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Run Wild | Forest Health

| hike of the month

SEPTEMBER 2018 // FREE

THE INLAND NW GUIDE TO OUTDOOR ADVENTURE, TRAVEL AND THE OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE

Road Trip: Craters of the Moon The Dirt on Gravel Bikes FAll Day Hikes

Bikes & Art:

Biking First Friday Last PAge: Cougar Encounter on Mount Spokane Hiking With Kids

Spokane Convention Center

February

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The most inspiring moments come through simple and unexpected discoveries—like hiking in Glacier National Park, just a 25 mile drive from Whitefish, Montana. Photo Š Noah Couser

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CONTENTS

FEATURES

20 | A Few Favorite Fall Hikes 22 | Outdoor Adventure in the Age of Climate Change

Seating

CrazyCreek.com

20 DEPARTMENTS

#sitthere

Did your ride end like this?

11 | Spotlight 12 | Biking 13 | Hiking 16 | Provisions 18 | Health & Fitness 26 | Nature 27 | Urban Outdoors

COLUMNS 14 | Out There Kids

26

17 | Eatology

IN EVERY ISSUE

21 | Run Wild

7

| Intro

8

| Dispatches

10 | Hike of the Month 28 | Outdoor Calendar

Start the road to recovery by hiring an experienced bicycle accident attorney who will ďŹ ght the insurance companies for you so you can focus on getting back on your bike.

30 | Last Page

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THE NUMBER ONE THING TO KEEP IN MIND IS THAT KIDS HAVE DIFFERENT OBJECTIVES AND GOALS THAN ADULTS.

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SEPTEMBER 2018 WWW.OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM

PUBLISHERS

Shallan & Derrick Knowles EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Derrick Knowles MANAGING EDITOR

Summer Hess ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Jon Jonckers SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR

Amy Silbernagel McCaffree DIGITAL EDITORS

Siobhan Ebel Lisa Laughlin COPY EDITOR

Andrew Butler CONTRIBUTORS

Crystal Atamian S. Michal Bennett David Camp Siobhan Ebel Adam Gebauer Henry Hagood Sarah Hauge Summer Hess Jon Jonckers Derrick Knowles Shallan Knowles Lisa Laughlin Amy S. McCaffree Ammi Midstokke Liv Stecker Aaron Theisen Kit Vogel Holly Weiler Woods Wheatcroft Wil Wheaton

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Mailing Address: PO Box #5 Spokane, WA 99210 www.outthereoutdoors.com, 509 / 822 / 0123 Out There Outdoors is published 10 times a year by Out There Monthly, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. ©Copyright 2018 Out There Monthly, LLC. The views expressed in this magazine reflect those of the writers and advertisers and not necessarily Out There Monthly, LLC.

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Disclaimer: Many of the activities depicted in this magazine carry a significant risk of personal injury or death. Rock climbing, river rafting, snow sports, kayaking, cycling, canoeing and backcountry activities are inherently dangerous. The owners and contributors to Out There Monthly do not recommend that anyone participate in these activities unless they are expertsor seek qualified professional instruction and/or guidance, and are knowledgeable about the risks, and are personally willing to assume all responsibility associated with those risks.

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ON THE COVER: HIKING IN THE SMOKE-FILLED SKIES.

Photo: Aaron Theisen

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Intro: Climate, Fires, & Smoke-filled Skies REMEMBER WHEN it use to rain during the hot summer months? If you have been here a while, then you can recall a wetter era when not just the occasional mud sprinkle but fullon thunderous downpours used to grace our summer skies from time to time. Yet in recent years, the trend has been towards recordbreaking temps, long stretches without rain, and a dramatic increase in the number of days with smoke-filled skies. These unwelcome changes should be worrisome for all of us, not just for those who prefer less scorching temps and cleaner air to pursue our outdoor passions and daily, sanity-producing outdoor rituals, whether it’s a walk down by the river, backyard gardening, or taking the kids to the

playground. The increased wildfires, smoke, and drier conditions in particular mean more people with health conditions are struggling just to breathe, and our forests, wildlife, and small tourism and outdoor recreation businesses are suffering. In this issue, first-time Out There contributor David Camp takes a look at the link between our warming climate and the forest fires and accompanying smoke that have been occupying more of our precious summer days, as well as a changing climate’s role in affecting the length and quality of our winters, in his feature “Outdoor Adventure in the Age of Climate Change” on page 22. “Science says this may well be the new nor-

mal, until it gets smokier still,” says Camp. Some of the science Camp references to reach this conclusion includes the research of scientists like Anthony Westerling, a Professor of Environmental Engineering at University of California, Merced, who has led teams of researchers tracking the growth of western wildfires over decades. Westerling and many others conclude that a warming climate is drying out western U.S. forests and leading to more large wildfires and a longer wildfire season. Maybe a busy life has kept you from thinking too much about climate change or perhaps you are a closet skeptic that human activities are influencing our planet’s complex climatic

processes on such a grand scale. No matter what you think about Al Gore, which news network you prefer, or how you vote, you owe it to yourself and future generations to read this article or others like it. If you need more convincing, do your own research beyond the politicized narratives that often pollute objective debate about climate change. Then consider taking some of the personal actions Camp suggests we can all do to make a small but significant impact on the threats we face from a warming planet. // DERRICK KNOWLES, PUBLISHER

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Dispatches RACHEL BUCKLIN SETS RECORD FOR 200-MILE TRAIL RACE THE ELEVATION GAINS, the remoteness, the

views, the distance traveled, the time out there— the Bigfoot 200-mile trail run might be the most epic trail race in North America. Rachel Bucklin, a Spokane Swift runner, never intended to set a women’s course record this year, but she never lost hope either. The race starts at Mount St. Helens and travels point-to-point to Mount Adams, then north to the small town of Randle, Wash. The Bigfoot 200 is the first ever point-to-point 200mile race in the United States, and it’s among the toughest races in the world. “I had been wanting to attempt a 200-miler for a while now, and Bigfoot was in Washington and on trails I hadn’t explored yet. I thought that would be an amaz-

ing way to see that part of the Washington,” says Bucklin. “I also knew it was difficult and beautiful, so I was sold.” Ultimately, with a race this long, it’s tough to appreciate the sheer volume of miles, elevation, and terrain. Bucklin reports, “I usually don’t go into a race knowing a course record, but it was my top goal to finish within three days, which was close to the course record. I really was just thrilled to be finishing so I could sleep.” Bucklin finished the course in 68 hours, 31 minutes, and 52 seconds, covering nearly 206 miles with over 42,000 feet of elevation gain. She finished 6th overall in a field of 150 competitors. In the world of endurance sports, this is a major victory. (Jon Jonckers)

VALLEYFEST MULTISPORT DAY ENJOY A DAY full of outdoor events at Valleyfest

in Spokane Valley September 23. With a 5k, 10k, family bike ride, duathlon, and boat-bike-run triathlon, there’s an event for all athletic abilities and outdoor sport interests. All of the events showcase the Spokane River, Centennial Trail, and beautiful

Spokane Valley parks. Leading up to the multisport events on Valleyfest weekend, there will also be live performances, vendors, the Totfest event, a car show, the Step Up for Down Syndrome Walk, and a parade on Friday night. More info at Valleyfest.org. (OTO)

BIKE, HIKE, & BREW BASH AT SPIRIT LAKE IF YOU STILL HAVEN’T checked out the amazing Empire Trails mountain biking, hiking, and running trail system near Spirit Lake, Idaho, Saturday, September 8 marks the first Bike, Hike & Brew Bash, a benefit for the Empire Trails. This kick-off to the fall trail season will raise funds for Empire Trails amenities like a bike repair station, additional benches, and trail grooming equipment. The day starts at 7:30 a.m. at the Empire Trails trailhead with a trail run put on by Trail Maniacs, test rides on e-mountain bikes, and a nature walk and presentation about forest management with

an Inland Empire Paper Company representative. Or you can head out on your own to explore the trails. Starting at 11 a.m. and continuing all day at nearby Sedlmayers Resort on Spirit Lake there will be 40 different beers on tap and live music throughout the day by David Reed, Broken Mantle Band, and The Usual Suspects. Raffle prizes at the event include a new fat tire e-bike, wake board, portable bar, custom corn hole set, and other prizes. Parking is limited, but you can ride from town on your bike or catch a shuttle to Sedlmayers. For more info call 208-819-4370.

FALL FUN RUN IN NEWPORT, WASH. ON SEPTEMBER 15, run the Newport Autumn

Bloom 5k or 10k for a scenic fall treat that gives back to the community. Runners begin at TJ Kelly Park in historic downtown Newport, weaving through neighborhoods and tree-shaded areas before coming to the DJ-adorned finish line. This is a great fall event for walkers or families with kids and serious runners alike—the 10k is a Bloomsday Second Seed qualifier. Runners who register and finish under the required 10k times (39 minutes for men; 47 minutes for women) will receive a custom medal, certificate of achievement, and the Bloomsday qualification. All participants will enjoy the scenic Pend Oreille River as they cross a bridge along the course, taking in bald eagles and mountain views. There will be

free, professional race photos, long-sleeve tech shirts, notable finisher’s medals, and a new-thisyear Spirit of Autumn Bloom Award. With over 100 community volunteers and proceeds going to local organizations like Reach Out and Read and the Healthy Kids Snack Bag Program, you can crush your end-of-season race goals while doing good. Post-race, grab some old-fashioned soda or homemade ice cream from Owen’s Deli, get a microbrew and burger at Kelly’s Bar & Grill, and take a ride on the Scenic Pend Oreille River Train for a historical tour. “Like” Newport Hospital and Health Services on Facebook for more info, and register at Newporthospitalandhealth.org. Corporate and group discounts are available for 6+ participants. (Lisa Laughlin)

BIKE 4 HUNGER WHEEL SPORT BICYCLES and Chef Chad White

of Zona Blanca are partnering up for a charity bike ride benefiting Chefs Cycle and the No Kid Hungry campaign on September 12. Riders will head out from Wheel Sport South to 7 Mile and back through Kendall Yards and Riverfront Park, ending the 24-mile road ride at Zona Blanca for pork rib quesadillas, drinks from Steel Barrel Taproom, giveaways, and raffles. The cost is $35 and includes post ride food and drinks, with proceeds benefitting the No Kid Hungry

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campaign. Chefs Cycle is a fundraising endurance event that features award-winning celebrity chefs and members of the culinary community fighting hunger. At the end of September, Chef Chad White will be completing a three-day, 300mile ride in Charlottesville, Virginia, with Chefs Cycle to raise awareness and funds in support of the No Kid Hungry campaign that is working to end childhood hunger in America. Info at Wheelsportbikes.com. (OTO)


SPOK ANE RATED MOST AFFORDABLE OUTDOORSY CIT Y

WHILE MANY CONSIDER Boulder, Bend, or

Bozeman to be the most outdoorsy cities in America, Realtor.com recently released its rankings for the most affordable outdoorsy cities, and they named Spokane at the top of the list. Realtor.com factored the following criteria: bicycle-friendliness rating, per capita outdoor gear stores, number of campgrounds, per capita of conservation scientists and foresters (a sign of heavy park and public lands presence), num-

ber of National Parks in the state, and percentage of residents who live within a 10-minute walk of a park. According to Realtor.com, “The housing market in Spokane is packed with single-family homes with one- and two-car garages and with some trees on the property.” They also mentioned the local ski lift-ticket prices are very low compared to the national average. (Jon Jonckers)

