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Go forth and lead. Leadership. Communication. Teamwork.

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These are the skills today’s CEOs are looking for in employees.

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The Extra Mile

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Fall 2007

Ed Ithier ’87

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Spotlight on Scholarships

President: Dr. Paul J. LeBlanc Editor: Michelle Dunn Content Editors: Richard Erskine, Woullard Lett, Frederick Lord, Heather Lorenz, Tiffany Lyon, Tom McDermott, Judy Timney Director of Publications: Patricia Garrity Graphic Design: Jason Mayeu Photography: Brian Crowley, Jeremy Earl Mayhew, Gil Talbot Proofreader: Ellin Jean, Jean Creative Services Printing: The Lane Press Inc. The Extra Mile is published two times per year by the Office of Marketing and Communications. Class Notes and changes of address may be sent to alumni@snhu.edu. Visit us online at snhu.edu for more university news and information about upcoming events. Postmaster: Send address changes to the Office of Alumni and Community Relations, Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 North River Road, Manchester, NH 03106

2007-2008 SNHU Board of Trustees Chairman Andrew “Mickey” Greene ’72 Vice Chairman Mark A. Ouellette ’77 Treasurer Bill McGarry Secretary Bradford E. Cook President/CEO Paul J. LeBlanc Board Members Howard Brodsky Michael Brody ’73 Cathy Champagne ’88 Clayton M. Christensen Stephanie Collins Rick Courtemanche ’73 Robert J. Decolfmacker ’78 Theresa Desfosses ’72 Robert Finlay ’92 Donald R. Labrie ’71 David Lee ’87, ’93 Frederic “Rick” Loeffler Kyle Nagel L. Douglas O’Brien Steven Painchaud Martha Shen-Urquidez Beverly Smith ’00 June Smith Thomas Tessier ’74 Raymond Truncellito Kimon S. Zachos Student Observer Benjamin Barkhouse Trustees Emeriti William S. Green Jacqueline Mara

William Trueheart Scholarship Lasting Memory Phil King ’00 and Michael Provencher ’00 wanted their beloved information technology professor, William Trueheart, to be remembered long after his retirement in May 2000. So they created a university scholarship in the associate professor’s name. “Professor Trueheart’s commitment to developing a student’s potential, his passion for teaching and his compassion for his students are just part of his legacy.” King said. For Trueheart, it was more than an honor; it was an opportunity to help students after he left the classroom. After retiring from the U.S. Army in 1980, Trueheart came to SNHU to teach information technology. For the next 20 years he worked to guide and educate the many young men and women who passed though his classroom. Though no longer teaching, he will be able to continue helping students by easing their financial burden through this scholarship.

Professor Trueheart’s commitment to developing

a student’s potential, his passion for teaching and his compassion for his students are just part of his legacy.

– Phil King ’00

“I’d hate for a student to be held back for financial reasons,” he says. “Knowing that this scholarship will help to give a student a chance in life to go somewhere really means a lot.” Members of the Trueheart family have offered to match each dollar donated, up to $2,500. Once fully endowed, the William Trueheart Scholarship will provide a legacy to his teaching excellence and provide support for IT majors. Awards will be based on academic achievement, involvement in university life and financial need.

To support the William Trueheart Scholarship or learn more about other giving opportunities, please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement at 603.645.9688 or visit snhu.edu online.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 69


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On the Cover

Departments

StayingConnected

12

Just because you’ve graduated doesn’t mean you have to say goodbye. SNHU alumni have found a number of ways to stay involved.

Features Teams on Tour

6

The men’s and women’s basketball teams got their game on in China last summer.

Makeup Master

8

School of Business grad Kris Soterion ’87 is making politics a bit prettier.

School of Business

8

School of Community Economic Development

10

School of Education

18

School of Liberal Arts

20

Sports

22

Alumni News

26

Class Notes

28

Honor Roll of Donors Report 2006-2007

35

Contents On the Cover – Sharing his Success Ed Ithier ’87 is a model of alumni involvement. He speaks in classes, networks with students and offers career-related advice, among other activities. He hopes students will see his involvement and support and be inspired to do the same after they graduate.

Write to Us!

Letters to the editor of The Extra Mile are welcomed and encouraged. Submission does not guarantee publication, and those letters that are published may be edited for style and length. Please include the writer’s name, the year of graduation if an alum, a daytime phone number and a return address. Letters may be sent by fax to 603.645.9676, by e-mail to snhumagazine@snhu.edu or by mail to the Office of Marketing and Communications, Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 North River Road, Manchester, NH 03106-1045. The views expressed in The Extra Mile do not necessarily reflect those of the university’s trustees, administrators, faculty, staff and/or students.

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University Happenings

Director Departs

Dear friends, I am not sure there is a more idyllic place than a New England university campus in the early fall. Outside my window I can see the women’s soccer team practicing, two members of the freshman class (our largest ever) lugging armfuls of books toward Newcastle Hall and one of our faculty members in earnest conversation with a student as they walk to class. The days remain sunny and warm, at least for a bit longer. Unlike so many campuses, ours is not reawakening to a new academic year after a lazy, quiet summer. Southern New Hampshire University is a 12-month hub of activity. Our new class of M.F.A. students was here for a highly successful residency with acclaimed authors Richard Rhodes and Sy Montgomery. International community economic development students came from around the country and the globe to spend six weeks in class here in Manchester. This issue features one of them – Alicia Fitzpatrick, who is doing inspirational work with Zuni pupils on the reservation where she teaches. In this issue of The Extra Mile, you may also read about our basketball teams’ and coaches’ tour of China. Hospitality students in our BASHA program were here studying and have now fanned out around the country for internships at some of the finest hotels. Many of those internships were made possible by SNHU alumni. The role of alumni is the subject of our cover story. This is a place that has transformed lives for 75 years. It has the biggest business school in the state. With a federal grant it, created a groundbreaking three-year honors business program that saves students 25 percent on tuition (find me even one other program that creates that kind of

“The students look normal. They talk normal. But they are superheroes.”

Mickey Green ’72 (left) is the new chairman of the university’s board of trustees. Rick Courtemanche ’73 chaired the board for 10 years and remains a member.

savings). Our CED program is considered the best in the field. Our aforementioned M.F.A. program features the very best writers in America. We do all of this and still we haven’t lost our commitment to students who might be the first in their families to go to college, who might be juggling family and work and education, who might be serving in Iraq and taking classes online. I could go on and on. I love to see alumni put SNHU stickers on their cars, mount their SNHU diplomas on their office walls, brag to their neighbors and co-workers and celebrate the school where they earned their education. A final word about two of those alumni: After 10 years of guiding our board of trustees, Chairman Rick Courtemanche ’73 is handing the baton to Mickey Greene ’72. Rick will continue as a member of the board. I have appreciated his wise counsel and personal support and I am grateful that he remains part of our leadership team even as I look forward to working with Mickey. The two exemplify extraordinary dedication and ongoing engagement. Best wishes!

By Sarah Littlefield, student Jane Torrey spent decades creating a comfortable setting for student learning. Academic adviser Burton Reynolds found her one evening elbow-deep in trash, preparing classrooms for students after a day of vendor events. “Jane is not embarrassed or afraid to roll up her sleeves and dig right in,” he said. After serving 20 years as director of the university’s Seacoast Center (formerly the Portsmouth Center), Torrey retired in August. “SNHU works hard to create a community which is nurturing, humane and focused on individuals. Few people exemplify that ethos better than Jane Torrey,” SNHU President Paul LeBlanc said. “Jane has been a passionate advocate for her students and the inspirational spirit of the Seacoast Center: one part cheerleader, one part mother to all and one part taskmaster.” As director of the center, located at the Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth, N.H., Torrey oversaw 300

Paul J. LeBlanc President

“Many of our students never thought they would go to college,” she said. “To watch them morph from someone who is anxious, unsure of themselves, into a confident graduate is awesome because it not only changes their life – it changes the life of every generation after them.

to 500 students and 25 to 30 faculty members per term, as well as a staff of five. She also managed the center’s budget; coordinated course offerings and schedules; recruited, hired, assigned, trained and evaluated adjunct faculty members; developed community and corporate relationships; and ensured academic integrity. With five other colleges operating within a five-mile radius of the Seacoast Center, competition for students is tough. Torrey responded by emphasizing exceptional service and community involvement. “You can tell when you walk into Jane’s organization, there’s a difference – the way the people, the administrative staff, treat you,” Reynolds said. Torrey had the utmost respect and admiration for her students and enjoyed being their cheerleader.

Graduate student Steve Cook, an information technology operations manager at Liberty Mutual who has multiple SNHU degrees, said Torrey made him feel all his work was worthwhile. “She’s very sweet and well respected,” he said. “A lot of people are going to miss her.” Torrey inspired loyalty, respect and laughter, said Lauren Andresen, former associate director at the Seacoast Center. “It was exciting and enlightening to work with her,” she said. “Much of what I learned from Jane I will use the remainder of my professional life.” As retirement neared, Torrey likened her feelings to what students experience as they approach graduation. “How do you reinvent yourself after you’ve been one thing for so long? I guess that’s my next challenge,” Torrey said. “For one thing, I’m going to have fun.”

SNHU works hard to create a community which is nurturing, humane

and focused on individuals. Few people exemplify that ethos better than Jane Torrey.

– President Paul LeBlanc

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 3


University Happenings

Director Departs

Dear friends, I am not sure there is a more idyllic place than a New England university campus in the early fall. Outside my window I can see the women’s soccer team practicing, two members of the freshman class (our largest ever) lugging armfuls of books toward Newcastle Hall and one of our faculty members in earnest conversation with a student as they walk to class. The days remain sunny and warm, at least for a bit longer. Unlike so many campuses, ours is not reawakening to a new academic year after a lazy, quiet summer. Southern New Hampshire University is a 12-month hub of activity. Our new class of M.F.A. students was here for a highly successful residency with acclaimed authors Richard Rhodes and Sy Montgomery. International community economic development students came from around the country and the globe to spend six weeks in class here in Manchester. This issue features one of them – Alicia Fitzpatrick, who is doing inspirational work with Zuni pupils on the reservation where she teaches. In this issue of The Extra Mile, you may also read about our basketball teams’ and coaches’ tour of China. Hospitality students in our BASHA program were here studying and have now fanned out around the country for internships at some of the finest hotels. Many of those internships were made possible by SNHU alumni. The role of alumni is the subject of our cover story. This is a place that has transformed lives for 75 years. It has the biggest business school in the state. With a federal grant it, created a groundbreaking three-year honors business program that saves students 25 percent on tuition (find me even one other program that creates that kind of

“The students look normal. They talk normal. But they are superheroes.”

Mickey Green ’72 (left) is the new chairman of the university’s board of trustees. Rick Courtemanche ’73 chaired the board for 10 years and remains a member.

savings). Our CED program is considered the best in the field. Our aforementioned M.F.A. program features the very best writers in America. We do all of this and still we haven’t lost our commitment to students who might be the first in their families to go to college, who might be juggling family and work and education, who might be serving in Iraq and taking classes online. I could go on and on. I love to see alumni put SNHU stickers on their cars, mount their SNHU diplomas on their office walls, brag to their neighbors and co-workers and celebrate the school where they earned their education. A final word about two of those alumni: After 10 years of guiding our board of trustees, Chairman Rick Courtemanche ’73 is handing the baton to Mickey Greene ’72. Rick will continue as a member of the board. I have appreciated his wise counsel and personal support and I am grateful that he remains part of our leadership team even as I look forward to working with Mickey. The two exemplify extraordinary dedication and ongoing engagement. Best wishes!

By Sarah Littlefield, student Jane Torrey spent decades creating a comfortable setting for student learning. Academic adviser Burton Reynolds found her one evening elbow-deep in trash, preparing classrooms for students after a day of vendor events. “Jane is not embarrassed or afraid to roll up her sleeves and dig right in,” he said. After serving 20 years as director of the university’s Seacoast Center (formerly the Portsmouth Center), Torrey retired in August. “SNHU works hard to create a community which is nurturing, humane and focused on individuals. Few people exemplify that ethos better than Jane Torrey,” SNHU President Paul LeBlanc said. “Jane has been a passionate advocate for her students and the inspirational spirit of the Seacoast Center: one part cheerleader, one part mother to all and one part taskmaster.” As director of the center, located at the Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth, N.H., Torrey oversaw 300

Paul J. LeBlanc President

“Many of our students never thought they would go to college,” she said. “To watch them morph from someone who is anxious, unsure of themselves, into a confident graduate is awesome because it not only changes their life – it changes the life of every generation after them.

to 500 students and 25 to 30 faculty members per term, as well as a staff of five. She also managed the center’s budget; coordinated course offerings and schedules; recruited, hired, assigned, trained and evaluated adjunct faculty members; developed community and corporate relationships; and ensured academic integrity. With five other colleges operating within a five-mile radius of the Seacoast Center, competition for students is tough. Torrey responded by emphasizing exceptional service and community involvement. “You can tell when you walk into Jane’s organization, there’s a difference – the way the people, the administrative staff, treat you,” Reynolds said. Torrey had the utmost respect and admiration for her students and enjoyed being their cheerleader.

Graduate student Steve Cook, an information technology operations manager at Liberty Mutual who has multiple SNHU degrees, said Torrey made him feel all his work was worthwhile. “She’s very sweet and well respected,” he said. “A lot of people are going to miss her.” Torrey inspired loyalty, respect and laughter, said Lauren Andresen, former associate director at the Seacoast Center. “It was exciting and enlightening to work with her,” she said. “Much of what I learned from Jane I will use the remainder of my professional life.” As retirement neared, Torrey likened her feelings to what students experience as they approach graduation. “How do you reinvent yourself after you’ve been one thing for so long? I guess that’s my next challenge,” Torrey said. “For one thing, I’m going to have fun.”

SNHU works hard to create a community which is nurturing, humane

and focused on individuals. Few people exemplify that ethos better than Jane Torrey.

– President Paul LeBlanc

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 3


Our Name in Lights The university’s Web site address is helping light up the Manchester, N.H., skyline. The neon sign was raised on the roof of the downtown building that houses SNHU Online, the university’s distance education program, and can be seen from Interstate 293. It is about 8 feet tall and 37 feet wide. Each letter weighs about 100 pounds, for a total weight, including framing, of about 1,500 pounds. The lights are configured with custom-bent neon and total 550 feet with 227 volts. “We took pains to create an old-fashioned-style sign that would evoke a sort of 1950s look for a 21st-century educational offering,” President Paul LeBlanc said. The sign was designed by Jutras Signs, owned by Cathy Champagne ?88.

Go Teach for SNHU Online Southern New Hampshire University needs qualified, part-time online instructors. We have one of the largest online programs in New England, serving thousands of students in 22 time zones. If you have a master’s degree in an appropriate discipline, we want to hear from you. Extensive work and teaching experience are desired. Please send a resume and cover letter to TeachOnline@snhu.edu. SNHU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. Visit www.snhu.edu/jobs and click on “Adjunct Faculty for Online Education” for a complete list.

4 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 5


Our Name in Lights The university’s Web site address is helping light up the Manchester, N.H., skyline. The neon sign was raised on the roof of the downtown building that houses SNHU Online, the university’s distance education program, and can be seen from Interstate 293. It is about 8 feet tall and 37 feet wide. Each letter weighs about 100 pounds, for a total weight, including framing, of about 1,500 pounds. The lights are configured with custom-bent neon and total 550 feet with 227 volts. “We took pains to create an old-fashioned-style sign that would evoke a sort of 1950s look for a 21st-century educational offering,” President Paul LeBlanc said. The sign was designed by Jutras Signs, owned by Cathy Champagne ?88.

Go Teach for SNHU Online Southern New Hampshire University needs qualified, part-time online instructors. We have one of the largest online programs in New England, serving thousands of students in 22 time zones. If you have a master’s degree in an appropriate discipline, we want to hear from you. Extensive work and teaching experience are desired. Please send a resume and cover letter to TeachOnline@snhu.edu. SNHU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. Visit www.snhu.edu/jobs and click on “Adjunct Faculty for Online Education” for a complete list.

4 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 5


University Happenings

Teams on Tour The university’s basketball teams took on China over the summer. During the 11-day exhibition tour, members of the men’s and women’s teams competed against Chinese teams, held youth basketball clinics and did a lot of sightseeing in Shanghai and Beijing. “We have a major initiative to establish a presence in China – we recruit there and we hope to bring programs to the country. The basketball teams’ tour was a way of carrying the SNHU banner and of nurturing our relationships with our Chinese university partners, and was a way of building goodwill,” said President Paul LeBlanc. “At the same time, it provided our students and coaches an extraordinary learning opportunity.” LeBlanc has visited China in recent years to develop SNHU’s relationship with Chinese universities and was amazed at the popularity of basketball there. The traveling party consisted of the teams, coaching staffs and Athletic Department personnel, as well as family members and friends. SNHU trustee Martha Shen-Urquidez, who is based in Beijing and Shanghai, made all of the 6 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

In Her Words By Samantha Allen Being part of the SNHU women’s basketball team while touring through China was amazing. It was an incredible experience that I will never forget!

“How can you do that?” Pinkos said, laughing. “We all bought a suitcase coming back.”

arrangements, set up the games and oversaw the visit. Beijing Sports University, China’s premier athletic training facility, hosted the group. It was the first overseas trip for the women’s basketball program, and the team went prepared. Players presented “fun facts” about China before practices. The coaching staff found a Chinese language pronunciation Web site, and the group practiced basic phrases. Coach Karen Pinkos even arranged for a local restaurant to prepare an authentic Chinese dinner for the players, which they ate using chopsticks. There was one hardship – travelers were allowed only one carry-on bag each for the 11-day trip.

While in China, the teams hit the courts to take on Chinese university teams; the women’s team also faced a professional team. “It was very different than the style we’re used to,” Pinkos said. “It was very physical – much faster.” Both teams had victories. The women lost to the pros, but it was a learning experience, sophomore Andrea Lozeau said. “They were incredible,” she said. “It will help us because now we’ll be more physical than the teams around here.” The teams did a lot of sightseeing, too – they went to the Summer Palace, Tiananmen Square, future Olympic sites in Beijing and the Great Wall. “You can’t really have a grip on how

incredible the Great Wall is until you’ve seen it and climbed it,” Lozeau said. Coach Stan Spirou was stunned by the extensive development in the two cities. “Since China is going to be a major player in the world politically, economically and, I think, athletically, it was good to see it evolving from the ground up,” he said. The trip was good for international relations, LeBlanc said. “With China we have a growing partnership and rivalry,” he said. “In that context, it is important for the Chinese to meet and interact with Americans, to understand us better – as we must understand them – and to meet individuals and realize that for all of our

differences, we share a wide range of common goals and desires.” Contending with language and cultural differences brought the teams closer together, Pinkos and Spirou said. “A trip like this is twofold,” said Spirou, who has taken his teams to Greece in the past. “Basketball-wise, it gives us a chance to come together and create some team unity. More importantly, the kids got the chance to experience the cultures of the different country and hopefully brought back memories that will last a lifetime.” “It was good for them to step out of their boxes, out of their comfort zones,” Pinkos said. “They’ll be talking about this trip forever.”

When we arrived in Beijing, none of us really had any idea what to expect – small things like no toilet paper, bathroom situations, food and manners seemed to hit us hard – but we got used to the lifestyle very quickly and soon it became second nature. The Chinese culture surprised all of us, but the experience of being there has made me realize how lucky I am to live in the U.S. and that I might never be able to return to China in my life. So I tried a little bit of everything – jellyfish, eel, seaweed – “weird” food that I’m sure I will never want to know what it actually was – and you know what: I’m still alive! Trying new things and going to new places never hurt anyone. One of my favorite experiences in China was climbing the Great Wall. Words cannot even begin to describe its beautiful and majestic qualities. It seemed to go on and on forever – and I bet if we had preseason on that wall, there would not be a team in the Northeast-10 that would be as strong or fast! I remember a certain point on the wall where it was nearly vertical for climbing; I was on all fours attempting to scale it. There is amazing architecture in China. Shanghai had some of the most amazing buildings (and lights) that I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning! The China experience will be one that I will never forget. Fifty years from now I’ll be telling my grandchildren about playing basketball in China.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 7


University Happenings

Teams on Tour The university’s basketball teams took on China over the summer. During the 11-day exhibition tour, members of the men’s and women’s teams competed against Chinese teams, held youth basketball clinics and did a lot of sightseeing in Shanghai and Beijing. “We have a major initiative to establish a presence in China – we recruit there and we hope to bring programs to the country. The basketball teams’ tour was a way of carrying the SNHU banner and of nurturing our relationships with our Chinese university partners, and was a way of building goodwill,” said President Paul LeBlanc. “At the same time, it provided our students and coaches an extraordinary learning opportunity.” LeBlanc has visited China in recent years to develop SNHU’s relationship with Chinese universities and was amazed at the popularity of basketball there. The traveling party consisted of the teams, coaching staffs and Athletic Department personnel, as well as family members and friends. SNHU trustee Martha Shen-Urquidez, who is based in Beijing and Shanghai, made all of the 6 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

In Her Words By Samantha Allen Being part of the SNHU women’s basketball team while touring through China was amazing. It was an incredible experience that I will never forget!

“How can you do that?” Pinkos said, laughing. “We all bought a suitcase coming back.”

arrangements, set up the games and oversaw the visit. Beijing Sports University, China’s premier athletic training facility, hosted the group. It was the first overseas trip for the women’s basketball program, and the team went prepared. Players presented “fun facts” about China before practices. The coaching staff found a Chinese language pronunciation Web site, and the group practiced basic phrases. Coach Karen Pinkos even arranged for a local restaurant to prepare an authentic Chinese dinner for the players, which they ate using chopsticks. There was one hardship – travelers were allowed only one carry-on bag each for the 11-day trip.

While in China, the teams hit the courts to take on Chinese university teams; the women’s team also faced a professional team. “It was very different than the style we’re used to,” Pinkos said. “It was very physical – much faster.” Both teams had victories. The women lost to the pros, but it was a learning experience, sophomore Andrea Lozeau said. “They were incredible,” she said. “It will help us because now we’ll be more physical than the teams around here.” The teams did a lot of sightseeing, too – they went to the Summer Palace, Tiananmen Square, future Olympic sites in Beijing and the Great Wall. “You can’t really have a grip on how

incredible the Great Wall is until you’ve seen it and climbed it,” Lozeau said. Coach Stan Spirou was stunned by the extensive development in the two cities. “Since China is going to be a major player in the world politically, economically and, I think, athletically, it was good to see it evolving from the ground up,” he said. The trip was good for international relations, LeBlanc said. “With China we have a growing partnership and rivalry,” he said. “In that context, it is important for the Chinese to meet and interact with Americans, to understand us better – as we must understand them – and to meet individuals and realize that for all of our

differences, we share a wide range of common goals and desires.” Contending with language and cultural differences brought the teams closer together, Pinkos and Spirou said. “A trip like this is twofold,” said Spirou, who has taken his teams to Greece in the past. “Basketball-wise, it gives us a chance to come together and create some team unity. More importantly, the kids got the chance to experience the cultures of the different country and hopefully brought back memories that will last a lifetime.” “It was good for them to step out of their boxes, out of their comfort zones,” Pinkos said. “They’ll be talking about this trip forever.”

When we arrived in Beijing, none of us really had any idea what to expect – small things like no toilet paper, bathroom situations, food and manners seemed to hit us hard – but we got used to the lifestyle very quickly and soon it became second nature. The Chinese culture surprised all of us, but the experience of being there has made me realize how lucky I am to live in the U.S. and that I might never be able to return to China in my life. So I tried a little bit of everything – jellyfish, eel, seaweed – “weird” food that I’m sure I will never want to know what it actually was – and you know what: I’m still alive! Trying new things and going to new places never hurt anyone. One of my favorite experiences in China was climbing the Great Wall. Words cannot even begin to describe its beautiful and majestic qualities. It seemed to go on and on forever – and I bet if we had preseason on that wall, there would not be a team in the Northeast-10 that would be as strong or fast! I remember a certain point on the wall where it was nearly vertical for climbing; I was on all fours attempting to scale it. There is amazing architecture in China. Shanghai had some of the most amazing buildings (and lights) that I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning! The China experience will be one that I will never forget. Fifty years from now I’ll be telling my grandchildren about playing basketball in China.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 7


Business

SCHOOL OF

Makeup Master By Patricia Garrity

Kriss Soterion ’87 knows how to put your best face forward. Soterion is a master makeup artist. Pundits raved after she gave presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton a pre-debate makeover last summer. She’s powdered a number of highprofile faces, including politicians Pat Buchanan, Jimmy Carter and former President Bill Clinton, and done makeup work for the networks, the Discovery Channel, CNN and Food Network. She operates a salon in Manchester, N.H., and has created her own product line, Kriss Cosmetics. Who is the most interesting person to whom you have applied makeup? Soterion: It was actually one of the most important moments I ever did makeup. It was three days after the 9/11 attack. I was working for NBC Nightly News, applying makeup to Tom Brokaw but also to former President (George) Bush Sr. President Bush Sr. was making the first transcontinental flight from Texas to Logan Airport to let the American people know that it was safe to fly commercial airlines again … there were SWAT teams everywhere and I had to get special clearance. I realized that in that moment of time I was probably in one of the most dangerous places in the country doing makeup.

Have Brush, Will Travel School of Business alumna Kriss Soterion ’87 has helped a lot of people look their best.

8 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

My biggest challenge is overcoming the stigma that being in the beauty industry is about vanity … but it’s remembering some of the powerful moments in history that I’ve shared in as a result of being a makeup artist that corrects my vision.

But the one that fills me with the most energy would have to be Bono from U2. I did his makeup at the Democratic convention in Boston. I was working with CNN and he was on “The Larry King Show.” That moment really was a zinger because he dropped his glasses down and he stared so deep in my eyes before I did his makeup. It’s almost like I received something from him that day. I’m not really sure what it was, but I think it might have been a blessing of some sort.

– Kriss Soterion ’87

they can act as if they do and they can step up to the plate and go and work that job that they have to work to keep their insurance. It’s times like that that I realize that this has nothing to do with vanity. But that is a huge challenge and the other, not so much today because I have my priorities in order, but for a long time it was a long lesson to learn balance between work and family and self-care.

How do you feel about your current celebrity status? Soterion: I’m chuckling because I think it’s really funny. I look at myself as somebody who provides a service to celebrities. Doing Hillary Clinton’s makeup has definitely put me on the map in a capacity that is greater than I have been in the past, but I still get up and do the same day. It wasn’t like a one-hit wonder makeover on Hillary Clinton. This is something that I have been doing since ’91. What keeps you going when times get tough? Soterion: Now I get that people that are successful have their priorities in order and they have a strong commitment to those priorities. For me it’s self-care and my prayer life … I have a wonderful husband of 19 years and three amazing boys, and when I’m making sure that the home front is my No. 1 thing, then anything else that I have room for will flourish. What is your biggest challenge? Soterion: My biggest challenge is overcoming the stigma that being in the beauty industry is about vanity. This is lipstick. This is just so frivolous. It’s not like I pick up my paintbrushes and it paints away homelessness or something. Sometimes I struggle with that, but it’s remembering some of the powerful moments in history that I’ve shared in as a result of being a makeup artist that corrects my vision. It’s also the moments where I’m working on a cancer patient and I’m helping them to be able to feel better about going through their day, with being able to make it look like they feel great so

Hillary’s Secret Weapon. Kriss Soterion ’87 was profiled in the Boston Herald for the makeover she gave presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton last summer.

Who was your favorite professor at SNHU? Soterion: Well, I’d have to say that my absolute favorite professor would be (retired Prof.) Lynda Gamans Poloian, who also happens to be my mom. I did have her as an instructor for my retailing class and I always joke around that she gave me a B. But the reason she is my favorite professor was she brought me up in education and really stressed the necessity of a good education as a foundation for further success.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 9


Business

SCHOOL OF

Makeup Master By Patricia Garrity

Kriss Soterion ’87 knows how to put your best face forward. Soterion is a master makeup artist. Pundits raved after she gave presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton a pre-debate makeover last summer. She’s powdered a number of highprofile faces, including politicians Pat Buchanan, Jimmy Carter and former President Bill Clinton, and done makeup work for the networks, the Discovery Channel, CNN and Food Network. She operates a salon in Manchester, N.H., and has created her own product line, Kriss Cosmetics. Who is the most interesting person to whom you have applied makeup? Soterion: It was actually one of the most important moments I ever did makeup. It was three days after the 9/11 attack. I was working for NBC Nightly News, applying makeup to Tom Brokaw but also to former President (George) Bush Sr. President Bush Sr. was making the first transcontinental flight from Texas to Logan Airport to let the American people know that it was safe to fly commercial airlines again … there were SWAT teams everywhere and I had to get special clearance. I realized that in that moment of time I was probably in one of the most dangerous places in the country doing makeup.

