I am both inspired and encouraged by these times, and equally inspired by our students and their work. It is their commitment coupled with their talent that makes it an absolute pleasure to be a part of the School of Architecture. Chris Jarrett Director and Professor

9


/

/

/

Faculty and students in the / School of Architecture are committed to creating an open-minded and creative atmosphere to pursue research, explore new forms of building, and discover collaborative practices that nurture human potential.

10

/


/

The School of Architecture at UNCCharlotte is devoted to engaging students in an energetic study of how architecture affects - and stimulates - everyday life.

/

11


S/oA PROSPECTUS F S SU

= FALL SEMESTER = SPRING SEMESTER = SUMMER SEMESTER

/

STUDENT NAME / FACULTY NAME 12

FIRSTAND LASTNAME / FIRSTAND LASTNAME

/


PROGRAM INDEX B/01 DEGREE TYPE

YEAR

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

B/01 B/02 B/03 B/04 B/05

BACHELOR of ARTS in ARCHITECTURE

B/01 B/02 B/03 B/04 BACHELOR of ARCHITECTURE

B/05

GRADUATE PROGRAM

M/01 M/02 M/03 M/UD

MASTER of ARCHITECTURE I

MASTER of ARCHITECTURE II

M/01 M/02 M/03

M/02 M/03

MASTER of URBAN DESIGN

M/UD

/ 13


FACULTY

JOSÉ L.S. GÁMEZ / Associate Professor Ph.D. in Architecture, UCLA; M.Arch., UC Berkeley; Bachelor of Environmental Design, Texas A&M.

Mona Azarbayjani researches building energy modeling and climate responsive building skins in high-rise buildings. She has published her research on sustainable building systems in a number of technical publications. She currently works in the SoA’s Center for Integrated Building Design Research and teaches design studio and environmental control systems.

THOMAS GENTRY / Assistant Professor M.Arch., Illinois Institute of Technology; B.Arch., University of Arizona. Thomas Gentry is a registered architect and Director of the Laboratory for Innovative Housing, a multidisciplinary research laboratory with the IDEAS Center in the Lee College of Engineering and the Center for Integrated Building Design Research in the College of Arts + Architecture. Gentry uses this multidisciplinary approach to teach and practice the integrative design process.

JEFF BALMER / Assistant Professor M.Arch., Iowa State University; B.Arch. & Bachelor of Environmental Studies, University of Waterloo. Jeff Balmer received an ACSA Creative Achievement Honorable Mention for the pedagogy of his CoA+A undergraduate writing seminar and co-chaired MADE, the 2010 National Conference on the Beginning Design Student (NCBDS). Balmer teaches the first-year undergraduate studio sequence, second-year writing seminar, and an advanced seminar in postwar cultural history.

KYOUNG-HEE KIM / Assistant Professor Ph.D. & M.Arch., University of Michigan; Master of Architectural Engineering and Bachelor of Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea. Kyoung-Hee Kim teaches with a focus on the integration of art and building physics, performance-based design, and climate responsive envelopes. Her research focuses on the development and implementation of building life cycle integrated design that identifies specific implications in pre-use, use, and post-use phases and enhances building performance.

CHRIS BEORKREM / Assistant Professor Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design, Columbia University; B.Arch., Iowa State University. Chris Beorkrem focuses on research in both the physical and analytical realms of digital design. In his teaching, practice, and research he explores the balance between the legibility of form and the efficient use of time, machines and material. He teaches digital design and fabrication in the School of Architecture.

ZHONGJIE LIN / Associate Professor Ph.D. in Architecture & M.S. in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania; M.Arch. & B.Arch., Tongji University, Shanghai, China.

DALE BRENTRUP / Professor M.Arch., UCLA; B.A. in Architecture, Arizona State University.

Zhongjie Lin specializes in modern architectural avant-garde movements, theory of urban design, and contemporary urbanism in East Asia. He is the author of Kenzo Tange and the Metabolist Movement: Urban Utopias of Modern Japan (Routledge, 2010), Urban Design in the Global Perspective (China Architectural & Building Press, 2006, co-authored with Kuang Shi and Gary Hack) and The Making of a Chinese Model New Town(China Architectural & Building Press, 2012).

Dale Brentrup is Director of the Center for Integrated Building Design Research and Daylighting + Building Energy Performance Laboratory. He is a registered architect and a senior research fellow in the Infrastructure Design Environment and Sustainability Center in the Lee College of Engineering at UNC Charlotte.

EMILY MAKAŠ / Assistant Professor Ph.D. in History of Architecture and Urbanism, Cornell University; Master of Historic Preservation, Columbia University; B.A. in History, University of Tennessee.

CHARLES DAVIS / Assistant Professor Ph.D. & M.S. in Architecture, University of Pennsylvania; M.Arch., SUNY Buffalo. Charles Davis II’s research examines the historical integrations of race and style theory in modern architectural debates, as well as the general effect of racial discourses on architectural production and professionalization. Charles has published essays in peer-reviewed journals including Architectural Research Quarterly, as well as the interdisciplinary journals APPX and VIA. In the past he has given talks at PhilaNOMA, the local chapter of the National Organization of Minority Architects.

Emily Makaš specializes in the history of modern European cities, and her research specifically engages the relationship between architecture, cities, heritage, memory, identity, and politics. Makaš teaches architectural history and seminars on topics such as “Capital Cities,” “Architecture and the National Identity,” and “Layered Berlin.” Most recent publications include the edited volume Capital Cities in the Aftermath of Empires: Planning in Central and Southeastern Europe (Routledge, 2010, co-edited with T.D. Conley) and the monograph Architectural Conservation in Europe and the Americas (Wiley, 2011, co-authored with J.H. Stubbs).

THOMAS FORGET / Assistant Professor & Undergraduate Program Coordinator M.Arch., Princeton University; Master of Environmental Design, Yale University; B.A. in Art History, Columbia University. Thomas Forget’s current practice and research explore the intersection of public space and architectural projection. His work as an urban designer and a moviemaker complement his scholarship on twentieth century urbanism, linear perspective, and cinema. His practice and research have been both exhibited and published.

14

/

José Gámez is Coordinator of the Design + Society Research Center and a member of the Latin American Studies faculty. His research and design practices explore questions of cultural identity in architecture and urban design, the impacts of Latino immigration upon urban space, and critical practices in Chicano Art.

MONA AZARBAYJANI/ Assistant Professor Ph.D. Architecture-Building Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign; M.Arch. & B.Arch., Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran.

/

JOHN NELSON / Associate Professor M.Arch. & B.Arch., Kent State University. John Nelson is a registered architect in private practice since 1976. His research, practice, and community outreach efforts center around the concerns of design-build affordable housing and climate responsive design. He teaches topical studios, environmental systems, and seminars on climate responsive passive design, computational energy analysis and prefabricated affordable housing.

/


/ DEBORAH RYAN / Associate Professor Master of Landscape Architecture, Harvard University; Bachelor of Environmental Design in Landscape Architecture, North Carolina State University. Deborah Ryan has a 25-year history of assisting communities and their leaders with challenges relating to development, urban open space, downtown revitalization and civic engagement in the community planning process. Formerly, she was the founding and former Director of the Charlotte Community Design Studio, Director of the Urban Open Space Leadership Institute (OSL) and Director of the Mayor’s Institute on City Design: South. ERIC SAUDA / Professor M.Arch., UCLA; A.B., Princeton University. Eric Sauda specializes in the use of digital and computational technologies and their transformative effect on architecture. His research focuses on urban visualization and interactive architecture. He works closely with the Urban Visualization Research Group, the Charlotte Visualization Center at the College of Computing and Informatics, and the Computing in Place Research Group. NICK SENSKE / Assistant Professor Ph.D. Candidate in Architecture, University of Michigan; Master of Science in Architectural Studies in Design Computation, MIT; B.Arch., Iowa State University. Nicholas Senske specializes in digital design integration. His current research draws from the fields of education and computer science and seeks to improve how architecture students learn computer software and computational thinking. In collaboration with other faculty, he is developing this research into a new curriculum for digital design within the School of Architecture. He teaches second-year undergraduate studio and the digital methods seminar.