RUN ALONG THE RIVER OF NO RETURN RIGGINS, IDAHO, four hours south of Spokane, is an incredible setting for a foot race. And it doesn’t hurt that the Riggins Salmon Run Saturday, September 8 takes place along the wild and free-flowing Salmon River (aka River of No Return) where runners can experience the rugged terrain without the intense training of a trail run. The town of Riggins is a friendly, communitycentered place, which made the creation of this race possible; Riggins is run on volunteers, say event organizers, and this race is no exception. The Salmon River road is training grounds for race director Mariah Crump and many other local runners who are happy to share the beauty of their backyard. “Hosting a family friendly, health-and-

wellness-centered event is such a blast! We love to see people out running and walking, cheering and supporting one another,” says Crump. The Riggins Salmon Run is a family-friendly event offering multiple distances including a kids’ fun run for children ages 3-6 years of age. The half marathon distance will kick off at 9 a.m. followed by the 10k start at 9:30, and a 10 start for the 5k. Runners will complete an out-and-back course, with a finish at Riggins City Park where runners and their families can enjoy music, food, and drinks. Finishers’ prizes will be given for each distance as well as Men’s and Women’s first prize awards. Register at Raceentry.com/races/rigginssalmon-run/2018/register. (OTO)

NEW BOOK CHRONICLES SPOKANE’S RUNNING SCENE PETER HAWKINS’ book “Varsity Seven” is a book

about running in the Inland Northwest and Spokane in particular, and Hawkins will be making an appearance at Fleet Feet Sports Spokane in Kendall Yards on September 8 from 1-3 p.m. “Varsity Seven” chronicles Spokane’s running scene, including the Spokane region’s rich history of pumping out accomplished cross-country run-

Harvest Festival September 22-23 brings one-ofa-kind arts and crafts, locally-grown produce, food vendors, live music, and performances and demonstrations that celebrate the bounty of fall to Pend Oreille County. Shop and support the local cottage industry of the Pend Oreille region. Held six miles north of Newport, Washington, this fun, family-friendly, free event is a great way to spend a fall weekend outdoors. Check out the vendor booths, take in the performances, and dance to live music under the skies and, later on, stars of the rolling countryside. Fifty lucky attendees will

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ners, from 1947 to today. “Varsity Seven” is also a journey of the Hawkins family—from 1993 to 2010, the family’s seven children were a part of Spokane’s cross-country running community during one of the most competitive eras and in one of the most competitive leagues in the country. Details at Fleetfeetspokane.com.

HARVEST FESTIVAL TIME IN PEND OREILLE COUNTY FOR THE THIRD YEAR in a row, the Pend Oreille

MIMOSAS 8-10 AM S WEEKEND

have the opportunity to try their hand at creating a mug out of clay after a live demonstration by Pritchett Pottery. This outdoor Festival takes place at the Indian Creek Community Forest (1802 Indian Creek Road, Newport, Wash.). A former horse ranch, the forest now houses the Kalispel Tribe’s native tree nursery and several other developing projects to benefit the community. Guided tours will be available over the weekend. Festival hours are 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sept. 22 and 10 a.m.4p.m. on Sept. 23. Learn more on Facebook (Pend Oreille Harvest Festival 2018) or online at Porta.us. (OTO)

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FUND RUN BENEFITS THOSE IN NEED THE NEW HOPE FUND RUN Saturday October 6 is a free 5K (3.1 mile) run or walk on a relativelyflat course that loops through the Summerwood neighborhood on Spokane’s northside. The event is sponsored by the Colbert Presbyterian Church outreach committee that will be collecting donations at the event that go directly to the New Hope Resource Center’s efforts to help those in need in surrounding communities. The New Hope Resource Center is a social service organization supported by local churches in north Spokane County and community contributions. Their goal is to serve basic human needs for those who are struggling in the communities of Riverside, Elk, Chattaroy,

Colbert and Mead by providing gasoline vouchers, emergency assistance with utility bills and rent, work supplies, car parts or repair assistance, chore assistance or transportation for seniors and disabled persons, free clothing, toiletries, household items, school supplies, and more. There is no advanced registration for the run/walk that starts at 9 a.m. at the New Hope Resource Center (4211 E. Colbert Rd.), but participants should arrive early to sign a waiver and receive a race number. Learn more about the New Hope Resource Center at Newhoperesource.org or the Fund Run at Newhopefundrun.wpengine.com. (OTO)

SEPTEMBER 2018 / OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM

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HikeOfTheMonth THE MOLLIES

Priest Lake, Idaho // By Holly Weiler

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THE DIFFICULT PARTS ARE JUST PART OF THE ADVENTURE. PHOTO: HOLLY WEILER

THE MOST DIFFICULT PART of this hike is getting to the trailhead, as the Forest Service (FS) road to the beginning of the trail is especially rough. Large swales to improve water run-off might prove impossible for all but high-clearance 4WD vehicles, so consider parking lower on the access road and hiking or utilizing a mountain bike to gain the final few miles to the trailhead. If you ride, be sure to pack a lock to chain the bike near the trailhead, as the trail to Mollies Lake and the Mollies is not suitable for cycling. The second most difficult aspect of this hike is negotiating the poorly maintained trail. The views from the top will be worth the effort, but at the beginning, lush vegetation obscures the trail tread on the way to the lake. Fortunately, the trail is short, and a September visit promises the reward of ripe huckleberries along the route, sweetening the deal enough to make beating back the bushes worth the extra effort. At approximately the one-mile mark, the trail reaches a junction with Mollies Lake to the right, and the summit path to the left. The lake is marshy, so the recommended route is to bear left and continue to the summit for the superb views. The trail to the top is braided and unmarked, so pick a route as best as possible, continuing ever upwards to the high point on the ridge. At the summit, turn around and take a moment to admire the view of Priest Lake to the south. To the west, the Shedroof Divide is visible just across the border in Washington. The Mollies was the site of an L-4 fire lookout tower from 1934 until 1949. The remains of the tower were destroyed in 1968, leaving just the concrete footings as a good place to sit and admire the view. This is the turn-around point for the hike, although strong hikers with scrambling skills may want to continue northwest

on the ridge toward Phoebe’s Tip. The hike is short enough to make it an excellent day trip, although heavy on the required drive time for anyone making it round-trip in a day. With a few backpack campsite options along the route, and excellent car camping opportunities at nearby Priest Lake, this trip can also easily be extended into an overnight. RT DISTANCE: 3.9 miles with 1,800 feet of eleva-

tion gain

RATING: Difficult MAP: USGS Caribou Creek, Grass Mountain GETTING THERE: From Priest River, Idaho, travel

north on Highway 57 toward Priest Lake. Turn right on the Dickensheet Highway toward Coolin, then right on Cavanaugh Bay Road to East Shore Road. Continue along Priest Lake to the northern end of the lake. Continue on East Shore Road once it passes Lions Head Campground and leaves the northern end of the lake and follows Caribou Creek. Turn north on FS 46, continuing 1.7 miles to the narrow road on the right that marks a small dispersed campsite and the trailhead for the Mollies. Park in the wide spot along the road.

GIVE BACK TO YOUR TRAILS: Participate in the

National Public Lands Day by joining a trail work party with Washington Trails Association and the Bureau of Land Management on September 29. // Holly Weiler is a hiker, backpacker, trail runner, and skier. She writes the Hike of the Month column for every issue of Out There.


Spotlight LEGACY OF DESTRUCTION

Who Does Vandalism on Public Land Really Hurt? // By Liv Stecker

BROKEN WIDOWS. // PHOTO COURTESY OF THE US FOREST SERVICE

IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT. The group

huddled around a smoking fire to ward off the encroaching cold that seeped in through the cracks in the rustic cabin. Major drafts had been stopped up by signs that the wanderers had torn down to block windows and crevices. Intent upon survival, the campers pushed toward the heat that generated from a fire burning directly on the cabin floor, waving smoke upward toward a hole they had cut into the primitive chimney. It makes sense, taking things apart in order to survive, doing irreparable damage to save a life. Except there were no lives in jeopardy and there was nothing to survive. A few miles down the road, warm beds, cheery restaurants, and cozy couches waited for the survivors to emerge from their experience in the “wild.” Right outside the cabin, their four-wheel drive SUVs and lifted pickup trucks sat parked all caddywampus on top of whatever features had once been placed there, designed for public enjoyment. The cabin was reconstructed painstakingly by public employees to model a historic homestead, meant for day use and free-of-charge for visitors to the Big Meadow Lake Campground on the Colville National Forest in northeast Washington. When the “survivors” left after Memorial Day weekend, a trail of empty beer cans and trash strewn in their wake; the cabin was nearly beyond salvaging, rendering countless volunteer hours of construction, repair, and maintenance work wasted. “The Big Meadow Lake recreation area provides a ton of amenities for free,” says Craig Newman, the staff officer for the Colville National Forest, the entity responsible for management of the land around Big Meadow Lake. “Free campground, day use, boat ramp, fishing dock, trails (some paved), wildlife observation tower, toilets, and the day-use cabin. Some of these features were envisioned and constructed through community partnerships,” says Newman. Right now the amenities at Big Meadow Lake are maintained and managed using taxpayer dollars as opposed to user fees. “When these sites are damaged or just need regular maintenance, it comes out of all of our (taxpayer’s) wallets, whether we use the sites or not.” If the cabin can be repaired, which remains in question, it will come at the greatest expense to the local camper, hiker, and hunter— the taxpayer. This is the consequence that reckless

campers and vandals inflict on the people with whom they share the land. North of Big Meadow Lake near the Canadian border, the recently-restored Salmo Lookout tower northeast of Sullivan Lake also had its shutters and windows destroyed by vandals. “Our crews had just done a restoration last year that cost $17,000,” says Colville National Forest law enforcement officer Will Markwardt. “The bid for repairs now is $11,300.” There were plans for the historic tower to be open in the near future for overnight camping rentals, an inexpensive way for visitors to enjoy the history and scenery of the area while generating some revenue for the operation and maintenance of the lookout. Those plans have been pushed back thanks to two suspects, whom the Forest Service plans to charge with a felony. All of the damages sustained on Forest Service lands and property are made worse by the fact that the funds that are needed to complete repairs are dwindling. “The Forest’s allocated budget for Recreation, Heritage, and Wilderness program management has decreased in the last 5 years from about $800,000 to around $300,000. Similarly, the Forest’s budget for trail maintenance and operations has declined in the last 5 years from the $300,000500,000 range to around $100,000,” adds Newman. At the end of the day, when visitors to the Colville National Forest, or any other public lands, leave a trail of destruction behind them, it’s the rest of us who foot the bill. And it’s our taxpayer money that reckless visitors are wasting on a few moments of ill-advised activity. National Forest lands are ours. The resources belong to every taxpayer, and the damages that they endure are inflicted upon all of us who seek to enjoy them and gain productive use from them. Vandalism sends no message to “The Man” or big government. It punishes the people who live and travel through the precious wild areas that belong to all of us. // Liv Stecker is a freelance writer in northeast Washington who travels the country all summer as a wildland firefighter and across the world all winter as a wandering storyteller. She is an expert on beer, eating, and how not to do lots of things. You can learn from her mistakes at www.livstecker.com. SEPTEMBER 2018 / OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM

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Biking GRAVEL BIKES: One Ride to Rule Them All // By Kit Vogel

Downtown Spokane Urban in nature

Get outside at downtownspokane.org PHOTO: JUSTIN SHORT

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OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

GRAVEL BIKES have taken the cycling world by storm over the past few years. Gravel bikes look like road bikes but are built to ride on more than the road. Why have gravel bikes become so popular so fast? We went to the local gravel experts at Mojo Cyclery in Spokane Valley to find out why more and more cyclists are putting more gravel in their travel. Mojos’s short answer: adventure! According to owner Morgan Johnson, “Gravel bikes are the ultimate adventurist bike. Gravel bikes offer multitudinous riding adventures with minimal limitation. They also offer high versatility, which allows one bike to fill many needs. Millennials appear to be drawn to gravel bikes with their minimalistic (non-N+1) attitude.” Gravel grinder rides and races have become popular events in amateur cycling throughout the world. Gravel races take place on a mix of trails and back roads with some single track. Amateur gravel grinders draw large crowds and have become weekend events with food and live music. Like cyclocross, gravel grinder culture is actively emerging as cyclists avoid the busy roads in the concrete jungles. In comparison to road bikes, gravel bikes are built with a more relaxed geometry and longer wheelbase that creates a more supple ride. Gravel bikes allow for wider tire options with lower pressure tires that maintain speed on pavement while increasing speed and traction for off-road adventures. Gearing on gravel bikes creates a wide range of options, allowing for easier ascents when compared to a typical road bike. In addition, fenders are easy to place for those messy rides. (Keep your friends. Use fenders.) Many mountain bikers are drawn to gravel bikes due to their versatility on terrain. Per Josh Hess, Mojo’s right-hand man, “Gravel bikes have a comfort geometry built for the cross country longhaul, minus the full suspension of mountain bikes.

Mountain bikes are built to absorb shock, descend, and roll over obstacles. Gearing for mountain bikes has a “one-by” (single in front and 9 to 11 gears in back) whereas gravel bikes typically have a “twoby” (two bigger gears in front with 9-11 gears in back); however, more gravel bikes are coming into the market that are one-by. Two-by gearing is more versatile for both on and off-road riding.” Mountain bike bottom brackets also tend to be higher to tackle big rocks and dips on their larger 27.5 and 29-inch wheels and longer wheelbase. Cyclocross bikes and gravel bikes are close cousins but appeal to vastly different riders. The geometry of cross bikes is a more aggressive crit-style with limited tire width options. Cross bikes are built for speed across trails. Frankly, gravel bikes are the chilled-out cooler cousin—the cousin likely to offer you a beer while riding across the trails. Both options are cool but with different personalities. There is no shortage of trails or dirt roads within the Inland Northwest. It’s easy to take a bike and cruise around easy Spokane trails at Riverside State Park, Beacon Hill, and High Drive. The most important things are to have fun and be safe! Gravel grinder races in Cle Elum and Leavenworth are welcoming environments for the whole family to enjoy and test their skills. The cycling world has always said that right number of bikes is N+1. However, the gravel bike has challenged that long-held belief. Whether you like road, trail, mountain or just cruising, gravel bikes are worth a look. Sometimes, the best way to see and feel the earth is on the dirt. Maybe a gravel grinder is in your future! Per Johnson, “The gravel bike is the One Bike to rule them all!”// Kit Vogel, PT, DPT, MS is an avid cyclist (former Cat 2 track racer), hiker, and climber with a newfound love of downhill skiing. She wrote about eliminating pain with bike fitting in the May issue of Out There.


Hiking

LAVA TUBES GIVE AN IDEA OF THE VOLUME OF LAVA THAT ONCE RAN THROUGH THIS AREA. // PHOTO: CRYSTAL ATAMIAN

CRATERS OF THE MOON National Monument and Preserve is a geologist’s dream, and an ideal location to explore during the fall and spring months. The variety of lava formations in one place seems unmatched anywhere else in the world. There are lava tubes that you can hike through, like Indian Tunnel, where you can see the impressive width of the lava flows that created this harsh, intricately sculpted landscape. Located 175 miles east of Boise, Craters of the Moon has some of the best examples of open rift cracks in the world. You can also find examples of vents, fissures, lava bombs, tree molds (the imprint of trees incinerated by lava), cinder cones, and spatter cones. One spatter cone, aptly named the Snow Cone, holds snow that is visible from the top of the cone even on 100-degree days. The three lava fields that make up the monument came from a series of cracks collectively known as the Great Rift, which is the deepest rift crack on Earth. While summer temps can reach into the 100s, late September temps are downright pleasant. Average October temps are in the 60s, although if you are camping that late in the fall, be aware that nighttime temps can venture down into the 30s this time of year. Camping is available at the 51 firstcome first-serve sites at the north end of the monument. This is some of the most unique camping I have ever experienced. Most sites are settled into

nooks and plateaus on the lava rock and provide a surprising amount of privacy to commune with a landscape unlike any other. Only the north end of the monument is accessible by vehicle. There is a 7-mile loop drive that includes a huge variety of what the area has to offer: wildlife, wildflowers, lava formations, and caves. Our favorite stop is the Caves Trail. If exploring the caves, which I highly recommend you do, bring a headlamp and a sweatshirt. Before you go you’ll need to fill out a free cave permit at the visitor’s center. There are a variety of caves, all of which are worth exploring and accessible, even for younger visitors; my kids crawled through four of them with our help and supervision at ages 11 and 6. Indian Tunnel is the largest and most accessible. It started its life as a lava tube, but several cave-ins have given it a much more open feeling. It is the best way to witness the volcanic forces that sculpted this area. Dewdrop Cave is wide and open, providing the perfect stop for those new to rock scrambling and cave exploring. The entrance to Boy Scout Cave is a tighter squeeze but opens up once you are inside, and really gives the feeling of cave exploring. It was surreal to find that this cave harbors icicles year-round. Craters of the Moon has some exceptional stargazing. In the summer it’s hard to take advantage

of the nighttime beauty because of the late sunsets, but fall offers the perfect time to sit up and watch the Milky Way extend its arms across the entire sky. In fact, it’s among only 39 sites in the United States to be named an International Dark Sky Park. With only a small part of the monument open to vehicles, it’s easy to think this is not a prime hiking destination. That couldn’t be further from the truth. There are paved and unpaved trails within the monument, and more rugged hiking opportunities are available in the backcountry area. The eight shorter trails within the monument range from 0.05 to 1.8 miles in length. The one backcountry route is the Wilderness Trail, which follows part of the Great Rift and also brings you past cinder cones, fissures, and other volcanic features. Keep in mind all overnight backcountry hikes require registration with a ranger, and no drinking water is available in the backcountry. There is an entrance fee of $15 per vehicle. The visitor’s center and loop drive are located 18 miles southwest of Arco, Idaho. //

deep water, deep thinking, deep change.

ROAD TRIP: Southern Idaho’s Craters of the Moon // By Crystal Atamian

Crystal Atamian is a freelance writer and editor in Spokane. Her interest in geology goes back over 20 years when she took six different geology classes at UC Davis “just for fun.” Crystal wrote about installing solar panels on your home in the July issue.

SITES TO SEE ON THE WAY TO CRATERS OF THE MOON • Sacajawea Interpretive, Cultural, and Education Center. Located in Salmon, Idaho, this is a must-see for anyone interested in Sacajawea and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Admission in October and November is by appointment; call 208-756-1188. Be sure to head out back and walk the trails. • Discovery Hill and Wagonhammer Trails, both north of Salmon, offer a variety of trails for mountain bikers—from green to double black trails and fat biking in the winter. • Heading south on US 93, the area around Williams Lake offers hiking, mountain biking trails, and great birding opportunities. • South of Salmon is Gold Bug Hot Springs. It requires a 2.5 mile moderately strenuous hike to the hot springs, but it is well worth the effort. As you hike, look up at the mountain range and you’ll see a V-shaped cut in the ridge. The pools are roughly located at the point of the V. //

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KIDS +++

++++

SPONSORED BY

+

LOCAL GUIDEBOOKS HELP FAMILIES GET OUTSIDE // By Amy S. McCaffree WHEN EXPLORING THE OUTDOORS or

hiking with our children, “It’s easy for us to get frustrated,” says Harley McAllister, a father of four boys who lives in Spokane Valley. “We’re thinking, I don’t want to be sitting by this river and throwing sticks in it and watching leaf boats float by; I want to get to the thing we came to see.” But McAllister has learned that kids offer a unique perspective. “The number one thing to keep in mind is that kids have different objectives and goals than adults. We tend to think, we’re going to this iconic place in this amount of time to see this amazing thing. We can become way too focused on the destination,” he says. “But kids don’t work that way. If we want kids to enjoy and appreciate nature, we need to allow them to explore and discover [at their own pace]. We can’t put a timetable on that.” EXPLORING NATIONAL PARKS AS A FAMILY

McAllister knows this well because he and his wife, Abby, have spent an enviable amount of time exploring some of America’s most beloved national parks, and writing about some of those adventures for Out There. Also, what started as personal research for an extensive national parks tour in fall 2014—upon the family’s return to the U.S. after four years living and teaching in the Dominican Republic—turned into an “Adventuring with Kids” family guidebook series, published earlier this year by Mountaineers Books. So far, there are three books available in the series that cover Yellowstone, Glacier, and five of Utah’s national parks. Their Yosemite guidebook debuts spring 2019. Each book includes detailed information

for field-tested and approved hikes, campgrounds, and other activities that Harley and Abby experienced with their children, now ages 6-17. Their honest, candid advice is encouraging, and the suggested itineraries— with three, five, and sevenday plans—are especially valuable. “Your kids will have a lot more love of nature and fond memories of your trip if you do a few things well, rather than try to check off a bunch of activities,” says McAllister. 50 HIKES WITH KIDS

Another new family guidebook is “50 Hikes with Kids: Oregon and Washington,” by Wendy Gorton. It also functions as a science and activity guide that’s exceptionally user-friendly for both parents and children. Gorton, a science educator, includes a five-item scavenger hunt for each hike, with color pictures and explanations about each item, such as geologic features, landmarks, or animal and plant species. Because most of the hikes are in the western half of both Oregon and Washington, with only 10 hikes located in central and southwest Washington and northeast Oregon, this guidebook is best for those traveling to the Pacific Northwest coastal regions. KEEPING KIDS ENERGIZED—SNACKS & PACKS

Inspired for more of your own family travel adventures? Here are some additional tips from guidebook author Harley McAllister. •Take Regular Snack Breaks: “Snacks are a crucial element to doing these types of outdoor adventures with kids. With their little bodies, they don’t have the energy reserves like we do. Snacks make it fun and special, lift their spirits, and get

SEPTEMBER FAMILY & KID EVENTS SEPTEMBER 9: SpokeFest—includes a family-friendly, 9-mile biking route. SEPTEMBER 15: Global Kidical Massive—3-mile family bike ride along the Centennial Trail, starting at Kendall Yards; 1-3 p.m. Meet at Spark Central. SEPTEMBER 21-23: Valleyfest (Spokane Valley)—Family bike ride, kids’ Fishing at the Falls, “The Incredibles” outdoor movie, and TotFest. SEPTEMBER 30: National Public Lands Day—free admission to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge near Cheney. NOTE TO PARENTS AND EDUCATORS: The National Park Foundation’s “Every Kid in a Park” program provides free entrance passes for every 4th-grade child and his/her family, for one full year (expiring Aug. 31, regardless of registration date during school year). More details at Everykidinapark.gov.