Have Brush, Will Travel School of Business alumna Kriss Soterion ’87 has helped a lot of people look their best.

8 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

My biggest challenge is overcoming the stigma that being in the beauty industry is about vanity … but it’s remembering some of the powerful moments in history that I’ve shared in as a result of being a makeup artist that corrects my vision.

But the one that fills me with the most energy would have to be Bono from U2. I did his makeup at the Democratic convention in Boston. I was working with CNN and he was on “The Larry King Show.” That moment really was a zinger because he dropped his glasses down and he stared so deep in my eyes before I did his makeup. It’s almost like I received something from him that day. I’m not really sure what it was, but I think it might have been a blessing of some sort.

– Kriss Soterion ’87

they can act as if they do and they can step up to the plate and go and work that job that they have to work to keep their insurance. It’s times like that that I realize that this has nothing to do with vanity. But that is a huge challenge and the other, not so much today because I have my priorities in order, but for a long time it was a long lesson to learn balance between work and family and self-care.

How do you feel about your current celebrity status? Soterion: I’m chuckling because I think it’s really funny. I look at myself as somebody who provides a service to celebrities. Doing Hillary Clinton’s makeup has definitely put me on the map in a capacity that is greater than I have been in the past, but I still get up and do the same day. It wasn’t like a one-hit wonder makeover on Hillary Clinton. This is something that I have been doing since ’91. What keeps you going when times get tough? Soterion: Now I get that people that are successful have their priorities in order and they have a strong commitment to those priorities. For me it’s self-care and my prayer life … I have a wonderful husband of 19 years and three amazing boys, and when I’m making sure that the home front is my No. 1 thing, then anything else that I have room for will flourish. What is your biggest challenge? Soterion: My biggest challenge is overcoming the stigma that being in the beauty industry is about vanity. This is lipstick. This is just so frivolous. It’s not like I pick up my paintbrushes and it paints away homelessness or something. Sometimes I struggle with that, but it’s remembering some of the powerful moments in history that I’ve shared in as a result of being a makeup artist that corrects my vision. It’s also the moments where I’m working on a cancer patient and I’m helping them to be able to feel better about going through their day, with being able to make it look like they feel great so

Hillary’s Secret Weapon. Kriss Soterion ’87 was profiled in the Boston Herald for the makeover she gave presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton last summer.

Who was your favorite professor at SNHU? Soterion: Well, I’d have to say that my absolute favorite professor would be (retired Prof.) Lynda Gamans Poloian, who also happens to be my mom. I did have her as an instructor for my retailing class and I always joke around that she gave me a B. But the reason she is my favorite professor was she brought me up in education and really stressed the necessity of a good education as a foundation for further success.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 9


Community Economic Development

SCHOOL OF

Tilling Tradition By Woullard Lett, School of Community Economic Development

Alicia Fitzpatrick ’07 hoped her students at Twin Buttes High School on the Zuni reservation in Zuni, N.M., would do something more constructive when she heard them complain about lunches. When student Alex Jamon bemoaned the school’s lack of fresh produce, Fitzpatrick stressed to him the importance of finding solutions to problems rather than grousing about them. So he did. Jamon hatched the idea to create a new elective science class dedicated to creating and managing a school greenhouse and a traditional Zuni waffle garden. Through it, students enhanced their modern school lunch program by applying the gardening techniques their Native American ancestors used. “Zuni is traditionally an agrarian society,” Fitzpatrick said. “Agriculture and the Zuni religion are infused.” Fitzpatrick has enabled the students to make decisions. She sought and received support from the school administration and a grant from the Red Rock Coalition, which is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Parents, school staff and community members are participating as well. Students have created the garden and built a frame greenhouse to extend the growing season. They reflected on the waffle garden’s progress through photography, journaling and small group discussions. In addition to learning how to grow food, students have incorporated traditional Zuni practices into the school curriculum. The Zuni have lived in the area since the 1500s, making them among the oldest stationary Native American settlements in North America. Their active lifestyle and traditional diet of corn and other vegetables sustained their health. But with major upriver civil engineering projects affecting their water supply and a modern food supply consisting of government surplus foods, their health began a slow deterioration that resulted in skyrocketing diabetes by the 1980s.

Nature and Nurture Working on traditional gardens enables her students to shape the future, says teacher Alicia Fitzpatrick ’07.

10 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Students at Twin Buttes High School in Zuni, N.M., constructed a greenhouse so they could grow fresh vegetables for school lunches.

I developed the realization that people have the ability to not only co-exist with each other,

but work for a common goal. I see this as a platform for a fresh start in healthy living for the next generation of youth.

– Alex Jamon, student

Other projects have stemmed from the waffle garden project. The students demolished an old building on the school campus and turned the foundation into an outside classroom. They built benches for the school grounds using some of the wood. They also developed a water catchment system around the school building. “I had an interest in doing a project with youth that involved the community, but I also knew the idea had to come from the youth,” said Fitzpatrick, an international community economic development program graduate. The students plan to supplement school lunches and sell some of the harvest to the local store in Zuni, the beginning of a school agribusiness. “I developed the realization that people have the ability to not only co-exist with each other, but work for a common goal,” Jamon said. “I see this as a platform for a fresh start in healthy living for the next generation of youth.”

What is a waffle garden? Traditional Zuni waffle gardens are terraced, with perimeters of raised mud. The pattern created looks like a waffle from above. The design makes efficient use of space and conserves water, an important factor in the arid Southwest. Crops include droughtresistant varieties of corn, squash, beans, melons, cilantro, chili peppers and more.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 11


Community Economic Development

SCHOOL OF

Tilling Tradition By Woullard Lett, School of Community Economic Development

Alicia Fitzpatrick ’07 hoped her students at Twin Buttes High School on the Zuni reservation in Zuni, N.M., would do something more constructive when she heard them complain about lunches. When student Alex Jamon bemoaned the school’s lack of fresh produce, Fitzpatrick stressed to him the importance of finding solutions to problems rather than grousing about them. So he did. Jamon hatched the idea to create a new elective science class dedicated to creating and managing a school greenhouse and a traditional Zuni waffle garden. Through it, students enhanced their modern school lunch program by applying the gardening techniques their Native American ancestors used. “Zuni is traditionally an agrarian society,” Fitzpatrick said. “Agriculture and the Zuni religion are infused.” Fitzpatrick has enabled the students to make decisions. She sought and received support from the school administration and a grant from the Red Rock Coalition, which is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Parents, school staff and community members are participating as well. Students have created the garden and built a frame greenhouse to extend the growing season. They reflected on the waffle garden’s progress through photography, journaling and small group discussions. In addition to learning how to grow food, students have incorporated traditional Zuni practices into the school curriculum. The Zuni have lived in the area since the 1500s, making them among the oldest stationary Native American settlements in North America. Their active lifestyle and traditional diet of corn and other vegetables sustained their health. But with major upriver civil engineering projects affecting their water supply and a modern food supply consisting of government surplus foods, their health began a slow deterioration that resulted in skyrocketing diabetes by the 1980s.

Nature and Nurture Working on traditional gardens enables her students to shape the future, says teacher Alicia Fitzpatrick ’07.

10 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Students at Twin Buttes High School in Zuni, N.M., constructed a greenhouse so they could grow fresh vegetables for school lunches.

I developed the realization that people have the ability to not only co-exist with each other,

but work for a common goal. I see this as a platform for a fresh start in healthy living for the next generation of youth.

– Alex Jamon, student

Other projects have stemmed from the waffle garden project. The students demolished an old building on the school campus and turned the foundation into an outside classroom. They built benches for the school grounds using some of the wood. They also developed a water catchment system around the school building. “I had an interest in doing a project with youth that involved the community, but I also knew the idea had to come from the youth,” said Fitzpatrick, an international community economic development program graduate. The students plan to supplement school lunches and sell some of the harvest to the local store in Zuni, the beginning of a school agribusiness. “I developed the realization that people have the ability to not only co-exist with each other, but work for a common goal,” Jamon said. “I see this as a platform for a fresh start in healthy living for the next generation of youth.”

What is a waffle garden? Traditional Zuni waffle gardens are terraced, with perimeters of raised mud. The pattern created looks like a waffle from above. The design makes efficient use of space and conserves water, an important factor in the arid Southwest. Crops include droughtresistant varieties of corn, squash, beans, melons, cilantro, chili peppers and more.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 11


C O V E R S T O RY

There is a saying in higher education that the difference between a good school and a great school is involvement of the alumni.

StayingConnected Hanging diplomas, talking about the university, mentoring and hiring students, attending events and supporting scholarships are just some of the ways alumni can advocate for the university. “We would like our alumni to interact with every stage of a student’s experience,” said President Paul LeBlanc. “Very few students have graduated from here without the help of others.” The university is fortunate to have many alumni visit campus, attend events, interact with and hire students, provide financial support and much more. “Alumni are critical to our success because they’ve lived the SNHU experience,” said Don Brezinski, vice president of the Office of Institutional Advancement.

12 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 13


C O V E R S T O RY

There is a saying in higher education that the difference between a good school and a great school is involvement of the alumni.

StayingConnected Hanging diplomas, talking about the university, mentoring and hiring students, attending events and supporting scholarships are just some of the ways alumni can advocate for the university. “We would like our alumni to interact with every stage of a student’s experience,” said President Paul LeBlanc. “Very few students have graduated from here without the help of others.” The university is fortunate to have many alumni visit campus, attend events, interact with and hire students, provide financial support and much more. “Alumni are critical to our success because they’ve lived the SNHU experience,” said Don Brezinski, vice president of the Office of Institutional Advancement.

12 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 13


Be of Service

Back to School

and a very flexible schedule to go to school on the weekends and at night during the summer.”

“I like that it kind of takes me back a little,” he said. “A lot of it is the innocence of the questions, the wide eyes of kids wanting to learn. It’s off the beaten path from what I have to do every day.”

Finlay also has connected students to another organization he supports, Friends of Forgotten Children, which helps families in the Concord, N.H., area with food, clothing, household goods and holiday gifts. In September, student volunteers spruced up the building and landscaping and the university sponsored the organization’s grand re-opening. The organization also will employ SNHU work-study students. “When alums get involved, students see that upon graduation they still have a responsibility to give back to their communities, and SNHU can support them in doing that,” Jacobs said.

Rick Courtemanche ’73 and students Brienne Casey and Casey Snow advocate for “alternative break” community service trips.

Repair a fence, build a shelter for hurricane victims, read stories to at-risk children, serve up some stew or make a donation. The university serves the community in dozens of ways through its Center for Service and Citizenship, and alumni can help.

“It was an exciting trip to bring technology to an area that is in such desperate need,” Finlay said. “These kids are really doing a lot and accomplishing so much that the dollar return, especially for business graduates to realize, is unbelievable.”

“Alums becoming involved role-model the behavior and the philosophy we’re trying to develop on campus: a philosophy of service where we give back,” Center Coordinator Sarah Jacobs said.

Finlay has a successful career – he is now managing director of Hillcrest Management, a private investment group – and supports the university to give back.

University trustee Rob Finlay ’92 became involved with the service office last spring, when students installed computers at rural primary schools in South Africa. Finlay contributed $10,000 to the effort. Trustees Theresa DesFosses ‘72, Rick Courtemanche ’73 and Mike Brody ’73, among others, also contributed.

“SNHU gave me a chance,” he said. “I was fortunate enough to get a scholarship when I went to school there,

14 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Courtemanche’s involvement with the center began with a gift to support an alternative spring break trip to help Hurricane Katrina victims in Pass Christian, Miss. He ended up going with them. “It really makes me feel good that we’re doing the right thing – that they’re involved, that they’re engaged, that we’re providing an experience that goes beyond the classroom,” he said. Alumni are role models, contacts and mentors for students, he said. He has helped students in many ways, including offering advice and writing recommendations. “It keeps me motivated, it keeps me young, it keeps me energized; it challenges me,” he said. “How could it not be anything but a win-win?” Join the 75 Acts of Service effort by sending your service project plans to serve@snhu.edu. Check www.snhu.edu for 75th anniversary and 75 Acts of Service updates.

mation and experience to offer students, he said. Plus he enjoys being back in the classroom.

Donahue’s longevity in the industry and career growth is a good example for students, Torrey said.

Scott McKenzie ’97 and his children are big fans of Penmen hockey and lacrosse.

Some alumni find themselves back in the classroom years after graduating. Alumni offer students a professional perspective and information they can use when deciding on careers. Chris Thompson ’01, manager of business development for the American Hockey League’s Springfield Falcons, has worked in a sport management and marketing agency, for the league and for a team. He talks to Dr. Doug Blais’ sport management students about various career paths they can take and offers advice. He does it in part out of gratitude for the contacts faculty helped him make when he was getting started. He also feels it is important to “stay connected to your roots.” “They went to bat for me,” he said. “What SNHU offers – you can’t put a price tag on it.” Blais ’88 and ’90 appreciates the connection a fellow alumnus can make with his students. “They reinforce some of the messages we’re giving. Then students say, ‘I guess Blais does have a clue, he does

know what he’s talking about,’” Blais said, laughing. “They get the sense that could be them in five years.” Neil Donahue ’82 was looking for something he could do for the university when he reached out to Assistant Professor Susan Torrey. A regional sales vice president for Compass Group, which provides food service for Microsoft, Fulton’s Crab House, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Academy Awards and other well-known organizations and high-profile events, he speaks to hospitality students about this segment of the food service industry that he said “often goes unnoticed.”

“He introduces them to a world that they really haven’t been exposed to,” she said. “It’s much more vivid than what an instructor or textbook can show.” Former basketball player Ed Ithier ’87 and ’92 (pictured on cover) has been visiting classes for 11 years. He hopes students who see alumni contributing are inspired to do the same after they graduate. “In any successful university, students need to see alumni, people who have had great experiences, come back and try to support the institution,” said

“Ours is kind of a sleeping giant,” he said. “Not too many people know about it until they’ve exhausted the other ‘Main Street’ avenues.” Working alumni have a lot of infor-

Chris Thompson ’01, with student Nicole Dumond, enjoys speaking with students about his varied career path.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 15


Be of Service

Back to School

and a very flexible schedule to go to school on the weekends and at night during the summer.”

“I like that it kind of takes me back a little,” he said. “A lot of it is the innocence of the questions, the wide eyes of kids wanting to learn. It’s off the beaten path from what I have to do every day.”

Finlay also has connected students to another organization he supports, Friends of Forgotten Children, which helps families in the Concord, N.H., area with food, clothing, household goods and holiday gifts. In September, student volunteers spruced up the building and landscaping and the university sponsored the organization’s grand re-opening. The organization also will employ SNHU work-study students. “When alums get involved, students see that upon graduation they still have a responsibility to give back to their communities, and SNHU can support them in doing that,” Jacobs said.

Rick Courtemanche ’73 and students Brienne Casey and Casey Snow advocate for “alternative break” community service trips.

Repair a fence, build a shelter for hurricane victims, read stories to at-risk children, serve up some stew or make a donation. The university serves the community in dozens of ways through its Center for Service and Citizenship, and alumni can help.

“It was an exciting trip to bring technology to an area that is in such desperate need,” Finlay said. “These kids are really doing a lot and accomplishing so much that the dollar return, especially for business graduates to realize, is unbelievable.”

“Alums becoming involved role-model the behavior and the philosophy we’re trying to develop on campus: a philosophy of service where we give back,” Center Coordinator Sarah Jacobs said.

Finlay has a successful career – he is now managing director of Hillcrest Management, a private investment group – and supports the university to give back.

University trustee Rob Finlay ’92 became involved with the service office last spring, when students installed computers at rural primary schools in South Africa. Finlay contributed $10,000 to the effort. Trustees Theresa DesFosses ‘72, Rick Courtemanche ’73 and Mike Brody ’73, among others, also contributed.

“SNHU gave me a chance,” he said. “I was fortunate enough to get a scholarship when I went to school there,

14 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Courtemanche’s involvement with the center began with a gift to support an alternative spring break trip to help Hurricane Katrina victims in Pass Christian, Miss. He ended up going with them. “It really makes me feel good that we’re doing the right thing – that they’re involved, that they’re engaged, that we’re providing an experience that goes beyond the classroom,” he said. Alumni are role models, contacts and mentors for students, he said. He has helped students in many ways, including offering advice and writing recommendations. “It keeps me motivated, it keeps me young, it keeps me energized; it challenges me,” he said. “How could it not be anything but a win-win?” Join the 75 Acts of Service effort by sending your service project plans to serve@snhu.edu. Check www.snhu.edu for 75th anniversary and 75 Acts of Service updates.

mation and experience to offer students, he said. Plus he enjoys being back in the classroom.

Donahue’s longevity in the industry and career growth is a good example for students, Torrey said.

Scott McKenzie ’97 and his children are big fans of Penmen hockey and lacrosse.

Some alumni find themselves back in the classroom years after graduating. Alumni offer students a professional perspective and information they can use when deciding on careers. Chris Thompson ’01, manager of business development for the American Hockey League’s Springfield Falcons, has worked in a sport management and marketing agency, for the league and for a team. He talks to Dr. Doug Blais’ sport management students about various career paths they can take and offers advice. He does it in part out of gratitude for the contacts faculty helped him make when he was getting started. He also feels it is important to “stay connected to your roots.” “They went to bat for me,” he said. “What SNHU offers – you can’t put a price tag on it.” Blais ’88 and ’90 appreciates the connection a fellow alumnus can make with his students. “They reinforce some of the messages we’re giving. Then students say, ‘I guess Blais does have a clue, he does

know what he’s talking about,’” Blais said, laughing. “They get the sense that could be them in five years.” Neil Donahue ’82 was looking for something he could do for the university when he reached out to Assistant Professor Susan Torrey. A regional sales vice president for Compass Group, which provides food service for Microsoft, Fulton’s Crab House, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Academy Awards and other well-known organizations and high-profile events, he speaks to hospitality students about this segment of the food service industry that he said “often goes unnoticed.”

“He introduces them to a world that they really haven’t been exposed to,” she said. “It’s much more vivid than what an instructor or textbook can show.” Former basketball player Ed Ithier ’87 and ’92 (pictured on cover) has been visiting classes for 11 years. He hopes students who see alumni contributing are inspired to do the same after they graduate. “In any successful university, students need to see alumni, people who have had great experiences, come back and try to support the institution,” said

“Ours is kind of a sleeping giant,” he said. “Not too many people know about it until they’ve exhausted the other ‘Main Street’ avenues.” Working alumni have a lot of infor-

Chris Thompson ’01, with student Nicole Dumond, enjoys speaking with students about his varied career path.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 15


Ithier, a product sales specialist with Xerox. “My motivation behind it all is to give students the sense that yes, anything’s possible, because I think a lot of times students don’t know what’s ahead of them.”

Alumni on Board

Talking Up Help Wanted the “U” Simply telling other people about the university is a great way for alumni to contribute.

Ithier speaks about sales-related topics, including motivating sales forces and building customer relationships, in marketing instructor Micheline Anstey’s classes. He also critiques students’ final project presentations. Students see the value of an SNHU education and how it’s used in the real world, Anstey said.

“Word of mouth will drive admissions,” Brezinski said. That’s certainly been the case with Teresa Prim ’89, of Chicago. The community economic development and real estate finance consultant influenced at least seven School of CED graduates to enroll in the program. Prim and her husband, Sequane Lawrence ’96, also spread the word when hosting their annual African-American community economic development networking event.

“The bottom line is that he encourages them to work hard now while they’re in school as this is where their work ethic and character are revealed,” she said. It’s his way of saying thank you. David Lee ’87 and ’93 loved SNHU so much that he persuaded his daughter, Carole, to attend.

I know when I was there, there were alumni who helped me, and I always valued that and appreciated that.

– Ed Ithier, ’87

David Lee ’87 and ’93, newly elected alumni board president, is so devoted to the university that he persuaded his daughter, lacrosse player Carole Lee, to turn down bigger scholarship offers to attend SNHU.

The athletics program drew Scott McKenzie ’97, a Nashua Center student, to campus; years after graduating, his whole family has ties here.

“I really love the school, especially the sports. It’s a family thing,” he said. “It was a great honor to have my daughter get a scholarship and play up there.”

McKenzie used to take his son to SNHU hockey games. He was so impressed with the team that years later he still presents an annual award of his creation – the Fire and Ice Award -- to a member of the team. He now brings his daughter, 11, to lacrosse games; he has been a guest speaker in classes; and his wife, Susan McKenzie, teaches math in the undergraduate day school.

Alumni have a vested interest in staying involved, which helps strengthen the university, Lee said.

“Here I always felt that I was somebody,” he said. “And people would go out of their way to help me.”

16 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

“The more the university improves over the years, the more your degree means,” he said. Robin (Sorenson) Kazes ’97 volunteers for the President’s Cup Golf Tournament, Alumni Weekend, the annual wine festival and other activities, especially those that raise money for student aid. “When I came on campus, I was paying for college myself. (The university)

found ways that I could get money. I got the Alumni Scholarship as well,” she said. “Otherwise I would have walked away from college.” Alumni events are great networking opportunities for alumni, too, she said. “It’s not even about careers and jobs and resumes,” said Kazes, manager of accounts payable and payroll for Scrivanos, which provides services for Dunkin Donuts’ 120 stores and 1,500 employees in four states. “You find yourself in a position where you can ask for advice.” Finally, Kazes volunteers simply because it’s fun. “I always think of it as being selfish,” said Kazes, a member of the alumni board. “I know if people get involved with the school, they’re going to have a good time.” Learn more about alumni activities and ways you can become involved by visiting www.snhu.edu/alumni online.

“I believe the program really enhances people’s skills,” she said. Staying connected also benefits her professionally. “There are still resources and information that I’m able to get from the program, either through my peers or by contacting the instructors directly,” she said. Work is a frequent topic when Amy Moy ’02 helps with recruiting. A graduate of the 3Year honors business program, Moy recently accepted a marketing and sales position for Mighty Innovations, a hightech Web applications company. She speaks at 3Year program networking events and prospective student open houses, often to parents who want to know about her career. “Parents always want to hear about life on campus and getting a job after,” she said. “It’s a two-way benefit: There’s a lot you can add for those students. I am amazed that every time I go back to an event, I connect with someone who is beneficial in my personal or professional life.”

Using SNHU’s Dorothy S. Rogers Career Development Center is a winwin for alumni, according to Director Jim Kuras. The center is always looking for alumni to help students with informational interviews, resume help, mock interviews and mentoring, and is always seeking news of internship opportunities and job openings. Strong connections can be made through the career center. The mock interview service helped Ithier get his internship. The person who hired him went to another company, then hired Ithier for a job after he graduated.

Alumni looking for jobs can use the center for job-hunting assistance from center staff and from other alumni. “Alumni help each other – that’s one of the most value-added aspects of the higher education community,” Brezinski said. “Just hearing (an applicant) is a Southern New Hampshire University alumnus in a job search ought to make you want to talk to them.” Please contact Jim Kuras at j.kuras@snhu.edu for more information.

“We all know that the world revolves around who you know,” Kuras said. “Students understand that relationships are built over time.” The center has an online mentoring program as well as campus recruiting through career and internship fairs and Resume-o-Rama days, where employers critique student resumes. (The next career fair will be in March.) Kazes had a great experience with an accounting student she brought to Scrivanos for an internship. “It brought a little SNHU to my place of business,” she said. The center soon will launch online resume-writing and interviewing modules, which will feature sponsorship opportunities for companies. Kuras also hopes alumni will use the online SNHU Recruit system to post jobs openings online.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 17


Ithier, a product sales specialist with Xerox. “My motivation behind it all is to give students the sense that yes, anything’s possible, because I think a lot of times students don’t know what’s ahead of them.”

Alumni on Board

Talking Up Help Wanted the “U” Simply telling other people about the university is a great way for alumni to contribute.

Ithier speaks about sales-related topics, including motivating sales forces and building customer relationships, in marketing instructor Micheline Anstey’s classes. He also critiques students’ final project presentations. Students see the value of an SNHU education and how it’s used in the real world, Anstey said.

“Word of mouth will drive admissions,” Brezinski said. That’s certainly been the case with Teresa Prim ’89, of Chicago. The community economic development and real estate finance consultant influenced at least seven School of CED graduates to enroll in the program. Prim and her husband, Sequane Lawrence ’96, also spread the word when hosting their annual African-American community economic development networking event.

“The bottom line is that he encourages them to work hard now while they’re in school as this is where their work ethic and character are revealed,” she said. It’s his way of saying thank you. David Lee ’87 and ’93 loved SNHU so much that he persuaded his daughter, Carole, to attend.

I know when I was there, there were alumni who helped me, and I always valued that and appreciated that.

– Ed Ithier, ’87

David Lee ’87 and ’93, newly elected alumni board president, is so devoted to the university that he persuaded his daughter, lacrosse player Carole Lee, to turn down bigger scholarship offers to attend SNHU.

The athletics program drew Scott McKenzie ’97, a Nashua Center student, to campus; years after graduating, his whole family has ties here.

“I really love the school, especially the sports. It’s a family thing,” he said. “It was a great honor to have my daughter get a scholarship and play up there.”

McKenzie used to take his son to SNHU hockey games. He was so impressed with the team that years later he still presents an annual award of his creation – the Fire and Ice Award -- to a member of the team. He now brings his daughter, 11, to lacrosse games; he has been a guest speaker in classes; and his wife, Susan McKenzie, teaches math in the undergraduate day school.

Alumni have a vested interest in staying involved, which helps strengthen the university, Lee said.

“Here I always felt that I was somebody,” he said. “And people would go out of their way to help me.”

16 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

“The more the university improves over the years, the more your degree means,” he said. Robin (Sorenson) Kazes ’97 volunteers for the President’s Cup Golf Tournament, Alumni Weekend, the annual wine festival and other activities, especially those that raise money for student aid. “When I came on campus, I was paying for college myself. (The university)

found ways that I could get money. I got the Alumni Scholarship as well,” she said. “Otherwise I would have walked away from college.” Alumni events are great networking opportunities for alumni, too, she said. “It’s not even about careers and jobs and resumes,” said Kazes, manager of accounts payable and payroll for Scrivanos, which provides services for Dunkin Donuts’ 120 stores and 1,500 employees in four states. “You find yourself in a position where you can ask for advice.” Finally, Kazes volunteers simply because it’s fun. “I always think of it as being selfish,” said Kazes, a member of the alumni board. “I know if people get involved with the school, they’re going to have a good time.” Learn more about alumni activities and ways you can become involved by visiting www.snhu.edu/alumni online.

“I believe the program really enhances people’s skills,” she said. Staying connected also benefits her professionally. “There are still resources and information that I’m able to get from the program, either through my peers or by contacting the instructors directly,” she said. Work is a frequent topic when Amy Moy ’02 helps with recruiting. A graduate of the 3Year honors business program, Moy recently accepted a marketing and sales position for Mighty Innovations, a hightech Web applications company. She speaks at 3Year program networking events and prospective student open houses, often to parents who want to know about her career. “Parents always want to hear about life on campus and getting a job after,” she said. “It’s a two-way benefit: There’s a lot you can add for those students. I am amazed that every time I go back to an event, I connect with someone who is beneficial in my personal or professional life.”

Using SNHU’s Dorothy S. Rogers Career Development Center is a winwin for alumni, according to Director Jim Kuras. The center is always looking for alumni to help students with informational interviews, resume help, mock interviews and mentoring, and is always seeking news of internship opportunities and job openings. Strong connections can be made through the career center. The mock interview service helped Ithier get his internship. The person who hired him went to another company, then hired Ithier for a job after he graduated.

Alumni looking for jobs can use the center for job-hunting assistance from center staff and from other alumni. “Alumni help each other – that’s one of the most value-added aspects of the higher education community,” Brezinski said. “Just hearing (an applicant) is a Southern New Hampshire University alumnus in a job search ought to make you want to talk to them.” Please contact Jim Kuras at j.kuras@snhu.edu for more information.

“We all know that the world revolves around who you know,” Kuras said. “Students understand that relationships are built over time.” The center has an online mentoring program as well as campus recruiting through career and internship fairs and Resume-o-Rama days, where employers critique student resumes. (The next career fair will be in March.) Kazes had a great experience with an accounting student she brought to Scrivanos for an internship. “It brought a little SNHU to my place of business,” she said. The center soon will launch online resume-writing and interviewing modules, which will feature sponsorship opportunities for companies. Kuras also hopes alumni will use the online SNHU Recruit system to post jobs openings online.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 17


Education

SCHOOL OF

Progressive Portfolio

Peggy Zola ’07 has found e-portfolios to be a much more attractive and comprehensive way to showcase her skills. “It was awesome to see the final product,” she said. “It was really nice to look at … and everything is there that you need.”

they proceed through their programs,” said Susan Gifford, administrator of the TQE grant. “Institutions with teacher preparatory programs are strongly encouraged to adopt an e-portfolio as part of the accreditation process. It’s the best decision for quality programs, for the state of New Hampshire and ultimately for the candidates.”