/

JENNIFER SHIELDS / Visiting Assistant Professor M.Arch. & Bachelor of Science in Architecture, University of Virginia. Jennifer Shields is a registered architect and partner at flux. She has taught upper level studios and seminars based on her research considering the phenomenological qualities of the built environment that contribute to a multi-sensory experience and creation of place. Prior to teaching, Jen worked on numerous commercial, retail and residential projects in North Carolina and South Carolina while at Tobin Dudley, now known as Tobin Starr and Partners. GREG SNYDER / Associate Professor M.Arch., Rice University; Bachelor of Science in Architecture, University of Texas, Arlington. Greg Snyder is a registered architect and teaches in the foundation programs of the SoA as well as the Graduate Thesis program. His research interests are in issues that arise out of acts of making and construction, and the phenomena and meaning that accrue in and around these acts. The class First Year for Life is the most recent seminar elective that examines relationships between one’s architectural education and the practice of everyday life. He has received numerous grants for projects including “This House is Home / The Mobile Gallery.”

MICHAEL SWISHER / Associate Professor M.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art; A.B. in Architecture, Washington University. Michael Swisher’s involvement with foundation studies extends across a 30-year teaching career. His primary teaching responsibilities include first year studio and skills, as well as visual studies electives. Michael has exhibited his paintings commercially for over two decades and most recent publication was a small book for his institution on the curriculum and sequence of studies in the foundation program of the first semester. DAVID THADDEUS / Professor M.Arch., University of Houston; Bachelor of Structural Engineering, American University of Beirut, Lebanon. David Thaddeus is a registered architect who teaches structures, architectural design and sustainable structure. His research focuses on the pedagogy of structural concepts and ideas using visual and qualitative methods. In addition he is interested in exploring structures, materials and construction methods from the perspective of sustainability and performance. David teaches seminars for the Architect Registration Exam (ARE) all across the USA and Canada. DAVID WALTERS / Professor Undergraduate & Graduate Degrees in Architecture and Urban Design, University of Newcastle-uponTyne, UK. David Walters is a British architect who has four decades of experience as an architect, urban designer and community planner. David is a senior urban designer with The Lawrence Group, Architects and Town Planners. With The Lawrence Group, David has won state and national awards for urban design master plans, form-based codes and community planning projects based in Carolina communities. Walters is the author or co-author of three books: Design First: Design-based Planning for Communities (with Linda Luise Brown); Designing Community: Charrettes, Masterplans and Form-based Codes; and The Future Office (with Christopher Grech). He is also the program coordinator of the Master of Urban Design program at the College of Arts and Architecture. BETSY WEST / Associate Professor M.Arch., Yale University; B.Arch., North Carolina State University. Betsy West is a practicing architect whose projects have been recognized at local, regional, and national levels. She has served as Chair of the former College of Architecture and as Graduate Program Coordinator. Her teaching, research, and practice activities explore the culture, social, political, and physical aspects of architecture and its relationship to landscape. PETER WONG / Associate Professor & Graduate Program Coordinator M.Arch., University of Pennsylvania; B.A. in Architectural Studies, University of Washington, Seattle. Peter Wong is a registered architect and has taught architectural design, history, and theory since 1988. He is a recipient of a 1996 Design Excellence Award given by the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) and was recognized with a Merit Award in 2004 by the Charlotte AIA Chapter for a workshop and guest house completed in 2003. Peter recently received an honorable mention with his colleague Jeff Balmer for “Writing Architecture in Six Genres,” an undergraduate writing seminar, as part of the ACSA’s Creative Achievement Award Program for 2010.

/ 15


C/oAA ADMINISTRATION

/

KEN LAMBLA / Dean & Professor M.Arch., UC Berkeley; Bachelor of Environmental Design, University of Kansas. Ken Lambla, AIA, has worked as an architect and urban designer in Belfast (Northern Ireland), Chicago, San Francisco, and, during his tenure at UNC Charlotte, throughout North Carolina on educational and institutional projects. His career in education and practice is focused on architecture as community development and advocates social responsibility, craft, and innovation. LEE GRAY / Associate Dean & Associate Professor Ph.D. in Architectural History, Cornell University; Master of Architectural History, University of Virginia; B.Arch & B.A. in Architecture, Iowa State University. Lee Gray is author of From Ascending Rooms to Express Elevators: A History of the Passenger Elevator in the 19th Century. Current projects include a history of escalators and moving sidewalks and a history of AIA Charlotte. He has appeared on the History Channel in “Modern Marvels - Building a Skyscraper” and the PBS program “NOVA: Trapped in an Elevator” (from “The Secret Life of Elevators”).

S/oA ADMINISTRATION CHRIS JARRETT / Director & Professor Master of Science in Architecture and Building Design, Columbia University; B.Arch., University of Oregon. Chris Jarrett’s research and teaching engages environmental design issues, including green building theory, eco-tectonics, and sustainable building technology. He recently received the BP Solar Award for Innovation, an AIA regional COTE Award, and an Outstanding Interdisciplinary Research Award. His work has been published in Japan Architect, Architecture, Progressive Architecture, and Interior Design.

/

KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG / Associate Director & Associate Professor Master of Environmental Design, Yale University; B.Arch., Texas Tech University. Kelly Carlson-Reddig’s research focuses primarily on the conceptual dimension of architecture’s materiality and tectonics. During her tenure at UNC Charlotte, she has developed two lecture series, “Architecture’s Materiality” and “Beyond Center: Diversity in Architecture.” She teaches graduate architectural design studios and critical practice/ technology seminars.

S/oA STAFF RYAN BUYSSENS BEN FUTRELL MATT HODGMAN RACHAEL MURDOCK REEDENA NEWLON RICH PREISS MICHELE WALLACE

16

/


ADJUNCT FACULTY/ JEREMY ROH / Part-Time Lecturer M.Arch., UNC Charlotte; B. Design, University of Florida.

CHRIS CAMPBELL / Part-Time Lecturer M.Arch. & B.A. in Architecture, UNC Charlotte. Chris Campbell teaches design studios and representation seminars in the undergraduate foundation program. His research and work focus on developing the colorations between painting, drawing, sculpture, and architecture. Chris received the Master of Architecture Representation Book Award in 2011 for his thesis ‘Didactic Counterparts: Painting and Architecture as Parallel Design Practices’. His work has been featured in the ‘9 Ideas for Long Farm’ exhibition.

Jeremy Roh specializes in digital methods and technology as it relates to project design in academia and the profession of architecture. Jeremy has taught upper-level seminars that explore 3D Modeling, Digital Visualization, Scripted Programming Languages, and the use of Graphical Algorithm Editors to explore parametric form making and computational design techniques. In addition to his work as a Project Designer at The FWA Group Architects, Jeremy owns his own business, JRoh DIGITAL & RESIDENTIAL DESIGN where he specializes in BIM Consulting, 3D Rendering, Animation, and Web Design. KAREN RUSSCHER / Part-Time Lecturer Master of Landscape Architecture, Harvard University; B.S. in Landscape Architecture, University of Kentucky.