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OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

them back on the trail,” he says. “We have a big bin of snacks, and at the beginning of each day, each kid gets to choose their own for the day.” McAllister recommends regular 5-minute snack breaks, with fun foods like chocolate-covered granola bars and electrolyte drinks. Though they generally eat healthy, indulging a bit on snacks for “high-activity days” helps to excite their kids. •Let Kids Carry Some Gear: As for daypacks, children can carry their own essentials, in addition to snacks, including a water bladder system or water bottle, fleece jacket, and waterproof rain jacket like the McAllister-recommended Froggtoggs. •Stay Clean: Because many national park campgrounds are rustic, McAllister recommends planning every three or four days to stay at one providing showers, or “mix it up and stay at a hotel every five days.” He says that “wet wipes are critical,” especially in bear country. Also, everyone should wear merino wool socks, he says, “to prevent blisters, regulate temperature, and keep feet from getting clammy while hiking.” •Reduce Stress: Always have a campsite reservation for your arrival day, then move to a firstcome/first-serve site deeper into a national park, as needed. This can get you closer to your destinations and hiking trailheads, as well as decrease daily time spent driving throughout the park. •Food Planning: Organize and pack food in bins, making it easy to move in and out of the car and to a campsite’s bear-proof storage box. To get an early start on the day, especially when driving to the next campsite, he recommends planning “a cold breakfast, such as muffins, fruit, or yogurt cups—something kids can eat in the car while we’re driving.” // Amy S. McCaffree is special section editor and the Out There Kids columnist. She wrote about backcountry adventuring with kids in the last issue.


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15


Provisions

(n.) food, drink, or equipment, especially for a journey.

SCHOOL LUNCH BOX. // PHOTO: S. MICHAL BENNETT

BAGS OF BUSHKA’S READY TO RE-HYDRATE. // PHOTO COURTESY OF BUSHKA’S KITCHEN.

APERITIF:

BACK TO SCHOOL MEAL TIPS

BAGS OF SNACKS. // PHOTO: SHALLAN KNOWLES

BY S. MICHAL BENNETT

REDUCING WASTE IN ON-THE-GO MEAL PREP I HAVE FOND LUNCH MEMORIES of my mom packing what we called “roaches,” or dates stuffed with cream cheese, as well as the best homemade peanut butter and jelly squares I have ever eaten. Ever. Now, it seems many people have less and less time to spend on making school lunches, and peanut butter with celery just doesn’t sound as appealing as school cafeteria pizza. However, making something healthy quickly doesn’t have to be as difficult as it might feel after a summer of throwing together fresh salads and barbequing in the backyard. Here are some simple tips for easy school lunches throughout the school year.

1. Buy bulk: Invest in reusable bulk bags and stock up on granola, trail mix, raisins, and other shelf-stable foods you can grab in a pinch. 2. Small bites: No bake nut butter bars are adaptable, nutritious, and fun to make with kids. Cut and freeze them in wax paper for an easy snack. 3. Creative cold: Freeze grapes and melon balls for a still-cold bite-sized tidbit. Repurpose plastic water bottles by filling them ¾ with water or juice, freezing, and then placing in the lunch bag to keep food cold. And it’s drinkable! 4. Leftovers: Plan dinners with cold, kid-friendly leftovers in mind, like zucchini pasta tossed with veggies and vinaigrette. When prepping for a casserole, chop extra broccoli and bag it for a future lunch. 5. Have a plan: Create a visual plan on the fridge or wall that lets kids see what’s coming and have input on their diet. Then leave room in the plan for treats once in a while. 16

OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

FRESH POWER BARS. // PHOTO: S. MICHAL BENNETT

POWER NO BAKE BARS

1 1/2 cup muesli cereal 1/4 cup oat flour 1 cup chocolate or vanilla protein powder 1 cup milk or coconut milk powder 2 tablespoons chia or flax seeds 2 tablespoons dark chocolate chips 1/3 cup peanut or almond butter 1/2 cup filtered water 2 tablespoon agave nectar or raw honey, to taste 1. Grease an 8 by 8-inch baking dish. Combine dry ingredients in a medium bowl and mix well. 2. In a separate bowl, stir together the nut butter, water, and agave until combined and smooth. Add to the dry mixture and work with your hands until a sticky dough forms. This is a fun task for kids! 3. Spread the dough into the prepared pan with a spatula, spoon, or fingers. Refrigerate for 3 hours. 4. When well chilled, cut into squares. Wrap bars individually in wax paper and store refrigerated or frozen. Include in your child’s lunch box and enjoy the rave reviews! (S. Michal Bennett)

Back-to-school time means preparing, mentally and logistically, for the next 9+ months of prepping quick breakfasts and packing lunches. This year, avoid pre-packaged foods and plastic waste by using eco-friendly storage products instead of single-use plastic bags and wrappers. One excellent source of inspiration and motivation is a kid-friendly recipe resource, Weelicious.com, with actual child-tested and approved ideas. For school lunches, Weelicious offers ideas for finger food lunches, packed in Bento-style containers (optional to use cutesy cookie-cutters for sandwiches). Another unique idea is Sandwich-ona-Stick, using cubed bread, cheeses, sliced or cubed meats, cherry tomatoes, and cucumbers. The reusable bento-style boxes let you separate ingredients and reduce prep time. You can also discover what your kids won’t eat with a mix and match lunch game. The Kitchen Engine in downtown Spokane— located at the Flour Mill retail building north of Riverfront Park—offers Full Circle Ziptuck reusable storage bags. They are BPA-free, air-tight, leak-proof, freezer-safe, and washable. The Kitchen Engine offers all available bundles (clear only): 2 snack bags, $6.99; mini (1/2 cup) and travel bag (1 quart) set, $7.99; and 2 sandwich bags, $7.99. Store crackers, baby carrots, or anything else you would normally pack in a disposable baggie. The Kitchen Engine also sells Bee’s Wrap (alternative to plastic wrap)—washable, re-usable, malleable food storage sheets. Options include a sandwich pack ($11.99) and sets of 3 in small, medium, or large ($17.99-$20.99). (Amy S. McCaffree)

FREEZE DRIED MEALS FOR THE SPEED OF LIFE

Bushka’s Kitchen offers ready-to-eat meals that are brimming with real nutrition and delectable flavor. Crafted with whole food ingredients, their innovation helps solve the conundrum of the modern life: we want to eat well, but we need to eat fast. Fortunately, Bushka’s has set out to provide a line of non-perishable meals that are both gourmet and on-the-go. Bringing busy people locally-crafted, healthy food is a worthwhile but lofty goal. But the unstuffed Italian pepper meal lives up to the challenge. It packs a pleasant, peppery heat, along with a delicious medley of herbs. Even the ground beef tastes well seasoned and of high quality, combining a home-cooked, from-scratch taste with a just-addwater level of ease. The pork harvest bowl is another successful culinary experience. The wild rice and pork pair deliciously with roasted Brussels sprouts and caramelized onion, while the balsamic vinegar and hint of orange add a delightfully complex flavor. It’s as easy to imagine stashing a few of these meals at work for the days when you don’t have time to prepare lunch as it is to imagine bringing them along on a multi-day backpacking trip. In fact, if you’re tired from a long day’s trek, these meals may be the best thing you’ve ever tasted in the great outdoors. That’s because Bushka’s founder, Deana Del Vecchio, came up with the idea for her company while preparing to hike the Laugavgur trail in Iceland. Dismayed by most of the prepackaged food options, she decided to make her own freeze-dried meals and dehydrated snacks that don’t suck. She succeeded on her trip, and—lucky for the rest of us—she’s sharing her R&D by making her delicious concoctions available to the masses. (Summer Hess) //


Eatology

OVERCOMPLICATING HEALTH WITH FANCY FOOD // By Ammi Midstokke

More Power

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less waste SALAD: THE ORIGINAL HEALTH FOOD // PHOTO: SHALLAN KNOWLES

IT’S KIND OF MY JOB TO EAT WEIRD THINGS.

Thankfully, there’s a market for making weird things super trendy by putting them in hipster packaging, adding some form of sugar, and referring to it as “paleolithic.” Most of the time I think it tastes exactly what baking would have tasted like had a bunch of dread-locked women in a cave tried to make chocolate bark. At the Ancestral Health Symposium in Bozeman this July, I take the plunge and eat a cricket cookie. “30 entire crickets!” exclaims the packaging. They must have been small crickets. I am testing all the cool new supplements, foodie cures, and anything that says “bison” on it. As far as I can tell, there’s a bottled solution here for every health ailment one might conceive. I watch Ben Greenfield try to pour himself a matcha. Something goes wrong and the matcha keeps flowing, but Ben has taken more noortropic supplements than most medical professionals would recommend, so he thinks fast and grabs a trash can before the floor gets covered in creamy green tea. Then he wanders off with his fanny pack to sign books—including the one he gave me. “What do you even keep in that thing?” I ask. He starts unloading it. There’s stevia, dental floss, and pretty much all the ingredients I keep in my own purse—except maybe lip gloss. I don’t keep lip gloss in mine. I had watched his talk on longevity. He’s writing a new book on the matter. If you haven’t read his last book, I highly recommend it. He saves you millions of dollars and hours by donating his body to his own scientific experiments, then telling you how to achieve the same results with blueberries and lion’s mane mushrooms. It’s good to see he’s human and spills his tea, too. I wander from stand to stand at this conference, listening to the sales pitch of every product. There is a lot of collagen. There is collagen in coconut creamer. There is collagen in green tea. There’s collagen with turmeric, collagen with chocolate,

collagen drinks, bites, bars. It makes sense, considering most of the tissue in the human body is held together by collagen. In fact, studies show collagen consumption has a positive impact on everything from nail and hair health to treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. It can reduce pain and inflammation in joints and is used in arthritis therapies. It’s an easy-to-absorb form of protein that you can put in anything (including your coffee, which I am now doing because I also read several studies that say it reduces cellulite, and what girl doesn’t hope for that?). Also, it’s in bone broth, so you can just eat lots of homemade soup if you want. Between cricket protein, collagen powders, and neurotransmission enhancing compounds, we should be able to supplement our way to perfect health, stellar athletic performance, and perhaps even immortality. As far as I can tell though, none of these solutions-in-a-bottle come even close to replacing the most effective means of sustainable health: eating well and living the good life. No pill reduces your stress load, makes up for lost sleep, cleanses you of the chemicals from bucket mix margaritas, equates to an hour outdoors, or lubricates your joints like water. Also notice: All of those things most beneficial and necessary to our health are pretty much free. You can get a lot of bang for your buck with some good supplements, or a lot of green protein from an overpriced cricket cookie. Or you could just make a wicked salad and take an afternoon nap in a hammock. Sometimes health and vitality just aren’t that complicated. //

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Ammi Midstokke is a nutritionist and writer in Sandpoint, Idaho. When she isn’t lost in the mountains, she’s saving lives with vegetables. In June she wrote about easy meal solutions that mostly involved mayonnaise, though she has yet to find a collagen mayonnaise product.