Zola sent hers to the school that ended up hiring her. “This is the tool to use if you want to sell yourself. Oldfashioned portfolios are cumbersome; ePortfolio adds value to the resume and to the interviewing process,” she said. “The entire team involved in the interview can view the e-portfolio together, making the process much more collaborative.” Beyond Paper In addition to being less cumbersome, e-portfolios allow for the inclusion of more varied and creative material. For example, students can upload video vignettes of themselves teaching classes, as well as examples of their lesson plans. Electronic portfolios can be sent in advance of a job interview, allowing a principal to preview a new teacher’s ability and gain insight into his or her disposition in the classroom.

By Judy Timney, School of Education

Alumna Leann McCormack’s college portfolio continues to wow her employer, even now that she is on the job. “I received a very positive response from the principal who hired me, and I’m probably going to be on the technology committee at my new school because of it,” said McCormack ’07, an elementary education graduate. McCormack’s work isn’t in a leather-bound, plastic-sleeved binder or case; she keeps her portfolio on her computer. During her last semester, McCormack participated in a School of Education pilot program for Chalk and Wire’s ePortfolio software. She found Digital Advancement that an electronic portfolio can encompass E-portfolios are helping School of quite a bit more than a case or binder Education graduates get hired. bulging with paper.

18 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

These “digital resumes” are going online at the university this fall, beginning with the School of Education. The technology enables the school to better train tomorrow’s teachers and give them a digital avenue to help them find work. SNHU introduced ePortfolio using a Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant through the state Department of Education. “Paper resumes are giving way to electronic portfolios,” said Associate Dean Ellen J. Kalicki. “The state strongly recommends that all education students have e-portfolios because they’re an excellent assessment tool, but they can also be very helpful for new graduates looking for employment as they can easily be shared with prospective employers via the Internet.”

E-portfolios are more than digital resumes. They are intended to be a valuable part of the learning process as well. For example, instructors can electronically assess student work. Students upload their work, be it videos, PowerPoint presentations, a series of lesson plans or their philosophy of education. Imbedded grading frameworks electronically assess the material and provide feedback to students and instructors. Instructors can determine students’ levels of competency, which in turn also informs instruction.

Not Just for College E-portfolios are used by students at universities across the country, including Pennsylvania State University, Indiana University and Stanford University. Now their use is trickling down even to the elementary school level. McCormack recently showed a group of veteran teachers in her district how to create an electronic portfolio. Just as they do at the college level, e-portfolios could help teachers and administrators at all levels track student growth and development. “At first the technological aspect was intimidating,” she said. “But once I showed them how to upload ‘artifacts,’ the teachers were relieved to see how easy it was to use.”

Prior to a student’s graduation, faculty and staff will use the tools to determine whether he or she has met state standards for pre-service teachers. “E-portfolios allow candidates to electronically display their body of work to determine points of progress as

This is the tool to use if you want to sell yourself. Old-fashioned portfolios are cumbersome; ePortfolio adds value to the resume and to the interviewing process. – Peggy Zola ’07

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 19


Education

SCHOOL OF

Progressive Portfolio

Peggy Zola ’07 has found e-portfolios to be a much more attractive and comprehensive way to showcase her skills. “It was awesome to see the final product,” she said. “It was really nice to look at … and everything is there that you need.”

they proceed through their programs,” said Susan Gifford, administrator of the TQE grant. “Institutions with teacher preparatory programs are strongly encouraged to adopt an e-portfolio as part of the accreditation process. It’s the best decision for quality programs, for the state of New Hampshire and ultimately for the candidates.”

Zola sent hers to the school that ended up hiring her. “This is the tool to use if you want to sell yourself. Oldfashioned portfolios are cumbersome; ePortfolio adds value to the resume and to the interviewing process,” she said. “The entire team involved in the interview can view the e-portfolio together, making the process much more collaborative.” Beyond Paper In addition to being less cumbersome, e-portfolios allow for the inclusion of more varied and creative material. For example, students can upload video vignettes of themselves teaching classes, as well as examples of their lesson plans. Electronic portfolios can be sent in advance of a job interview, allowing a principal to preview a new teacher’s ability and gain insight into his or her disposition in the classroom.

By Judy Timney, School of Education

Alumna Leann McCormack’s college portfolio continues to wow her employer, even now that she is on the job. “I received a very positive response from the principal who hired me, and I’m probably going to be on the technology committee at my new school because of it,” said McCormack ’07, an elementary education graduate. McCormack’s work isn’t in a leather-bound, plastic-sleeved binder or case; she keeps her portfolio on her computer. During her last semester, McCormack participated in a School of Education pilot program for Chalk and Wire’s ePortfolio software. She found Digital Advancement that an electronic portfolio can encompass E-portfolios are helping School of quite a bit more than a case or binder Education graduates get hired. bulging with paper.

18 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

These “digital resumes” are going online at the university this fall, beginning with the School of Education. The technology enables the school to better train tomorrow’s teachers and give them a digital avenue to help them find work. SNHU introduced ePortfolio using a Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant through the state Department of Education. “Paper resumes are giving way to electronic portfolios,” said Associate Dean Ellen J. Kalicki. “The state strongly recommends that all education students have e-portfolios because they’re an excellent assessment tool, but they can also be very helpful for new graduates looking for employment as they can easily be shared with prospective employers via the Internet.”

E-portfolios are more than digital resumes. They are intended to be a valuable part of the learning process as well. For example, instructors can electronically assess student work. Students upload their work, be it videos, PowerPoint presentations, a series of lesson plans or their philosophy of education. Imbedded grading frameworks electronically assess the material and provide feedback to students and instructors. Instructors can determine students’ levels of competency, which in turn also informs instruction.

Not Just for College E-portfolios are used by students at universities across the country, including Pennsylvania State University, Indiana University and Stanford University. Now their use is trickling down even to the elementary school level. McCormack recently showed a group of veteran teachers in her district how to create an electronic portfolio. Just as they do at the college level, e-portfolios could help teachers and administrators at all levels track student growth and development. “At first the technological aspect was intimidating,” she said. “But once I showed them how to upload ‘artifacts,’ the teachers were relieved to see how easy it was to use.”

Prior to a student’s graduation, faculty and staff will use the tools to determine whether he or she has met state standards for pre-service teachers. “E-portfolios allow candidates to electronically display their body of work to determine points of progress as

This is the tool to use if you want to sell yourself. Old-fashioned portfolios are cumbersome; ePortfolio adds value to the resume and to the interviewing process. – Peggy Zola ’07

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 19


Liberal Arts

SCHOOL OF

Mother Nurture

There were nights that they didn’t know where they were going to sleep with their babies, and they risked losing them to the system. Some nights they stayed with me.

– Verneesha Banks ’00

Milwaukee Child Welfare. (Several staff members have since enrolled in the PCMH.) “When I go into the field, I cross paths with other students and graduates of PCMH,” she said. “I pick up on a lot of similar values and beliefs.” In addition, the University of Wisconsin recently hired Banks as its primary foster parent trainer. Finally, she also has started Wraparound’s Mobile Urgent Treatment Team for kids who have mental health issues. The team provides access to on-site crisis response from mental health experts. She always has her eye on the next child she can help. “This is something that I’ll be doing as long as I can walk and have all my functions,” she said, chuckling. Verneesha Banks ’00

When she was working as a social worker for Wraparound Milwaukee, an agency that serves children with serious emotional disorders who are at risk of being removed from their homes or hospitalized, Banks adopted a 15-year-old boy who had been in 30 foster homes. “The kid couldn’t stand one more move,” she said. “Now he is going to college this fall.”

By Susan Maslack, School of Liberal Arts

Verneesha Banks ’00 started having kids when she was 15. She was more fortunate than many girls in that situation; her parents were supportive and took care of her son so she could attend school. “I had two parents who, despite my mistakes, stepped up and believed and helped me do whatever I could do, no matter what,” the Milwaukee resident said. Those early experiences and her love of children have motivated Banks in her career. Since becoming a social worker, The Mother in the Shoe Banks, now 35, focuses on helping famiVerneesha Banks ’00 nurtures lies in crisis. She has been particularly foster children at home and at work. drawn to young mothers.

20 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

“There were nights that they didn’t know where they were going to sleep with their babies, and they risked losing them to the system,” she said. “Some nights they stayed with me.” Banks’ career is entwined with her personal life. While a student in the university’s Program in Community Mental Health, she welcomed a foster child, a cocaine-addicted baby, into her home. She has since adopted her. “Her prognosis then was not good, but (now) she’s a beautiful 7-year-old and doing very well,” she said.

The “mother in the shoe,” as Wraparound Milwaukee Deputy Director and fellow PCMH alum Mary Jo Meyers ’00 calls her, now has six children. “It always seemed that my education process and my child-rearing process connected, in not only professional ways but personal ways,” she said. “Three of my kids have special needs, and I know not having the educational background that I wouldn’t be able to do it.” As a consultant and trainer, Banks works with families who have children in out-of-home care and need to return to their communities. She and Meyers train others around the country to use this community-based support model. They also have trained every case manager in the Bureau of

“My parents instilled in me a spirituality and faith that has made a big difference for me and taught me that faith is about people,” she added. “I believe that God gives everybody a gift, and God has given me this gift of children and my ability to care for them. When God gives you a gift or gives you a calling, he also gives you the resources to succeed.”

Innovative Practice The Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce has selected Southern New Hampshire University’s Graduate Program in Community Mental Health as an “Innovative Practice in Workforce Development.” The coalition will highlight the program in its Registry of Innovative Practices. The university’s mental health program seeks to develop leaders and promote improved service outcomes in the field of behavioral health and to increase the number of family members and people in recovery working in the field. It has sites in Manchester, N.H.; Burlington, Vt.; Madison, Milwaukee and Wausau, Wis.; and Anchorage, Alaska.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 21


Liberal Arts

SCHOOL OF

Mother Nurture

There were nights that they didn’t know where they were going to sleep with their babies, and they risked losing them to the system. Some nights they stayed with me.

– Verneesha Banks ’00

Milwaukee Child Welfare. (Several staff members have since enrolled in the PCMH.) “When I go into the field, I cross paths with other students and graduates of PCMH,” she said. “I pick up on a lot of similar values and beliefs.” In addition, the University of Wisconsin recently hired Banks as its primary foster parent trainer. Finally, she also has started Wraparound’s Mobile Urgent Treatment Team for kids who have mental health issues. The team provides access to on-site crisis response from mental health experts. She always has her eye on the next child she can help. “This is something that I’ll be doing as long as I can walk and have all my functions,” she said, chuckling. Verneesha Banks ’00

When she was working as a social worker for Wraparound Milwaukee, an agency that serves children with serious emotional disorders who are at risk of being removed from their homes or hospitalized, Banks adopted a 15-year-old boy who had been in 30 foster homes. “The kid couldn’t stand one more move,” she said. “Now he is going to college this fall.”

By Susan Maslack, School of Liberal Arts

Verneesha Banks ’00 started having kids when she was 15. She was more fortunate than many girls in that situation; her parents were supportive and took care of her son so she could attend school. “I had two parents who, despite my mistakes, stepped up and believed and helped me do whatever I could do, no matter what,” the Milwaukee resident said. Those early experiences and her love of children have motivated Banks in her career. Since becoming a social worker, The Mother in the Shoe Banks, now 35, focuses on helping famiVerneesha Banks ’00 nurtures lies in crisis. She has been particularly foster children at home and at work. drawn to young mothers.

20 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

“There were nights that they didn’t know where they were going to sleep with their babies, and they risked losing them to the system,” she said. “Some nights they stayed with me.” Banks’ career is entwined with her personal life. While a student in the university’s Program in Community Mental Health, she welcomed a foster child, a cocaine-addicted baby, into her home. She has since adopted her. “Her prognosis then was not good, but (now) she’s a beautiful 7-year-old and doing very well,” she said.

The “mother in the shoe,” as Wraparound Milwaukee Deputy Director and fellow PCMH alum Mary Jo Meyers ’00 calls her, now has six children. “It always seemed that my education process and my child-rearing process connected, in not only professional ways but personal ways,” she said. “Three of my kids have special needs, and I know not having the educational background that I wouldn’t be able to do it.” As a consultant and trainer, Banks works with families who have children in out-of-home care and need to return to their communities. She and Meyers train others around the country to use this community-based support model. They also have trained every case manager in the Bureau of

“My parents instilled in me a spirituality and faith that has made a big difference for me and taught me that faith is about people,” she added. “I believe that God gives everybody a gift, and God has given me this gift of children and my ability to care for them. When God gives you a gift or gives you a calling, he also gives you the resources to succeed.”

Innovative Practice The Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce has selected Southern New Hampshire University’s Graduate Program in Community Mental Health as an “Innovative Practice in Workforce Development.” The coalition will highlight the program in its Registry of Innovative Practices. The university’s mental health program seeks to develop leaders and promote improved service outcomes in the field of behavioral health and to increase the number of family members and people in recovery working in the field. It has sites in Manchester, N.H.; Burlington, Vt.; Madison, Milwaukee and Wausau, Wis.; and Anchorage, Alaska.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 21


Star Search

It’s like you are courting the most beautiful girl in high school. You go from the flirting stage to the point where you think you have a date for the prom, and then the next thing you know she dumps you and goes with someone else.

Women’s basketball coach Karen Pinkos spent 16 years recruiting at the Division I level before coming to Division II SNHU two years ago.

By Tom McDermott, Sports Information Director

The art of recruiting is a big part of being a successful coach, though it often goes unnoticed. Coaches at Southern New Hampshire University go the extra mile to land top recruits. The list of talented athletes who have worn the Penmen “blue and gold” over the years is impressive. Men’s basketball coach Stan Spirou has learned that it is not an exact science. Just because an athlete was a standout in high school does not always mean he or she will perform that well in college. There also are times that a lower-profile recruit unexpectedly blossoms. Come Play with Us

He has also learned to watch for unforeseen Recruiting players involves travel, prospects, such as Wayne Robertson, a persuasion, luck and patience. two-time All-American who led SNHU to

22 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

back-to-back national semifinal appearances in the mid-’90s. “We got a call to take a look at this player in Toronto,” said Spirou. “We made the trip and I was not interested in the player we went to see, but noticed Wayne and fell in love with the kid.” The hard part was persuading the extremely shy Robertson to leave home for a strange city 600 miles away. Spirou knew he had to get him on campus for an official visit, an important part in the recruiting process that often seals the deal. “He was not very receptive to our offer, but once we got him on campus and he had a chance to see the school and meet the team, he felt much more comfortable,” Spirou said.

Sports

PENMEN PRIDE

– Stan Spirou

and paperwork involved in getting recruits cleared to attend school in the U.S.

Swedish native Tobias Svantesson, a two-time All“Just like at the Division I level, the month of July is American, was another of Anderson’s successful our busiest time,” Pinkos said. “There are AAU tour- international recruiting efforts. naments all over the country “We worked really hard to get all month long that we need to him, and he ended up being be seen at. It’s crazy, but it is a one of the best goalkeepers in great chance to see some of the program history,” said players we are interested in, Anderson. “The best part is and you almost always end up that he stayed with the program discovering someone you were after graduation and still serves not aware of.” as our goalkeeping coach.” Travel is a big part of recruiting. Spirou, Pinkos and Anderson It’s far from glamorous. stressed the importance of Men’s soccer coach Dave developing relationships not Anderson made his first only with the recruits, but also recruiting trip to Nigeria last with their parents and high winter. Even with assistant school coaches. Unfortunately, coach Emeka Ezeugo, a native the closer you become with a Nigerian, accompanying him, recruit, the harder it is to let go things did not go smoothly. when he or she decides to After arriving in Nigeria, they attend another school, they said. discovered their next flight was cancelled and wasn’t “It’s like you are courting the most beautiful girl in being rescheduled. Their only option was to drive. high school,” Spirou said, laughing. “You go from the The bumpy ride took 11 hours and two old taxis, flirting stage to the point where you think you have a Anderson said. They stopped once, for bread and date for the prom, and then the next thing you know water. They finally arrived at their far-from-luxurious she dumps you and goes with someone else.” hotel at 3 a.m. “It can work both ways,” Pinkos said. “There have been “That was a miserable day, but in the end it was worth times when I have had to tell a recruit that we are no it,” said Anderson. “Two of the players I went over to longer interested, and that is a very hard thing to do.” see accepted our scholarship offer.” In the end it comes down to being a good salesperson, The challenges of recruiting internationally extend and like any good salesperson, a coach had better be beyond travel. Coaches must decide on prospects after prepared to spend countless hours on the road. getting only one, maybe two, chances to see them play. “I tell people that coaches are like cowboys,” Spirou They must maintain contact once they return home, said. “If you are going to do it right, you better be despite significant time differences. Then, if an offer is ready to spend a lot time alone on the range, just accepted, they must navigate the visa-related red tape you and your horse.”

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 23


Star Search

It’s like you are courting the most beautiful girl in high school. You go from the flirting stage to the point where you think you have a date for the prom, and then the next thing you know she dumps you and goes with someone else.

Women’s basketball coach Karen Pinkos spent 16 years recruiting at the Division I level before coming to Division II SNHU two years ago.

By Tom McDermott, Sports Information Director

The art of recruiting is a big part of being a successful coach, though it often goes unnoticed. Coaches at Southern New Hampshire University go the extra mile to land top recruits. The list of talented athletes who have worn the Penmen “blue and gold” over the years is impressive. Men’s basketball coach Stan Spirou has learned that it is not an exact science. Just because an athlete was a standout in high school does not always mean he or she will perform that well in college. There also are times that a lower-profile recruit unexpectedly blossoms. Come Play with Us

He has also learned to watch for unforeseen Recruiting players involves travel, prospects, such as Wayne Robertson, a persuasion, luck and patience. two-time All-American who led SNHU to

22 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

back-to-back national semifinal appearances in the mid-’90s. “We got a call to take a look at this player in Toronto,” said Spirou. “We made the trip and I was not interested in the player we went to see, but noticed Wayne and fell in love with the kid.” The hard part was persuading the extremely shy Robertson to leave home for a strange city 600 miles away. Spirou knew he had to get him on campus for an official visit, an important part in the recruiting process that often seals the deal. “He was not very receptive to our offer, but once we got him on campus and he had a chance to see the school and meet the team, he felt much more comfortable,” Spirou said.

Sports

PENMEN PRIDE

– Stan Spirou

and paperwork involved in getting recruits cleared to attend school in the U.S.

Swedish native Tobias Svantesson, a two-time All“Just like at the Division I level, the month of July is American, was another of Anderson’s successful our busiest time,” Pinkos said. “There are AAU tour- international recruiting efforts. naments all over the country “We worked really hard to get all month long that we need to him, and he ended up being be seen at. It’s crazy, but it is a one of the best goalkeepers in great chance to see some of the program history,” said players we are interested in, Anderson. “The best part is and you almost always end up that he stayed with the program discovering someone you were after graduation and still serves not aware of.” as our goalkeeping coach.” Travel is a big part of recruiting. Spirou, Pinkos and Anderson It’s far from glamorous. stressed the importance of Men’s soccer coach Dave developing relationships not Anderson made his first only with the recruits, but also recruiting trip to Nigeria last with their parents and high winter. Even with assistant school coaches. Unfortunately, coach Emeka Ezeugo, a native the closer you become with a Nigerian, accompanying him, recruit, the harder it is to let go things did not go smoothly. when he or she decides to After arriving in Nigeria, they attend another school, they said. discovered their next flight was cancelled and wasn’t “It’s like you are courting the most beautiful girl in being rescheduled. Their only option was to drive. high school,” Spirou said, laughing. “You go from the The bumpy ride took 11 hours and two old taxis, flirting stage to the point where you think you have a Anderson said. They stopped once, for bread and date for the prom, and then the next thing you know water. They finally arrived at their far-from-luxurious she dumps you and goes with someone else.” hotel at 3 a.m. “It can work both ways,” Pinkos said. “There have been “That was a miserable day, but in the end it was worth times when I have had to tell a recruit that we are no it,” said Anderson. “Two of the players I went over to longer interested, and that is a very hard thing to do.” see accepted our scholarship offer.” In the end it comes down to being a good salesperson, The challenges of recruiting internationally extend and like any good salesperson, a coach had better be beyond travel. Coaches must decide on prospects after prepared to spend countless hours on the road. getting only one, maybe two, chances to see them play. “I tell people that coaches are like cowboys,” Spirou They must maintain contact once they return home, said. “If you are going to do it right, you better be despite significant time differences. Then, if an offer is ready to spend a lot time alone on the range, just accepted, they must navigate the visa-related red tape you and your horse.”

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 23


Penmen SPORTS Numbers SHORTS

Deb Robitaille

John Delanoy

Felicia Brum

by the

157

– Career hits posted by softball player Felicia Brum ’07, who replaced Nikki Cote ’06 as the program’s leader in career hits during the 2007 season.

66

– Points totaled by women’s lacrosse player Jennifer Parro during the 2007 season, a new program record. Parro, who also broke the record for assists in a season (46), led all Division II players in assists per game (3.29) last spring.

24

– Number of wins posted by the softball team during the 2007 season, breaking the previous record of 23 set in 2006.

16

– Number of SNHU studentathletes who earned Northeast-10 Conference All-Academic honors during the spring of 2007. SNHU’s 16 selections ranked second only to Bentley College. The women’s lacrosse team led the way with six selections.

10

– National ranking earned by the women’s lacrosse team during the 2007 season, marking the first national ranking in the four-year history of the program.

24 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Hall of Fame

Athletic Director Chip Polak has announced the addition of William Beane, John Rootes and the 1989 men’s soccer team to the university’s Athletic Hall of Fame. The honorees will be inducted Jan. 19. With the addition of the 2007 inductees, the SNHU Athletic Hall of Fame now consists of 79 individuals and one team. Beane and Rootes both served as head men’s soccer coaches at the university, while the 1989 men’s soccer team still owns the distinction of being the only team in the history of SNHU athletics to win a NCAA National Championship. Beane could be considered the “Father of Penmen Soccer,” as he was the program’s first coach. He spent four seasons, from 1965 through 1968, on the sidelines and led the team to a combined 21-7 record during his first two seasons. He did dual duty as head baseball coach during that time and led the Penmen to back-to-back NEIBA titles in 1967 and 1968. Rootes, coach of the 1989 national championship team, averaged 16 wins a year during his 10 seasons at SNHU and remains the winningest coach in program history. He led the team to a 22-2-0 record during his rookie season in 1988 before posting a 22-1-2 mark and a national title in 1989. He led the Penmen to six NCAA Tournament appearances during his 10 seasons. He posted a 169-30-10 during his time at SNHU and currently ranks as the fifth winningest coach in the history of NCAA Division II men’s soccer. SNHU claimed the title following a 3-1 victory over Final Four host North Carolina-Greensboro, behind two goals from sophomore sniper Archie Harlow. Rootes now is head coach at Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia.

Bernstein, McGuire Named Top Athletes Sophomore Ashley Bernstein and senior David McGuire were named the 2006-2007 Female and Male Athletes of the Year during the university’s 42nd annual athletic awards ceremony. Sophomore Julie Kraus (women’s lacrosse) was honored as the Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year and junior John Delanoy (men’s lacrosse) Julie Kraus was named Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Seniors Carolyn Mahoney (women’s soccer) and Ken Burlage (hockey) were selected for the Sportsmanship awards. Seniors Felicia Brum (softball) and Pat White (men’s soccer) received Unsung Hero awards. Bernstein led the softball team to a record 24 wins and the No. 2 seed in the Northeast-10 Conference Tournament. McGuire led the men’s soccer team to a 9-7-5 record, its sevent straight appearance in the Northeast-10 Tournament and its 13th David McGuire overall appearance in the NCAA Division II Tournament this fall. Women’s Lacrosse Earns First National Ranking The women’s lacrosse team earned its first ranking in the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association Division II national poll.

Sports

PENMEN PRIDE

Honors and Milestones Squire and Delanoy Cop National Honors Women’s lacrosse coach Mary Squire and men’s lacrosse player John Delanoy were recognized at the national level. Squire was named Division II National Coach of the Year by womenslacrosse.com and was named Northeast-10 Conference Coach of the Year. She guided the Penmen to a record 10 wins and its first national ranking last spring. Delanoy was named to the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association Division II All-America team. An honorable mention selection at midfield, he becomes the second player in program history (Mike Hutnick, 2006, was the first) to earn All-America honors. The Best of the Rest Hockey players Brandon Hammermeister and Dominic DiMarzo earned all-conference honors after leading the Penmen to a 12-14-1 record and an appearance in the semifinals of the Northeast-10 Tournament. Hammermeister recorded his 100th career point during the season. Men’s basketball player Sam Carey recorded his 1,000th career point during the 2006-07 season. Senior Jason Smith was named all-conference in baseball; teammate Ryan Thompson recorded his 100th career hit and teammate Rob Hennessy recorded his 100th career strikeout. Seniors Felicia Brum and Tara Moriarty, sophomore Karissa Bettencourt and freshman Andrea Clausi were named all-conference after leading the softball team to a record 24 wins. Brum closed out her career with a school-record 157 hits, while Moriarty recorded her 100th career hit. Junior Mary Bradford and sophomore Ashley Bernstein recorded their 100th career strikeouts. Softball coach Deb Robitaille was voted Northeast-10 Coach of the Year for the second season in a row.

Graduate student Lisa McEachern and sophomores Libby Parent and Julie Kraus collected all-conference honors in women’s lacrosse. Parent and classmates Maura Murphy and Jennifer Parro all recorded their 100th career points during the season. Parro totaled a program-record 46 assists and 66 points and closed out the year as the Division II national leader in assists per game. All-conference honors in tennis went to senior Pedro DePaula and juniors Melissa Ramos and Amanda Nason. DePaula earned all-conference honors for the second straight year after going 9-2 at No. 1 singles. All-Academic Selections The women’s lacrosse team placed six members on the Northeast-10 Conference All-Academic team – graduate student Steph Bouley, senior Julie Lancaster, junior Lucretia Joy and sophomores Kraus, Parent and Murphy. Kraus has maintained a 3.98 cumulative GPA during her two years at the university. The SNHU softball team had four members named to the Northeast-10 All-Academic team. Selected were seniors Ashley Smith and Brum, junior Laurie Boland and Bettencourt. Men’s lacrosse players Chris Dindler, Mike Panora and Delanoy also earned all-academic honors. Delanoy is a finance/economics major with a 3.69 cumulative GPA. The women’s tennis team placed two members on the Northeast-10 All-Academic team. Juniors Amanda Nason and Lauren Nigrelli were second-team selections. Baseball standout Jason Smith was a Northeast-10 allacademic selection, as were Megan Shay of the women’s basketball team and Hammermeister.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 25


Penmen SPORTS Numbers SHORTS

Deb Robitaille

John Delanoy

Felicia Brum

by the

157

– Career hits posted by softball player Felicia Brum ’07, who replaced Nikki Cote ’06 as the program’s leader in career hits during the 2007 season.

66

– Points totaled by women’s lacrosse player Jennifer Parro during the 2007 season, a new program record. Parro, who also broke the record for assists in a season (46), led all Division II players in assists per game (3.29) last spring.

24

– Number of wins posted by the softball team during the 2007 season, breaking the previous record of 23 set in 2006.

16

– Number of SNHU studentathletes who earned Northeast-10 Conference All-Academic honors during the spring of 2007. SNHU’s 16 selections ranked second only to Bentley College. The women’s lacrosse team led the way with six selections.

10

– National ranking earned by the women’s lacrosse team during the 2007 season, marking the first national ranking in the four-year history of the program.

24 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Hall of Fame

Athletic Director Chip Polak has announced the addition of William Beane, John Rootes and the 1989 men’s soccer team to the university’s Athletic Hall of Fame. The honorees will be inducted Jan. 19. With the addition of the 2007 inductees, the SNHU Athletic Hall of Fame now consists of 79 individuals and one team. Beane and Rootes both served as head men’s soccer coaches at the university, while the 1989 men’s soccer team still owns the distinction of being the only team in the history of SNHU athletics to win a NCAA National Championship. Beane could be considered the “Father of Penmen Soccer,” as he was the program’s first coach. He spent four seasons, from 1965 through 1968, on the sidelines and led the team to a combined 21-7 record during his first two seasons. He did dual duty as head baseball coach during that time and led the Penmen to back-to-back NEIBA titles in 1967 and 1968. Rootes, coach of the 1989 national championship team, averaged 16 wins a year during his 10 seasons at SNHU and remains the winningest coach in program history. He led the team to a 22-2-0 record during his rookie season in 1988 before posting a 22-1-2 mark and a national title in 1989. He led the Penmen to six NCAA Tournament appearances during his 10 seasons. He posted a 169-30-10 during his time at SNHU and currently ranks as the fifth winningest coach in the history of NCAA Division II men’s soccer. SNHU claimed the title following a 3-1 victory over Final Four host North Carolina-Greensboro, behind two goals from sophomore sniper Archie Harlow. Rootes now is head coach at Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia.