CARRIE GAULT / Part-Time Lecturer M.Arch. & B.A. in Architecture, UNC Charlotte. Carrie Gault is a registered architect and teaches design studio in the undergraduate foundation program. With over 20 years experience in the design community, Carrie worked for mid-sized firms in Boston and Charlotte before starting her own firm. Happy Box Architecture has been recognized locally, regionally, and nationally for its innovative approaches to design and its sensitivity to the communities and ecologies in which it works. The firm focuses on renovation, infill, and sustainable projects with commercial, institutional, and nonprofit clients. Carrie also collaborates with local artists on public and private art installations and multimedia productions. JOSIE HOLDEN-BULLA / Part-Time Lecturer B.Arch., Mississippi State University. Josie Holden-Bulla is a registered architect and teaches design studio courses in 2nd and 3rd year and has taught topical studios for 4th year and graduate students.  She attempts to balance practice and teaching in the steadfast belief that the two activities compliment one another more often than they conflict with one another.  In architectural practice, she has contributed to a number of urban infill multi-use structures and community-based, urban design projects. DICK PERLMUTTER / Part-Time Lecturer AADiploma, Architectural Association, London; B.A., Oberlin College. Dick Perlmutter is a registered architect and principal of Perlmutter Architects. Dick has designed and managed projects for many prominent firms, including Arquitectonica, Spillis Candela/AECOM, Perkins & Will, and Little. While at the Architectural Association in London he studied under Rem Koolhaas, Elia Zenghelis, and Zaha Hadid. Dick teaches Professional Practice for the B. Arch. and M. Arch programs in the School of Architecture. LANDON ROBINSON / Part-Time Lecturer M.Arch., Cornell University; B.Arch. & B.A. in Architecture, UNC Charlotte. Landon Robinson teaches first year design studios and representation seminars focusing on drawing and observation. His interests in and research on drawing and architecture are guided by the study of Aldo Rossi and John Hejduk. The Solopsist Vessel, his project featured in the ‘9 Ideas for Long Farm’ exhibition, explored the influence of iterative drawings and repetition to exploit the relationship between still life and object and its translation into architecture.

/

Karen Russcher has been practicing Landscape Architecture and Master Planning for over 20 years in North Carolina and California. Karen has extensive experience in large-scale master planning including educational, recreation, and corporate campuses, as well as Streetscape and Mixed-use Urban Design projects. While in North Carolina, Karen was a principal with LandDesign and participated in many large-scale masterplanning projects in Charlotte as well as surrounding states. Karen’s love of the natural environment brought her to California, where she focused on sustainable design practices carefully incorporating best management practices that connect the built environment with the natural environment. BRYAN SHIELDS / Part-Time Lecturer M.Arch. & Bachelor of Science in Architecture, University of Virginia. Bryan Shields teaches 2nd and 3rd Year studio courses as well as upper level seminars discussing architecture and its relationship to context. Prior to teaching, Bryan worked on numerous urban infill housing projects in Charlotte, North Carolina and Lexington, Kentucky while with David Furman Architecture, now known as Axiom Architecture. He has taught upper level studio courses in critical exploration as well as seminar courses focused on the mapping of social and phenomenological contexts in order to better situate design in the site and community.

/

HERB SPROTT / Part-Time Lecturer Bachelor of Environmental Design, Texas A&M. Herb Sprott is a registered architect and Director of Design with Hall Architects. As a former principal at Tobin + Dudley Architects and former Technical Director of The Freelon Group’s Charlotte office, Mr. Sprott brings experience in a wide variety of project types and sizes. Herb has taught several design studios focusing on the importance of materials, detailing and coordination in creating successful facilities. MICHAEL WILLIAMS / Part-Time Lecturer B.Arch., University of Tennessee. Michael Williams is a registered architect and principal at Liquid Design. Liquid Design is an innovative architectural firm noted for its distinctive approach and award winning projects. In 2009 Liquid Design received the AIA Design Honor Award and Sustainable Design Award for Celadon and an AIA Charlotte Honor Award for the Design of the U.S. National Whitewater Center in 2007.

17


S/oA /

/

GRADUATE PROGRAMS /

182


/

/

/

PETER WONG _ GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR DAVID WALTERS _ MUD PROGRAM COORDINATOR

183


S/oA /

MASTER of ARCHITECTURE I /

/

184

The Master of Architecture I (M.Arch. I) is the professional, threeyear graduate degree program leading to the NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture degree. The M.Arch. I program provides flexibility for students who have an undergraduate degree in a field other than architecture. Students admitted to the M.Arch. I program complete a threeyear, 96-credit curriculum that begins in the second session of the summer semester. In the first year of the M.Arch. I program, students acquire the fundamentals of visual and spatial design, conceptualization, problem solving, and material and environmental influences. In addition to design studio, students take introductory coursework in architectural history and theory, building technology, and representation. In the second year, students join incoming M.Arch. II students to complete a curriculum consisting of a comprehensive architectural design project, an advanced graduate design studio coupled with courses in contemporary theory, building technology, computational methods, design methodology, and architectural electives. In the third year, students complete an advanced graduate design studio and a research or design-based thesis, along with courses in architectural research, building technology, computational practices, professional practice and architectural electives.

/


/

/

/

185


M/01 /

SU

M.Arch. I

/

Architecture Design Studio_G/Core 01 introduces students to fundamental concepts of architectural design and place making. Students are introduced to the art and science of design, exploring ideas through freehand sketching, abstract exercises in 2-D composition, 3-D modeling, and visual theory. Students are exposed to a broad range of issues and methods of design and practice. They are also introduced to a number of related topics including history, urbanism, materiality, and daylight. The studio incorporates a 4-day field trip to study and analyze buildings and places in their urban context. Recent site visits include Charleston and Savannah.

/

186


/

/

/

SUMMER STUDIO / PETER WONG + WILL ALLEN

187


/

/

/

188

SAIRY SANCHEZ / PETER WONG


/

/

/

M/01_Su

GARRETT LAPPING / PETER WONG

189


190

SUMMER REVIEW REVIEW / PETER WONG


ALLEN DAVIS / PETER WONG

191


M/01 /

F

M.Arch. I

/

/

Architecture Design Studio_G/Core 02 focuses on fundamental concepts of architecture as well as the acquisition and practice of a wide range of technical and graphic skills and media. Studio is complemented with an introductory course on Ideas in Architecture, addressing readings and projects on modern and contemporary architecture. Studio serves as an arena to explore and critically examine these issues through the act of making. A 4-day field trip during SoA’s fall semester ‘field week’ to Chicago introduces students to seminal examples of 20th century modern architecture, including Mies van der Rohe and Frank Lloyd Wright, and a number of important cultural institutions, as well as the urban fabric and infrastructure of the city of Chicago. /

192


/

/

/

193


/

/

/

194

SALON REVIEW / GREG SNYDER


/

/

M/01_F

/

195


/

/

/

196

MIKALE KWIATOWSKI / GREG SNYDER


/

/

M/01_F

/

KAMERON KING / GREG SNYDER

197


198

ANNA STOKES / GREG SNYDER


199


M/01 /

S

M.Arch. I

/

/

Architecture Design Studio_G/Core 03 focuses on the development of site, space, and design process issues as well as the continued acquisition and practice of a variety of technical and graphic skills. Students investigate theoretical and spatial concepts, social aspects, and technical requirements that are necessary for working in a challenging urban context. Exploration into the creative and appropriate use of media is fostered. A 4-day field trip during SoA’s spring semester ‘field week’ further develops students’ knowledge of significant works of ‘architecture in context’. Recent site visits have been to Boston and New Haven.