Sept. 13-16 2018

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17


Health&Fitness THE LOST ART OF TAKING A BREAK //

By Sarah Hauge

RESTING CAN DO WONDERS FOR A WORKOUT ROUTINE. PHOTO: SHALLAN KNOWLES

SATURDAY THROUGH SUNDAY

September 22 & 23, 2018

Saturday 10am-8pm & Sunday 10am-4pm

Indian Creek Community Forest 1802 Indian Creek Rd Newport, WA 99156

Free Entrance! Live Music - Artisan Vendors - Games Storytellers - Local Produce Food - Non-Smoking & Pet Free Event

Celebrating local harvest and history! Hosted By 1.844.PORTA.US www.porta.us

WE’VE ALL BEEN THERE: forced to take a break from a favorite activity. Maybe the issue is an overuse injury, bedrest during a high-risk pregnancy, hazardous wildfire smoke, or a drier-than-desired winter that’s keeping you off the ski slopes. It’s easy to get down in the dumps when you can’t do what you love. The good news is that with the right perspective, a forced change in plans can help you discover new activities and take better care of yourself. Below are some ways to cope with an undesired break—and maybe even find some happiness along the way. TRY SOMETHING NEW

If summer wildfires make kayaking, biking, or running off limits, try something indoors that you typically neglect, like yoga, barre, or strengthtraining. You’ll challenge different muscle groups, increase flexibility and balance, and leave feeling better than before you started. You might even discover a new passion. “I’ve had a patient who was devastated after suffering an ACL rupture at Hoopfest, but which later led to a love of running and turned him into a competitive ultrarunner!” says physical therapist Jonathan Hook of Physical Therapy Associates and PTA Performance. Without the forced rest, “he would still be pounding it out on the court instead of hitting the trails.” REST

Jam-packed schedules mean there just aren’t enough hours in the day. Often, a good night’s sleep is the first to give. If an injury means you can’t get in your typical early-morning swim or round of golf, use that time for something novel: sleeping in. See how you feel on a full eight hours (for once!). Rest, notes Hook, is an essential part of fitness. “Stress plus rest equals growth,” he says, citing research from the book “Peak Performance” by Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness. On its own, stressing the body leads to ineffective workouts and can contribute to overuse injuries. “I love using this equation to encourage the individuals who are ‘forced’ to rest for one reason or another and help change their perspective to see it more as ‘recovery,’” says Hook. OCCUPY YOUR MIND

When your body must be still, keep your brain active. Dive deep into a big book of Sudoku puzzles, take up cross-stitching, start writing your great American novel, or download a meditation app (Headspace is a good one). Keeping your 18

OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

mind active—or, in the case of meditation, learning to quiet it—will help you keep a positive outlook on this whole “workout break” thing. FOCUS ON SOMETHING YOU CAN CONTROL: YOUR NUTRITION

When intense workouts are off the table, channel some of your usual mental drive onto eating well. Challenge yourself to get in a rainbow’s worth of fruits and veggies every day, drink lots of water, cut back on sugar, and slow down enough to notice how all of that makes you feel, adjusting as you go. Chances are, you’ll feel a little better than if you deep-freeze each day’s sorrows in a pint of ice cream (although you should probably do that every once in a while, too). INVEST IN RELATIONSHIPS

Meet a friend for a leisurely walk or some gentle stretching in the park instead of your usual run. If you’re on bed rest, invite a friend over to bingewatch a funny show. Listen to your pal’s words of encouragement, distract yourself with good conversation, and think about how great it feels to laugh. It won’t magically cure your body, but time with a good friend never hurts. LEARN FROM YOUR PAST

If you’re getting over an injury, take the time to think about the probable cause. Are you dealing with an overuse injury that could have been avoided if you’d addressed muscle imbalances and taken more time off? How can you plan your workouts going forward to have an overall healthier body? DON’T BE TOO HARD ON YOURSELF

Don’t push yourself before you’re ready. Wait until conditions are right before you get back out there. Remember: This—whether this means smoky skies, a fracture, or a pregnancy—won’t last forever. “We know that outlook is huge,” says Hook. “Fear or anxiety of not healing can influence the body’s ability to repair.” These, he adds, are “great principles to remember to both encourage rest, and fully embrace it when we are forced to do so.” What you’re able to do may be (way) less strenuous than usual, but that doesn’t mean it’s not good for you. Look for the upsides. // Sarah Hauge lives in Spokane with her husband and two daughters, and will be running the Happy Girls Half Marathon in September. She contributed to the “Backcountry Pursuits” feature in the August issue.


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19


A Few Favorite Fall Hikes

a.

c.

e.

g.

b.

d.

f.

h.

SUMMER HAS ITS CHARMS (ALPINE LAKES, ICE COLD BEVERAGES, AND WILDFLOWER BLOOMS TO NAME A FEW), BUT THE COOLER TEMPERATURES OF FALL AND THE ANTICIPATION OF THE LEAVES CHANGING COLOR HAS MANY OF US LONGING TO SPEND OUR WEEKENDS HIKING. HERE ARE A FEW FAVORITE HIKES FROM A COUPLE “OUT THERE OUTDOORS” CONTRIBUTORS FOR YOU TO EXPLORE THIS FALL! (Siobhan Ebel)

GOLD HILL TRAIL #3

UPPER HOLLAND LAKE LOOP

(Ammi Midstokke)

(Aaron Theisen)

LOCATION: Near Sandpoint in Bonner County,

LOCATION: North of Missoula, Montana, in the

Idaho. The trail is accessed by taking Bottle Bay Rd from Highway 95 approximately 5 miles until the trailhead appears on the right. There is ample parking and a restroom.

HIKE DESCRIPTION: This trail, found just out-

side of Sandpoint, has a nostalgic attraction for a local, along with all the autumnal wonder any nature lover could hope for. The 2.5 miles to the ‘lookout’ begins with a sustained climb that winds its way through nearly 50 switchbacks. Forested and well-shaded, the crisp autumn mornings here offer hues of gold and red from trailhead to summit. The forest has both coniferous and deciduous trees, and later autumn hikes promise a carpet of bright leaves. Most people stop at the obvious viewpoint, but hikers can continue for nearly another mile for more vistas of the bright colors that surround Lake Pend Oreille. From the initial view point, one has an expansive view of Sandpoint, the western end of Lake Pend Oreille, the Pend Oreille River, and the Selkirk Mountains. Years ago, my dad set a family record running this trail (33 minutes up, 22 minutes down), and it is my life goal to someday crush his time. Every fall he asks me, “Did you beat my time yet?” And every fall, I wish I had tried harder. For us average spirits, the hike takes 2-3 hours round trip.

ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 5-7 miles depending on how far you feel like going. LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: Moderate. It is a good

climb, gaining something near 1,500 feet. The singletrack trail is well worn, wide, and easy to navigate.

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OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

Swan Range.

HIKE DESCRIPTION: The larch-fronted shores of

popular Holland Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley north of Missoula are the departure point for a classic 12-mile backpacking loop high into the Swan Crest. The 6-mile hike to Upper Holland Lake parallels the crooks and cascades of Holland Creek; backward glances reveal Holland Lake below and the snow-clad panorama of the Mission Mountains to the west. Upper Holland Lake is a miniature version of its low-elevation kin, a wooded pool with a moose-friendly marsh at the inlet. But the star is Sapphire Lake, which is actually a pair of tarns perched on stacked bedrock benches

a mile or so of climbing beyond Upper Holland Lake. The lakes mirror the layer-cake pyramid of Little Carmine Peak directly across the Holland Creek drainage; to the east unfurl the endless bastions of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. A popular horse packing portal into the Bob Marshall Wilderness, the Upper Holland Lake loop can get crowded on summer weekends. Autumn, when the crowds have thinned and the western larch put on their golden show, is the time to go. Be aware that snow stacks up in the Swans beginning in early autumn; bring waterproof boots and plan for minor route-finding challenges on the leeward side of the Crest. ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: 12.1 miles LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: Difficult

TIPS FOR FALL HIKING • Fall is hunting season, so if you’re hiking in the backcountry or densely-forested areas be sure to wear bright colors. This makes you easily distinguishable to anyone who might be hunting in the area. • This time of year the weather can be unpredictable, so be prepared. In addition to the usual water, snacks, and sunscreen, be sure to bring a jacket or coat in case the weather changes suddenly. As a general rule, longer hikes at higher elevations and backcountry hikes require you to bring heavier clothing items and additional safety gear. Use good judgment. • Animals generally want nothing to do with us and will usually avoid people. However, there are always exceptions, so know the area you’re hiking in and bring bear spray and keep an eye out for bears and cougars, especially if hiking with small children. • Be respectful of mother nature. Every hiker should know and follow these basic rules: Don’t cut trails; pack it in, pack it out; and never approach wild animals. • Finally and most importantly, enjoy the experience! Studies suggest that hiking is good for not only your physical health but your mental health too. Whether you prefer to hike with friends and family or alone, get outside this fall and experience the healing power of nature for yourself. (Siobhan Ebel) A-B, D: GOLD HILL TRAIL #3, PHOTOS: WOODS WHEATCROFT // C, E-F UPEER HOLLAND LAKE LOOP, PHOTOS: AARON THEISEN. // G: MT SPOKANE PHOTO: SHALLAN KNOWLES. // H: MOUNT SPOKANE, PHOTO: SKYE SCHILLHAMMER

MOUNT SPOKANE SUMMIT AND ALPINE SKI AREA TOUR (Amy S. McCaffree)

LOCATION: Mount Spokane State Park HIKE DESCRIPTION: While not a specific trail, this hik-

ing route leads you to the best summit vantage points within the alpine ski area, starting from the Vista House. Bring warm layers—it’s cool and often windy here in the fall. From the top of Chair 1, hike southwest past the cell and radio towers to a designated viewing area that includes picnic tables and viewing markers that identify distant lakes. Return to the “top of 1” (skier jargon for Chair 1) and follow the Gold Cross trail, leading to the top of Chair 2. Consult the huge wooden ski park map sign if you’re unfamiliar with the ski park runs. To your left off Gold Cross you’ll see the new runs on the “backside of the mountain” and where a new chairlift is currently being installed. Eventually, you come to a small ski patrol building (left) and Chair 2 (right)—stay left and hike down Northwest Passage. All around the open ski runs you’ll see foliage turning amber and red hues, including huckleberry bushes; some may still have berries. Hike down the Skookum run; at the bottom, head left across the bowl and up to the top of Chair 3 to enjoy more stellar views. Depending on how far you want to hike, turn around at any point or follow Half Hitch, from top of 3, down to the cat track—a dirt service road that traverses down to the lower chairlifts and Lodge 2. Be aware of vehicles using the road for summer maintenance operations. (All alpine public services are closed until opening day of ski season.)

NOTE: This fall, there will be periodic to frequent closures

of the Summit Road for chairlift installation, especially when a helicopter is needed. Call either the ski area (509238-2220) or state park ranger office (509-238-4258) to inquire about closures, especially on weekdays.