Bernstein, McGuire Named Top Athletes Sophomore Ashley Bernstein and senior David McGuire were named the 2006-2007 Female and Male Athletes of the Year during the university’s 42nd annual athletic awards ceremony. Sophomore Julie Kraus (women’s lacrosse) was honored as the Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year and junior John Delanoy (men’s lacrosse) Julie Kraus was named Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Seniors Carolyn Mahoney (women’s soccer) and Ken Burlage (hockey) were selected for the Sportsmanship awards. Seniors Felicia Brum (softball) and Pat White (men’s soccer) received Unsung Hero awards. Bernstein led the softball team to a record 24 wins and the No. 2 seed in the Northeast-10 Conference Tournament. McGuire led the men’s soccer team to a 9-7-5 record, its sevent straight appearance in the Northeast-10 Tournament and its 13th David McGuire overall appearance in the NCAA Division II Tournament this fall. Women’s Lacrosse Earns First National Ranking The women’s lacrosse team earned its first ranking in the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association Division II national poll.

Sports

PENMEN PRIDE

Honors and Milestones Squire and Delanoy Cop National Honors Women’s lacrosse coach Mary Squire and men’s lacrosse player John Delanoy were recognized at the national level. Squire was named Division II National Coach of the Year by womenslacrosse.com and was named Northeast-10 Conference Coach of the Year. She guided the Penmen to a record 10 wins and its first national ranking last spring. Delanoy was named to the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association Division II All-America team. An honorable mention selection at midfield, he becomes the second player in program history (Mike Hutnick, 2006, was the first) to earn All-America honors. The Best of the Rest Hockey players Brandon Hammermeister and Dominic DiMarzo earned all-conference honors after leading the Penmen to a 12-14-1 record and an appearance in the semifinals of the Northeast-10 Tournament. Hammermeister recorded his 100th career point during the season. Men’s basketball player Sam Carey recorded his 1,000th career point during the 2006-07 season. Senior Jason Smith was named all-conference in baseball; teammate Ryan Thompson recorded his 100th career hit and teammate Rob Hennessy recorded his 100th career strikeout. Seniors Felicia Brum and Tara Moriarty, sophomore Karissa Bettencourt and freshman Andrea Clausi were named all-conference after leading the softball team to a record 24 wins. Brum closed out her career with a school-record 157 hits, while Moriarty recorded her 100th career hit. Junior Mary Bradford and sophomore Ashley Bernstein recorded their 100th career strikeouts. Softball coach Deb Robitaille was voted Northeast-10 Coach of the Year for the second season in a row.

Graduate student Lisa McEachern and sophomores Libby Parent and Julie Kraus collected all-conference honors in women’s lacrosse. Parent and classmates Maura Murphy and Jennifer Parro all recorded their 100th career points during the season. Parro totaled a program-record 46 assists and 66 points and closed out the year as the Division II national leader in assists per game. All-conference honors in tennis went to senior Pedro DePaula and juniors Melissa Ramos and Amanda Nason. DePaula earned all-conference honors for the second straight year after going 9-2 at No. 1 singles. All-Academic Selections The women’s lacrosse team placed six members on the Northeast-10 Conference All-Academic team – graduate student Steph Bouley, senior Julie Lancaster, junior Lucretia Joy and sophomores Kraus, Parent and Murphy. Kraus has maintained a 3.98 cumulative GPA during her two years at the university. The SNHU softball team had four members named to the Northeast-10 All-Academic team. Selected were seniors Ashley Smith and Brum, junior Laurie Boland and Bettencourt. Men’s lacrosse players Chris Dindler, Mike Panora and Delanoy also earned all-academic honors. Delanoy is a finance/economics major with a 3.69 cumulative GPA. The women’s tennis team placed two members on the Northeast-10 All-Academic team. Juniors Amanda Nason and Lauren Nigrelli were second-team selections. Baseball standout Jason Smith was a Northeast-10 allacademic selection, as were Megan Shay of the women’s basketball team and Hammermeister.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 25


Alumni News

Where Are They Now?

What’s NEW? Please submit news about births, marriages, careers and more. We would like the information to help us maintain accurate records. Mail to the Office of Alumni and Community Relations, SNHU, 2500 N. River Rd., Manchester, NH 03106-1045, fax to 603.645.9663, e-mail alumni@snhu.edu or fill out the Alumni Datasheet Form online at www.snhu.edu/alumni.asp. The deadline for the Spring 2008 issue is Dec. 10. ____________________________________________________________________________________ Last name First ____________________________________________________________________________________ Middle/Maiden ______Class year ____Day __________________Center (if applicable) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City State ZIP

Dave Landry ’83 helps a student hone his IT skills. Miquel De Los Santos, a junior in college and an alumnus of the Technology Training Program, now works for ABCD and Verizon Business. He jokingly calls himself the program’s “poster child.” “There is a hidden talent in each of the kids,” he said. “Now I am a mentor for the students both technically and personally. It is great to watch them grow.”

Dave Landry ’83, John Xintaras Jr. ’99 and Attila Galuska ’99, through their employer, Verizon, are teaching low-income Boston-area teens information technology skills that will help them in their scholastic and professional careers. For three years, Verizon Business has partnered with Action for Boston Community Development Inc., the largest independent, private, nonprofit human services agency of its kind in New England. ABCD serves more than 100,000 low-income individuals and families annually while working to eliminate poverty. Verizon Business provides a 15-week Technology Training Program at ABCD for approximately 30 teenagers from lowincome families each year. The original

26 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

aim of the program was to teach basic Microsoft Office systems, such as Word and Excel. But instructors quickly found that many of the students were more advanced, so the program switched to Web site design and broader information technology skills. Landry, vice president of billing for Verizon Business, has been with the program from the beginning. He gets tremendous satisfaction from working with the students. “I am now learning (HTML) with them, trying to read ahead before class,” he said. “It’s great seeing how students put it all together. The creative product blew me away.” “It’s a different experience from the usual workload,” Galuska added.

Once the 15-week program is completed, students present their completed Web sites to family, friends and city officials. They are then placed in paid internships through ABCD’s SummerWorks program.

Where are you now?

____________________________________________________________________________________ Home e-mail address Work e-mail address Employment/Promotions ____________________________________________________________________________________ Position Start date ____________________________________________________________________________________ Company name ____________________________________________________________________________________ Address

Landry, Xintaras and Galuska were connected before they joined the training program. Xintaras and Galuska knew each other from classes.

Marriage

“Attila actually tutored me when I was injured as a student,” Xintaras said.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Month/Day/Year

Landry interviewed Xintaras and Galuska at SNHU for positions with Verizon, where they have worked since.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Spouse’s full name Class year (if SNHU alumnus/a)

Xintaras just finished his first year working with the program and also finds it very rewarding. “I get a great sense of helping others and will continue to work with the program,” he said. “The students are the best part.”

For more alumni news, visit Don’t forget to fill out the What’s New form and let us know how and what you are doing.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Home phone

snhu.edu

____________________________________________________________________________________ City State ZIP

Birth/Adoption ____Boy ____Girl

Date born ____________________ Date adopted ______________________

____________________________________________________________________________________ Full name What else would you like your classmates to know? ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ I am interested in learning more about alumni activities and volunteer opportunities. Please contact me via: ____E-mail ____Phone ____Mail Announcements that are incomplete cannot be considered for publication.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 27


Alumni News

Where Are They Now?

What’s NEW? Please submit news about births, marriages, careers and more. We would like the information to help us maintain accurate records. Mail to the Office of Alumni and Community Relations, SNHU, 2500 N. River Rd., Manchester, NH 03106-1045, fax to 603.645.9663, e-mail alumni@snhu.edu or fill out the Alumni Datasheet Form online at www.snhu.edu/alumni.asp. The deadline for the Spring 2008 issue is Dec. 10. ____________________________________________________________________________________ Last name First ____________________________________________________________________________________ Middle/Maiden ______Class year ____Day __________________Center (if applicable) ____________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City State ZIP

Dave Landry ’83 helps a student hone his IT skills. Miquel De Los Santos, a junior in college and an alumnus of the Technology Training Program, now works for ABCD and Verizon Business. He jokingly calls himself the program’s “poster child.” “There is a hidden talent in each of the kids,” he said. “Now I am a mentor for the students both technically and personally. It is great to watch them grow.”

Dave Landry ’83, John Xintaras Jr. ’99 and Attila Galuska ’99, through their employer, Verizon, are teaching low-income Boston-area teens information technology skills that will help them in their scholastic and professional careers. For three years, Verizon Business has partnered with Action for Boston Community Development Inc., the largest independent, private, nonprofit human services agency of its kind in New England. ABCD serves more than 100,000 low-income individuals and families annually while working to eliminate poverty. Verizon Business provides a 15-week Technology Training Program at ABCD for approximately 30 teenagers from lowincome families each year. The original

26 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

aim of the program was to teach basic Microsoft Office systems, such as Word and Excel. But instructors quickly found that many of the students were more advanced, so the program switched to Web site design and broader information technology skills. Landry, vice president of billing for Verizon Business, has been with the program from the beginning. He gets tremendous satisfaction from working with the students. “I am now learning (HTML) with them, trying to read ahead before class,” he said. “It’s great seeing how students put it all together. The creative product blew me away.” “It’s a different experience from the usual workload,” Galuska added.

Once the 15-week program is completed, students present their completed Web sites to family, friends and city officials. They are then placed in paid internships through ABCD’s SummerWorks program.

Where are you now?

____________________________________________________________________________________ Home e-mail address Work e-mail address Employment/Promotions ____________________________________________________________________________________ Position Start date ____________________________________________________________________________________ Company name ____________________________________________________________________________________ Address

Landry, Xintaras and Galuska were connected before they joined the training program. Xintaras and Galuska knew each other from classes.

Marriage

“Attila actually tutored me when I was injured as a student,” Xintaras said.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Month/Day/Year

Landry interviewed Xintaras and Galuska at SNHU for positions with Verizon, where they have worked since.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Spouse’s full name Class year (if SNHU alumnus/a)

Xintaras just finished his first year working with the program and also finds it very rewarding. “I get a great sense of helping others and will continue to work with the program,” he said. “The students are the best part.”

For more alumni news, visit Don’t forget to fill out the What’s New form and let us know how and what you are doing.

____________________________________________________________________________________ Home phone

snhu.edu

____________________________________________________________________________________ City State ZIP

Birth/Adoption ____Boy ____Girl

Date born ____________________ Date adopted ______________________

____________________________________________________________________________________ Full name What else would you like your classmates to know? ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ I am interested in learning more about alumni activities and volunteer opportunities. Please contact me via: ____E-mail ____Phone ____Mail Announcements that are incomplete cannot be considered for publication.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 27


Class Notes

’75 Edward F. Luciano, of Rumford, R.I., is a business education teacher for the Putnam Board of Education. Rumford has been teaching high school business education classes for more than 30 years. ’82 Susan (Williams) Stanewick, of Concord, N.H., is the assistant commissioner for administration for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public Health. ’83 Jeffrey M. Crouse, of Enfield, Conn., received a Master of Arts degree in education with a concentration in higher education administration from the University of Connecticut. Edward N. Emond, of Laconia, N.H., was elected to the board of directors of the Association of School Business Officials International. Emond is the business administrator for the Laconia School System. Robert J. Montminy, of Candia, N.H., is the owner of and certified public accountant for Montminy Financial Services.

Bonnie A. Vadala, of Newmarket, N.H., is a fulltime teacher for Rye Elementary School. Vadala is a certified personal trainer for Great Bay Athletic Club and is also a parttime freelance makeup artist for Chanel.

’88 Scott W. Averill, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., was elected to the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County. He is an executive vice president for Independent Health in Buffalo.

Keith M. Wagner, of The Woodland, Texas, is the owner of Wagner Insurance, an insurance agency that serves all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Patrick D. Murphy, of Kearsarge, N.H., is the division manager of Heartland Payment Systems. Edwin Vincente Sanabria, of Leominster, Mass., is director of the Central Massachusetts Center for Healthy Communities. Chunde Shi, of Beijing, China, is a senior systems analyst for the Science Applications International Corp. Derek TenBroeck Jr., of Pepperell, Mass., is the principal of TenBroeck Insurance Group. William “Bo” Yerxa II, of Waldoboro, Maine, is the president of the board of the Maine Citizens Leadership Fund. ’89 Beth (Bachand) Ammerman, of Blackstone, Mass., is the store systems user support manager for the TJX Companies in Framingham. Wendy Lee Parker, of Hillsboro, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s “40 Under Forty” list.

Dennis J. Riley, of Norwich, Conn., was appointed by the state Senate president to a four-year term on the state of Connecticut’s new Citizen’s Ethics Advisory Board.

’90 Diane E. Catino, of Bridgewater, Mass., is the staffing coordinator for Bridgewater State Hospital.

’84 Debra Achramowicz, of Clinton, Maine, is the owner of Debra Achramowicz CPA, PA.

Sadig Abdel Marouf Ibrahim, of Port Sudan, Sudan, is in charge of the economic planning and international cooperation in the Red Sea. Ibrahim also occupies a post of government project coordinator in a joint project between the state and UNDP for poverty alleviation and governance.

Gary DeStefano, of Lake Oswego, Ore., is the new president of Nike global operations. ’86 Edward F. Davis III, of Lowell, Mass., is the new police commissioner of the Boston Police Department. Syahrizal Yusuf, of Tangerang, Indonesia, is the senior vice president heading the debt capital market division for Kim Eng Securities.

28 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Benjamin Markham, of Houston, Texas, is the vice president of operations and a member of the board of directors for W.E. Lyons Construction Co.

’91 Ike Ofoje, of Aiken, S.C., is the men’s head soccer coach at the University of South Carolina-Aiken. Ofoje has been named Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year and has led the Pacers to the most successful season in the program’s history. Yvette Pinzon, of Winter Park, Fla., is the president of Filmvest. ’92 Rosita Alexander Snagg, of Stubbs, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, is the secretary of the Ministry of National Mobilization, Social Development and Local Government for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Yvon J. Gagnon, of Manchester, N.H., is a senior buyer for BAE Systems and is also a certified purchasing manager. Gagnon is a youth minister at his church. ’94 Kelly L. Boston, of Portsmouth, N.H., was promoted to Portsmouth Finance as the site controller of Lonza Biopharmaceutical Business. Hannah E. Gladstone, of Waterville, Maine, is the director of student life for Thomas College. Héctor Meléndez, of Summerville, S.C., is a retired chief petty officer of the U.S. Coast Guard after 21 years of service. Meléndez is currently working as a maritime law enforcement instructor for 3/Comms/Titan at the U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement Academy in Charleston. Tami (Reynolds) Robertson, of Baton Rouge, La., is the girls basketball and golf coach for St. Michael’s High School. ’95 Denise M. Moore, of Orange, N.J., is the coordinator of health and human services for Orange.

Roland Bechard, of Charlotte, Maine, is the career aspirations program director at the School Union 106 in Calais.

Jason B. Soucy, of Avon Lake, Ohio, is the tournament director for IMG Golf.

Ronald E. Biron, of Manchester, N.H., is the new assistant dean for the School of Business at Southern New Hampshire University.

’96 Victoria L. Magnell-Crowley, of Rockland, Mass., was promoted to manager of Contractor Resources for FedEx.

Brian K. Jackson, of Egg Harbor City, N.J., was awarded the 2006 George Lynn Volunteer of the Year Award, presented annually by the United Way of Atlantic County. Jackson is the executive assistant to the president at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

kson

’71 Samuel E. Lewis, of San Antonio, Texas, is a training manager for the U.S. Air Force Civil Service. Lewis manages all of the Air Force vehicle maintenance courses.

’87 Mohamad Noor Wahab, of Petagas Sabah, Malaysia, is the director of planning and development for the State Social Welfare Department in Sabah, Malaysia.

c Brian K. Ja

Achievements

’93 Michael Boisvert, of Campton, N.H., was promoted to officer of Meredith Village Savings Bank.

Beena Mahat, of Nuwakot, Nepal, is a program manager for the Family Planning Association of Nepal. Jane F. Millett, of Brunswick, Maine, is a broker for Welcome Home Realty. Dennine (Ladd) Roy, of Savannah, Ga., is a certified paralegal with The National Association of Legal Assistants.

Lungisani Kunene, of Natal, South Africa, is the process manager for the Msunduzi Local Government.

Kevin M. McGuire, of Milford, N.H., is the senior director of operations for UnitedHealthcare in Hooksett.

John C. Taylor, of Londonderry, N.H., is the principal consultant and master facilitator for Career Mobility, LLC, a talent solutions consulting practice.

Nawina M. Nyirenda, of Washington, D.C., is senior program assistant for the National Academy of Science.

’98 Angelique M. Clifton, of Oceanside, Calif., is the owner of Angelique Accounting Service. Sonya A. Grenier, of Tewksbury, Mass., is the services operational accountant for Cognos Corporation. Charlene M. Ledoux, of Mason, N.H., is a certified music practitioner and a cello instructor. Ledoux is a member of the Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra and VA-National Medical Chorale and Symphony Orchestra. Melissa (Conti) Sipe, of Richmond, Va., is an assistant commissioner for the Colonial Athletic Association. Harold R. Tessendorf, of Macon, Ga., is the executive director of the Macon Area Habitat for Humanity. ’99 Michael B. Johnson, of Morristown, N.J., is a brand manager for Daiichi Sankyo Pharmaceutical Inc. Gregory C. Scott, of La Palma, Calif., is president and chief operating officer for Weingart Center Association. David A. Turcotte, of Lowell, Mass., earned a Doctor of Science degree from the University of Massachusetts. ’00 Diane R. Blomgren, of San Jose, Costa Rica, is an administrator at the Rasur Foundation.

Shawn M. Small, of Quincy, Mass., is the assistant vice president for JPMorgan Chase.

Adam N. Davidoff, of North Woodstock, N.H., is the international sales manager for the Loon, Waterville Valley and Cranmore ski areas.

’97 Peter A. Chamberlin, of Warner, N.H., was named the finance director for the town of Wolfeboro.

Deborah S. Degenova, of Portsmouth, N.H., is a business operations manager for McKesson Corporation.

Ozlem Turk, of Istanbul, Turkey, is the guest service agent for Volantis Yachting. ’01 Senait Gebreegziabher, of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, is the deputy country director for Save the Children Federation in Sri Lanka. John A. Henderson, of Baltimore, Md., is a housing specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Corey N. Johnson, of New Ipswich, N.H., is a realtor for ERA, The Masiello Group. Vicente Emmanuel Pajaro, of Marikina, Philippines, is a general manager for Pavicem Merchandising Corporation. Michelle (Husson) Pillsbury, of Manchester, N.H., is an executive chef for Haverhill Country Club. ’02 Ester M. Alcantara, of Modesto, Calif., is a supply officer for the U.S. Navy. Nasir Abdi Arush, of Manchester, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s “40 Under Forty” list. Richard A. Bardellini Jr., of Northfield, N.H., was named vice president of manufacturing at New Hampshire Ball Bearing. Kevin B. Crean, of Arlington, Mass., is the human resource manager for Twins Enterprise Inc., a family owned company specializing in the manufacturing of licensed headwear and sporting apparel. Shawn P. Dupont, of Merrimack, N.H., is a retirement specialist for Fidelity Investments.

For more alumni news, visit

snhu.edu The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 29


Class Notes

’75 Edward F. Luciano, of Rumford, R.I., is a business education teacher for the Putnam Board of Education. Rumford has been teaching high school business education classes for more than 30 years. ’82 Susan (Williams) Stanewick, of Concord, N.H., is the assistant commissioner for administration for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public Health. ’83 Jeffrey M. Crouse, of Enfield, Conn., received a Master of Arts degree in education with a concentration in higher education administration from the University of Connecticut. Edward N. Emond, of Laconia, N.H., was elected to the board of directors of the Association of School Business Officials International. Emond is the business administrator for the Laconia School System. Robert J. Montminy, of Candia, N.H., is the owner of and certified public accountant for Montminy Financial Services.

Bonnie A. Vadala, of Newmarket, N.H., is a fulltime teacher for Rye Elementary School. Vadala is a certified personal trainer for Great Bay Athletic Club and is also a parttime freelance makeup artist for Chanel.

’88 Scott W. Averill, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., was elected to the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County. He is an executive vice president for Independent Health in Buffalo.

Keith M. Wagner, of The Woodland, Texas, is the owner of Wagner Insurance, an insurance agency that serves all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Patrick D. Murphy, of Kearsarge, N.H., is the division manager of Heartland Payment Systems. Edwin Vincente Sanabria, of Leominster, Mass., is director of the Central Massachusetts Center for Healthy Communities. Chunde Shi, of Beijing, China, is a senior systems analyst for the Science Applications International Corp. Derek TenBroeck Jr., of Pepperell, Mass., is the principal of TenBroeck Insurance Group. William “Bo” Yerxa II, of Waldoboro, Maine, is the president of the board of the Maine Citizens Leadership Fund. ’89 Beth (Bachand) Ammerman, of Blackstone, Mass., is the store systems user support manager for the TJX Companies in Framingham. Wendy Lee Parker, of Hillsboro, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s “40 Under Forty” list.

Dennis J. Riley, of Norwich, Conn., was appointed by the state Senate president to a four-year term on the state of Connecticut’s new Citizen’s Ethics Advisory Board.

’90 Diane E. Catino, of Bridgewater, Mass., is the staffing coordinator for Bridgewater State Hospital.

’84 Debra Achramowicz, of Clinton, Maine, is the owner of Debra Achramowicz CPA, PA.

Sadig Abdel Marouf Ibrahim, of Port Sudan, Sudan, is in charge of the economic planning and international cooperation in the Red Sea. Ibrahim also occupies a post of government project coordinator in a joint project between the state and UNDP for poverty alleviation and governance.

Gary DeStefano, of Lake Oswego, Ore., is the new president of Nike global operations. ’86 Edward F. Davis III, of Lowell, Mass., is the new police commissioner of the Boston Police Department. Syahrizal Yusuf, of Tangerang, Indonesia, is the senior vice president heading the debt capital market division for Kim Eng Securities.

28 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Benjamin Markham, of Houston, Texas, is the vice president of operations and a member of the board of directors for W.E. Lyons Construction Co.

’91 Ike Ofoje, of Aiken, S.C., is the men’s head soccer coach at the University of South Carolina-Aiken. Ofoje has been named Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year and has led the Pacers to the most successful season in the program’s history. Yvette Pinzon, of Winter Park, Fla., is the president of Filmvest. ’92 Rosita Alexander Snagg, of Stubbs, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, is the secretary of the Ministry of National Mobilization, Social Development and Local Government for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Yvon J. Gagnon, of Manchester, N.H., is a senior buyer for BAE Systems and is also a certified purchasing manager. Gagnon is a youth minister at his church. ’94 Kelly L. Boston, of Portsmouth, N.H., was promoted to Portsmouth Finance as the site controller of Lonza Biopharmaceutical Business. Hannah E. Gladstone, of Waterville, Maine, is the director of student life for Thomas College. Héctor Meléndez, of Summerville, S.C., is a retired chief petty officer of the U.S. Coast Guard after 21 years of service. Meléndez is currently working as a maritime law enforcement instructor for 3/Comms/Titan at the U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement Academy in Charleston. Tami (Reynolds) Robertson, of Baton Rouge, La., is the girls basketball and golf coach for St. Michael’s High School. ’95 Denise M. Moore, of Orange, N.J., is the coordinator of health and human services for Orange.

Roland Bechard, of Charlotte, Maine, is the career aspirations program director at the School Union 106 in Calais.

Jason B. Soucy, of Avon Lake, Ohio, is the tournament director for IMG Golf.

Ronald E. Biron, of Manchester, N.H., is the new assistant dean for the School of Business at Southern New Hampshire University.

’96 Victoria L. Magnell-Crowley, of Rockland, Mass., was promoted to manager of Contractor Resources for FedEx.

Brian K. Jackson, of Egg Harbor City, N.J., was awarded the 2006 George Lynn Volunteer of the Year Award, presented annually by the United Way of Atlantic County. Jackson is the executive assistant to the president at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

kson

’71 Samuel E. Lewis, of San Antonio, Texas, is a training manager for the U.S. Air Force Civil Service. Lewis manages all of the Air Force vehicle maintenance courses.

’87 Mohamad Noor Wahab, of Petagas Sabah, Malaysia, is the director of planning and development for the State Social Welfare Department in Sabah, Malaysia.

c Brian K. Ja

Achievements

’93 Michael Boisvert, of Campton, N.H., was promoted to officer of Meredith Village Savings Bank.

Beena Mahat, of Nuwakot, Nepal, is a program manager for the Family Planning Association of Nepal. Jane F. Millett, of Brunswick, Maine, is a broker for Welcome Home Realty. Dennine (Ladd) Roy, of Savannah, Ga., is a certified paralegal with The National Association of Legal Assistants.

Lungisani Kunene, of Natal, South Africa, is the process manager for the Msunduzi Local Government.

Kevin M. McGuire, of Milford, N.H., is the senior director of operations for UnitedHealthcare in Hooksett.

John C. Taylor, of Londonderry, N.H., is the principal consultant and master facilitator for Career Mobility, LLC, a talent solutions consulting practice.

Nawina M. Nyirenda, of Washington, D.C., is senior program assistant for the National Academy of Science.

’98 Angelique M. Clifton, of Oceanside, Calif., is the owner of Angelique Accounting Service. Sonya A. Grenier, of Tewksbury, Mass., is the services operational accountant for Cognos Corporation. Charlene M. Ledoux, of Mason, N.H., is a certified music practitioner and a cello instructor. Ledoux is a member of the Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra and VA-National Medical Chorale and Symphony Orchestra. Melissa (Conti) Sipe, of Richmond, Va., is an assistant commissioner for the Colonial Athletic Association. Harold R. Tessendorf, of Macon, Ga., is the executive director of the Macon Area Habitat for Humanity. ’99 Michael B. Johnson, of Morristown, N.J., is a brand manager for Daiichi Sankyo Pharmaceutical Inc. Gregory C. Scott, of La Palma, Calif., is president and chief operating officer for Weingart Center Association. David A. Turcotte, of Lowell, Mass., earned a Doctor of Science degree from the University of Massachusetts. ’00 Diane R. Blomgren, of San Jose, Costa Rica, is an administrator at the Rasur Foundation.

Shawn M. Small, of Quincy, Mass., is the assistant vice president for JPMorgan Chase.

Adam N. Davidoff, of North Woodstock, N.H., is the international sales manager for the Loon, Waterville Valley and Cranmore ski areas.

’97 Peter A. Chamberlin, of Warner, N.H., was named the finance director for the town of Wolfeboro.

Deborah S. Degenova, of Portsmouth, N.H., is a business operations manager for McKesson Corporation.

Ozlem Turk, of Istanbul, Turkey, is the guest service agent for Volantis Yachting. ’01 Senait Gebreegziabher, of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, is the deputy country director for Save the Children Federation in Sri Lanka. John A. Henderson, of Baltimore, Md., is a housing specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Corey N. Johnson, of New Ipswich, N.H., is a realtor for ERA, The Masiello Group. Vicente Emmanuel Pajaro, of Marikina, Philippines, is a general manager for Pavicem Merchandising Corporation. Michelle (Husson) Pillsbury, of Manchester, N.H., is an executive chef for Haverhill Country Club. ’02 Ester M. Alcantara, of Modesto, Calif., is a supply officer for the U.S. Navy. Nasir Abdi Arush, of Manchester, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s “40 Under Forty” list. Richard A. Bardellini Jr., of Northfield, N.H., was named vice president of manufacturing at New Hampshire Ball Bearing. Kevin B. Crean, of Arlington, Mass., is the human resource manager for Twins Enterprise Inc., a family owned company specializing in the manufacturing of licensed headwear and sporting apparel. Shawn P. Dupont, of Merrimack, N.H., is a retirement specialist for Fidelity Investments.