/

200


/

/

/

201


/

SITE PLAN 1/64” = 1’

/

PROCE

MECHANICAL SPACE

S2

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’

WAITING

OFFICES

/ RECEPTION CREMATION

RESTROOMS

COLD FAMILY RECEIVING

202

CLARKE SNELL / BETSY WEST


/

/

M/01_S

/

203


/

PARTI DIARGAM

SECTION A-A 1/16”=1’-0”

SECTION A-A 1/16”=1’-0”

/

/

204

STEFAN PINHEIRO / BETSY WEST


/

/

M/01_S

/

205


S/oA

/

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE II The Master of Architecture II (M.Arch. II) is the professional, twoyear graduate degree program leading to the NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture degree. The M.Arch. II program is designed for students who hold an undergraduate degree (B.A. or B.S.) with a / program. major in architecture from a NAAB-accredited Students admitted to the M.Arch. II program complete a two-year, 60-credit curriculum that begins in the fall semester. The duration of graduate study for M.Arch. II students may vary according to prior preparation and course work in architecture, including the fundamentals of visual and spatial design, conceptualization, and problem solving, as well as introductory coursework in architectural history and theory, building technology, and representation. In the first year of the M.Arch. II program, students complete a curriculum consisting of a comprehensive architectural design project, an advanced graduate design studio coupled with courses in contemporary theory, advanced building technology, computational methods, design methodology, and architectural electives. In the second year, students complete an advanced graduate / design studio and a research or design-based thesis, along with courses in architectural research, building technology, computational practices, professional practice and architectural electives.

206


/

/

124

Thesis Document

/

IGOR POLYAKOV / JOSÉ GÁMEZ + ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

207


M/02 F

/

M.Arch. I + M.Arch. II

/

/

Architecture Design Studio_G/Advanced 04 (CAP) focuses on a site-specific project emphasizing technological and systemic issues that lead toward comprehensive building design. The purpose of this studio is to expand student’s ability in abstract design language with systems logic and tactile material engagement. The studio seeks the development of experimental propositions that are implemented in a highly resolved architectural project. Students must evidence requisite knowledge in environmental and structural systems integration, as well as appropriate responses to material, climate and energy use demonstrated through plans, sections, elevations, wall sections and 3-D representations. /

208

/


/

/

/

209


/

/

/

210

ZAC PORTER / JENNIFER SHIELDS


/

/

M/02_F

/

211


/

/

/

212

CHRIS CAMPBELL / JENNIFER SHIELDS


/

/ M/02_F

/

213


/

/

M/02_F

/

214

CHRIS CAMPBELL / JENNIFER SHIELDS


/

/

/ 215


/

M/02_F

/

/

216

JEFF SCOTT / KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG


/

/

/

217


675

680

706

701

695

690

721

706

701

695

690

685

685

680

670

675

670

/

2

711

2

MECHANICAL 200 SF

SITE PLAN 1" = 200'

MECHANICAL 4800 SF

721

1

LOWER LEVEL PLAN 1/16" = 1'

/

/

218

ALLISON SCHAEFFER (BOTTOM) / KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG


/

2

WOMENS 300 SF

MENS 200 SF

PRODUCTION MNGR 200 SF MECHANICAL 200 SF

D. HALL MNGR 120 SF

2

C

SHARED INDOOR DINING 2800 SF C

KITCHEN 700 SF

C LOADING 1795 SF

MECHANICAL 200 SF

BAKERY 275 SF

HEARTH OVEN KITCHEN 275 SF

GRILL/SAUTE 275 SF

INTERNATIONAL KITCHEN 500 SF

ICE 120 SF

CONVENIENCE STORE 2200 SF

OPEN SALADS/SOUPS/DELI 275 SF

SUPERVISORS 270 SF

COFFEE/BAKERY 225 SF COMMISSARY KITCHEN 2200 SF

MENS 200 SF 1

WOMENS 200 SF FOOD SHOP 1100 SF RETAIL 600 SF

EXTR. DINING 1530 SF

SANITATION 1950 SF MENS 200 SF

DINING 7600 SF

DISH STORAGE 250 SF

BREAK & LOCKER 425 SF

TAKE OUT 700 SF

STORAGE 2200 SF 1

DISH WASHING 800 SF

WOMENS 300 SF

POT STORAGE 250 SF CHEMICAL STORAGE 50 SF

2

DINING 4750 SF

RETAIL LEVEL PLAN 1/16" = 1'

A.Y.C.E. LEVEL PLAN 1/16" = 1'

1

STRUCTURAL FRAMING PLAN 1/16" = 1'

STRUCTURAL FRAMING PLAN 1/16" = 1'

WEST ELEVATION 1/16" = 1'

NORTH ELEVATION 1/16" = 1'

725'-2"

SECTON 2

708'-0"

1/16" = 1'

695'-6"

SECTION 1 1/16" = 1'

725'-2"

708'-0"

695'-6"

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

1/16" = 1'

1/16" = 1'

/

M/02_F

/

STEVE COSTELL (TOP) / KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG

219


/

/

/

220

WILL ALLEN / PETER WONG


/

M/02_F

/

/

MICHAEL BOWEN / PETER WONG

221


M/02 /

F+S

M.Arch. I + M.Arch. II

/

/

Architecture Design Studio_G/Advanced 05+06 focuses on specific issues relevant to current architectural theory and practice. These studios expand upon introductory concepts of architecture while giving students the opportunity to tailor their design education to meet their own interests. Students choose from among several options, each of which addresses different topical issues. These studios are exploratory in nature. The research interests of the faculty define the premise of advanced studios. This includes the studio topic, method of inquiry, questions to be examined, as well as the pedagogical approach. /

/

222


/

/

M/02

/

223


/

/

/

224

CHARLOTTE WHITLOCK / NICK AULT


/

M/02_S

/

/

JIM MATTISON / NICK AULT

225


/

M/02_S

/

/

226

CHRIS CAMPBELL / KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG


/

/

/

227


/

/

/

228

ZAC PORTER / KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG


M/02_S

/

/

/

229


/

/

/

230

BARKES + MILNER + PAPPA / CHRIS BEORKREM


/

M/02_S

/

/

CANADAY + GULATI + HESS / CHRIS BEORKREM

231


/

/

/

232

ELIZABETH UNRUH / PETER WONG


/

M/02_S

/

/

LI LI / PETER WONG

233


M/03 /

M.Arch. I + M.Arch. II S THESIS

/

/

/ Architecture Design Studio_G/Advanced 07 offers support and structure for students to advance an individual thesis project. Students are encouraged to build upon earlier investigations explored in one or more advanced studios. Thesis students have the choice to pursue one of two modes of inquiry: research track or design track. In either case, the thesis project consists of two parts. The first part (seminar) occurs during the penultimate semester. Research Documents is focused on setting the parameters of the thesis investigation in /terms of a particular topic and line of inquiry. Students conclude the semester with a project document that conveys the research and conceptual framework for their investigation. The second part (studio) occurs during the final semester and serves as the culmination of the M.Arch. Program. Thesis studio provides a platform for students to present a clearly articulated theoretical position and method of practice. The work of the thesis studio sets an example of depth of thinking and skill in making. /

234


/

/

/

/

235


/

IHABITING GROUND[S]: MEASURES OF/GROUND AND THE MINIMAL DWELLING Within the ground there exists a myriad of rich circumstance and latent potential, conditions particularly promising for the generation of a dwelling. Measurements taken from the ground range in scale from the physical, to those more experiential and perceptual properties of a site. This range of qualities can be divided into a threetiered analysis, though there are certainly connections between each. These categories can be described as first, the physical, “hard data,” of the site, followed by the contextual and circumstantial data, and finally, the data that must be experienced both perceptual and phenomenological. The ground is a stage for visions and dreams and nightmares, those phenomena greater than the geographic limits or cultural identity of a site—and a dwelling must address these qualities accordingly, both sheltering and connecting its inhabitant to the larger environment. Only when architecture, and in particular the dwelling, asserts a clear correspondence between the ground, its contextual circumstance, and a personal, experiential relationship with a site will the essential bridge between a home and its place in the world exist. A dwelling must be recognized as an integral link between humans and the world—serving as the relational structure between inhabitant and ground, connecting the human to the world. This project seeks to identify the connections between dwellings and ground first through the examination of two existing dwelling conditions; the first, Le Corbusier’s Villa Le Lac on Lake Geneva, and the second, a slum housing typology located in the Spanish Quarter of Naples, Italy. Both studies led to an intervention designed to activate the connection between the dwelling and ground. For the final phase of this thesis, a more accessible site in Belmont, North Carolina has been selected, and successive measures of ground will ultimately lead to the design of a new dwelling condition, activated by the ground, able to connect its occupant to the greater world. 236