ROUND-TRIP DISTANCE: Up to approximately 3

miles round-trip, but varies based on your turnaround point.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: Easy to Moderate. //


RunWild THE ULTIMATE RUNNING PARTNER //

By Sarah Hauge

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I’VE HAD A LOT OF UNDERSTANDING, FAITHFUL RUNNING PARTNERS OVER THE YEARS, BUT NO ONE HAS BEEN MORE LOVINGLY GENEROUS THAN MY DOG. // PHOTO: SARAH HAUGE

I left for this morning’s run without my dog. She watched, old white paws up on the windowsill. “Bye, Em,” I said with a wave before running down the block. For years the most energetic, eager being in our household was our dog, Emmy. But over time I’ve taken her along on fewer and fewer of my runs. She’s 12 now—a very healthy 12, knock on wood— but her energy has more limits than it used to, and after a couple of blocks she’ll make it clear, through ample sniff breaks and the slowing of her pace, that it’s time for us to go back home. When my husband and I got Emmy as a puppy, I dreamed that she would be my everyday companion, giving a sense of protection on any pre-sunrise or post-sunset run and every secluded trail. This dog of ours, though, ran away whenever we got out the leash, not because she didn’t want to go out, but because it was more fun to be chased. Early on she made it clear that her preference is either a very casual walk or a short-lived, all-out sprint. The slow and steady run I like to do is not quite right for her. Even so, we’ve run together for years and years, me often bringing Emmy along for a mile or so, then dropping her off at the house for a scoop of food, a congratulatory pat, and a long rest as I go on my way out the door again. The passing of time, of course, has brought many changes. She’s seen me through long workdays and grad school, pregnancy, and the birth of one child, then another. She’s run alongside a single stroller and then a double and then a balance bike, standing by as I’ve untangled her leash from the wheel when it gets run over, pausing while I pick up a book happily tossed out onto the street by a chubby toddler hand. She’s run early in the morning, in the evening, and around finicky nap and school pick-up schedules. She’s panted next to me at the park drinking fountain as I clumsily fashion a makeshift water bowl out of a plastic bag. As my life has gotten more full, she’s traded nearly all of her sprints through the park for runs at my pace, on my schedule. I’ve had

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a lot of understanding, faithful running partners over the years, but no one has been more lovingly generous than my dog. One of the things we do now is the evening walk. On a cool summer night after the kids are tucked in bed I’ll leave my husband home with his beloved, oft-heartbreaking Mariners and take Emmy for a long, unhurried stroll. We pass gardeners and friends chatting by their yard waste bins, smelling that distinctly summer scent of sprinkler water hitting sidewalks still warm from a day of baking in the sun. Often, someone will praise my beautiful, quirky old dog. “What kind is she?” they’ll ask. If they’re adults they’ll wonder if she’s part terrier. If they’re kids they’ll say, “She looks like a wolf!” I’ll explain that we don’t know; my husband and I adopted her from the shelter, SpokAnimal, when she was a fuzzy stray puppy. We think she’s part terrier and part something that loves the snow and stays impeccably clean, like a Shiba Inu. Zero parts wolf, though they’re right; she does look like one. The next morning I’ll get up early, when Emmy is the only other soul awake. I feed her and let her out, drink half a cup of coffee, and toss her a bite of my pre-run granola bar. She watches as I do a couple of stretches and pull on my shoes. She doesn’t stand expectantly next to me while I do this like she used to. She knows I’m running. She knows it’s no longer her thing. But running was never her thing. She would always rather have sprinted across a field of summer grass or powdery new snow, would always have rather walked—nose up, ears perked—on a cool, quiet evening. And many times she did. But most often, she ran with me. However ill-matched we’ve sometimes been, running was for many years our thing, one way of seeing the world, side by side. // Sarah Hauge lives in Spokane with her husband and two daughters and will be running the Happy Girls Half Marathon in September. SEPTEMBER 2018 / OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM

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of Spokane’s longtime leading cycling advocates, as well as a board member for Spokefest—the Inland Northwest’s largest bicycle ride, held the second Sunday in September—Sally fears the event’s future is increasingly murky. “Last year we were about to cancel the whole thing until the day before,” she says. “In fact, we’ve almost cancelled it two of the past three years because wildfire smoke made outdoor activity hazardous, and we don’t want families with kids riding in unhealthy air.” The cyclists weren’t alone. Throughout 2017’s summer and fall, football, soccer, and running practices were cancelled; hiking trips were called off; parks and tennis courts went quiet. Across the Northwest, ashes sometimes fluttered down from the ghostly pall like powder snow. The reason was clear to anyone who checked online fire maps: Spokane was surrounded by a thousand-mile-wide ring of flames stretching from Central BC to Napa Valley. “We never had to think about this before 2015,” says Phillips. She’s right. Since the 1998 banning of field burning in Washington, the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency rarely rated more than one day a year unhealthy due to wildfire smoke until 2012, when there were two. Then came 2015 with 13 such days; then 2017 with 16.

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IS THIS THE SMOKY NEW NORMAL?

Science says this may well be the new normal, until it gets smokier still. Anthony Westerling, professor of Environmental Engineering at University of California, Merced, has led teams of researchers tracking the growth of western wildfires over decades. Writing in “The Conversation,” he says, “It is a warming climate that is drying out western U.S. forests and leading to more, larger wildfires and a longer wildfire season.” Westerling’s team finds that the area of burned forest in the Northwest—the hottest of the nation’s hot spots for wildfire growth—grew by 5,000 percent between 1973 and 2012 while Western fire seasons are now 84 days longer. The rising tide of smoke has deep consequences. For one thing, airborne particulate pollution’s wellknown link to heart disease and strokes. Also, a massive study published this July in “The Lancet” medical journal shows strong evidence that breathing particulates contributes to diabetes as well, accounting for fully 14 percent of diabetes cases. Smoke is only part of the climate challenge. Spokane Riverkeeper Jerry White Jr. thinks more these days about drought and its impacts on fish habitat and river running. “Rafting the river provides a fantastic tourism draw for visitors to Spokane, and I’m always pleased to meet people from faraway places in the boats,” he says. “However, 2015 saw river flows drop so much by midsummer that downstream rapids like Bowl and Pitcher and the Devil’s Toenail became unrunnable, so the outfitters had to go to faraway rivers, and Spokane lost out on that business.” White says he expects more years like that ahead, with spring river volumes coming earlier and declining to low flows by the middle of summer. “Those earlier drop-offs in flows also hurt trout, stranding trout fry before they can wash down-

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stream,” says White. “And summer water temperatures often rise much too high for trout in places like the upper Spokane near the state line, where they are forced to move along the river in search of cool spots near springs or deep pools.” And that heat is expected to grow. A study by Oregon State University’s PRISM Climate Group calculates that if emissions continue on present trend, by the year 2100 Spokane’s current 81-degreeaverage summers will become 93-degree-average summers like those of far southern Texas, with even more heat beyond. In a region that takes special joy in outdoor pursuits, all this is as welcome as a turd in one’s Gatorade. What does it mean to face challenges like these with outdoor activities that are much of why we live here in the first place? HIGH ALTITUDE IMPACTS

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I discovered another possible example of climate change in mid-June, while climbing Mount Hood. Our team could not depart the Timberline Lodge parking lot at the usual 1 a.m.; now, you leave two hours earlier because rock fall on the summit pitch becomes dangerous at sunrise rather than hours later, as before. Even in the traditional peak week of that popular mountain’s climbing season, in this good snow year, the standard Pearly Gates route had quickly melted into a rock-spitting bowling alley a full month before expected. Meanwhile, Mount Hood’s famed summer skiing and snowboarding camps are closing earlier, especially in El Nino years like 2015, when Timberline’s August 2 closure was the earliest since the opening of the Palmer Lift 40 years ago. Up at Whistler, the venerable Camp of Champions declared bankruptcy last year due to climate change. Owner Ken Achenbach announced the closing in a sudden post on the camp’s website: “Simply put, it’s the effects of global warming. I wanted to give you [campers] an exceptional experience, and now I can’t. I haven’t slept in a week. After 28 years my dream is over.” That was a shock, but Whistler is feeling the heat elsewhere as well. 25 years ago outdoor retailer REI shot its winter catalog photos in midsummer on a small glacier conveniently located at the top of the Whistler Village Gondola—a glacier that no longer exists. Now a bowl of bare rock, it’s merely one of Whistler’s multiple glacial casualties, along with Decker Glacier, which is now Decker Lake. Still, every warming cloud has its silver lining. “For climbers climate change adds uncertainty,” says Matt Jeffries, president of The Mountaineers’ Spokane chapter. “At the same time, this may actually create opportunities and longer weather windows. The permit season in the Enchantments may last longer into the fall. Also, weather extremes bring surprises like last winter’s cold in interior Canada. We saw ice climbing routes last longer in the Canadian Rockies, starting early and going long on everything from Cranbrook up to Jasper. Then you see things like the retreat of the Athabasca Glacier, up along Canada’s Icefields Parkway. It has receded and dropped so much that the tour bus parking area recently had to be moved downslope to get close to the ice.”

ADAPTATION IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Adaptation has long been under way in snow sports; witness Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park’s protracted, controversial effort to expand chairlifts and runs to the mountain’s northwest side where snows last longer—a plan mirrored by similar projects at other Northwest ski areas. Another game-changer for coping with warmer, less predictable weather is the worldwide turn towards snowmaking. After lagging the country in snowmaking for years, Northwest resorts are finally coming to terms with rising snowlines and the rising threat of snow droughts, even here where snow has always been abundant. Nearby hills like 49° North and Schweitzer now make snow to ensure adequate early-season coverage. Meanwhile, in summer, many hikers, mountain bikers, and climbers now plan backcountry trips to skirt the late summer fire season. We think more about water sources and less about having campfires. We should think more about bugs as well. In April the Centers for Disease Control reported that insect-borne diseases have tripled in the U.S. since 2004, thanks largely to “warmer weather” (climate change being a taboo term in Trump-era federal reports). The Northwest now sees bug-borne maladies once largely confined to the Southeast, like West Nile virus and Lyme disease, while other states now experience their first cases of the tropical staples: malaria, dengue, Chikungunya, Chagas disease, and Zika. It might also be wise to reconsider the long-held dreams of owning a cabin getaway, as fire danger continues rising, with insurance rates sure to follow. We can’t wag fingers at Florida homeowners who rebuild beach homes after increasingly-strong hurricanes while we build houses ever farther into the Inland Northwest’s tinder-dry woods. Most of all, we think about when it’s safe to breathe. North Idaho College cross-country coach Erin Lydon sums it up: “My husband and I moved to Spokane from Chicago for outdoor activities, choosing this over Bozeman and Boulder, our other two finalist options. But clean summer air is important to us. Why live here if you can’t go outside during the year’s best weather?” Lydon trains 33 cross-country runners aged 7-16 from Spokane and Kootenai counties for the USA Junior Olympics, held each December. That puts their peak training period square in the middle of fire season. “August is our key training month, just prior to September’s race season start, yet it has the worst air quality,” she says. “I don’t recall ever canceling a practice for air pollution before we had to cancel five in August 2015, then we cancelled six in August 2017. Now we go by the EPA’s Airnow app. Any reading above 120 is a definite cancellation, and 110 is probable.” WHAT’S NEXT?

It’s very literally a new world, with a coming climate probably unlike any seen since the dawn of humanity. For decades, new climate science findings have consistently trended towards more alarming conclusions, which is almost certain to


continue as we learn more about climate feedbacks and knock-on effects. We who live and love the Northwest outdoor life are in a good position to lead our region towards the cleaner future we need, to preserve what we enjoy and to pass it along for coming generations to enjoy as well. It is neither hard nor expensive to

set a better example and to get involved. // David Camp is owner of Camp Creative, the sales & marketing director for Northwest Renewables, and a board member for 350 Spokane. This is his first article for Out There.