For more alumni news, visit

snhu.edu The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 29


Class Notes Jessica M. Koor, of Waltham, Mass., is the reimbursement supervisor of Air Products Inc. Stephanie A. Longchamps, of Nashua, N.H., is a teacher for the Nashua School District. Amy L. Moy, of Manchester, N.H., is the director of sales and marketing for Mighty Innovations and volunteers as a courtappointed special advocate for abused and neglected children through CASA of New Hampshire. Susan Pearlman, of Eastlake, Ohio, is a job coach coordinator for the Vocational Guidance Services organization in Cleveland.

Tuesday (Sellards) Orluk, of Hampton Falls, N.H., is a real estate agent for Prudential Rush Realty. Orluk is the program coordinator for the Haverhill Community Violence Coalition. Benjamin E. Piscopo, of Weare, N.H., is the director and trainer of Boss Language Training Center’s TutorSearchChina.com in Zhuhai, Guang Dong, China. Danielle (Jendrasko) Salvaggio, of Gorham, Maine, is the director of admissions/marketing for Catherine McAuley High School. Eric J. Snyder, of Wilbraham, Mass., is the head volleyball coach for Stonehill College.

’03 Karen S. Diaz, of Derry, N.H., is the director of education for Lincoln Technical Institute.

’05 Eric J. Guyette, of Millville, Mass., is a program supervisor for Alternatives Unlimited Inc.

Samantha Doyle, of Saugus, Mass., is an event planner for Boston Butler.

Baltazar M. Kimangano, of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, was promoted to chief research, planning and development manager for Tanzania Buildings Agency.

April L. Gancarz, of Allston, Mass., is the HCI compliance analyst II for Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston. Richard W. Hindle, of Allston, Mass., was promoted to scheduling analyst for Circles. Darcy R. Tippie, of Auburn, Maine, is an assistant manager for Kay Jewelers. ’04 Sara (Flanagan) Cotter, of Middleton, N.H., was promoted to public relations tax manager for Liberty Mutual Insurance. Cotter is also a certified payroll professional.

Halima M. Kwikwega, of Shinyanga, Tanzania, is a monitoring and evaluation specialist for the office of The Permanent Secretary Prime Minister’s Office. Sabath E. Mbuguma, of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, is the program manager for Cooperazione Internazionale. Ezekiel J. Mwalutende, of Mbeya, Tanzania, is the airport manager for Tanzania Airports Authority.

Rosann M. Jager, of Detroit, Mich., is a trek manager for the Building With Books organization.

Edward R. Nzela Mbanga, of Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, was promoted to senior economist at the Ministry’s Headquarters.

Mehul S. Jinwala, of Jersey City, N.J., is a marketing representative for Kessler Rehabilitation Center.

Valerrie B. Pritt, of Boynton Beach, Fla., is a librarian for Palm Beach County.

Christopher J. Kelly, of Portsmouth, N.H., is a sales representative for Johnson & Johnson.

Lindsay A. Robuccio, of Merrimack, N.H., is a marketing specialist for St. Joseph Hospital.

Patricia (Thibert) Mackie, of Bolingbrook, Ill., recently graduated with a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Benedictine University and has earned an LPC license. Robert J. Newton, of Tampa, Fla., is a general manager for Residence Inn by Marriott.

30 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Stacy Burk, of Marlton, N.J., is a local manager for Verizon.

Pablo X. Pena, of Manchester, N.H., is a credit analyst for TD Banknorth.

Alicia A. Carrier, of Raymond, N.H., is a preschool teacher at Glen Lake School.

Gary T. Pepka, of Pembroke, N.H., is the strategic marketing manager for Allegro Micro Systems Inc.

Joanne E. Doane, of Salisbury, Mass., is the account manager for GE Supply Logistics. Gail (McGill) Farrington, of Manchester, N.H., is a research coordinator for NH Oncology and Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Barbara A. Gardner, of Franklin, N.H., is a mentor for the JAG program at West High School in Manchester and is a ninth-grade class adviser at Pittsfield Middle-High School. Evangelia K. Georgiadis, of Manchester, N.H., is an account executive for Beneficial Financial. Jillian V. Lagasse, of Hudson, N.H., is the lead qualification specialist for Sybase Inc. Lori L. Lavallee, of Hooksett, N.H., is a business analyst for Liberty Mutual Insurance. Eric Lavoie, of Salem, N.H., is the regional account manager for Anixter. Mary R. Lawrence, of Bedford, N.H., is the marketing assistant for Emerson Ecologics. Jenna (Stevens) Legendre, of Manchester, N.H., is the program support specialist assistant for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Genna M. Lencsak, of Hollis, N.H., is a teacher for Chapel School in Nashua. Guyla (Merchant) Mawson, of Peyton, Colo., is a medical support assistant for the U.S. Army. Allison K. McKay, of Somersworth, N.H., was promoted to publicist of Bisson Barcelona. Amanda (O’Keefe) Murchison, of Bedford, N.H., is a ninth-grade English teacher at Goffstown High School.

’06 Joseph M. Allison, of Merrimack, N.H., is the executive chef for Tyng’s Tavern & Grill.

Cynthia A. Nelson, of Merrimack, N.H., is the catering manager for Tidewater Hospitality Resource & Tidewater Catering Group.

Alyssa M. Bonetti, of Plymouth, Mass., is a travel/event planner for Circles.

Sherman A. Partap, of Nashua, N.H., is the program manager for Harris Corporation. Partap is working on the FAA telecommunications infrastructure program as the service manager for the FAA New England Region.

Vinh Q. Bui, of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is the deputy manager of advertising and promotion for Saigon Union of Trading Cooperatives.

Adam R. Correau, of Nashua, N.H., is the contract specialist/buyer for the Department of Defense for the U.S. Air Force.

Daniel L. Pletcher, of Nashua, N.H., is an electronic engineer for Analog Devices Incorporated.

Richard N. Hudon, of Creedmoor, N.C., is the senior risk adviser for Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina in Durham. Hudon is a certified information systems auditor and a certified risk professional.

Peter F. Richard, of Raymond, N.H., is a customer relations manager for XMA Corporation.

Peter Spivack, of Manchester, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s Rose L. Ruggiero, of Manchester, N.H., is a man- “40 Under Forty” list. ager for USAlliance Federal Credit Union. Michelle Saporito, of Nottingham, N.H., is the senior pension administrator for Baldwin & Clarke.

Marriages ’81 Carol B. Howes married Thaddeus Strojny.

Megan A. Sprague, of Marlborough, N.H., is a media buyer and trade show coordinator for Carlisle Wide Plank Floors. Jessica A. Starr, of Charlotte, N.C., is the intellectual property marketing specialist for Alston & Bird LLP. Jessica L. Townsend, of Milford, N.H., is the account executive for New Hampshire Magazine.

Travis L. Willette, of Bennington, Vt., is an outside salesman for Fastenal Company. William W. Yengi, of Mbeya, Tanzania, is the senior administrator for the Walter Reed HIV Program.

es

The Kazes

’07 Bethany L. Carter, of Scarborough, Maine, is a customer service representative for Time Warner Cable. Thomas Chagnon, of Portsmouth, N.H., is the director of customer service and production planning for Prime Tanning Company Inc.

’82 Susan Williams married John Stanewick ’76.

Stephanie A. Longchamps married William Mosher. ’03 Vincent R. Forgione married Kimberly D. Pelletier. Eemaan Rameez married Abdullah Shazmeen. ’04 David J. Illg II married Carrie Hankins. Christine J. Mandeville married Garth Fitzsimmons ’05.

Brandi Mellor married Mike Emerson. Garth M. Fitzsimmons married Christine Mandeville ’04. ’06 Heather L. Coble married Aaron Heyer. Jennifer M. McKew married Bruce Jordan.

’89 Elizabeth A. Bachand married Brian Ammerman.

Rebecca M. Odesse married Michael James Guidry Jr.

’91 Rodney C. Dore married Julie Anderson.

Lauren A. Poor married Michael Berardi.

’96 Eric K. Klopp married Mary Jane Krueger.

James J. Wilhelm, of Naperville, Ill., is the corporate manager of retail loss prevention for Ace Hardware Corporation.

’02 Nicholas J. Coates married Sarah Jordan.

’05 Sara M. Flanagan married Daniel Cotter.

’76 John Stanewick married Susan Williams ’82.

Kimberly A. Schaff, of Harpswell, Maine, is the assistant principal for Great Salt Bay Community School.

’00 Christina L. Morrell married Brandon H. Martin.

William Stavropoulos married Darlene Tran. ’97 Angela C. Buckler married Gino Edwards. Robin Sorenson married Michael Kazes. ’98 Melissa M. Conti married Jason Sipe. ’99 Sandra Luke Abrams married Don Hill. Leah E. Malin married Jason R. Stupp.

’07 Adam R. Correau married Angela Marie Holt.

New Arrivals ’73 Susan C. Madden and her husband, Edward, announce the birth of their twin sons, James and Stephen, on Nov. 17, 2005. ’88 Patrick D. Murphy and his wife, Kelley, announce the birth of their son, Robert, on May 1, 2006. ’90 Diane (Bartlett) Catino and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their son, Ryan Christopher, on Feb. 14, 2006.

For more alumni news, visit

snhu.edu The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 31


Class Notes Jessica M. Koor, of Waltham, Mass., is the reimbursement supervisor of Air Products Inc. Stephanie A. Longchamps, of Nashua, N.H., is a teacher for the Nashua School District. Amy L. Moy, of Manchester, N.H., is the director of sales and marketing for Mighty Innovations and volunteers as a courtappointed special advocate for abused and neglected children through CASA of New Hampshire. Susan Pearlman, of Eastlake, Ohio, is a job coach coordinator for the Vocational Guidance Services organization in Cleveland.

Tuesday (Sellards) Orluk, of Hampton Falls, N.H., is a real estate agent for Prudential Rush Realty. Orluk is the program coordinator for the Haverhill Community Violence Coalition. Benjamin E. Piscopo, of Weare, N.H., is the director and trainer of Boss Language Training Center’s TutorSearchChina.com in Zhuhai, Guang Dong, China. Danielle (Jendrasko) Salvaggio, of Gorham, Maine, is the director of admissions/marketing for Catherine McAuley High School. Eric J. Snyder, of Wilbraham, Mass., is the head volleyball coach for Stonehill College.

’03 Karen S. Diaz, of Derry, N.H., is the director of education for Lincoln Technical Institute.

’05 Eric J. Guyette, of Millville, Mass., is a program supervisor for Alternatives Unlimited Inc.

Samantha Doyle, of Saugus, Mass., is an event planner for Boston Butler.

Baltazar M. Kimangano, of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, was promoted to chief research, planning and development manager for Tanzania Buildings Agency.

April L. Gancarz, of Allston, Mass., is the HCI compliance analyst II for Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston. Richard W. Hindle, of Allston, Mass., was promoted to scheduling analyst for Circles. Darcy R. Tippie, of Auburn, Maine, is an assistant manager for Kay Jewelers. ’04 Sara (Flanagan) Cotter, of Middleton, N.H., was promoted to public relations tax manager for Liberty Mutual Insurance. Cotter is also a certified payroll professional.

Halima M. Kwikwega, of Shinyanga, Tanzania, is a monitoring and evaluation specialist for the office of The Permanent Secretary Prime Minister’s Office. Sabath E. Mbuguma, of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, is the program manager for Cooperazione Internazionale. Ezekiel J. Mwalutende, of Mbeya, Tanzania, is the airport manager for Tanzania Airports Authority.

Rosann M. Jager, of Detroit, Mich., is a trek manager for the Building With Books organization.

Edward R. Nzela Mbanga, of Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, was promoted to senior economist at the Ministry’s Headquarters.

Mehul S. Jinwala, of Jersey City, N.J., is a marketing representative for Kessler Rehabilitation Center.

Valerrie B. Pritt, of Boynton Beach, Fla., is a librarian for Palm Beach County.

Christopher J. Kelly, of Portsmouth, N.H., is a sales representative for Johnson & Johnson.

Lindsay A. Robuccio, of Merrimack, N.H., is a marketing specialist for St. Joseph Hospital.

Patricia (Thibert) Mackie, of Bolingbrook, Ill., recently graduated with a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Benedictine University and has earned an LPC license. Robert J. Newton, of Tampa, Fla., is a general manager for Residence Inn by Marriott.

30 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Stacy Burk, of Marlton, N.J., is a local manager for Verizon.

Pablo X. Pena, of Manchester, N.H., is a credit analyst for TD Banknorth.

Alicia A. Carrier, of Raymond, N.H., is a preschool teacher at Glen Lake School.

Gary T. Pepka, of Pembroke, N.H., is the strategic marketing manager for Allegro Micro Systems Inc.

Joanne E. Doane, of Salisbury, Mass., is the account manager for GE Supply Logistics. Gail (McGill) Farrington, of Manchester, N.H., is a research coordinator for NH Oncology and Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Barbara A. Gardner, of Franklin, N.H., is a mentor for the JAG program at West High School in Manchester and is a ninth-grade class adviser at Pittsfield Middle-High School. Evangelia K. Georgiadis, of Manchester, N.H., is an account executive for Beneficial Financial. Jillian V. Lagasse, of Hudson, N.H., is the lead qualification specialist for Sybase Inc. Lori L. Lavallee, of Hooksett, N.H., is a business analyst for Liberty Mutual Insurance. Eric Lavoie, of Salem, N.H., is the regional account manager for Anixter. Mary R. Lawrence, of Bedford, N.H., is the marketing assistant for Emerson Ecologics. Jenna (Stevens) Legendre, of Manchester, N.H., is the program support specialist assistant for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Genna M. Lencsak, of Hollis, N.H., is a teacher for Chapel School in Nashua. Guyla (Merchant) Mawson, of Peyton, Colo., is a medical support assistant for the U.S. Army. Allison K. McKay, of Somersworth, N.H., was promoted to publicist of Bisson Barcelona. Amanda (O’Keefe) Murchison, of Bedford, N.H., is a ninth-grade English teacher at Goffstown High School.

’06 Joseph M. Allison, of Merrimack, N.H., is the executive chef for Tyng’s Tavern & Grill.

Cynthia A. Nelson, of Merrimack, N.H., is the catering manager for Tidewater Hospitality Resource & Tidewater Catering Group.

Alyssa M. Bonetti, of Plymouth, Mass., is a travel/event planner for Circles.

Sherman A. Partap, of Nashua, N.H., is the program manager for Harris Corporation. Partap is working on the FAA telecommunications infrastructure program as the service manager for the FAA New England Region.

Vinh Q. Bui, of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is the deputy manager of advertising and promotion for Saigon Union of Trading Cooperatives.

Adam R. Correau, of Nashua, N.H., is the contract specialist/buyer for the Department of Defense for the U.S. Air Force.

Daniel L. Pletcher, of Nashua, N.H., is an electronic engineer for Analog Devices Incorporated.

Richard N. Hudon, of Creedmoor, N.C., is the senior risk adviser for Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina in Durham. Hudon is a certified information systems auditor and a certified risk professional.

Peter F. Richard, of Raymond, N.H., is a customer relations manager for XMA Corporation.

Peter Spivack, of Manchester, N.H., was named to the 2007 New Hampshire Union Leader’s Rose L. Ruggiero, of Manchester, N.H., is a man- “40 Under Forty” list. ager for USAlliance Federal Credit Union. Michelle Saporito, of Nottingham, N.H., is the senior pension administrator for Baldwin & Clarke.

Marriages ’81 Carol B. Howes married Thaddeus Strojny.

Megan A. Sprague, of Marlborough, N.H., is a media buyer and trade show coordinator for Carlisle Wide Plank Floors. Jessica A. Starr, of Charlotte, N.C., is the intellectual property marketing specialist for Alston & Bird LLP. Jessica L. Townsend, of Milford, N.H., is the account executive for New Hampshire Magazine.

Travis L. Willette, of Bennington, Vt., is an outside salesman for Fastenal Company. William W. Yengi, of Mbeya, Tanzania, is the senior administrator for the Walter Reed HIV Program.

es

The Kazes

’07 Bethany L. Carter, of Scarborough, Maine, is a customer service representative for Time Warner Cable. Thomas Chagnon, of Portsmouth, N.H., is the director of customer service and production planning for Prime Tanning Company Inc.

’82 Susan Williams married John Stanewick ’76.

Stephanie A. Longchamps married William Mosher. ’03 Vincent R. Forgione married Kimberly D. Pelletier. Eemaan Rameez married Abdullah Shazmeen. ’04 David J. Illg II married Carrie Hankins. Christine J. Mandeville married Garth Fitzsimmons ’05.

Brandi Mellor married Mike Emerson. Garth M. Fitzsimmons married Christine Mandeville ’04. ’06 Heather L. Coble married Aaron Heyer. Jennifer M. McKew married Bruce Jordan.

’89 Elizabeth A. Bachand married Brian Ammerman.

Rebecca M. Odesse married Michael James Guidry Jr.

’91 Rodney C. Dore married Julie Anderson.

Lauren A. Poor married Michael Berardi.

’96 Eric K. Klopp married Mary Jane Krueger.

James J. Wilhelm, of Naperville, Ill., is the corporate manager of retail loss prevention for Ace Hardware Corporation.

’02 Nicholas J. Coates married Sarah Jordan.

’05 Sara M. Flanagan married Daniel Cotter.

’76 John Stanewick married Susan Williams ’82.

Kimberly A. Schaff, of Harpswell, Maine, is the assistant principal for Great Salt Bay Community School.

’00 Christina L. Morrell married Brandon H. Martin.

William Stavropoulos married Darlene Tran. ’97 Angela C. Buckler married Gino Edwards. Robin Sorenson married Michael Kazes. ’98 Melissa M. Conti married Jason Sipe. ’99 Sandra Luke Abrams married Don Hill. Leah E. Malin married Jason R. Stupp.

’07 Adam R. Correau married Angela Marie Holt.

New Arrivals ’73 Susan C. Madden and her husband, Edward, announce the birth of their twin sons, James and Stephen, on Nov. 17, 2005. ’88 Patrick D. Murphy and his wife, Kelley, announce the birth of their son, Robert, on May 1, 2006. ’90 Diane (Bartlett) Catino and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their son, Ryan Christopher, on Feb. 14, 2006.

For more alumni news, visit

snhu.edu The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 31


Class Notes ’93 Julie (Sweetland) Hayward and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their daughter, Brooke Maire, on Sept. 6, 2006. Donna (Wade) Savage and her husband, Jeff, announce the birth of their daughter, Victoria Rose, on Aug. 4, 2006. ’95 Kristina (Murphy) Herrick and her husband, Keith, announce the birth of their daughter, Avery Marie, on May 23, 2006.

Alumni News

William Libby and his wife, Rebecca ’00, announce the birth of their son, Preston William, on Jan. 26.

Lynzie (Fenohr) Millard and her husband, Timothy, announce the birth of their daughter, Kayde M., on Aug. 12, 2006.

Nathalie (Haddad) Peterson and her husband, Marc, announce the birth of their daughter, Lila, on Nov. 21, 2006.

Gary T. Pepka and his wife, Deborah, announce the birth of their son, Colby, on April 5, 2006.

Melissa (D’Agata) Piraino and her husband, James, announce the birth of their son, Bandon Thomas, on April 9.

Sarena J. Thompson and her husband, Nathan, announce the birth their daughter, Evianna Patricia Raimo, on Oct. 12, 2006.

Brett A. Lennerton announces the birth of his son, Lucas Stephen, on March 2.

’00 Scott A. Bilodeau and his wife, Janine, announce the birth of their daughter, Sophia Rose, on Jan. 19.

Burak Mehmet Ozbasoglu and his wife, Tugba, announce the birth of their son, Yigit, on Aug. 27, 2006.

Anil Kumar and his wife, Jennifer, announce the birth of their son, Logan Kamlesh, on April 2.

’45 ’68 ’70 ’73 ’78

Jason B. Soucy, and his wife, Jill, announce the birth of their daughter, Riley Kate, on Feb. 3, 2006.

Rebecca (Belanger) Libby and her husband, William ’99, announce the birth of their son, Preston William, on Jan. 26.

’80 ’83 ’86

’97 Holly A. Randall and her husband, James Maki, announce the birth of their son, Riley James, on March 11.

Kathleen (Wild) Miller and her husband, Joshua, announce the birth of their daughter, Calli, on Oct. 2, 2006.

’87 ’88

’01 Shawn M. McNamara and his wife, Manchell (Veilleux) McNamara, announce the birth of their son, Conner M., on Aug. 15, 2006.

’90 ’94 ’03 ’07

’98 John R. Krause and his wife, Tatum ’99, announce the birth of their daughter, Hannah, on Dec. 31, 2006. Jennifer (Sillo) Rayher and her husband, Jason ’98, announce the birth of their daughter, Katherine Elsa, on June 6, 2006.

’04 Amy (Fallon) Daigle and her husband, Kenneth, announce the birth of their son, Logan Robert, on Sept. 26, 2006.

Jennifer (Jenness) Scheffer and her husband, Mark, announce the birth of their daughter, Carly Elizabeth, on March 1.

Danielle (Foley) MacDonald and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their daughter, Allison, on July 4, 2006.

’99 Amy (Condon) Goodell and her husband, Jason, announce the birth of their son, Evan James, on April 19.

Lynn (Hicks) Nagle and her husband, Charlie, announce the birth of their twin daughters, Jessica and Riley, on Feb. 10, 2006.

Michael B. Johnson and his wife, Alyson, announce the birth of their son, Tucker Stoney, on April 20. Tatum (Turner) Krause and her husband, John ’98, announce the birth of their daughter Hannah, on Dec. 31, 2006.

32 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

In Memoriam Joseph Mc Ardle Roger Charpentier Richard Marandola John Turgeon Clair Snyder Calvin Wayman Gerald Soucy Dennis Bishop Walter Berry Barbara (Levesque) Northrop Eric DiMaio Karen (Lindbloom) Nelson Michael Passamonte Lionel Martin Jennifer (Harvey) Cotton-Grad Patrick Roberge Elizabeth Terry

Martin Luther King Day of Action

Jan. 19, 2008 Alumni Family Day and Athletic Hall of Fame Induction

SNHU Alumni Board February 2008 (TBD) Black History Month

Feb. 23, 2008 Alumni Hockey Day

Feb. 29 and March 1, 2008 Relay for Life

March 2008 (TBD) Women’s History Month

April 19, 2008 International Night

June 16, 2008 President’s Cup Golf Tournament

snhu.edu

The Alumni Association has developed a simple and convenient way for you to show your Penmen pride while benefiting the university. SNHU will receive a payment from U.S. Bank when you receive your card, and will then receive a percentage of each purchase you make with it. The money will help us support student programs. Visit the Alumni Benefits & Services page online at www.snhu.edu/alumni and pick out your favorite card.

January 2008 (TBD)

75 Acts of Service Awards Spring Concert

For more alumni news,

President’s Cup Scores Big Alumni Credit Card

Join us for our 75th anniversary celebration and other university events.

April 2008 (TBD)

Robert J. Newton and his wife, Kimberly, announce the birth of their twin son and daughter, Ryan John and Kailey Ann, on Aug. 26, 2006. ’06 Adam Gilpatrick and his wife, Meredith, announce the birth of their daughter, Josie, on Sept. 11, 2006.

Upcoming Events

Visit us online at snhu.edu or contact the Office of Alumni and Community Relations at 603.645.9799 for more information or to register for events.

From left to right: J.P. Winslow, Mike Cyr, Tom Huther ’87 and Bob Martucci.

President David Lee ’93

The 17th annual President’s Cup Golf Tournament at Sky Meadow Country Club in Nashua, N.H., in June generated a record amount of almost $42,000 for the university’s student scholarship fund.

Vice President Peter Perich ’76, ’85

Tom Huther, Bob Martucci, Mike Cyr and J.P. Winslow took first place with a score of 61. Michael Kazes, Patrick Rahn and Steve Thorpe placed second with a 61. Chuck Rolecek, Steve Rolecek, Tim Baines and Ben Loveless placed third with a 62. The event had 62 sponsors. The following Presidential Sponsors each donated $2,000: • AAA Northern New England • Accurate Air Inc. • Anagnost Investments Inc. • Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield • The Cerato Group LLC of Wachovia Securities Financial Network • Coca-Cola Bottling of Northern New England • C.R. Sparks Restaurant/Hanover Street Chop House • EMC Microsoft Practice • Follett Higher Education Group • Friends of SNHU • Granite Group Benefits • Harvey Construction • The NHHEAF Network Organizations • TD Banknorth N.A.

Treasurer K. Brian McLaughlin ’88 Secretary Meghan (Cotton) Dalesandro ’00 Executive Director of Major Gifts Michael DeBlasi ’70 Directors Janice Fitzpatrick ’93 Steven Gore ’90, ’02 Robin (Sorenson) Kazes ’97 Kristina Kintzer ’01, ’03 Ashley (Adams) Liadis ’02, ’05 Tiffany Lyon ’00, ’02 Katherine McKenney ’03, ’05 Jeff Penta ’05 Seth Wall ’00 President Emeritus Chad Mason ’98, ’00

What’s Happening Looking for something fun to do with your friends and family? Check out the Alumni and Friends Events Calendar at snhu.edu/alumni. Finding and registering for an event is easy, and events are posted well in advance.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 33


Class Notes ’93 Julie (Sweetland) Hayward and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their daughter, Brooke Maire, on Sept. 6, 2006. Donna (Wade) Savage and her husband, Jeff, announce the birth of their daughter, Victoria Rose, on Aug. 4, 2006. ’95 Kristina (Murphy) Herrick and her husband, Keith, announce the birth of their daughter, Avery Marie, on May 23, 2006.

Alumni News

William Libby and his wife, Rebecca ’00, announce the birth of their son, Preston William, on Jan. 26.

Lynzie (Fenohr) Millard and her husband, Timothy, announce the birth of their daughter, Kayde M., on Aug. 12, 2006.

Nathalie (Haddad) Peterson and her husband, Marc, announce the birth of their daughter, Lila, on Nov. 21, 2006.

Gary T. Pepka and his wife, Deborah, announce the birth of their son, Colby, on April 5, 2006.

Melissa (D’Agata) Piraino and her husband, James, announce the birth of their son, Bandon Thomas, on April 9.

Sarena J. Thompson and her husband, Nathan, announce the birth their daughter, Evianna Patricia Raimo, on Oct. 12, 2006.

Brett A. Lennerton announces the birth of his son, Lucas Stephen, on March 2.

’00 Scott A. Bilodeau and his wife, Janine, announce the birth of their daughter, Sophia Rose, on Jan. 19.

Burak Mehmet Ozbasoglu and his wife, Tugba, announce the birth of their son, Yigit, on Aug. 27, 2006.

Anil Kumar and his wife, Jennifer, announce the birth of their son, Logan Kamlesh, on April 2.

’45 ’68 ’70 ’73 ’78

Jason B. Soucy, and his wife, Jill, announce the birth of their daughter, Riley Kate, on Feb. 3, 2006.

Rebecca (Belanger) Libby and her husband, William ’99, announce the birth of their son, Preston William, on Jan. 26.

’80 ’83 ’86

’97 Holly A. Randall and her husband, James Maki, announce the birth of their son, Riley James, on March 11.

Kathleen (Wild) Miller and her husband, Joshua, announce the birth of their daughter, Calli, on Oct. 2, 2006.

’87 ’88

’01 Shawn M. McNamara and his wife, Manchell (Veilleux) McNamara, announce the birth of their son, Conner M., on Aug. 15, 2006.

’90 ’94 ’03 ’07

’98 John R. Krause and his wife, Tatum ’99, announce the birth of their daughter, Hannah, on Dec. 31, 2006. Jennifer (Sillo) Rayher and her husband, Jason ’98, announce the birth of their daughter, Katherine Elsa, on June 6, 2006.

’04 Amy (Fallon) Daigle and her husband, Kenneth, announce the birth of their son, Logan Robert, on Sept. 26, 2006.

Jennifer (Jenness) Scheffer and her husband, Mark, announce the birth of their daughter, Carly Elizabeth, on March 1.

Danielle (Foley) MacDonald and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their daughter, Allison, on July 4, 2006.

’99 Amy (Condon) Goodell and her husband, Jason, announce the birth of their son, Evan James, on April 19.

Lynn (Hicks) Nagle and her husband, Charlie, announce the birth of their twin daughters, Jessica and Riley, on Feb. 10, 2006.

Michael B. Johnson and his wife, Alyson, announce the birth of their son, Tucker Stoney, on April 20. Tatum (Turner) Krause and her husband, John ’98, announce the birth of their daughter Hannah, on Dec. 31, 2006.