CHARLOTTE WHITLOCK / ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

/


/

Figure 17:

/

100

M/03_S

101

/

105

237


/

/

/ DIDACTIC COUNTERPARTS: THE PARALLEL PRACTICE OF PAINTING AND ARCHITECTURE Painting and Architecture embody a corresponding degree of intention and process, from conception to realization; furthermore there is an active and complimentary practice as well as a shared history of critical similarities between each. Neither Painting nor Architecture is superior to the other; they should instead enlighten and inspire as compliments. These models of intention share principles that can define a shared set of cognitive skills. Therefore, Painting and Architecture should be seen as both analogous and iterative. Despite the intimacy between painting and architecture, there is little analysis covering their parallel practice. The objective of this course is to engage in a simultaneous investigation to reify their analogous process and to test the possibility of cross-referencing the criteria of evaluation of both. 238

CHRIS CAMPBELL / ERIC SAUDA + MICHAEL SWISHER


/

M/03_S

/

/

239


/

M/03_S

/ THE NARRATIVE DIMENSION: A METHODOLOGY for ICORPORATING WRITING EXERCISES INTO THE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PROCESS The thesis explores the integration of creative writing exercises into the architectural design process. The preliminary research for the project focused on a recent historical moment in which narrative became a platform for challenging the established conventions of architectural representation. Spanning from the mid-1970s to the late 1980s, the thesis dissects three architectural projects—Bernard Tschumi’s Manhattan Transcripts, John Hejduk’s Lancaster/Hanover Masque, and Lars Lerup’s Love/House— that use narrative texts to explore the interconnected relationships between architectural form, cultural meaning, and human interaction. Building on this analysis, two design projects are presented: a wedding ceremony and a pottery studio. Above all else, the thesis attempts to transform the process of design by pairing various creative writing techniques with traditional means of architectural investigation. In the end, the thesis does not present a building as its resulting product, but a structured methodology for design. The craft of this methodology is explicitly addressed in the form of a syllabus for the pottery studio. The syllabus defines three distinct paths for the design project, each consisting of architectural and literary assignments that address site analysis, program analysis, design exploration, design refinement and design presentation. Finally, the body of work is used to develop a set of conclusions regarding the nature of designing an architectural methodology, particularly the degree of specificity and constraint needed to create a productive assignment. 240

ZAC PORTER / ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

/


/

/

/

241


/

SENSING SITE: EXPANDING SITE ANALYSIS WITH CONDITIONS OF EXPERIENCE AND TIME Architecture occurs on a site. In architecture, descriptions of site may be limited to the simplest outline of a property or may be expanded into complex conditions of layering. This thesis relies on the understanding that a site is more than a static set of abstractions, but an infinitely complex set of processes that can be useful for design. These processes on site may be historical, social, natural, legal, or cultural. However, this thesis focuses on human perception and the senses; it is about diagramming an empirical understanding of a site over time. The question of this thesis is: Is it possible for conventional methods of site analysis to be expanded to investigate site issues experientially on a human scale and over time? This thesis uses Edward White’s method from his book, Site Analysis, as a baseline for conventional site analysis methods. The research then extends his ‘prototypical site issue’ list to develop a corpus of diagrams that represent site conditions which are experienced first-hand on a human scale and over time. Issues of diagramming, communicable graphics, perception, and dissemination are major points in this thesis. The thesis is split in two parts: Sensing Site [Semester 2] and Site as a Function of Natural Recurrences [Semester 1]. The first semester involves broad questions of site, land, landscape, and time. The second semester is a distillation of the first, with a specific focus on human scale, time based, experiential site analysis. Within the second semester, there are three major sections: 1. An execution of Edward White’s site analysis method, 2. A human-scale, time based, experiential site analysis, and 3. A field guide, using the work from the previous two sections to produce a guide for design students to execute an experiential, human-scale, timebased site analysis. 242

SAM BUELL / SAUDA + WEST + DAVIS II + J.SHIELDS + FRAKES

/ M/03_S

334

‘Interruption’ design: Ideas: • Specialized screen structures in a watershed to modify the detritus collection. • Creation of new leaf collectors in a watershed, contrasting the natural actions of collection with artificial mimicry.

/


/

/

/

243


/

258

/

FIELDING SACRED GROUND The intention of Fielding Sacred Ground is to introduce formal operations in order to choreograph the experience among existing and proposed objects within an existing field condition so that the user may be aware of deliberate relationships between objects. Core elements of the program are the chapel, columbarium and crematorium. This methodology explores architecture as an arrangement of objects. These relationships are arranged and recognized across all scales of the project. It is the acknowledgement of these correlations through specific activities and experiences that define the success of this investigation. Those experiences range from the ritual of burial to perhaps the less meaningful occupation of a neighboring resident traversing the grounds. Fielding Sacred Ground is a formalist antidote to the modern practice that form follows function. Rather than using program to generate form, program is merely a means to evaluate formal explorations. Any inherent meaning of the program adopted by the architecture was not deliberate. The primary objective of this study was to generate an architectural intervention based on objectobject relationships among built form, site, and existing context. 244

WILL ALLEN / ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

259

/ 265

264


/

/

261

M/03_S

260

/

245


Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

M/03_S

/

193

197

238

Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

239

Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

ARCHITECTURAL INTERVENTIONS: TECTONIC RESPONSE TO BUILT CONTEXTUAL CONDITIONS

/

This thesis aims to question the role of the existing built context when a design intervention is prompted to intervene into existing buildings. Out of this larger thesis question comes a secondary question which asks how can one intentionally articulate the tectonic moments between intervening and existing elements in such design interventions. Using a site in Belmont, NC, a series of design investigations were undertaken in order to explore these two primary questions. The first investigation focused on documenting the existing built conditions found within the Belmont site. At this point in the discourse, the role that archeology plays in generating a design response was the primary question. A secondary question asks whether an intervention has the capacity to emerge or be drawn out from a site through a thorough understanding of a built site. The second investigation questioned whether or not program could be used as a way to evaluate one intervention response over another. To begin investigating the role of program in the design intervention, two character types were developed. The intent was to test whether or not attributes found within a program definition could initiate a dialogue between program and site. In the third investigation, three bridge designs aimed to question how the introduction of a new spatial relationship into the site impacts the development of the detailing of the bridge as it meets the floor levels of the existing built site. In the last investigation, two clearly stated bridge design prompts were developed that provide a clear declaration of intent towards the existing built context. The intent in this final phase of the thesis was to develop a method which clearly articulates the tectonic conditions between existing and intervening elements in a design intervention.