ADAPTATION VS PREVENTION As valuable as adaptation is, we all face a more vexing question as well: what can we do to avoid making the problem worse ourselves? After all, transportation is our region’s top source of greenhouse gas emissions, and outdoor sports enthusiasts are chronic offenders, driving gas-guzzling, gear-hauling rigs to far-flung destinations. We can do better, and without too much trouble. Every nation on Earth has officially agreed to decarbonize, so let’s do our part. Here are major ways you can make a personal difference: • Transportation: Never buy another gas or diesel vehicle again; go electric, plug-in hybrid or carfree. In town, help push for transit and bike infrastructure. • Home: Go solar, get rid of gas, and think of upgrading with heat pumps, efficient windows, and appliances. • Diet: Cut red meat and dairy, which have enormous carbon costs, and eat at least a few vegetarian meals per week. • Savings: Move your money from S&P Index funds to fossil-free funds like those from SPDRs, which have outperformed for years as fossil fuels lose value. • Vacations: Stop flying and explore closer to home. • Volunteering: Join climate-conscious groups—especially strong, local ones like 350 Spokane. • Vote: Support political progress such as Washington State Initiative 1631’s carbon fee (on this November’s ballot), and the City of Spokane’s push towards fossil-free electricity. • Some Good News: Except for volunteering, all of these measures will save or make you money. They’ll also help Spokane compete for talent in a world where highly educated, highly mobile young people value clean energy, healthy eating, and denser living.

SEPTEMBER 2018 / OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM

25


Nature FORESTS AND A CHANGING CLIMATE //

By Adam Gebauer

WITH GLOBAL TEMPERATURES on the rise, for-

ests in our region are changing and are expected to change even more. Forests make up nearly half of the land area in the Pacific Northwest, providing resources for local economies, habitat for fish and wildlife, and abundant recreation and traditional activities. In our region, temperatures have risen of 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit over the last century, and are projected to rise between 3 and 10 degrees in the next decade, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Our late summer “smoke season” is an example of the changes to come. Alongside land use changes in the form of development, climate change is having the biggest impact on the health and productivity of our forests. Increases in temperature have and will effect production, distribution, and disturbances of our region’s forests. One seemingly positive outcome from climate change is that spring will come earlier, and trees will have more time to grow—along with more of some resources to help them grow. Warmer temperatures mean the growing season will increase by several weeks. Also, the main cause of climate change— the increase of carbon dioxide (CO2)—can make trees more productive. CO2—along with water and sunlight—are the key ingredient to photosynthesis. But across the region, precipitation patterns have and will continue to change. Drier areas are experiencing more frequent droughts, and the percent of precipitation falling as snow has declined. This has lead to lower snowpack, early snow melt, and lower stream flows across the region. A region’s snowpack acts as water storage for our forests, allowing water to be available later into the summer. With this reduction, our Inland Northwest forests are drying earlier in the season. This reduction in water will mostly likely counteract any production gains from increased CO2 in the atmosphere. There is a direct link between increases in climatic temperature and other disturbances that affect forests. Along with a longer growing season for trees comes longer and more tolerant seasons for pest insects and pathogens. Not only are these pests moving into more northern latitudes and higher altitudes, they are also having longer feeding seasons and are surviving milder winters. Additionally, droughts reduce a tree’s ability to produce sap, which is its natural defense against 26

OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

many predators. For example, western pine beetles prey on the ponderosa pines. High numbers of droughtstressed trees add to greater outbreaks. In 2016, more than 12,900 acres of our region’s ponderosas died, fostered by low sap due to water stress in the trees. Eastern Washington also faces more frequent outbreaks of mountain pine beetles affecting lodgepole pines and higher elevation whitebark pine. Warmer temperatures and drier forests have increased the number, severity, and size of forest fires as well. Many fire managers say there is no fire season; there are fire years— years of severe fires burning from spring through early winter. In 2017 more that 1.2 million acres of forest burned in the Pacific Northwest. Forest fires and massive tree die off creates a feedback loop that adds more CO2 to the atmosphere, instead of trapping it in wood and soil. This increases our atmospheric temperature and the likelihood of more fires and pest insect activity. The distribution of tree species is also changing with climate change. As mountain pine beetles kill off lodgepole pine in southern Oregon, they are replaced by more beetle-resistant Douglas fir and ponderosa. On the east side of the Cascades, these two species are also the most planted in industrial forestry but can be more susceptible to fires. Over the long-haul, as areas become drier, they will change drastically, altering from forest to savannah grassland and sage-steppe. As average temperatures increase, some tree species will shift to more northern latitudes and higher elevations. In high alpine environments some species such as whitebark pine may be out-competed by species that tolerate warmer seasons. There are some steps we can take to help reduce the impact of some of these changes. For example, we can strive for healthier forest with activities like selective thinning and controlled burns, which reduces crowding and can slow the spread of insects and fire. But many changes will take time, and we will have to wait to see how our forests adapt to the changing climate. // When Adam Gebauer is not teaching skiing or summiting a mountain, he is wrangling his herd of goats and running Syringa Ecological Consulting. He wrote about the work of a restoration ecologist in the August Out There.


Parent-Child  Nursery  Kindergarten  Grades 1-6

UrbanOutdoors

ARE YOU READY

SPOKANE’S WALKING ART TOUR //

TO STEP OUTSIDE

By Amy S. McCaffree

the box of mainstream education?

NOW ACCEPTING

COMBINE CYCLING or urban hiking with the delights of outdoor and indoor art for some late summer and early fall destination-focused recreation. Create your own personalized art tour using some of these ideas for your route planning. MARMOT ART SPACE (1202 Summit Parkway): Located in Adams Alley across from Craftsman Cellars, in Kendall Yards, this family-friendly gallery hosts projects from local, regional, and international artists. Every First Friday event celebrates the opening of a new exhibit. Kids are always welcome. KENDALL YARDS ART WALK/RIDE: 10 featured outdoor art installations and 10 points of interest, mostly overlooks of the Spokane River offering stunning views. Find a map PDF at kendallyards.com. “I AM A TOWN” SIDEWALK POETRY TOUR:

Includes 13 stops with destinations in downtown Spokane, Browne’s Addition, and on the South Hill. Find the Google Maps link at spokanearts. org/iamatown.

RIVERFRONT PARK & CENTENNIAL TRAIL SCULPTURE WALK/RIDE: At spokanearts.org,

download the PDF brochure featuring the route map and details for each sculpture. Tour begins at WSU’s downtown Spokane campus and ends at the Monroe Street Bridge. CHASE GALLERY (808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd, City Hall lower level): Currently showing is Spokane Handweavers Guild: Celebrating 70 Years of Weaving. Sept. 7 First Friday includes weaving demonstrations and poetry readings. Open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. through Sept. 24. More details at spokanearts.org/ chase-gallery. SARANAC ART PROJECTS (25 W. Main): This non-profit artist cooperative provides exhibit space and opportunities for artists and curators. First Friday is usually opening night for new exhibits. Visit saranacartprojects.org for current information. Open Thursdays 2-6 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays, noon-8 p.m JUNDT ART MUSEUM, GONZAGA UNIVERSITY

(200 E. Desmet Ave, southwest end of GU campus): New exhibit of Auguste Rodin sculptures opens Sept. 8, and the museum also has permanent collections, including Chihuly Glass works

and exhibits in its Arcade Gallery. Don’t miss the outdoor sculpture exhibition. Free. Open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BING CROSBY HOUSE MUSEUM, Gonzaga (508 E. Sharp Ave.): Yes, Bing Crosby’s childhood home is part of GU’s campus, in its original location. View 200+ items related to Crosby’s singing and acting career, including his gold records and Oscar statuette. Open Monday-Friday, 10 a.m-4 p.m., Saturday 1-4 p.m. Free.

first grade applications for 2018-2019

NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS + CULTURE

(2316 West 1st Ave.): Located in the Browne’s Addition neighborhood west of downtown Spokane, the MAC features permanent collections, including American Indian and historical artifacts, and current exhibits in its galleries. Current exhibits feature Spokane painter Mel McCuddin and the historical and controversial photographer Edward S. Curtis. Info and hours at northwestmuseum.org. TSUGA NORTHWEST ARTS (1114 S. Perry St.): Outside the downtown core, this art gallery and community space in the South Perry District features fine art and handmade goods curated by local and regional artists focused on the great outdoors of the Pacific Northwest. If coming from downtown, visit the gallery by bike via the Ben Burr Trail. Open Tuesday-Saturday. See tsugaarts. com for hours.

4225 W Fremont Rd, Spokane WA (509) 326-6638 admin@SpokaneWindSongSchool.org www.SpokaneWindsongSchool.org/enrollment

SPOKANE FALLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FINE ARTS GALLERY (3410 W. Fort George Wright

Drive, Building 6): A new exhibit opens Sept. 25, featuring works by Bob Ebendorf (found object jewelry/sculpture and postcards) and Fred Holcomb (oil on canvas). Open Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free. BRYAN OLIVER GALLERY, Whitworth University (300 W. Hawthorne Road): On the city’s far north side, a new exhibit opens Sept. 11, featuring new acquisitions from landscape painter and Whitworth alumnus Ben Frank Moss. Open Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free.) // Amy S. McCaffree is special section editor and Out There Kids columnist. She wrote more about the “I Am a Town” poetry tours in the August issue.

PLANNING YOUR SEPTEMBER FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK OR RIDE Begin your First Friday itinerary planning online at the Downtown Spokane Partnership’s (DSP) website, downtownspokane.org/first-Friday. Each month is different, depending on participating venues and the new or continuing art exhibits they’re hosting. Select events and venues according to featured routes that are organized by theme, including gallery, kid-friendly, stage, and tasting room, among others. Select events by clicking “add to my list,” and when finished choosing your preferences, click “my picks” to view your complete list, along with its corresponding street map of marked locations. You can then “email picks” to yourself and use this easy-to-read agenda for your evening ride or urban hike. On Sept. 7, start at Marmot Art Space to see Christy Branson’s melted wax artwork, along with works from other local and regional artists—plus enjoy complimentary Veraci Pizza. Then pedal or walk to Chase Gallery, at City Hall, for weaving demonstrations and poetry readings, followed by a stop at Liberty Ciderworks to see Chris Bovey’s limited-edition handmade graphic art prints and taste award-winning hard ciders.

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OutdoorCalendar RUNNING

(September 22) Spokane Happy Girls Run.

(September 8) Palouse Sprint Triathlon. Where:

Where: Spokane. Women’s half marathon, 10k and 5k runs with great post-race festivities and fabulous goody bags. Info: Happygirlsrun.com

about 3 miles heads out from Spark Central through Kendall Yards and back on the Centennial Trail. Meet at Spark Central to begin the ride at 1 p.m. Info: Summerparkways.com

(September 23) Valleyfest Multi-Sport Day 5&10k Run. Where: Spokane Valley. The Valleyfest

(September 22-24) Silveroxx Mountain Bike Festival. Where: Silver Mountain Resort, Kellogg,

Moscow, Idaho. A perfect triathlon for beginners, families, and seasoned triathletes alike. Start with a swim in a heated outdoor pool and enjoy a bike and run on the rolling hills of the Palouse. Info: Palousetri.com

(September 9) Sundae Sunday 10 Miler. Where: Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, Spokane. When: 7 a.m. Info: raceroster.com/events/2018/16883/brrcssundae-sunday-10-miler

(September 15) Bellingham Traverse.