32 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

In Memoriam Joseph Mc Ardle Roger Charpentier Richard Marandola John Turgeon Clair Snyder Calvin Wayman Gerald Soucy Dennis Bishop Walter Berry Barbara (Levesque) Northrop Eric DiMaio Karen (Lindbloom) Nelson Michael Passamonte Lionel Martin Jennifer (Harvey) Cotton-Grad Patrick Roberge Elizabeth Terry

Martin Luther King Day of Action

Jan. 19, 2008 Alumni Family Day and Athletic Hall of Fame Induction

SNHU Alumni Board February 2008 (TBD) Black History Month

Feb. 23, 2008 Alumni Hockey Day

Feb. 29 and March 1, 2008 Relay for Life

March 2008 (TBD) Women’s History Month

April 19, 2008 International Night

June 16, 2008 President’s Cup Golf Tournament

snhu.edu

The Alumni Association has developed a simple and convenient way for you to show your Penmen pride while benefiting the university. SNHU will receive a payment from U.S. Bank when you receive your card, and will then receive a percentage of each purchase you make with it. The money will help us support student programs. Visit the Alumni Benefits & Services page online at www.snhu.edu/alumni and pick out your favorite card.

January 2008 (TBD)

75 Acts of Service Awards Spring Concert

For more alumni news,

President’s Cup Scores Big Alumni Credit Card

Join us for our 75th anniversary celebration and other university events.

April 2008 (TBD)

Robert J. Newton and his wife, Kimberly, announce the birth of their twin son and daughter, Ryan John and Kailey Ann, on Aug. 26, 2006. ’06 Adam Gilpatrick and his wife, Meredith, announce the birth of their daughter, Josie, on Sept. 11, 2006.

Upcoming Events

Visit us online at snhu.edu or contact the Office of Alumni and Community Relations at 603.645.9799 for more information or to register for events.

From left to right: J.P. Winslow, Mike Cyr, Tom Huther ’87 and Bob Martucci.

President David Lee ’93

The 17th annual President’s Cup Golf Tournament at Sky Meadow Country Club in Nashua, N.H., in June generated a record amount of almost $42,000 for the university’s student scholarship fund.

Vice President Peter Perich ’76, ’85

Tom Huther, Bob Martucci, Mike Cyr and J.P. Winslow took first place with a score of 61. Michael Kazes, Patrick Rahn and Steve Thorpe placed second with a 61. Chuck Rolecek, Steve Rolecek, Tim Baines and Ben Loveless placed third with a 62. The event had 62 sponsors. The following Presidential Sponsors each donated $2,000: • AAA Northern New England • Accurate Air Inc. • Anagnost Investments Inc. • Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield • The Cerato Group LLC of Wachovia Securities Financial Network • Coca-Cola Bottling of Northern New England • C.R. Sparks Restaurant/Hanover Street Chop House • EMC Microsoft Practice • Follett Higher Education Group • Friends of SNHU • Granite Group Benefits • Harvey Construction • The NHHEAF Network Organizations • TD Banknorth N.A.

Treasurer K. Brian McLaughlin ’88 Secretary Meghan (Cotton) Dalesandro ’00 Executive Director of Major Gifts Michael DeBlasi ’70 Directors Janice Fitzpatrick ’93 Steven Gore ’90, ’02 Robin (Sorenson) Kazes ’97 Kristina Kintzer ’01, ’03 Ashley (Adams) Liadis ’02, ’05 Tiffany Lyon ’00, ’02 Katherine McKenney ’03, ’05 Jeff Penta ’05 Seth Wall ’00 President Emeritus Chad Mason ’98, ’00

What’s Happening Looking for something fun to do with your friends and family? Check out the Alumni and Friends Events Calendar at snhu.edu/alumni. Finding and registering for an event is easy, and events are posted well in advance.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 33


See a Show Upcoming McIninch Art Gallery Events Every Picture Tells a Story: Myths, Messages and Morals Nov. 2 to Dec. 13 This exhibition examines the subject of allegory as depicted in contemporary painting. Artists include Gideon Bok, Katherine Doyle, Simon Harling and Adelaide Murphy Tyrol.

Simon Harling “Blood Simple Cadillac,” 2006, oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches

Lewis W. Hine “Child Labor at Amoskeag Millyard,” May 1909

The Art of Politics: Documenting Social Change Jan. 18 to Feb. 14 This exhibition offers a selection of work from photographers who have captured some of the subjects of political issues and social change. The exhibit will seek to underscore the current election year climate by portraying past presidential hopefuls as well as images that capture the essence of such issues as war, poverty, immigration, human rights and relief from natural disasters, to name a few. (This exhibit is presented in collaboration with the New Hampshire Institute of Art.) An opening reception will be held Friday, Jan. 25, from noon to 1 p.m.

All gallery events are free and open to the public. The gallery, which was made possible by a generous gift from the McIninch Foundation, is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The gallery is closed on Sundays and will be closed from Nov. 17 through Nov. 25 for the Thanksgiving holiday. Please call Debbie Disston at 603.629.4622, e-mail m.gallery@snhu.edu or visit www.snhu.edu online for additional information.

34 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Record Enrollment The university welcomed its largest incoming freshman class into the undergraduate day school in September. The 723 incoming freshman and transfer students represent 23 states. SNHU’s equal ratio of men to women represents a divergence from the national average for incoming freshman classes, which is 65 percent women to 35 percent men. The university has approximately 1,900 traditional, full-time undergraduate day students and a total enrollment in all divisions, including SNHU Online and the centers, of about 9,425 students.

Corrections From the Spring 2007 issue: The university’s renewable energy agreement is with PPM Energy. The wind turbines pictured are located at the Klondike Wind Power Project in Oregon.


Giving Back Honor Roll of Donors Report 2006-2007 The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 35


2006-2007 Constituent Giving Totals Southern New Hampshire University recognizes the individuals, corporations, foundations and agencies listed on the following pages for their generous gift support from July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007. To them the university extends its deepest appreciation.

25.4%

18.5%

Alumni $399,181

Faculty, Staff, Parents and Friends $291,165

44.3%

11.8%

Corporations and Organizations $186,302

Foundations $697,626

$1,250,065

Constituent Giving Total $1,574,274

Government Contributions

2006-2007 Constituent Giving and Government Contributions Total: $2,824,339

36 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007


Honor Roll of Donors Report

President’s Circle Annual contributions of $1,000 or more are recognized in Southern New Hampshire University’s most prestigious giving society, the President’s Circle. This group of donors makes an immediate impact, allowing the university to continue its important work of hiring the best faculty, attracting the best students and maintaining the best facilities.

President’s Circle Gifts of $50,000 and above Andrew W. “Mickey” Greene ’72 Christos ’91 and Mary Papoutsy

Gifts of $25,000-$49,999 Anonymous Donor Geoffrey E. Clark and Martha Fuller Clark The Salizzoni Family Foundation Kimon and Anne Zachos

Gifts of $10,000-$24,999 John and Pamela Blackford Cathy ’88 and H. Joseph Champagne Jr. Rick ’73 and Marcia Courtemanche Theresa M. Desfosses ’72 Robert ’92 and Karin Finlay David E. Hills and Catherine McLaughlin-Hills Robert and Kate Horgan Donald ’71 and Denise ’69 Labrie Josephine A. Lamprey Bob McDermott ’81 June Smith and Steve Pensinger James Watson

Steven Shulman Wellesley A. Stokes ’74 Thomas ’74 and Diane Tessier Ray and Barbara Truncellito John and Francine Webb

Gifts of $2,500 to $4,999 Craig ’80 and Mary ’79 Ahlquist Michael ’73 and Lisa Brody Ronald J. Costigan ’79 Robert ’78 and Patricia DeColfmacker Ann ’79 ’95 and Peter Lally David ’93 and Amy Lee L. Douglas and Ellen O’Brien Susan B. Parker Wade A. Philbrick ’85 Raymond ’77 and Terry ’88 Prouty Rowland ’40 and Ferne Schmidtchen Christopher J. Toy

Gifts of $1,000 to $2,499 Anonymous D. Anwar I. Al Ghani ’98 Daniel Archambeault ’84 Benjamin G. Barkhouse ’74 Tom and Nancy Barrett Walter ’80 and Shirley ’82 Batchelder Robert Berg and Vivian Derryck Martin and Michelle Bradley

Donald J. Brezinski Nelson S. Burbank ’83 Craig and Kathleen Camuso Tom and Patience Chamberlin Clayton and Christine Christensen Rick Colfer ’82 Lawrence Connell Bradford E. and Kathleen D. Cook Patrick D. Cullen Bea ’73 and Mike Dalton Robert ’87 and Lynne David Michael ’70 and Maureen ’70 DeBlasi David C. Dobbins ’03 Daryl A. Dreffs Karen Erickson C. Richard and Kathy Erskine Peter V. Ferris ’81 James Freiburger and Eleanor Dunfey-Freiburger Friend of the School of Community Economic Development Robert ’77 and Michele ’77 Garneau James ’84 and Susan Goldman Steven N. Gore ’90 R. Alan Greene and Christy Greene Tera L. Hale ’06 Douglas E. Hall Edward J. Hannigan ’75 Roger and Frances Hebert

Gifts of $5,000 and $9,999 David Bellman ’92 Howard Brodsky Sidney M. Casel ’71 Richard A. and Joanne Gustafson Rene ’71 and Fayne LeClerc Jacqueline F. Mara Claude and Joan Marchessault John and Betty Miles G. David and Susan Miller Kyle W. Nagel Mark ’77 and Lisa Ouellette Charles and Karen Rolecek

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 37


Linda C. Hicks ’94 Pamela D. Hogan ’83 Dorothea D. Hooper Jay ’86 and Sonya Hoyt Peter and Virginia Irwin Edward ’87 and Deborah ’85 Ithier Robert D. Jaffin ’79 Michael M. Kaleel ’70 Scott and Ellen Kalicki Judith A. Knapp and Michelle L. Knapp Dr. George J. and Mrs. Pauline ’83 ’92 Larkin Jr. Joseph ’89 and Laurie LaRocque Paul LeBlanc and Pat Findlen Rick Loeffler Steven L. Marram ’85 J. Kenneth McGill K. Brian ’88 and Linda ’87 ’89 McLaughlin Ed Miville Mary Jean Mockler Constantinos G. Mokas Claira Monier Keith ’99 and Samantha Moran Dick and Lynn Moran Mike Morin Barry M. Moskowitz ’87 Andrew and Kim Murphy David ’69 and Charlene Myler James A. Nielsen Steve and Maria Manus ’89 Painchaud Prashanth R. Palakurthi David ’78 and Diane Patryn Joseph “Chip” Polak Brad Poznanski John J. Rainone ’85 Thomas ’81 and Tracy ’98 Roche Timothy Rooney John and Thora Russell Greg ’81 and Sally ’81 Sargent Robert and Muriel ’80 Schadee Robert ’72 and Ellen ’73 Schiavoni Ellen Seidman Curtis C. Smith Stanley and Patricia ’89 Spirou Adrienne Stevens The Tancreti Family George Teloian William Tummillo ’70 Adelaide Walker James D. Walter Michael J. Zubretsky

38 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

SNHU Donors Southern New Hampshire University proudly recognizes those donors who contributed up to $999 during this past fiscal year. Every gift, no matter the size, makes an impact on SNHU’s current students.

Gifts of $500 to $999 Gordon Allen Michael J. Asselin ’74 Michael Black ’86 A. Kenneth Bonanno ’77 Valerie J. Bradley Daniel M. Burnham Michael and Christine Cikacz Michael D. Cooney ’90 Robert A. Cruz ’68 Mark R. Dachel ’91 Louis D. DeMato Lewis M. Feldstein Mark Fortin ’86 Robert A. Freese ’89 William M. Gahara ’86 Carmen P. Giampetruzzi ’86 Bill and Beth Gilmore Paul and Linda Goyette Robert ’87 and Laurie ’87 Grenus Daniel C. Hall ’01 Richard O. Hanson ’77 Darcy Horgan Kathleen Hynes Priscilla J. Jeffery ’98 John Kacavas Fran B. Kelly Diane Lander and Susan Knight Ronald and Valerie Lauderdale Gertrude B. Leoutsakos ’37 Chad L. Mason ’98 Michael McCluskey William D. McGarry Terri Y. Montague Dennis P. Moore ’74 Christopher F. Morris Ravi Thaduri and Sangeetha Palakurthi Ravindra ’77 and Jasmine ’03 Pandit Roy Priest Debra Redfern Renee Reiner ’93 Elisabeth S. K. Robinson Deborah D. Robitaille

Peter ’79 and Judith ’87 Romein Steven F. Soba David Stapleton Dick and Carol Stephens Wayne W. Stiles ’87 Benjamin M. Sutch ’00 Cyrus and Barbara Sweet Scott V. Truncellito ’93 Stephen and Susan VanDerBeken Steven ’82 and Mattie Lynn Walters Vincent A. Wenners Scott and Cindy Wheeler Steven and Peggy Widener Robert E. Yasutis ’84

Gifts of $250 to $499 Darlene A. Atta ’97 Daniel A. Belanger Jane C. Belanger ’90 Charles Victor Bergh and Juliet Liu-Bergh Norman and Donna Bernard Richard and Kimberly Blanchette Jeffrey A. Camuso ’02 Owen and Esther Carey Gary and Pachareeya ’90 Carkin Gene N. Cartier Joel Chagnon Catherine T. Cocco ’88 Kevin G. Collimore ’91 Jennifer L. Connor ’93 Robert L. Corrallino Robert and Barbara Costello Susan L. Daneault Bert Davis Steven N. Devoe ’90 William and Margaret Dolbow Carol A. Drew ’85 Robert H. Duffley ’91 William O. Duffy ’71 John and Nancy Dufour Richard Dunfey Jacqueline F. Dunn ’94 Euclid A. Dupuis ’69 and Arlene Nadeau Dupuis ’84 Thomas C. Fischer Janice A. Fitzpatrick ’93 Laurence A. Franco ’75 Dave Frederick ’70 Marilyn Frederick Channing ’75 and Susan Fuller William ’88 and Kolby ’90 Gallant Patricia R. Gerard ’91 Libby Ginnetti


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Gregory C. Goodwin William and Joan Green Ellen R. Griffin Bruce Gross James B. Hall ’78 John D. Hankinson ’92 Steven and Constance ’91 Harvey David and Marilynne Hedstrom Philip and Carolyn Hollman Amelia S. Houtchens ’69 Michael F. Hover Nancy Iamundo Kathy Ireland Kenneth and Carol Jue Ari and Effie Kalampalikis Burton S. and Janice G. ’85 Kaliski William J. Kanteres Samuel and Louise Kaymen Chris and Helen Kehas William E. Kiernan Peter J. Kiriakoutsos ’78 Donald Kummins Paul ’85 and Barbara ’85 Labonte Donald L. LaCroix ’72 Cathy La Forge and Jon Travis Linda J. Lambert ’84 David A. Landry ’83 Paul H. Leclair ’80 Ingrid ’84 and Regis Lemaire Saul and Gloria ’00 Levenson Stephanie W. Lewry ’97 Bryan S. MacLaren ’96 William Maddocks ’96 Thomas M. McDermott Richard A. McGrath ’76 Christina A. Metzler Michael R. Morin ’82 Dana and Cindy Motta Karen L. Muncaster Dennis R. Murphy ’01 Nancy A. Newton ’91 Kristen A. Ng ’86 Helen M. Packey Eugene Piana Jennifer A. Pistarelli ’98 Thomas Potterfield Cyrilla H. Prescott ’73 Munro H. Proctor Shelley M. Proulx ’83 ’93 ’96 Vladimir ’98 and Lyra Riabov Nancy J. Richardson Marc Robillard ’79 Wayne ’81 and Kimberly Mae Robinson

Dennis P. Roy Stephen Schade ’86 Kathleen A. Schoonmaker ’87 Dennis K. Sentenac ’87 Dawn M. Silver ’78 Jerry A. Smith ’74 Walter and Celeste Snitko Christos and Maria Spirou Daniel R. Sullivan Casey (Nanci) Sweet-Valenti David and Linda Taylor Jill E. Teeters and David Lamothe Jane E. Torrey ’90 Lauren A. Tregor ’83 Gary P. Tripp The Trueheart Sisters James Truncellito William and Linda Tynion Utiang Ugbe ’02 and Sintiki Tarfa-Ugbe Peter Uvin David ’85 and Gail ’88 Wheeler James A. Whitmore ’95 Peter C. Willey ’85 Wayne B. Williams ’72 Sara J. Wilson Jeffrey M. Wlodyka ’86 Edward ’74 and Deborah Au Wolak Elizabeth and Thomas Wright Susan Youngs Walter and Christine Zimmermann

Frank and Eleanor Barnes John and Judith Barry Charles P. H. Bascom ’78 R.P. Bass Jr. Bill and Dee Beane David J. Beauchesne ’85 Robert J. Begiebing Michele Beniamino ’99 Allan ’84 and Valerie ’86 Benowitz

Gifts of $100 to $249 Anonymous Donor Mark and Debbie Ackerman James A. Adelstein ’94 Barbara C. Agel ’78 Michael J. Alamo Jr. ’92 John H. Alden ’86 John F. Alfonse ’74 Debra J. Allen ’86 Cliff Antell ’98 Thomas B. Anthony ’84 Nicholas D. Antonecchia ’76 William and Carey Appold John Arico ’88 and Anna Doody Arico ’88 James Armenio Christopher and Britta Ayer Thomas and Joan Bagley Richard C. Bailey ’91 Steven Baker ’90 and Susan Matore-Baker ’90 Arthur and Stavoula Bakolas

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 39


Margaret M. Benson ’81 Carolyn and Randy Benthien Stephanie H. Bergeron Alan F. Bernier ’76 Gene A. Besaw ’69 Alex R. Bickford ’03 Frederick W. Bishop ’73 James C. Blackadar ’89

Stephen R. Callis ’71 Henry and Nancy Campbell Fanny Canotas Richard D. Cartier ’69 Joseph and V. Jacqueline Cavanaugh Daniel L. Chalifour ’83 Douglas F. Challenger Mary A. Chatigny ’95

Douglas ’88 ’90 and Christine ’97 Blais Robert ’86 and Ramona ’86 Blais Dr. Kimberly L. Bogle Nancy B. Bormuth ’81 David R. Bothwell ’74 Henri P. Boucher ’77 Dolores R. Boutin ’93 Catherine A. Bowers ’74 Michael Bradford ’83 Brian Bradley ’92 and Heather Henry Bradley ’91 Sharen K. Brady ’89 Nick D. Brattan ’76 Edward M. Breen ’87 Donald and Ginette Brenner Kenneth A. Broadbent ’78 James H. Brock ’80 Audrey Brown ’45 Darryl M. Brown ’80 Mary P. Brown Frederic W. Browne ’05 Lisa D. Bryan ’02 Robert ’83 and Annette Bryant Jack B. Caldwell ’86 Daniel Calegari Nina ’86 and Paul Calkins Steve Callender and Julie Clark

Arthur A. Chicaderis ’98 Lindley H. Churchill ’74 Ann M. Clark William A. Clark Henry Claypool Julie A. Cleary ’82 Robert and Lorie Cochran Brian C. Coffin ’73 Burton and Patty Cohen Pamela Cohen Chuck Collins ’88 Pierre B. Collins ’07 Ivan Colon ’91 Brendan T. Conry ’79 Margaret B. Coolican ’87 Gillian E. Coombs Gayle J. Cozens Brian ’04 and Meghan ’00 Dalesandro Sean and Motoko Day John R. Deakyne ’89 J. Michael Degnan ’80 Barbara A. Deguise ’93 Adrienne Delozier Barbara Demeter ’91 Michelle E. Desrosier ’80 Sampath Kumar Deva ’95 James A. Devlin ’92

40 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Peter and Rita Dignan Samuel Dillard Jr. ’69 Ronald V. Dimambro ’71 Trisha C. Dionne ’05 Matthew A. Doggett ’03 Dennis and Sharon Donnermeyer Francis A. Donovan ’79 Winston L. Dookram ’73 Richard M. Dozier Richard C. Ducharme ’68 Caroline and Walter Dueger Patricia C. Duffey ’90 Patrick Duffy and Jaye Gibson Douglas ’76 and Debra ’82 Dunn Michelle E. Dunn Lawrence and Victoria Elbroch Joseph V. Elia ’84 Eileen P. Elias Edward N. Emond ’83 Stephen W. Faulkner ’84 Mark E. Ferdinando Robin Figueroa ’94 Katheran L. Fisher ’79 Robert and Priscilla Fleeson Donald P. Foley ’82 Brenda L. Ford ’88 Daniel P. Fortin ’85 Peter Franggos Catherine B. Frazer ’00 Alan J. Frio ’72 Ronald J. Gadwah ’81 Julia M. Gargus ’93 Vera J. Garrant ’86 Patricia E. Garrity ’80, ’04 Philip E. Gates ’70 Tara A. Geibel ’87 Gerald G. Gelinas ’77 Larry E. Geoffrion ’69 Robert ’74 and Felecia Gerardi W. Warren Gerety ’87 Mark A. Giangregorio ’82 James and Ann Gikas Jeffrey and Penelope Gilbert Ingrid M. Gillespie ’03 Philip E. Ginsburg John L. Good ’81 Lizbeth L. Good ’97 Karen Goodman David and Dorothy Goodwin Carrie Gotkowitz Dr. and Mrs. James L. Grace Jr. Joel S. Grace ’01 Arnold E. Green ’80


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Ernest ’81 and Loretta Greenberg Michael S. Greenberg Michael P. Gregowske ’95 Mary M. Griffin and Andrew Kaplan James S. Gruber and Patience Stoddard Nin Guan and Lijun Fang Sandra Guerra ’00 Normand L. Guilbert ’74 Gina M. Guinta ’01 Rodney Guldenstern ’92 Rosa C. Guy ’82 James A. Hadley ’96 Michael G. Haggerty ’86 Dr. Yvonne C. Hall Terrie Harman and Tom McCarron Elizabeth B. Harris John E. Hart ’88 Jacqueline M. Hartwell ’85 Dr. Mahboubul Hassan Frederick T. Hast, II ’85 Thomas ’00 and Katherine ’99 Helm Steven D. Henderson ’85 Warren Hern ’74 Robert P. Herold M.D. Donald ’99 and Sandra ’99 Hill David N. Hilton ’90 Robert M. Hodge ’80 Richard L. Hodgkinson ’96 Paul and Selma Hoff John and Bianca Holm Lisa A. Hopkins ’86 James E. Hoy ’80 William E. Hoysradt ’79 June Iamundo Ralph L. Isenburg ’43 Sarah Jacobs Joseph P. Jarnutowski ’76 Paul F. Jeannotte ’73 ’77 Alan L. Jenne ’93 Vivian M. Johnson ’71 Eugene F. Jones ’95 Pamela M. Jones ’04 Thomas Jones Karl L. Joslin ’96 and Lynn Davis Joslin ’00 Elizabeth Jowdy Wayne E. Justason ’86 Senthil Jyothiprakashan and Geetha Senthil Peter C. Kamveris Robert E. Kantor ’87 Patricia Kazakis ’71 John D. Keese ’81 John W. Kennedy ’66 Michel Kervyn de Lettenhove ’94

Wayne D. King Patrick D. Kirby ’96 Kathryn M. Kirkwood ’86 James E. Knee ’84 Kerry D. Koch ’96 Kathleen Kovacs ’02 Stephen Kriteman ’66 Becki M. Krueger ’97 James Kuras Brenda A. Labrie ’87 Joseph ’70 and Linda ’61 Lacasse Maurice J. Lacerte ’49 Elizabeth Ladu ’06 Thomas Lafortune ’73 Michelle Lamontagne-Strout ’96 Keith ’95 and Tara ’97 Landry Guy L. LaPerle ’71 Ronald W. LaPointe ’79 Mark E. Lareau ’69 Scott T. Latimer ’92 Daniel W. Lawrence ’01 John E. Layton ’67 Mark L. Le Page ’79 G. Michael and Carolyn Lee Constance D. Lein ’41 Janice Lemieux ’04

Tiffany A. Lyon ’00 ’02 Daniel J. Macek ’82 Mark L. Maciolek ’95 Louise T. Major ’89 Ernest W. Mander ’78 Patricia J. Mandravelis ’89 Robert P. Marcotte ’88 Russell R. Marcoux ’70 Kay A. Marcus ’80 Marcel R. Marquis ’01 Cathy B. Martin ’76 Roland A. Martin ’72 Prabha V. Maruvada Jason and Karen Mayeu Diana L. McCourt ’00 Donald McDonnell ’66 Gaylene M. McHale ’85 Katherine A. McKenney ’03 Keith N. McLaren ’01 Louise McNeilly ’03 Lowell J. McPherson ’85 Margie Mendell Michelle C. Mersereau ’89 Barbara J. Milon ’02 Kimberly F. Monk ’98 Debbie J. Moore

Christie L. Lenda ’05 Stephen D. Lent ’93 Cynthia R. Levandowski ’99 Debra A. Levy ’94 Ashley A. Liadis ’02 William J. Locke ’70 Steven M. Logan ’79 Robert C. Losik William F. Love ’74

Eric M. Moreau ’91 Dennis C. Morgan ’86 Bruce L. Morris ’83 Gail K. Morrison ’95 David C. Murphy ’68 Gary P. Nachajko ’70 Jittiporn Nagapradip ’06 John and Laura ’84 Nanof James ’85 and Karen ’89 Naro

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 41


Scott A. Newbury ’83 Ray H. Ng ’93 William Norton ’84 Eric Norwalt Duncan L. Noyes ’89 Stewart B. Oakes ’97 Joanne K. O’Leary ’73

42 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Kenneth M. Olson James ’00 and Michele ’96 O’Neill Millard A. Owens ’89 Melinda Palisi-Parker ’87 Jeffrey ’70 and Mary Ellen Palmer Anthony G. Pappafagos ’77 Matthew F. Pappas ’01 Michael J. Paris ’88 Robert T. Pariseau ’70 Thomas E. Peacock ’87 Cristina Pefianco-Heins ’86 Laurence J. Pelletier ’74 Dennis ’89 and Mary Ann Peltier Peter ’76 ’85 and Martha ’75 Perich Dwaine C. Perry ’96 Charles S. Pettigrew ’74 Michael ’80 and Jessica ’81 Pfalzgraf

Denise E. Pichette-Volk ’79 John A. Piecuch ’71 Karen M. Pinkos Anna and Edward Plitt Candace W. Portilla ’93 Joseph and Pauline Poulos Jane P. Powers Stephanie J. Powers Donald Prouty Michael J. Prymak ’00 Vgee Ramiah ’87 John D. Rauh Jason ’98 and Jennifer ’98 Rayher Diana J. Reilly ’89 Peter E. Reilly and Mary N. Picard Karl D. Rice ’72 Patricia and Phillip Richardson Robert E. L. Richardson ’71 Linda B. Riddle ’82 Ronald ’68 and Jane MacKey Rioux John C. Ritter Donna M. Robinson Thomas and Rovena Robinson Nancy J. Robitaille ’88 Martin D. Roche ’85 Steven D. Rodrigue ’92 Susan E. Roecker John D. Roller ’87 Clifford N. Rosenthal Gary R. Rowe ’77 Richard A. Roy ’83 Debra Royce-Druge ’84 Linda J. Rozolis ’04 Robert ’73 and Phyllis Ruais Massood Samii John J. San Antonio ’06 A. Vaughan and Elizabeth Sanborn Robert Sanderson ’67 Phillip and Pamela ’91 Sapienza Craig ’74 and Deborah ’75 Schreck Karl J. Schwab ’97 Susan Sci ’85 Audrey J. Scotti ’87 Daniel J. Seabourne ’70 Mary J. Searles ’03 Thomas J. Sedoric Dawn Sedutto Brian D. Seguin ’96

William A. Serin ’74 Philip R. Sewall Nicholas and Emily Shakra Dennis C. Shea ’98 Kevin P. Shea ’00 Harry P. Sheldon ’76 Tracey A. Sherman ’91 Patrice M. Shevlin ’80 Keith Shiel Patricia A. Shrader Sherleene Sissell ’86 Kevin ’89 and Christine ’87 Smith David L. Snell ’86 Joseph V. Soboleski ’86 Leo A. Soucy ’89 Darlene M. Spang ’94 Louis M. Stafford ’88 David G. Stahl Raymond J. Stahl ’88 Andrew and Karen Statires William Statires John ’79 and Muriel Sterling Marie Strahan Barbara K. Summers and Bill Goodwin Michael and Jayne Swack Margaret Talcott Judith A. Tammaro ’87 P. Derek TenBroeck ’88 Edward and Margot Thompson Patricia L. Thompson ’76 Judith A. Timney ’06 Joseph M. Todd ’87 Anthony J. Troia ’70 Christel Truglia Michelle Trull ’97 David Turcotte ’99 Gordon ’85 and Annette ’84 Tuttle Jennifer A. Van Campen ’98 John ’68 and Dian ’67 Van Santvoord James P. Villa ’91 Edward and Jane Vizvarie Dennis G. Walters ’85 William D. Ward ’83 Jeffrey D. Watts ’93 Joseph Weitze Jeanne E. Welivar ’90 Paul T. Wentworth ’96 Erik S. Wheeler ’93 Joseph Wheeler