/

Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

191

195

246

TOMMY BARRY / ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER


/

                 

250 226

227

/

Thomas J Barry -­ Thesis Document

/

251

247


/

/ THE PERVASIVE PATTERN: A BIOMIMETIC DESIGN METHODOLOGY It would seem that since humanity first began building settlements and creating tools that it has been marching tenaciously upon a path of progress. This thesis considers biomimicry as one such progressive trend, and aims to examine its validity and relevance, particularly as it relates to architecture. Establishment of validity will be accomplished through examination of its historical context, definition of its typologies and methodologies, taxonomic categorization of its terminology, a discussion of its contemporary portrayal, provision of a series of illustrative examples to augment the observations offered, and experimentation through implementation of a biomimetic design methodology. These observations, characterizations, experiments, and conclusions, are discussed through conceptual consideration of how “second nature” and humanities innate biophilic tendencies have given rise to biomimetic architectural methodologies and through carefully articulated examination of the point and mode of methodological translation of biological principles. Upon humanities tenacious path of progress there exists a paradoxical junction between architecture and biomimicry. Janine Benyus states that, “living things have done everything we want to do.” However, while this dogmatic tenet of the movement is based on sound logic it is not entirely inclusive with regard to architecture. Since, as established through this discourse, nature does not create buildings, nor does it create with intent. Therefore the implications of biomimetic principles to architecture necessitate methodological application that requires analysis and consideration beyond that required for other disciplines. 248

WYNN BUZZELL / CHRIS BEORKREM + KELLY CARLSON-REDDIG + ERIC SAUDA

/


methodological M/03_S

/

functional biomimicry

biomimicry

Architecture

Biology

biological analogy

spiritual biomimicry

aesthetic biomimicry

DETAIL ct u

Analysis

Honey Honey comb Comb

o

3

ct u o

al

Honey/

1o

fu

r e -

al in ncto

1

geo-

2

Analysis

Step 2

stru

o

fu n

/

parametric adapta-

3

o

r al

Honey Honey comb Comb

literal

2

Sample Methodology

Detail Analysis

fu

r e -

1o

ction

Step 2

Honey/

al in ncto

o

al

geo-

2

stru

r al

Biological Pattern

ction

Step 1

fu n

SAMPLE

metaphorical

o

3

Honey Honey comb Comb

0

literal

parametric adapta-

reproduction

structure storage

Step 2a

S

F

F

S

F P

P

P

S

F

Translation

Translation

Translation

Step 3

Translation

Translation

Translation

P

quantum mechanics

rules

These “rules� arise due to atomic scaled geometries and electromagnetic properties.

geo.

additive

function

Step 2b

Atomic scaled rules give rise to the geometries and their respective sets of constraints at the molecular level, cellular level, etc.

Exterior Enantiomers

Geometric Dimers

anomoly

Branched Centroid conformations

/

Interior Enantiomers

S

P

Geometric Polymers

GEOMETRIC TRANSLATION

Biomimetic design

S

P

F

Translation

METHODOLOGY

Translation

geo.

XPERIMENTATION

METHODOLOGY

rules

Step 2b

S

F

Step 2a

Translation

249


/

Station 1: Section

Station 1: Section

Section is oriented towards specific views inscribed by the conditions of Saint-Petersburg’s airport.

Demonstrates how travelers observe and enter the train through one of the thresholds of the station

Station 1: Set of Views Views above define the boundary of each threshold

Station 1: Section Demonstrates how train enters the ground via another threshold where the view of the trees transforms as the train passes them.

Station 1: Plan Demonstrates the orientation of the first station and its relation to the existing airport.

/

RETHINKING ARRIVAL TO SAINT-PETERSBURG, RUSSIA THROUGH THE LENS OF THRESHOLD AND PROMENADE This thesis attempts to rethink the existing arrival into Saint-Petersburg, Russia through the installation of a transit line. The challenge is to choreograph experience of arrival through the development of connection between the airport and the city that utilizes the language of promenade and threshold. Promenade and threshold are abstract terms that describe qualities of space. The threshold is a screen through which we pass, subtle at times and highly significant at others. It indicates physical distinction between the different spaces: inside/outside, public/private, air/land/ subterranean, etc. Threshold can be represented through series of constructed views, or moments of light juxtaposed with moments of darkness, or manipulated ground plane conditions. Thresholds are linked by promenade which establishes order of the spaces. Promenade can be described as a connector between constructed views, or as a concealed network of paths that link one environment to the other, or as an avenue between manipulated ground plane conditions.

/

Overall subway network of Saint-Petersburg

Proposed extension of the line and 3 stations.

250

ANASTASIA KRASNOSLOBODTSEVA / JOSÉ GÁMEZ + ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER


M/03_S

/

Station 2: Unfolded Section

Station 2: Unfolded Section

Promenade begins at the city side and leads the traveler into the environment of the memorial.

Promenade continues to reveal thresholds within the interior of the memorial

3. Threshold allows for closer encounter with memorial sculptures

3. Threshold allows for closer encounter with memorial sculptures

4. Promenade between events

1. Threshold allows for observation of the memorial with urban fabric in the background. 2. Promenade between events

7. Anticipating arrival of the train in urban setting

6. Threshold of ascending to the platform along the memorial wall.

5. Main circulation hall with WWII murals

7. Anticipating arrival of the train in urban setting

6. Threshold of ascending to the platform along the memorial wall.

5. Main circulation hall with WWII murals

4. Promenade between events

1. Threshold allows for observation of the memorial with urban fabric in the background. 2. Promenade between events

5 4 6

/

5

3

7

2 4 6 7

3 2 1

1

Station 2: Perspectives and Plan

Station 2: Perspectives and Plan

Set of perspectives above attempt to communicate what it would be like to experience this part of the promenade. Plan demonstrates where this portion of the section was cut.

Set of perspectives above attempt to communicate what it would be like to experience this part of the promenade. Plan demonstrates where this portion of the section was cut.

Station 2: Unfolded Section This part of the promenade connects interior environment of the memorial to the urban fabric.

/

8. Traveling on the train above urban fabric 8. Traveling on the train above urban fabric

Station 3: Section Section above demonstrates promenade and a set of thresholds experienced by pedestrians at this station.

8 8

Station 2: Perspectives and Plan Set of perspectives above show the string of experiences associated with this section. Plan demonstrates where this portion of the section was cut and the views orientation.

Station 3: Sequential Photos Photos above communicate a set of experiences that a pedestrian would encounter entering this station.

251


/

/ SOUND + SPACE: A CRITICAL DUALITY Sound and space combined form a critical duality at work in our everyday environment. Their relationship is one of complete dependence: no sound exists without space, and no inhabited space is without sound. Because of this reciprocity, our perceptions of sound and space are inextricably linked to one another. Our interaction with the aural environment aids in the sensing of spatial attributes, even when independent of visual information. Even in the context of a dark room, we are able to discern a portion of the physical properties of the space as a result of reverberations from objects, surfaces, and materials. In addition to the spatial cues that are gathered as a result of our interactions with sound and space, the aural environment influences our associations, memories, and overall experience. Our internal experience of the external world can be greatly altered by what we hear and the way we hear it. The relationship that can be formed between the acoustic environment and ourselves is a powerful one, helping to construct a reality that is responsible for the way we experience the world around us. Despite the power of our aural perception, we are often unaware of the auditory events that occur around us and are even more unaware of the manner in which such events manipulate our experience of space. It is almost as if we only begin to notice sound in our environments once it becomes excessive and unwanted, thus what begins as sound becomes perceived as noise. Although we have become a culture increasingly separated from the sensorial world around us, still preserved is the potential for our aural perceptions to alter the experiential identity of our environments. What has become necessary now is the re-establishment of the experiential identity of space and the re-examination of our perception of architectural space through the vehicle of auditory phenomena. Too often architects work in a world shaped by questions of representation, which serve to 252