Where: Bellingham, Wash. A fun relay race that celebrates the journey of wild salmon. Solo, tandem, and relay teams to run, bike and paddle through Bellingham’s scenic parks, winding trails, and open waterways. Info: Bellinghamtraverse.com

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(September 15) Newport Autumn Bloom. Where: Newport, Wash. This fall fun run includes two distances starting at T.J. Kelly Park, a 5k and 10k, which is a Bloomsday 2nd seed qualifier. The event benefits the Newport Hospital and Health Services Foundation. Info: NewportHospitalandHealth.org

(September 16) Sandpoint Scenic Half & 10k. Where: Sandpoint, Idaho. With a route across Sandpoints’ iconic Long Bridge offering panoramic views of Lake Pend Oreille and the surrounding mountains, this race is an established, fun, and professionally managed event. Info: Sandpointchamber. com.

(September 16) Two Bear Marathon.

Where: Whitefish, Mont. When: 7:30 a.m. Full and half marathon and 5K. The course follows the roads along the edges of Glacier National Park. Info: TwoBearMarathon.org

RUNNING (October 6) New Hope Fund Run.

Where: New Hope Resource Center, Colbert, Wash. A 5k fun run/ walk through the Summerwood Neighborhood that helps people in need in north Spokane County with things like financial support for certain prescriptions, emergency vehicle repair, utility shut-off notices, vouchers for gasoline, housing assistance, food and clothing needs, and more. There is no registration for this race but donations are accepted. Info: Newhopefundrun.wpengine.com

(October 6) Wild Moose Chase. Where: Mt Spokane. When: 8:30 a.m. Running options include 5k, 10k and 25k. All participants receive shirts and need a Discover pass for parking. Info: nsplit.com/ wild-moose-chase-2018. (October 20) Oktoberfest Trail Runs.

Where: Leavenworth Ski Hill. When: 8:30 a.m. 10-Mile and 5-Mile, plus kid’s race is held during the third and final week of Leavenworth’s Oktoberfest celebration. Info: RunWenatchee.com

Where: Honeysuckle Beach, Hayden Lake. When: 7:30 a.m. This course goes around Hayden Lake on

OUTTHEREOUTDOORS.COM / SEPTEMBER 2018

(September 30) Sekani Trail Run. Where: Camp Sekani Park, Spokane. The 10th annual event includes a free kids 1k, plus a 5k and 10k run/walk on forested singletrack above the Spokane River. Info: Sekanitrailrun.com

BIKING (September 9) 11th Annual SpokeFest. Where: Kendall Yards, Spokane. SpokeFest, the Inland Northwest’s largest bicycling event, invites anyone interested in riding a bicycle, including families, to come enjoy one of several different length group rides. The routes are carefully chosen to be interesting, beautiful and challenging, but not so challenging that first-timers can’t make it. The routes are easier with training, but it is not required. Biking-related exhibitors, bike shops, food, music, and a kid’s Strider bike demo area make for a fun, festive atmosphere for all. Info: Spokefest.org

(September 15) Global Kidical Massive. Where: Kendall Yards, Spokane. Just like a regular Kidical Mass, a fun, safe bike ride especially for kids, but on this special day Spokane joins thousands of kids all over the planet for a worldwide “Kidical Mass” bike ride. This free, family-friendly afternoon bike ride of

Idaho. With events for every rider type, including a night ride, ladies day, kids races, downhill race, super-d (top to bottom) race, best trick, minibike dh, minibike keg slalom, bunny hop contest, and outdoor movies, the Silveroxx Mountain Bike Festival is one of the biggest mountain bike events in the Northwest. Info: Silvermt.com

OTHER (August 31-September 3) Fall Fest. Where: Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Final week of summer operations for hiking and mountain biking. Live music and over 75 regional micro-brews and ciders. Info: Schweitzer.com/event/fall-fest (September 8) Bike, Hike & Brew Bash. Where: Spirit Lake, Idaho. When: 7:30 a.m. Hike or bike on the Empire Trails system. Live music, raffle prizes and beer/cider garden. Info: SpiritLakeChamber.com (September 23) Valleyfest Multi-Sport Day Triathlon. Where: Spokane Valley. The Valleyfest annual triathlon with a boat leg instead of a swim, includes a 1.5 mile canoe or kayak, an 11 mile bike ride, and a 3-mile run all through some of Spokane Valley’s most scenic places. Info: Valleyfest.org

(September 23) Valleyfest Multi-Sport Day Duathlon. Where: Spokane Valley. The Valleyfest annual duathlon includes a 5k run, 11 mile bike ride, and one last 5k run. Info: Valleyfest.org

SIX MONTH EVENTCALENDAR

(October 13) Hayden Lake Marathon.

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annual races start and finish at the Plantes Ferry with a course that runs west past the Plantes Ferry obelisk to the Island Trail Head, then over the Spokane River on the Denny Ashlock Bridge and along the Centennial Trail. Info: Valleyfest.org.

hilly, challenging forest-lined HaydenLakeMarathon.org

roads.

Info:

(October 13) Socktoberdash 2018.

Where: Mirabeau Park Spokane Valley. When: 9 a.m. This 5K and 10K race supports foster kids in Washington State. Crazy socks encouraged. Donations for socks and undies (new only please) accepted for foster kids. Info: active.com/spokane-valley-wa/running/ distance-running-races/socktoberdash-2018

(October 21) Trails to Taps. Where: Bellingham. When: 9 a.m. Teams of 5 to 10 runners relay through trails to different breweries. Info: TrailsToTaps.com (October 29) Monster Dash. Where: Manito Park, Spokane. When: 8:30 a.m. Kids and adult registration includes shirts. Costume contest at start line. Info: SpokaneSwifts.com/monsterdash/ (November 22) Cheney Turkey Trot. Where: Cheney High School. When: 9 a.m. Info: runsignup. com/Race/WA/Cheney/CheneyTurkeyTrot (December 1) Jingle Bell Run. Where: Riverfront Park, Spokane. The Arthritis Foundation’s annual fundraiser. Costumes and jingle bells on shoelaces

encouraged. Info: events.arthritis.org/

OTHER (September 23) Valleyfest Multi-Sport Day Triathlon. Where: Spokane Valley, Wash. The Valleyfest annual triathlon with a boat leg instead of a swim, includes a 1.5 mile canoe or kayak, an 11 mile bike ride, and a 3-mile run all through some of Spokane Valley’s most scenic places. Info: Valleyfest.org

(September 23) Valleyfest Multi-Sport Day Duathlon. Where: Spokane Valley, Wash. The Valleyfest annual duathlon includes a 5k run, 11 mile bike ride, and one last 5k run. Info: Valleyfest.org

(February 23-24) 3rd Annual Spokane Great Outdoors & Bike Expo. Where: Spokane Convention Center. Check out all types of bikes from local shops and reps, and find deals on bikes, paddle sports gear, and other outdoor equipment. Check out outdoor adventure travel destinations and clubs from around the region; enter to win thousands of dollars of outdoor gear prizes; and learn new outdoor skills, try gear, and enjoy free backcountry snacks at the REI Campground. Plenty of kids’ activities, including a climbing wall, make this a fabulous family event. Info: SpokaneOutdoorExpo.com


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LastPage WILD ENCOUNTERS ON FAMILIAR TRAILS // By Henry Hagood

4TH OF JULY SKY FROM THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT SPOKANE // PHOTO: HENRY HAGOOD

TO ESCAPE THE CROWDS and noise on Independence Day this year, I headed up to Mount Spokane State Park that evening. I picked up two burritos at Atilanos on the way up—one for me and one for my dog, Grouper. At the trailhead just above the ranger station, I loaded Grouper’s pack with his carne asada burrito (no onions please) and water, and off we went. The trail climbs and winds through forest, bear grass, and huckleber-

ries all the way to the summit. In the fading light the friendly ranger said he was closing the gate and bid me a happy 4th. Just like that Grouper and I had the whole place to ourselves. As the sky darkened, the flashes of fireworks became more visible across the horizon. We could make out the lakes, particularly Coeur d’Alene, as dark patches surrounded by brilliant flashes. We enjoyed our burritos (still warm) and beer (still

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111 S. MADISON ST. SPOKANE, WA.

cold) in the chilling wind and watched the last light disappear in the western sky. Bundled up and refueled, it was time for the descent. The bright headlight mounted on my handlebars showed us the trail entrance from the summit parking lot, and down we went. Swoopy, fast single track through the alpine by headlight is a completely different experience than during daylight. Your field of vision narrows, and your focus follows suit. In straight sections the light floods the sides of the trail and you can take in the whole scene, but around corners is a different story. Just like driving a car on sharp corners you are committed to the turn before your headlight can fully illuminate the terrain. A blind curve. It was at one of these corners where my ride got interesting. Only 10 minutes in to our descent, Grouper and I were flowing down the trail into a sharp left turn. My eyes were glued to the light in front of my bike. I turned past the beam of light, whipped around the berm and, as my light caught up to shine in front, it illuminated a large, airborne mountain lion. No more than 5 feet squarely in front of me was a big cat, jumping from my left to right, over the trail. A stump on the right side obscured its head, but there was no mistaking the burly front shoulder, white underbelly, and muscular thigh outstretched, having just launched itself downhill. The tail of the mountain lion was remarkable. It was thick and a beautiful amber color with a dark tip that seemed quite distant from the creature’s rump. It had left my field of vision by the time I came to a stop, and the first thing I did was grab ahold of Grouper and quickly leash him up. I put my bike up on my shoulder, screamed like a crazy person, and scanned back and forth with my light into the woods. Nothing to be seen.

After a few minutes of lung-emptying banshee screams, I took some deep breaths to calm myself and started walking down the trail. With my bike shouldered and Grouper on a short leash, we made slow and uneasy progress. A series of switchbacks cut directly below the path the cat likely took, and we still had 6 miles and about 2,000 feet of descent to the car. Also going through my head was the recent account from the west side of two mountain bikers attacked by a cougar—one fatally. I thought about what my best bet would be if the cougar came back on the offensive. Do I go for the eyes? Swing my bike at it? Choke it? I didn’t like my options. I walked for about a mile with my bike held high to get past the switchbacks and then began pedaling with Grouper still on leash. Finally, where the trail changes aspect on the mountain, I let him off and we made haste down the trail, hollering all the while. The strong winds swayed the trees, and I jumped at the occasional creaking of the timber under stress, convinced it was the cat. We made it back to the car after 11 p.m., and I felt a relief like I hadn’t experienced before. After living and recreating in Alaska for years, I had become accustomed to encounters with large-toothed mammals. Brown bears while hiking and sea lions while diving were commonplace; however, this experience, here on our local ski hill, tapped into a rawness that was equally frightening and refreshing. I have a restored appreciation for our wild lands so close to town. We are lucky people to be sharing these woods with such amazing creatures. // Henry Hagood is a lover of all things outdoors, including backcountry burritos. This is his first article for Out There.


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Out There Outdoors // September 2018  

Outdoor Adventure in the Age of Climate Change // Road Trip: Craters of the Moon // The Dirt on Gravel Bikes // Fall Day Hikes // Bikes & Ar...

Out There Outdoors // September 2018  

Outdoor Adventure in the Age of Climate Change // Road Trip: Craters of the Moon // The Dirt on Gravel Bikes // Fall Day Hikes // Bikes & Ar...

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