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Nikki J. Wheeler ’85 Walter S. Wheeler ’55 Gretchen A. Whiting ’91 Todd R. Whitney ’96 Marty and John Wilde Douglas D. Willey ’80 Vanessa K. Williams ’96 Sumner and Helen Winebaum Daniel T. Wright ’79 Andrew J. Yasment ’85 David M. Young ’79 David J. Zingaro ’73

Richard F. Ayers ’81 Steven M. Bachner ’76 Robert I. Bailey ’88 Christopher C. Baker ’87 Douglas A. Baker ’91

Nancy M. Bartolotta ’81 Thomas Bartram ’72 Gail Bates ’89 Daniel M. Bator ’71 Anne V. Baumeister ’84

Laura K. Baker ’95 Paula M. Baker ’88 Lisa M. Balch ’94 David R. Ball ’71 Richard V. Ballantyne ’94 John N. Banalya ’02 Corbitt Banks ’90 Nancy D. Baradziej ’62 Ann T. Barbagallo ’88 Alice P. Barber ’87 Michael ’85 and Lauren ’86 Barber William V. Barber ’73 Kathy M. Barbone ’87 Allen G. Barclay ’71 Davida J. Barnes ’85 Ronald A. Barone ’95 William F. Barratt ’86 Jeffrey ’76 and Carol ’80 Barrett Lee Ann Barron ’97 Mary E. Barsamian ’94 Douglas L. Bartlett ’78 Vanessa A. Bartlett ’93

Janet R. Beach ’82 Gregory H. Beal ’81 Ernest E. Beane ’95 Michael ’90 and Pamela ’83 Beauchamp Kevin R. Beauchesne ’02 Ronald Beaulieu ’73 Suzanne M. Beaumont ’88 Daniel J. Beauregard ’85 John P. Beauregard ’92 Roland Bechard ’92 Veronica J. Beeson ’82 ’90 Arthur G. Belair ’73 Roger E. Belanger ’80 Leo Beliveau ’97 Russell F. Bellemare ’92 Carolyn N. Belliveau ’84 Kathleen Bellville ’72 Clifton Below ’85 and Kathryn Petuck ’85 Mark J. Bennett ’96 Donna L. Benson ’69 John S. Bentley ’91 Kelly J. Bergeon ’84

Gifts under $100 Anonymous Donor Marie Absmeier ’72 Debra ’84 and John Achramowicz Alberta T. Adams ’88 Benjamin L. Addison ’90 Theresa Adinolfi ’84 Michael ’03 and Margie ’03 Aguilar Charles W. Ahto ’81 Gary F. Alamed ’73 Becky L. Alarie ’05 Peter B. Alden ’83 Darlene G. Alexander ’05 Jennifer A. Allen ’99 Linda M. Allen ’97 Michael F. Allen ’97 Stephen E. Allen ’01 Steven S. Allen ’90 Benjamin A. Alms ’99 Ann L. Alpert ’78 Jacqueline R. Alukonis ’77 Gary W. Amadon ’87 Francisco Amador Alamo ’80 Elizabeth A. Ammerman ’89 Arthur D. Anderson ’88 James G. Anderson ’78 Susan M. Anderson ’02 Irene M. Andrea ’87 Richard J. Andreoli ’72 Donna L. Archambault ’05 Michael G. Argiropolis ’83 Ronald L. Armstrong ’85 Amber A. Arndt ’89 Mark L. Aronson ’77 Mildred M. Ashooh ’52 Forrest and Norma Athey Scott Aubertin ’88 Dale E. Austin ’97

Gerard A. Bergeron ’00 Roland R. Bergeron ’67 Ernest J. Bergevin ’67 Dwight A. Berner ’83 Byron G. Berry ’87 Gayle A. Berube ’03 Ralph H. Berube ’67 Catherine M. Bettencourt ’95 Janice R. Bettencourt ’99 Michael Bianconi Thomas S. Biggs ’81 Francine Bigney ’78 Daniel A. Bilodeau ’94 Russell ’02 and Amy ’01 Bilodeau Scott A. Bilodeau ’00 Richard G. Biron ’79 Vivian F. Bisbee ’90 Robert Bivone ’70 Leslie K. Blair ’80 William C. Blaisdell ’81 Kelly A. Blake ’97 Ngaio M. Blake ’00 John R. Bloomquist ’78 Lisa A. Bock ’81 Barry J. Bodell ’73 Raymond J. Boire ’77 Joseph R. Boisvert ’87 Michael Boisvert ’93 Ruth G. Boland ’86 Christopher F. Bolgiano ’78 Susan M. Bonenfant ’91 Chantel L. Bonner ’05 Kelly L. Boston ’94 Kristine K. Bouchard ’95 Raymond W. Bouchard ’80 Maurice Boucher ’70 Sonya L. Boucher ’95 Jeffrey P. Bourassa ’93 Janice L. Bouvier ’82 Suzanne K. Bowman Bruce T. Boyarsky ’95 Philip J. Boyatsis ’85 Marc A. Boyd ’71 Adam R. Breen ’05 Dorothy M. Brendle ’42 George J. Breslin ’96 Barbara E. Bridges ’69 Charles G. Bridgewater ’83 Laquita A. Brooks ’98 Laurie A. Brothers ’89 Anne L. Brown Barbara W. Brown ’93

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 43


The Brown Family David P. Brown ’81 James V. Buatti ’80 Carol J. Buchalski ’77 David ’94 and Harriet ’95 Buck William P. Buckley ’77 Fay E. Bulcock ’46 Dana R. Bull ’86 Susan P. Bunker ’86 Monique M. Bunton ’91 Jean P. Burbank ’92 Karen M. Burfeind ’02 William W. Burgess ’68 Arnold Burke ’83 John E. Burke ’60 Laurie J. Burke ’02 Linda Burns ’97 Scott W. Bursey ’99 James ’96 and Theresa Butterfield Steven M. Buyck ’97 Richard Cabral ’84 Nancy Callanan ’92 Jeffrey D. Cameron ’86 Jeffrey Cammuso ’87 Lynn E. Campbell ’94 Ronald F. Campbell ’82 Ralph J. Campilio ’93 Deborah ’74 and Antonio Campo Ronald E. Carbary ’98

44 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Malcolm L. Card ’77 Gertrude M. Carey ’83 Jane S. Cargill ’97 Philip J. Cargill Pachareeya ’90 and Gary Carkin Lisa Carlson-Edelstein ’84 Michelle E. Caron ’00 Robert E. Caron ’67 Pamela M. Carr ’91 Tonia S. Carr ’95 Michael Cartelli ’89 Stephen V. Carter ’77 Sister Nancy Casey ’87 Thomas A. Cassidy ’89 William ’91 and Donna ’90 Cassidy Elizabeth A. Castro ’87 Jamee J. Cates ’04 Cathleen V. Cavanna ’82 Lori L. Cayouette ’96 Lori D. Centerbar LaPierre ’05 Melissa J. Ceppetelli ’06 Patricia T. Cerins ’81 Ronald T. Cerow ’70 Laura R. Chabot ’06 John R. Chakmakas ’78 Leonidas V. Chalas ’42 Laurie A. Chandler ’89 Nathan Chapman ’72 Nancy G. Charest ’87

Wayne J. Charest ’88 Terry J. Chase ’70 Janet L. Chaves ’96 Sheryl R. Cheney ’89 Adele M. Chertoff ’02 Julia Chmura ’88 David C. Choate ’89 Richard P. Chumsae ’83 Christina Clamp Charles W. Clark ’78 George W. Clark ’68 Gloria C. Clark ’90 Howard R. Clark ’48 Roger C. Clark ’78 Jerri L. Clayton ’83 Daniel F. Cleary ’86 Arthur T. Clinton ’74 Barbara B. Clinton ’89 Michael P. Cloutier ’86 Kevin F. Coakley ’79 Diane M. Cobb ’91 Richard A. Cohen Anne T. Collins ’81 Fotis C. Colocousis ’86 Alexander Colon ’92 Richard O. Columbia ’60 Sandra M. Comer-Cooper ’91 Anne M. Conboy ’86 Mary B. Conboy ’96 John P. Conley ’74 Angelo J. Constantino ’96 Donna L. Cooper ’93 Thomas J. Copadis ’69 Wayne and Cathy Cope Louise Corbin ’93 John J. Corey ’80 David B. Cormier ’87 Clifford Cornell ’70 Edmund E. Correa ’95 Christine Corrigan ’95 Peter T. Corrigan ’95 Vincent P. Corson ’06 Rueben R. Cortez ’93 Carolyn A. Costello ’04 Douglas E. Cote ’01 Patricia M. Cote ’70 John A. Couillard ’88 Eugene J. Coulombe ’91 Gregory A. Couture ’96 Thomas S. Couture ’69 Susan M. Cowan ’85 Kathleen E. Crawford ’84 Russell C. Crevoiserat ’93

Moira A. Cristy ’91 Michael W. Crocker ’88 Tony A. Cromwell ’76 Warren B. Cronk ’74 Brenda ’89 and Douglas Crosby Donald E. Crowell ’02 Ray A. Crowell ’82 Ellen Crowley ’83 Donna ’79 and Brian Cullen Kenneth J. Cullerot ’86 Norman R. Cullerot ’59 Kevin Cummings ’72 James M. Cunningham ’74 Michael Curran ’84 Christopher H. Currier ’01 Roy Currier ’67 Cynthia P. Curtis ’95 Stephen P. Curtis ’82 Elise C. Cuvay Jerome Daigle ’85 Philip Daigneault ’69 Michael J. Daley ’71 Vincent J. D’Alfonso ’83 Edwin Dalley ’80 Dianne Dalpra ’81 Michael J. D’Amato ’91 Edward E. Dame ’67 Patricia M. Damon ’05 Janice E. Danese ’80 John H. Daniels ’78 John T. Danis ’70 Darlene M. D’Anna ’04 Porter M. Davis Susan W. Davis ’99 Richard A. Day Francis A. Dayton ’85 Ronald E. De Lano ’81 Elroy J. De Xavier ’91 Robert L. DeAngelo ’84 Lana Dearborn ’92 Thomas P. Dearborn ’00 Michael P. DeAtley ’79 Lois T. Debisz ’93 Lawrence ’86 and Jo-Ann ’86 Decato Philip ’88 and Lori ’79 Deconinck Robert ’96 and Carol Defeo Jr. Anthony J. Defide ’04 Douglas R. Delavan ’00 Tiffany L. Delworth ’95 Stanley G. DeMello ’93 Ann C. Demencuk ’97


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Elaine P. Demers ’70 William M. Denker ’79 Tami A. Dennison ’90 Robert E. Deschene ’78 David A. Deselle ’88 Cristina L. Desmarais ’89 Elizabeth L. Desmarais ’92 Donald D. Desmond ’76 Jennifer L. Desrosiers ’96 Aleks L. Dessanti ’83 Thomas Devaney ’95 Dennis Devine Gail L. Dexter Margaret Di Tulio ’86 Eugenia Diamantopoulou ’93 Karen S. Diaz ’03 Joseph and Lisa Dibrigida Suzanne T. Dice ’94 Suzanne M. Dickie ’91 Susan C. Dietz ’82 Heather J. Digby ’02 Thomas A. Dillon ’82 Philip N. DiMarzio ’69 Michael R. Diodati ’05 Laura B. Dionne ’01 Michael A. Dipoto ’05 Bryan J. Disko ’04 Charles J. DiStefano ’70 Barbara S. Divenuti ’94 Michael W. Docter ’87 William ’86 and Shirley Dodge Stephen and Maura ’88 Doherty Gerard C. Doiron ’73 Walter J. Domian ’97 Louise A. Donington ’98 Janet L. Donley ’03 David C. Donohue ’86 Francis H. Donovan ’87 Ann M. Doolittle ’86 Edward A. Dorval ’03 Michael ’85 and Tonya ’84 Douglas James ’98 and Rachel Alice ’98 Dowd III William G. Downer ’75 Michelle L. Dozier ’01 Joan M. Drake ’66 Kevin L. Draper ’81 Coleen F. Dreher ’87 Shari L. Drewes ’96 Reginald R. Dubay ’79 Paul A. Dube ’84 Natalie L. Ducharme ’84

Edmond J. Duchesne ’69 Carole A. Duclos ’69 Andrew T. Dudek ’88 James D. Dufoe ’74 Kara L. Dufour ’05 Roger A. Duhaime ’70 Edward and Jean Dumm ’71 Elmer Dunbar ’52 Christine D. Dunlop-Mele ’90 Janet M. Dunn ’81 Joy L. Dunn ’87 William E. Dunn ’74 Michael R. Dupuis ’90 Richard N. Durham ’82 Mike A. D’Urso ’92 Diane M. Dussault ’02 John E. Dustin ’86 Jane E. Dyer ’82 Juliana Eades Gail C. Eaton ’91 Jon E. Eckles ’87 Laurie A. Edelman ’88 Deborah L. Edwards ’99 Mary Lynn Edwards Richard Eisinger Saul W. Ellerin ’86 David W. Elliott ’88 James A. Elliott ’83 Steven J. Elliott ’91 Ella B. Ellison ’88 Mary E. El-Massih ’85 Frederick W. Elwell ’85 Robert and Heidi Ely Heather J. Emery ’78 Perry Engle ’92 Edward C. ’77 and Linda A. ’79 Enman Larry S. Enman ’83 David P. Erikson ’67 Charles W. Ermer ’68 Cecelia F. Esposito ’97 David E. Essex ’04 Angela E. Estes ’05 Forrest S. Evarts ’69 Betty E. Eveland ’83 Lauren J. Faber ’03 Barry D. Factor ’76 James H. Fairclough ’80 David E. Fairfield ’80 Ethel M. Fairweather ’84 Thomas F. Fallon ’71 Jo Ann Faris ’87 Peter G. Farno ’87

Marianne Farrar ’86 M. Catherine Farrell ’79 ’81 Scott A. Feenan ’91 Karna E. Feltham ’87 Robert N. Fenn ’85 Rodney C. Fenstermaker ’92 Earleen M. Fernald ’87 Robert J. Ferrara ’87 Tiffany J. Ferreira ’98 Dr. Henry H. Ferrell III Claude ’54 and Gloria Ferron James M. Fialkowski ’04 William L. Fiddler ’84 Carolyn M. Fields ’86 Glenn M. Fiore ’06 Kristi S. Firliet ’76 Robert M. Fitts ’72 Kathleen M. Fitzgerald ’88 Michael N. Fitzpatrick ’06 Dean S. Flanagin ’98 Grant M. Flinn ’91 Jamie L. Flint ’99 Gia F. Florian ’91 David Flynn ’75 Elizabeth M. Fogelgren ’91

Robert ’81 and Virginia Fogg Francis J. Ford ’94 Guy D. Ford ’97 Malcolm ’91 and Julie ’89 Ford

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 45


R. Daniel ’79 and Jacqueline Ford Anne Formalarie ’99 Jay T. Fornwalt ’71 Kenneth M. Fortin ’05 Jean M. Foster ’86 John L. Fournier ’98 Victoria Fowler ’86 Mark H. Frampton ’91 Debra A. Frank ’94

46 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Barbara D. Franzoso Philip Fratini ’88 Marjorie S. Frazier ’88 Michael J. Frechette ’87 James S. Frederick ’70 Paul K. Freeman ’86 Eugene Friedman ’70 Andrew Fries ’93 Anita Frye ’05 Joan E. Fye ’86 Kathleen M. Gagne Pauline Gagne ’94 Gerald A. Gagnon ’84 Peter R. Gagnon ’68 Linda R. Gaines ’96 William T. Galasso ’68 Michael A. Galea ’85 J. Christopher Gallagher and Jane F. Holmes Diane L. Gallant ’69 Lisa A. GallivanReed ’79 William and Marcia Gallogly

Ryan P. Gamache ’02 April L. Gancarz ’03 Stephen L. Gangi ’85 Barbara A. Gardner ’06 Manuel S. Garganta ’76 Patricia Gately ’86 Lucy Gaudet Louis F. Gaudette ’83 Min Gautam ’93 Wayne H. Gehris ’80 Roger F. Geilen ’79 Norman and D. Diane Geis Richard and Brenda Gelinas Bruce S. Gelly ’81 Armand R. Genest ’76 Dennis P. George ’69 Gary A. George ’88 Kenneth L. Georgevits ’83 Margaret Georgia ’87 Edward and Sara Germain Robert J. Germain ’77 Michael F. Gertner ’91 Brynn M. Gestewitz ’04 Nancy E. Gesuelle ’76 Deborah S. Giard ’78 Gerald H. Giberson ’85 Clifford S. Gideon ’81 Diana L. Gilbert ’92 Nancy J. Gilbert ’87 Eric A. Gildemeister ’06 George A. Gilman ’72 Philip E. Gilmore ’55 Marcel F. Girouard ’71 Tammy R. Gitter ’91 Mark T. Giuliano ’96 Michael A. Given ’82 William A. Gizara ’77 Richard Godbout ’87 Carol M. Godfrey ’02 Mark P. Godfrey ’86 Steve D. Goff ’86 Gary C. Goldberg ’78 Ernest Gonsalves ’83 Howard A. Goodman John F. Goodrow ’81 Georgette M. Gordon ’01 Benjamin W. Gorman ’00 Beth A. Goscinski ’93 Sean P. Grady ’83 Leslie J. Graham ’85 Rita E. Granfors ’86 Dennis M. Granger ’99 Klara Grape ’92

John D. Greener ’03 Clare ’04 and Meredith ’04 Greenlaw Richard M. Greenslade ’90 Bruce D. Griffin ’72 Jennifer E. Griffin ’88 Linda S. Griffin ’83 Martha J. Griswold ’74 Robert J. Groleau ’86 Jonathan A. Grollman ’84 Robert J. Guilbault ’79 John R. Gulick ’83 Jerome D. Guthro ’69 Joanne H. Gutt ’88 Linda S. Haeseler ’71 Thomas P. Hagen ’91 David C. Hahn ’82 Kristianto Halim ’05 Carole Hall ’94 Jayne B. Hall ’03 Robert Hall ’75 William J. Hall ’80 Gerard J. Hallahan ’89 Arlene H. Hallatt ’81 Beth C. Hallet ’01 Bonnie J. Halsey ’84 Holly L. Hamelton ’99 Robert J. Hamilton ’81 Valerie J. Hamilton ’90 Heidi Hammell ’79 Bryan L. Hammond ’87 William J. Hammond ’88 Thomas Hampton ’87 John T. Hamre ’95 Daniel A. Hanagan ’71 Thomas P. Hand ’73 Barbara C. Hanson ’86 Philip P. Hardcastle ’00 Thomas F. Hardiman ’70 Pamela E. Harding ’02 Mark A. Hardmon ’97 Michael J. Harris ’83 Brian C. Harrison ’98 Paul J. Hartzog Sherman V. Hawkins ’82 Charles E. Hayes ’86 Donald E. Hayes ’87 Gene M. Hayes ’80 Donald C. Heath ’70 Daniel N. Hebert ’78 Greg J. Hedrich ’81 Joseph U. Hedrich ’80 Joseph P. Heleniak ’50


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Charles P. Hempfling ’76 Matthew M. Henzy ’02 Richard A. Hering ’78 Cecilio Hernandez ’05 Spencer ’90 and Janet ’83 Hertje Mr. Rick Hindle ’03 Philip B. Hippert ’74 Tim Hitchcock ’95 Marjorie E. Hobbs ’01 Herbert J. Hodgdon II ’79 Donald R. Hodgkins ’72 Gary D. Hodgson ’79 Martha D. Holland ’94 Janette U. Holton ’93 James R. Horn ’06 Karyl A. Horn ’80 Donelda E. Horne ’78 Melora C. Hosler ’96 Gilbert U. Hoss ’85 Michael A. Hotchkiss ’96 Anna M. Houde ’97 Paul A. Houle ’87 Dianne B. Howe ’03 Denise B. Hubbard ’96 Bradley S. Hunter ’96 Marie A. Hurd ’91 Bonnie G. Hurley ’01 Sharon J. Hussey-Mclaughlin ’93 Ray P. Hutchinson ’79 John M. Ioli ’88 Debra A. Irish ’85 Linda Irons ’84 Phyllis M. Isbell ’79 Raheemah Jabbar-Bey ’96 Eric M. Jackomino ’04 Brian K. Jackson ’92 M. Susan Jackson ’74 Spencer M. Jackson ’84 William ’89 and Susanne ’87 Jackson Hanna B. Jacoby ’87 Randal F. Jacunski ’86 Steven Jacunski ’84 Karl A. Jaeger ’92 Diana Jamieson ’75 Stanley W. Janiak ’87 John J. Jason ’88 Markelly Jean-Pierre ’06 D. Andrea Jenkins ’02 Kenneth and Amelia Jenkins Sandra A. Jenkins ’84 Angela J. Jennings ’02

Libby M. Jensen ’00 Ronald C. Jobel ’86 Anna M. Johnson ’83 Corey N. Johnson ’01 Donald H. Johnson ’79 Gary M. Johnson ’78 George H. Johnson ’78 James J. Johnson ’96 Joanne M. Johnson ’98 Kelly J. Johnson ’96 Neil A. Johnson ’87 Paula R. Johnston ’01 Raymond P. Jolin ’72 Rebecca C. Jollymore ’77 Richard R. Joyal ’77 Judith M. Jumper ’88 Paul ’86 and Annette Juneau Michael Juralewicz ’87 Jillian P. Jurilla ’99 Virginia Jurofcik ’87 Veronica and Ira Kamerman Matt and Emily ’03 Kaminsky Dr. Sridevi Kandikonda Abubakr ’99 and Marsha ’02 Karim Shova Karki ’01 Stephen P. Karp ’68 Richard S. Kaszynski ’68 Robin Kazes ’97 Jodi L. Keane ’90

James M. Keenan ’88 Dania R. Keisling ’82 Charles F. Keller ’91 James C. Kelly ’82 Nina P. Kelly ’77 Kevin C. Kennedy ’91 Janet C. Kennett ’88 Janet W. Kepes ’05 Muriel Keraghan ’97 Aaron Keyton ’04 Mara K. Khavari ’00 Marjorie L. Kilkelly ’86 Alana J. Kimball ’06 Paula M. King ’02 Tracy L. Kinney ’03 Kristina E. Kintzer ’01 Maureen J. Kirshy ’86 Lisa C. Kirton ’98 Richard P. Klaxton ’78 Stacy A. Knapp ’05 Wilson G. Knight ’93 Elizabeth M. Knowland ’77 Janice M. Koblenzer ’67 Christopher C. Kolwicz ’04 Samuel A. Koroma ’97 Janice M. Kozlowski ’86 Eric R. Kruger ’94 Joseph S. Kulik ’82 Linda L. La Plante ’79 Rupert I. La Rose ’74

Scott R. LaBreche ’97 Joseph R. Lachance ’06 Martha A. Lachance ’81 Donna Lacroix ’06 Kim M. Lafleur ’04 John M. Lafond ’74 Ronald P. Lafond ’78 Sandra J. Lakin ’90 David Lalumiere ’98 Kelly M. Lamanna ’85 Virginia G. LaMarsh ’84 John C. Lamonday ’95 Donna K. Lamontagne ’84 Dennis A. Lamper ’93 Larry J. Lanata ’70 Joanne Landry ’05 Erik C. Lanzer ’82 Amy L. Laroche ’03 William A. Larrivee ’70 Christopher M. LaSalle ’93 Patricia D. Latham ’80 Ellen M. Lavin ’89 Michael E. Lavoie ’86 Claire M. Lawlor ’91 Kathleen J. Lawlor ’94 Gregory S. Lawrence ’97 Vern J. Laws ’89 George R. Leach ’92 Helen Leach ’93 Timothy A. Leach ’85

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 47


Arthur J. Learned ’78 Marc T. Leavitt ’01 Clayton L. Leblanc ’94 Donald Leblanc ’96 Judy A. Leeds ’78 Charles L. Lefebvre ’82 Gregory B. Lemay ’86 Shirley Lemay ’54 Susan M. Lemieux ’90 Thomas Lenkowski ’86 Elaine S. Lentz ’88 David Leonard ’93 Dana M. Leone ’05 Jill L. Lepisko ’89 Marilyn R. Lermond ’77 Gordon A. Lesage ’87 Ronald E. Leshinski ’71 Nicole M. Lessard ’03 Raymond E. Lessard ’68 Ronald ’86 and Sophia Lessard David M. Letourneau ’81 Richard K. Letourneau ’91 Woullard Lett ’92 and Brenda Bailey Lett ’95 Mark B. Leventhal ’88 Joseph F. Levin ’78 Marc E. Levitre ’85 Sandra M. Lewis ’93 Susan E. Lewis ’67

48 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Douglas W. Libby ’89 Keith J. Lima ’96 Deborah M. Limoges ’93 Eve Lindsey ’98 James and Carol Linehan Margaret Lins ’87 Janice Lison ’87 Daniel R. Livingston ’90 Bibb G. Longcrier ’83 David P. Longo ’86 John W. Loose ’86 Carlos Lopez ’02 and Zelma Echeverria ’01 Hillary L. Louis ’98 Paul F. Loveless ’91 Laurence R. LoVuolo ’70 Marc J. Lubelczyk ’01 Walter J. Lubelczyk ’51 John W. Lui ’83 James E. Lurie ’71 Michael P. Lussier ’78 Paul H. Lusty ’94 Derek A. MacDermott ’96 Earl R. MacDonald ’86 Michael T. MacDonald ’96 Allan MacDougall ’81 and Lisa Denningham ’92 Alice S. Macek ’94 Christine A. MacKelvey ’05

Ann R. MacNaughton ’93 Robert Madison ’88 Colleen D. Mahoney ’01 Michael W. Maki ’93 Troy A. Malbon ’05 Carol Maleska ’86 Philip A. Malizia ’88 Thomas W. Mallory ’86 Robin E. Maloney ’83 Donald ’83 and Rosemary ’83 Malpass Scott ’98 and Beth ’01 Maltzie Marcus E. Mann ’92 James Manoukian ’03 David ’70 and Jeanne ’73 Manseau Thomas G. Mansour ’04 Edward F. Mapp ’86 Craig ’86 and Elaine Marble Richard L. Marchant ’80 Steven E. Marek ’73 David C. Mariotti ’82 Faith T. Marrotte ’81 Thomas J. Marshall ’80 Gerald J. Martel ’77 Robert O. Martel ’68 Brian C. Martin ’04 Caryn G. Martin ’85 Margaret W. Martin ’88 Thomas ’68 ’70 and Anne Martin Laura L. Martinage ’93 Claudio Martinez ’04 Leif Martinson ’97 Eric C. Martorano ’05 Anthony Mascolo ’86 Michael D. Matthews ’80 Angela L. Maxfield ’93 Susan M. Maxfield ’95 Paul T. Maxwell ’93 Thomas P. Maziarz ’96 Denise T. Mc Carthy ’71 William G. Mc Nichols ’78 John J. McCabe ’77 Karen A. McCaffrey ’00 Joseph J. McCall ’75 Donna T. McCarthy ’87 Shawn M. McCarthy ’84 Brenda J. McCartney ’86 Patricia M. McCaughey ’90 Douglas E. McClure ’00 Nancy J. McCormack ’87 Brian M. McCoy ’85 Norman C. McCoy ’77

Anne McCubrey ’99 Arthur P. McDeed ’80 Patrick F. McDermott ’87 Michael J. McDonough ’87 Frederick J. McDowell ’68 Karen E. McEachern ’96 David J. McGee ’91 Mary C. McGinnis ’83 Philip J. McGlone ’81 Sue-Ann McGorty ’03 Brian P. McGovern ’74 William M. McGowan ’84 Charles W. McInnis ’86 Michelle R. McKinnon ’95 Susan D. McLoughlin ’83 William E. McMahon ’92 Kristopher K. McMorrow ’95 Shawn ’96 and Amanda McNamara Tami L. McNamara ’90 Lynda R. McPhee ’79 Robert F. McPherson ’81 Deanna M. McWilliams ’97 LTC Richard W. Meade Jr. ’73 Ruth I. Medlock ’02 Albert R. Melaragni ’87 Ramiro Melendez Calderon ’83 Andrew J. Mendolia ’94 Emily C. Mercier ’76 Cecile R. Merrill ’82 Peter G. Merrill ’02 Dennis G. Merrow ’68 William L. Merrow ’70 Henry R. Metz ’77 Thaddeus Michalak ’76 David Miles ’05 Donna B. Miller ’81 Madeline and Francis Miller Harriet A. Miller ’94 Jeanne and Brian Miller Timothy R. Miller ’87 Virginia Miller ’79 Chester L. Mills ’89 Kenneth N. Mills ’68 Walter P. Milne ’89 Georgina Miranda de Pineiro ’88 Denise D. Mitchell ’81 Frederick T. Mitchell ’95 Lisa S. Mitchell ’83 Stanley G. Mitchell ’80 Susan J. Mitchell ’88 Bryan D. Mitofsky ’83 George E. Miville