LIZ RICHARDSON / ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

/


M/03_S

/

/

/

continually encourage our visually dominated society. This fosters a world of images and iconography, where design is reliant on materialized visual perceptions and seldom ever attempts to manipulate less tangible phenomena such as the immaterial qualities of sound. This work seeks to negotiate this disparity between intangible and tangible conditions in both art and architecture, to counteract the dominance of visual stimuli in our environments, and to promote the use of sonic effects in the shaping of architectural space. The work began with an exercise in the design+fabrication of a wearable device intended to manipulate existing anatomical auditory conditions, which in turn directly manipulates one’s experience of the space in which the devices are worn. The intention of subsequent phases of the investigation focused on implementing those lessons learned from the device testing and fabrication – in the form of an installation that serves to condense the sonic qualities of the surrounding urban environment in which the piece is sited. This intervention provides an experience of sensorial clarity that gives prominence to auditory cues as a way of forming one’s experience of architectural space and the larger context of the urban sonic milieu. The finalized installation piece is a dual-skinned structure of folded sheet steel [used for its inherent resonance] in between which are a series of listening tubes, located and dimensioned in order to provide auditory access to out-lying sound sources. The resulting soundspace collapses the larger auditory environment so that it is able to be experienced from within the boundaries of the space, but more importantly the space itself articulates for all listeners, a distinct and particular awareness of the everyday aural environment. This work positions itself between addressing questions of representation and performance, contending with issues of materiality and fabrication while still addressing the performative power of auditory cues with regards to the making of architectural space. 253


/

TOWN CENTER (CONTINUED) Transit service Mixed-use

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CAMPUS

Connection with ReVenture Park Mixing industrial, commercial and residential uses Urban stream with Carolina Thread Trail

/

NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Connection with school Mixed-use Transit service

New Urbanism: Master Plan Miles 0.5

0

/ DIVERGENT METHODS: A THESIS TO RESOLVE DEBATE Two theories for how to go about environmentally sustainable urban design are New Urbanism and Landscape Urbanism. The general strategy of New Urbanism is to provide high-density development that becomes less intense further from the center of town or a transit stop. The compact form enables the preservation of more land and lessens the consumption of land and resources. Landscape 254

LINDSEY TROGDON / JOSÉ Gà MEZ + ERIC SAUDA

Urbanism primarily focuses upon natural processes in design and may then insert and integrate urban development into the landscape. Within urban design discourse, the theories disagree on the framework, process, and objective of sustainable urban design. This thesis is a vehicle to comprehend and assess both the complements and inherent conflicts between the theories.


MT. HOLLY CORRIDOR

/

REVENTURE PUBLIC FACE ADAPTIVE REUSE REVENTURE WATER FRONT PARK MIXED-USE

TRIBUTARY

SWATH ENHANCED LANDSCAPE NEAR CONNECTIVE BOULEVARD CATAWBA RIVER DISTRICT

/

Landscape Urbanism: Master Plan

Scale: 1.500 0

Miles 0.5

The design project consisted of a process of urban The two methods were filters for design submissions for design and densification initiated by both Landscape the ReVenture Park, Charlotte, North Carolina. The schemes Urbanism and New Urbanism principles. The schemes include illustrations to qualify each contender’s successes are expected to pilot discourse based the similarities and limitations. An assessment is carried out to determine and differences of both methods. Landscape the opportunities and constraints for both methods to Urbanism and New Urbanism provide positive determine a value system for sustainable urban design. agendas for community design. Instead of accepting irresolvable differences between Landscape Urbanism / and New Urbanism, how can we proactively exploit M/03_S both methods to guide multifaceted, sustainable urban design? 255


/

/

/

256

GRADUATE THESIS DEFENSE


/

M/03_S

/

/

257


S/oA MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN

/

/

The Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.) is a 12-month, 36-credit, threesemester (fall-spring-summer) program with an integrated 5-week summer travel-design immersion experience. The program focuses on cities and suburbs that are being reshaped by shifting demographics, global capital, information technology, and environmental sustainability. The M.U.D. Program is located in the University’s Center City Building in downtown Charlotte, adjacent to the city’s light rail line. Planned travel programs include cities in China and Europe. The Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.) program is an applied research and design degree. It is structured to prepare beginning and mid-career design and planning professionals to engage complex issues faced by contemporary towns and cities in America, particularly those postindustrial landscapes that are being reshaped by information technology, / global capital movements, rapidly shifting demographics, soaring urban and suburban growth, and new environmental challenges of sustainable development. The program takes the Charlotte metropolitan region as its laboratory while simultaneously examining issues of national and global import.  The Design+Society Research Center provides a point of contact for students to engage in funded research projects with the faculty. The premise of the M.U.D. program is that urban design is a fusion of physical design, policy and implementation strategies. It mediates the professional disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, planning, development and engineering that together structure our urban environment, and constructs collaborations between these specialists and the citizens affected by urban development. Urban design students are challenged to explore their role as active and informed participants in the multi-constituent process of transforming cities. The M.U.D. Program encourages students in the Master of Architecture Program to enhance their education with a dual degree – M.Arch./M.U.D.

/

258


/

/

/

THOMAS McCARTHY / JOSÉ GÁMEZ + ERIC SAUDA + GREG SNYDER

259


M/UD

/

F /

/ Urban Design Studio_G/Fundamentals 01 introduces students to fundamental concepts of urban design, as well as the acquisition and practice of a wide range of technical and graphic skills and media. This studio is intended to serve as an arena to explore and test issues focused around the making of public infrastructure, spatial definition by buildings, and the particular dynamics of civic and social spaces. It also introduces students to a number of historical and contemporary theories, models, and strategies of urban design, as well as the social, political, economic, and environmentally responsible principles of urban development.

/

260


/

/

/

261


/ /

/

/

262

MICHAEL LOVAGLIO / DAVID WALTERS


density

Diagrams & Precedents

Context Analysis

figure ground

7 5

green infrastructure

LEGEND 5 stories 4 stories 3 stories 2 stories

circulation

2

1 4

6

M/UD_F

8 LEGEND Mallard Creek Church Rd. University access roads Green streets Pedestrian paths Light rail

Bridging the Gap

3

Connecting UNCC campus and surrounding communities Concept Images/Precedents

1

Royal Crescent, Bath, England Royal Crescent, Bath, England

1

2

Royal Crescent, Bath, England

3

2

Green Amphitheater

Green Amphitheater

1/4 mile

5

Green Amphitheater

6

Pedestrian bridge idea

7 Green Amphitheater

Green Amphitheater

3

1

4

Green Amphitheater

4

8

5

6

Pedestrian bridge idea

Pedestrian bridge idea

1

2

1/2 mile LYNX Light Rail Station

1 1/4 mile

2

1

Sequence of Spaces

LYNX Light Rail Station

Context Analysis

Concept Images/Precedents Concept Images/Precedents

3

3

2 4

1/2 mile

800’

1000’

5

6

Aleksandra Borinsenko . Meghan Childers . MUD Studio . Professor David

/

4

2

on

ht

NX

Lig

tati

il S

Ra

LY

5

6

3 Ma

lla

rd

Cre

ek

Ch

urc

hR

d

/

5

der Rd

600’

5

exan

400’

6

y Al

200’

Mar

0’

LYNX Light Rail Line

N

SITE DETAILS BORISENKO + CHILDERS / DAVID WALTERS Townhomes - 394 units

Density

263


/

M/UD_F

/

/

264

ADAM MARTIN / DAVID WALTERS


/

/

/

265


/

/

/

M/UD_F

266

DAVIS + McKNIGHT + MARTIN / DAVID WALTERS


/

/

/

ALLEN DAVIS / DAVID WALTERS

267


M/UD

/

S

/

/

268

Urban Design Studio_G/Intermediate 02 focuses on urban open space, and the sustainable development of neighborhoods, districts, sites and spaces. Exploring design process issues as well as the continued acquisition and practice of a variety of technical and graphic skills are emphasized. Students are introduced to key concepts of land use planning and the understanding that urban open space is considered both a natural and cultural resource, holding deep ecological, recreational, and aesthetic value. The studio aims to integrate concepts and principles of open space, buildings, landscape, and infrastructure into a coherent, beautiful and well functioning whole.

/


/

/

/

269


/

/

M/UD_S

/

270

ALEX BORISENKO / JOSÉ GÁMEZ


/

/

/

CHRIS MURYN / JOSÉ GÁMEZ

271


/

/

M/UD_S

/

272

LINDSAY TROGDON / JOSÉ GÁMEZ


/

/

/

CHAD + TAYLOR + PAT / JOSÉ GÁMEZ

273


/

/

/

274

KEMENA + ALEX + NICK / JOSÉ GÁMEZ


/

M/UD_S

/

/

LINDSAY + TAYLOR + CHRIS / JOSÉ GÁMEZ

275


/

/

/

276

HANIN KHASRU / DEB RYAN


/

M/UD_S

/

/

BEATTIE + MARTIN + ROBERTSON + WHITLOCK / DEB RYAN

277


/

/

/

278

ADAM MARTIN / DEB RYAN


/

M/UD_S

/

/

LINDSAY SHELTON / DAVID WALTERS

279


/

/

/

280

KEIHLY MOORE / DAVID WALTERS


/

M/UD_S

/

/

281


/

/

/

282

NICOLE GOSS / DAVID WALTERS


/

M/UD_S

/

/

283


M/UD SU

/

Urban Design Studio_G/Advanced 03 focuses on site-specific projects and emphasizes methods of speculative research and design as well as technological and systemic issues of sustainability in urban environments. This course pursues a directed research and design agenda that vary according to faculty interest, expertise and/or project requirements. The final studio in the three-semester sequence is divided into two parts. The first part is a 5-week travel and design intensive study abroad experience held during Summer Session I. The second part is a 5-week intensive studio held on-campus, at the Center City Building, during Summer Session II, allowing students to develop their design initiated in Summer Session I. The rise of mass urbanization in China has recently served as the locus of study during the third semester of the M.U.D. Program. Students traveled to Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Nanjing and Suzhou as part of this study. /

284

/


/

/

/

285


/

/

/

286

MICHAEL LOVAGLIO / ZHONGJIE LIN


/

M/UD_Su

/

/

287


/

/

/

288

RON SESSOMS / ZHONGJIE LIN


/

M/UD_Su

/

/

2012 FINAL PROJECTS / ZHONGJIE LIN

289


/

/

/

M/UD_Su

290

P. R. CHINA / ZHONGJIE LIN


/

/

/

291


S/oA INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

292


293


S/oA SU

/

/

Increasingly, architects are called upon to operate in settings that require an understanding of different cultures and languages. The opportunity to study abroad provides future architects with a competitive advantage in an increasingly globalized milieu. The SoA has a strong tradition of providing students with a variety of study abroad options. Following one’s second year of study, students may enroll in a range of programs that are offered every summer. These programs are four to five weeks in length, and typically consist of a pair of three credit electives and history courses. Over the past four years, we have run programs in Rome, Italy, and Shanghai/Beijing, China. The School of Architecture also has a longstanding relationship with Brian Mackay-Lyons’ Ghost studio, an intensive two-week design-build workshop in Nova Scotia that takes place every June. The school also offers an opportunity for students to study abroad during the regular academic year. UNC Charlotte has several longstanding student exchange programs in England, The Netherlands, Mexico, Finland, Belgium, and Germany. Typically, these exchange programs allow two or three fourth year architecture students to study abroad during the spring semester, with extensive possibilities for personal travel and research.

/

294


/

/

/

LANDON ROBINSON / GREG SNYDER

295


/

/

/

296

GROUP DRAWINGS / ROME / JEFF BALMER + CHRIS BEORKREM


/

/

/

297


/

/

/

298

GROUP DRAWINGS / ROME / JEFF BALMER + CHRIS BEORKREM


/

/

/

299


/

/

/

300

FIGURE and GROUND on the IBERIAN PENINSULA / GREG SNYDER


/

/

/

301


/

/

/

302

CHRIS CAMPBELL / FIGURE and GROUND on the IBERIAN PENINSULA / GREG SNYDER


/

/

/

303


S/oA

/

/

STORRS HALL /

304


/

/

/

305


S/oA

/

STORRS HALL

/

The School of Architecture is located in its own building, Storrs Hall, designed by Charles Gwathmey of Gwathmey Siegel Associates in New York. The /building houses design studios, classrooms and seminar rooms, computer labs, student lounges, an exhibition gallery, wood and metal labs, a digital fabrication lab, a library, audiovisual resources, a three-hundred-seat auditorium, a one-hundred-seat lecture hall, and staff and faculty offices.

/

306


/

/

/

307


/

/

/

308

THOMAS I. STORRS HALL / GWATHMEY SIEGEL ASSOCIATES, NYC


/

/

/

309


/

/

/

310

COMPUTER LABS AND PRINT LAB


/

/

/

DIGITAL ARTS CENTER / DIGITAL DESIGN COLLABORATIVE

311


/

/

/

M/UD

312

CHARLES C. HEIGHT ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY


/

/

/

313


/

/

/

314

WOOD LAB / RICH PREISS


/

/

/

315


/

/

/

316

WOOD LAB / RICH PREISS


/

/

/

317


/

/

/

318

WOOD LAB / RICH PREISS


/

/

/

319


/

/

/

320

WOOD LAB / RICH PREISS


/

/

/

321


/

/

/

322

MEGAN McGUINN / RICH PREISS


/

/

/

RYAN SHABAN / RICH PREISS

323


/

/

/

324

METAL LAB / RICH PREISS + RYAN BUYSSENS


/

/

/

325


/

/

/

326

METAL LAB / RICH PREISS + RYAN BUYSSENS


/

/

/

327


/

/

/

328

LIZ RICHARDSON / GREG SNYDER + NICK AULT


/

/

/

DeSIMINI + POLYAKOV + McGREGOR / CHRIS BEORKREM + RYAN BUYSSENS

329


/

/

/

330

DIGITAL FABRICATIONS LAB / RYAN BUYSSENS


/

/

/

331


/

/

/

332

DIGITAL FABRICATIONS LAB / RYAN BUYSSENS


/

/

/

LANDON ROBINSON / NICK AULT

333


/

/

/

334

CARSON RUSSELL / RYAN BUYSSENS


/

/

/

RYAN BARKES / NICK AULT

335


/

/

/

336

DAYLIGHTING and ENERGY PERFORMANCE LAB / DALE BRENTRUP


/

/

/

337


/

/

/

338

CEVALLOS + J.CHAPPELL + T.CHAPPELL + HEWITT + MARTINEZ + MILLER / DALE BRENTRUP + DAVID THADDEUS


/

/

/

DAYLIGHTING and ENERGY PERFORMANCE LAB / DALE BRENTRUP

339


/

/

/

340

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S FIRST YEAR FOR LIFE


/

/

/

341


/

/

/

342

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S FIRST YEAR FOR LIFE


/

/

/

343


/

/

/

344

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S FIRST YEAR FOR LIFE


/

/

/

345


/

/

/

346

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S 9 IDEAS FOR LONG FARM


/

/

/

347


/

/

/

348

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S 9 IDEAS FOR LONG FARM


/

/

/

349


/

/

/

350

STORRS GALLERY / GREG SNYDER’S 9 IDEAS FOR LONG FARM


/

/

/

351


/ / /

/ /

/ /

/

/

352

352

/

SoA Prospectus  

SoA Prospectus (Graduate Edition)

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you