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Kevin C. Mock ’87 Gregory T. Moe ’81 John W. Mohr ’72 Arthur A. Molderez ’73 Al ’88 and Kristin ’88 Molin Michael M. Monteith ’80 Robert J. Montminy ’83 Keith D. Mooradian ’77 Patrick J. Moquin ’77 Narcisa J. Moran ’00 Thomas J. Morelli ’69 Timothy J. Morelli ’80 Richard R. Morency ’83 Adrienne A. Morgan ’04 Charles F. Morgan ’86 Debra J. Morgan ’86 Robert L. Morin ’79 Roy S. Morrison ’97 Linda Morse ’86 Marcelle A. Morton ’84 Allan M. Moses ’81 Robert S. Moulton ’95 Nikki Moutsioulis ’72 James J. Muccigrosso ’85 Sharon A. Mullen-Campbell ’94 Peter T. Mullin ’78 Floyd L. Mundy ’67 Robert L. Munro ’84 Raymond R. Murphy ’73 Rosemary A. Murphy ’05 Susan A. Murphy ’91 Ann-Marie ’93 and Martin Murray N. Joan Murray ’82 Alfred R. Muskett ’90 David T. Mylott ’01 John Mynster ’87 James J. Nacke ’73 Ida Nadeau ’83 Wilfred G. Nadeau ’89 Susan Naimark ’92 Dawn Najarian ’85 Marian and Terry Nedza Scott ’81 and Nancy ’81 Nesson Paul A. Neville ’68 Richard ’95 and Amy ’95 Neville Michael J. Newman ’94 Tandee Newman ’86 Mark S. Nichols ’04 Linda M. Nicholson ’83 Sheila L. Niemela ’63 Oliver E. Niemi ’61 Karen M. Nilsen ’86

Sheryl M. Norwood ’95 Bert H. Noyes ’84 Nicholas and Luan Nugent Nicholas Nugent David W. Nute ’95 Curtis ’83 and Mary Sue ’85 Nutt James Mageto Nyambati ’93 Stephen B. Nye ’83 Christopher T. O’Brien ’86 John S. O’Brien ’95 John J. Occhionero ’90 Walter H. Oczkowski ’80 Maureen O’Dea ’88 Linda S. Oelkuct ’87 George S. Ogin ’95 William D. Ogle ’03 Ruth R. O’Hara ’94 Glen M. Ohlund ’93 Melanie C. Ohrem ’79 Jacqueline K. Okonak ’93 Michael T. Oleksak ’00 Joseph J. O’Neill ’79 Michael R. Order ’93 Edward O’Reilly ’74 Richard E. Osberg ’81 Dianne A. Osborn ’01 Nancy S. Osborn ’95 Lisa J. Ouellette ’95 Marie C. Ouellette ’96 Noreen J. Page ’79 Richard ’81 and Karen ’79 Page Katharine D. Paine Bert and Agnes Palmer Gregory J. Palmer ’83 James M. Palmisano ’94 Lorraine P. Palumbo ’94 Brian A. Panteledes ’05 John W. Pappas ’94 Charles E. Paquin ’72 Fred A. Para ’68 Dean K. Parmer ’01 Muriel M. Parris ’66 George H. Partridge ’90 Jeffrey S. Passen ’96 Debra A. Patrick ’87 Mark S. Patrick ’73 Steven ’90 and Marie ’91 Patrick April L. Patrick-Lemmo ’85 Robert E. Patriquin ’85 Lake R. Patterson ’82 Anthony J. Patti ’80 Victor H. Paul ’03

Tonya D. Peak ’03 Cheryl L. Peaslee ’01 Lori Peixoto ’85 Ernest T. Pelland ’94 Arthur A. Pelletier ’75 Richard L. Pelletier ’97 Jeffrey M. Penta ’05 Michael A. Pepin ’92 Gary T. Pepka ’06 Mark Perec ’99 Erica J. Perkins ’01 Nancy F. Perkins ’89 Therese P. Perrin ’97 Carmen Perron Glen A. Pesquera ’80 Michele L. Petersen ’91 Leslie A. Peterson ’85 Robert A. Peterson ’73 Daryl D. Pfaff ’93 Jeffrey A. Pfeiffer ’94 John F. Pfifferling ’99 Norton R. Phelps ’85 Joseph R. Phillips ’90 Christine Piacentino ’83 Kenneth E. Pickett ’82 Cheryl A. Pierce ’86 Richard G. Pierce ’91 Thomas M. Pignatiello ’83 Donald R. Pinard ’69 Linda A. Pineau ’81 Alice Pion ’84 Ruthie A. Pistorino ’01 Michael L. Place ’96 Tammy L. Plummer ’03 Thomas A. Podawiltz ’88 Michael P. Poitras ’84 Jeanne M. Polito ’83 Laurence J. Polk ’84 Carol Pontious ’85 Anthony S. Poore ’96 Jean Potillo ’85 Lucille L. Potvin ’55 Raymond G. Potvin ’77 Bill Poulin ’72 Pauline E. Powers ’78 Ann M. Pozerycki ’84 John S. Pratt ’69 Jo Anne Precourt ’89

Phyllis J. Prince Geraldine N. Provost ’96 Judith M. Pryde ’04 John M. Puchacz ’82 Maurine Purcell ’94 Susanne D. PutvainGann ’05

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 49


James M. Queenan ’01 Matthew J. Quimby ’06 Julianne L. Rain Linda M. Raines ’94 Linda C. Ralston ’92 Paul E. Ramsey ’85 Mark Ranalletti ’98 and Kathryn Wallingford ’98 Alan J. Rand ’71 Marilynn J. Randall Vagalebre ’80 Valerie M. Randazzo ’87 Priscilla Rawles ’84 Wayne E. Rawlins ’05 Jaime R. Reatiraza ’83 Bradley S. Reed ’00

50 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Claude F. Reed ’74 Robin E. Reed ’81 Marie T. Reeve ’98 Anna M. Rego ’92 Irene P. Reshetar ’88 Roger Retzke ’84 Joan C. Reuter ’82 Charlene Ricci ’05 Ellen L. Rice ’96 Harold F. Rice ’77 Peter and Beth Rice Stewart L. Richardson ’78 Susan F. Richardson Guy P. Riendeau ’69 Susan Rigione ’83 Dennis J. Riley ’83 Richard ’84 and Phyllis ’85 Riviere Richard J. Rizza ’86 Colin Roach Frank T. Roach ’90 John C. Roach ’71 Claire M. Roberge ’88 John E. Roberts ’76 Daniel Robertson ’84 Daniel ’84 and Christine ’83 Robinson Debra A. Robinson ’01 Ivette I. Robinson ’00 John ’79 and Ramona ’78 Roch David C. Rodis ’97 Gina M. Rogers ’04 Patricia Rogers ’68 Sharon F. Rohrbacker ’79

Carlene M. Rose ’06 Harry R. Rosenblad ’68 Betsy A. Rosenbluth ’95 Lois V. Rostanzo ’90 Mark C. Roth ’84 Brien G. Rousseau ’81 Vivian N. Rowe ’94 Armand E. Roy ’68 Dawn T. Roy ’01 Jeffrey A. Roy ’78 Susan I. Roy ’97 Richard T. Ruddell ’00 Geoffrey B. Ruggles ’85 Patricia M. Rutko ’00 Arthur H. Ryan ’86 Paul Ryan ’85 James E. Sacco ’95 Michael H. Sacks ’93 Edward R. Sadoway ’90 Alan E. Saffron ’03 Ryan M. Sambataro ’06 John R. Samson ’88 Mary P. Sanady ’87 Priscilla A. Sanborn ’84 Susan Sanders ’85 Jerald N. Sandler ’83 Jean E. Sandmann ’85 Patricia L. Sangillo ’00 Glenn V. Santini ’73 Colleen P. Santo ’96 Shawna L. Santos ’04 Patricia Sargent ’84 Ellen M. Savage ’97 Lucia C. Savage ’77 John S. Scheeler ’91 Barbara Schlegel ’74 Susan M. Schmitz ’06 Richard S. Schoff ’80 Susan Schragle-Law Nancy W. Schroeder ’87 Elba I. Schulman ’83 W. Paul Schwabe ’82 John C. Scribner ’90 James E. Scullen ’83 Robyn D. Sealock ’96 Kathy L. Seaver ’71 Paul R. Seguin ’87 Susan I. Seskevich ’82 Lisa M. Sessions ’03 Donna L. Severance ’94 Melvin ’68 and Janice ’82 Severance David A. Sewall ’92

Thomas ’02 and Lisa ’05 Seymour Ann Shapiro Matthew D. Sharp ’04 Franz C. Shattuck ’90 Edward H. Shaw ’93 Bonnie J. Shekarabi ’93 Edward Shepard ’80 Michael M. Shields ’99 Thomas J. Shields ’77 Peter R. Siconolfi ’96 Denise M. Sicotte ’95 Donald Sillars ’84 Nancy L. Simard ’88 Michael J. Simchik William R. Simonds ’96 Richard U. Simoneau ’82 Kathy M. Simpson ’86 Mary S. Simpson ’96 Mark S. Singer ’75 Judah J. Siomos ’01 Amy L. Sirois ’88 Richard J. Sirois ’96 Karol A. Skoby ’87 Gail Skrzyszowski ’68 Eileen M. Sleeper ’88 Julie A. Sleeper ’86 Karen Sloper ’72 Debra Ann Smegelsky ’88 Deborah L. Smith ’92 Douglas A. Smith ’84 G. Robert Smith ’98 Gregory D. Smith ’82 Karen L. Smith ’71 Lawrence A. Smith ’60 David J. Snow ’72 Richard H. Snow Donna M. Snyder ’78 Brian M. Soares ’00 Paul W. Soares ’83 David B. Soha ’91 Mark G. Somerville ’06 Jennifer M. Sonker ’98 Karen L. Soucy ’87 Richard ’94 and Martha ’89 Soucy Robert A. Soucy ’84 Raymond J. Sourdif ’84 Owen Spargo ’73 Lori E. Spencer ’81 Megan A. Sprague ’06 Robert M. Spry ’75 Cynthia T. Sroda ’88


Honor Roll of Donors Report

David R. St. Cyr ’73 Lisa St. Hilaire Robert P. St. Jean ’81 Richard E. St. Onge ’78 Andre J. St. Pierre ’86 Denis D. St. Pierre ’93 Mark S. Stafiej ’91 Dawn Stanhope ’03 Efstathios Stathopoulos ’86 Shawn Stephens ’95 Charles N. Stewart ’75 Kurt P. Stinson ’95 Mark M. Stinson ’84 Don S. Stohl ’72 James P. Stone ’83 Mary M. Stone ’81 Andrew F. Stotski ’53 Philip J. Stuart ’70 Linda S. Stucchi ’78 David Sturniolo ’88 Robert I. Suanet ’77 Stephen J. Sugar ’91 Lauren J. Sugerman John G. Sullivan ’86 Andrew R. Supplee Terry Swack Kevin ’90 and Lynn ’91 Sweeney Margaret Sweeney ’83 Stephen Szostek ’85 Gerald D. Taillon ’84 Susan M. Takesian ’85 Donald E. Talbot ’68 Louis B. Tallarita ’89 Gerald ’80 and Donna Tanguay Paul V. Tardif ’74 Thomas Tarr ’70 David J. Taylor ’87 Jacqueline G. Taylor ’96 Leon ’76 and Joan ’84 Tessier Sharon A. Testa ’85 Joyce B. Tetu ’83 Thomas F. Tetu ’88 Frank Thelen III John Therrien ’84 Nick J. Therrien ’98 John W. Thiers ’91 Elizabeth A. Thomas ’89 Michelle A. Thomas Patrick S. Thomas ’98 Tamara L. Thomas ’84 Susan M. Thompson ’84 Scott W. Thorp ’84 Allen Thurber ’75

Paul ’94 and Leslie ’94 Todis Susan Tomasetti Michael and Catherine Toner John T. Tookes John F. Toomey ’80 Alison B. Torrey ’95 Joseph A. Torrice ’05 Dennis A. Torrisi ’69

Suzanne M. Verrill ’93 Michael J. Villano ’79 James A. Virgulto ’79 Thomas A. Vitale ’80 Deborah F. Vitarelli ’85 Brenda L. Vittner ’98 Patricia A. Volpe ’82 John W. Wadsworth ’75

Salvatore J. Toscano ’72 Totty O. Totty ’93 Steven R. Towle ’86 Herve ’68 and Linda Tremblay Leanne Tremlett ’97 Michael ’99 and Dale ’83 Trombley Kenneth Trott ’67 Ronald L. Trott ’72 Stacy L. Trottier ’92 Roxanne A. Tufts-Keegan ’94 Raymond L. Turgeon ’98 Nicholas P. Turmel ’06 Christine A. Turner ’66 Harold Turner Jr. ’90 Darren H. Unger ’90 John and Bonnie Vadala ’90 Ronald G. Vaillancourt ’74 Jean Van Stelten ’87 Christopher ’87 and Pamela ’88 Vance John and Judith Vance Barbara VanDyke Wheatcraft Bruce D. Vanni ’67 Edward Vasconsellos ’79 Edmund ’93 and Julie ’95 ’98 Vasseur Roger R. Veilleux ’96 Leon F. Veretto ’89

Helen K. Waldron ’39 Richard T. Walsh ’71 Laura L. Walta ’91 Michael J. Warenda ’02 Kristen M. Waterman ’96 John J. Waterworth ’88 Judy A. Watson ’04 Raymond J. Weber ’77 Marie S. Webster ’66 Susan Wefald ’92 Rita M. Weir ’97 Janet L. Weisner ’78 Donald Weitzel ’70 James F. Welch ’81 Charles E. Welton ’79 Franklin H. Welton ’79 Debra J. Wentworth ’82 Jean L. Wesinger ’99 Gary ’84 ’90 and Micheline ’84 ’90 West Yvette Weymans ’51 Michael A. Wheeler ’97 Priscilla E. Wheeler ’67 Allen G. White ’73 Charles W. White ’04 Douglas ’80 and Alana ’91 White James T. White ’96 Brian and Maria White Jerry L. Whiteford ’69

Marie A. Whitney ’88 Lewis N. Whittum ’83 Elizabeth A. Widman ’77 Allan J. Wilayto ’88 Robert E. Wildman ’75 Alan E. Wilkinson ’99 Thomas P. Willand John C. Willenbucher ’74 Kevin R. Willey ’99 Donald F. Williams ’69 Michelle M. Williams ’81 Ms. Wendy Williams Lucille Williams-Grange ’81 Lillie T. Wilson ’04 Sally G. Wilson ’90 Frank E. Wing ’82 Vera M. Wingate ’87 Mark Winne ’84 Lawrence ’76 and Ute ’80 Winzurk Thomas M. Wnuk ’81 Tracy S. Wolford ’05 Jay A. Wolk ’97 Gail S. Wood ’76 Marcell R. Wood ’92 Richard V. Wood Donna Woodcome ’85 Donna D. Woodfin ’83 P.J. Woodhams Nancy A. Woods ’69 Jeanne Wormelle ’89 Robert N. Worthington ’81 Cecil H. Wright ’82 Linda A. Wright ’94 Linda B. Wright ’73 Chen Fa Wu ’06 Clarence T. Wyatt ’95 Marc J. Wydom ’95 Jeremiah S. Yankauskas ’80 Antonio J. Yemma ’70 Elizabeth A. Yenkner ’06 Charles W. York Karen E. York ’06 Harold V. Young ’39 William and Diane Young Kathryn J. Younker ’64 Kenneth P. Zacek ’69 Richard ’94 and Sharon ’90 Zacharias Alan E. Zalewski ’80 Christine and Walter Zimmermann Jeannine G. Zins ’81

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 51


Ten-Year Donors With deep gratitude we recognize the following group of donors who have supported SNHU consecutively for the last 10 or more years.

Barbara C. Agel ’78 John H. Alden ’86 Frank and Eleanor Barnes Charles P. H. Bascom ’78 Bill and Dee Beane Daniel A. Belanger Mark J. Bennett ’96 Catherine M. Bettencourt ’95 Vivian F. Bisbee ’90 Richard and Kimberly Blanchette Sonya L. Boucher ’95 Martin and Michelle Bradley Dorothy M. Brendle ’42 Stephen R. Callis ’71 Jeffrey D. Cameron ’86 Fanny Canotas Gertrude M. Carey ’83 Robert E. Caron Jr. ’67 Stephen V. Carter ’77 John R. Chakmakas ’78 Cathy ’88 and H. Joseph Champagne Jr. Anne T. Collins ’81 Bradford E. and Kathleen D. Cook John J. Corey ’80

52 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Christine Corrigan ’95 Rick ’73 and Marcia Courtemanche Warren B. Cronk ’74 Michael Curran ’84 Philip Daigneault ’69 Bea ’73 and Mike Dalton Bert Davis Michael ’70 and Maureen ’70 DeBlasi Robert ’78 and Patricia DeColfmacker Elaine P. Demers ’70 Tami A. Dennison ’90 William and Margaret Dolbow Andrew T. Dudek ’88 John and Nancy Dufour Richard Dunfey Jacqueline F. Dunn ’94 Peter G. Farno ’87 Claude ’54 and Gloria Ferron Janice Fitzpatrick ’93 Brenda L. Ford ’88 Laurence A. Franco ’75 Alan J. Frio ’72 Channing ’75 and Susan Fuller Robert ’77 and Michele ’77 Garneau Philip E. Gates ’70 Lucy Gaudet Ernest ’81 and Loretta Greenberg Andrew W. “Mickey” Greene ’72 Richard and Joanne Gustafson Michael G. Haggerty ’86 James B. Hall ’78 Yvonne C. Hall

Edward J. Hannigan ’75 Donald E. Hayes ’87 Joseph U. Hedrich ’80 Linda C. Hicks ’94 Pamela D. Hogan ’83 Philip and Carolyn Hollman Jay ’86 and Sonya Hoyt Edward ’87 and Deborah ’85 Ithier Randal F. Jacunski ’86 George H. Johnson ’78 Wayne E. Justason ’86 Burton S. and Janice G. ’85 Kaliski Stephen P. Karp ’68 John D. Keese ’81 Chris and Helen Kehas Nina P. Kelly ’77 Richard P. Klaxton ’78 Donald Kummins James Kuras Donald ’71 and Denise ’69 Labrie Peter and Ann Lally ’79 ’95 George and Pauline ’83 ’92 Larkin Jr. John E. Layton ’67 Mark L. Le Page ’79 Rene ’71 and Fayne LeClerc Bibb G. Longcrier ’83 Robert C. Losik Jacqueline F. Mara Nancy J. McCormack ’87 Thomas M. McDermott John and Betty Miles Walter P. Milne ’89 Dick and Lynn Moran Christopher F. Morris Nikki Moutsioulis ’72 David C. Murphy ’68 Alfred R. Muskett ’90 Duncan L. Noyes ’89 Marie C. Ouellette ’96 Mark Ouellette ’89 Steve and Maria Manus ’89 Painchaud Thomas E. Peacock ’87 Laurence J. Pelletier ’74 Norton R. Phelps ’85 Joseph “Chip” Polak Jean Potillo ’85 Joseph and Pauline Poulos Brad Poznanski

Raymond ’77 and Terry ’88 Prouty Vladimir ’98 and Lyra Riabov Wayne ’81 and Kimberly Mae Robinson David C. Rodis ’97 Peter ’79 and Judith ’87 Romein John and Thora Russell Massood Samii John S. Scheeler ’91 Robert ’72 and Ellen ’73 Schiavoni Rowland ’40 and Ferne Schmidtchen Tracey A. Sherman ’91 Dawn M. Silver ’78 Mary S. Simpson ’96 Lawrence A. Smith ’60 Stanley and Patricia ’89 Spirou Kurt P. Stinson ’95 Andrew F. Stotski ’53 George Teloian Thomas ’74 and Diane Tessier Frank Thelen III Jane E. Torrey ’90 Salvatore J. Toscano ’72 Christopher J. Toy Anthony J. Troia ’70 Ray and Barbara Truncellito Darren H. Unger ’90 Edmund ’93 and Julie ’95 ’98 Vasseur James D. Walter Marie S. Webster ’66 Walter S. Wheeler ’55 Elizabeth A. Widman ’77 Allan J. Wilayto ’88 Robert N. Worthington ’81 Robert E. Yasutis ’84 Kathryn J. Younker ’64 Kimon and Anne Zachos Alan E. Zalewski ’80 Walter and Christine Zimmermann

Friends and Parents Anonymous Donor Gordon Allen William and Carey Appold James Armenio Forrest and Norma Athey Christopher and Britta Ayer


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Thomas and Joan Bagley Arthur and Stavoula Bakolas Benjamin G. Barkhouse ’74 Frank and Eleanor Barnes Tom and Nancy Barrett John and Judith Barry Anne V. Baumeister ’84 Daniel A. Belanger Carolyn and Randy Benthien Charles Victor Bergh and Juliet Liu-Bergh Norman and Donna Bernard Michael Bianconi Suzanne K. Bowman Valerie J. Bradley Donald and Ginette Brenner The Brown Family Daniel M. Burnham James ’96 and Theresa Butterfield Daniel Calegari Steve Callender and Julie Clark Henry and Nancy Campbell Craig and Kathleen Camuso Fanny Canotas Owen and Esther Carey Gene N. Cartier Joseph and V. Jacqueline Cavanaugh Joel Chagnon Douglas F. Challenger Tom and Patience Chamberlin Michael and Christine Cikacz Ann M. Clark William A. Clark Henry Claypool Robert and Lorie Cochran Richard A. Cohen Gillian E. Coombs Wayne and Cathy Cope Robert L. Corrallino Robert and Barbara Costello Gayle J. Cozens Donna ’79 and Brian Cullen Bert Davis Porter M. Davis Sean and Motoko Day Robert ’78 and Patricia DeColfmacker Adrienne Delozier Louis D. DeMato Dennis Devine Joseph and Lisa Dibrigida

Peter and Rita Dignan William ’86 and Shirley Dodge Dennis and Sharon Donnermeyer Richard M. Dozier Caroline and Walter Dueger Patrick Duffy and Jaye Gibson Richard Dunfey Juliana Eades Richard Eisinger Lawrence and Victoria Elbroch

Robert ’74 and Felecia Gerardi Edward and Sara Germain James and Ann Gikas Jeffrey and Penelope Gilbert Bill and Beth Gilmore Libby Ginnetti Philip E. Ginsburg Karen Goodman David and Dorothy Goodwin Carrie Gotkowitz

Eileen P. Elias Robert and Heidi Ely Lewis M. Feldstein Mark E. Ferdinando Henry H. Ferrell Thomas C. Fischer Peter Franggos Barbara D. Franzoso Kathleen M. Gagne J. Christopher Gallagher William and Marcia Gallogly Robert ’77 and Michele ’77 Garneau Lucy Gaudet Norman and D. Diane Geis Richard H. Gelinas

Paul and Linda Goyette Dr. and Mrs. James L. Grace Jr. William and Joan Green Michael S. Greenberg R. Alan Greene and Christy Greene Mary M. Griffin and Andrew Kaplan Bruce Gross James S. Gruber and Patience Stoddard Nin Guan and Lijun Fang Douglas E. Hall Terrie Harman and Tom McCarron Elizabeth B. Harris

Paul J. Hartzog Mahboubul Hassan Roger and Frances Hebert David and Marilynne Hedstrom Robert P. Herold, M.D. David Hills and Catherine McLaughlin-Hills Paul and Selma Hoff Philip and Carolyn Hollman John and Bianca Holm Darcy Horgan Robert and Kate Horgan Michael F. Hover Kathleen Hynes June Iamundo Nancy Iamundo Peter and Virginia Irwin Kenneth E. and Amelia Jenkins Thomas Jones Kenneth and Carol Jue Senthil Jyothiprakashan and Geetha Senthil John Kacavas Ari and Effie Kalampalikis Peter C. Kamveris Sridevi Kandikonda William J. Kanteres Chris and Helen Kehas William E. Kiernan Wayne D. King Judith A. Knapp and Michelle L. Knapp Donald Kummins George and Pauline ’83 ’92 Larkin Jr. Ronald and Valerie Lauderdale David ’93 and Amy Lee G. Michael and Carolyn Lee James and Carol Linehan Craig ’86 and Elaine Marble Claude and Joan Marchessault Prabha V. Maruvada Michael McCluskey J. Kenneth McGill Margie Mendell Christina A. Metzler Madeline and Francis Miller Jeanne and Brian Miller Bryan D. Mitofsky ’83 Mary Jean Mockler Constantinos G. Mokas Dick and Lynn Moran Mike Morin

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 53


Gail K. Morrison ’95 Dana and Cindy Motta Marian and Terry Nedza Nicholas and Luan Nugent Kenneth M. Olson Katharine D. Paine Prashanth R. Palakurthi Ravi Thaduri and Sangeetha Palakurthi Bert and Agnes Palmer Susan B. Parker Eugene Piana Anna and Edward Plitt Joseph and Pauline Poulos

54 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Stephanie J. Powers Janet Prince and Peter Bergh Phyllis J. Prince Munro H. Proctor Donald Prouty Debra Redfern Peter E. Reilly and Mary N. Picard

Peter and Beth Rice Patricia and Phillip Richardson John C. Ritter Elisabeth S. K. Robinson Thomas and Rovena Robinson Susan E. Roecker Charles and Karen Rolecek Timothy Rooney Dennis P. Roy Linda J. Rozolis ’04 John and Thora Russell A. Vaughan and Elizabeth Sanborn Thomas J. Sedoric Philip R. Sewall Nicholas and Emily Shakra Ann Shapiro Keith Shiel Michael J. Simchik Walter and Celeste Snitko Richard H. Snow Christos and Maria Spirou Stanley and Patricia ’89 Spirou David G. Stahl David Stapleton Andrew and Karen Statires William Statires Dick and Carol Stephens Chuck J. Stergiou Marie Strahan Lauren J. Sugerman Daniel R. Sullivan Barbara K. Summers and Bill Goodwin Andrew R. Supplee Terry Swack Cyrus and Barbara Sweet Margaret Talcott The Tancreti Family David and Linda Taylor George Teloian Michelle A. Thomas Edward and Margot Thompson Michael and Catherine Toner John T. Tookes Christel Truglia James Truncellito William and Linda Tynion Peter Uvin John and Judith Vance Stephen and Susan VanDerBeken Barbara VanDyke Wheatcraft

Edward and Jane Vizvarie Adelaide Walker James Watson John and Francine Webb Joseph Weitze Vincent A. Wenners Scott and Cindy Wheeler Brian and Maria White Thomas P. Willand Sumner and Helen Winebaum Richard V. Wood Elizabeth and Thomas Wright William and Diane Young Michael J. Zubretsky

Faculty and Staff Anonymous Robert J. Begiebing Stephanie H. Bergeron Christine C. Blais ’97 Douglas D. Blais ’88 Kimberly S. Blanchette Kimberly L. Bogle Martin J. Bradley Sharen K. Brady ’89 Donald J. Brezinski Mary P. Brown Gary Carkin Christina Clamp Jerri L. Clayton ’83 Pamela Cohen Richard Colfer ’82 Pierre B. Collins ’07 Patrick D. Cullen Susan L. Daneault ’06 Michael DeBlasi ’70 Lori A. Deconinck ’79 Gail L. Dexter Trisha C. Dionne ’05 William J. Dolbow Daryl A. Dreffs Robert H. Duffley ’91 John Dufour Eleanor Dunfey-Freiburger Jacqueline F. Dunn ’94 Michelle E. Dunn Euclid A. Dupuis ’69 Mary Lynn Edwards Karen Erickson C. Richard Erskine Thomas C. Fischer Laurence A. Franco ’75


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Marilyn Frederick James Freiburger Patricia E. Garrity ’80 ’02 Patricia R. Gerard ’91 Karen Goodman Gregory C. Goodwin Linda Goyette Ellen R. Griffin Yvonne C. Hall Richard O. Hanson ’77 Constance E. Harvey ’91 Steven Harvey Mahboubul Hassan Thomas M. Helm ’00 Linda C. Hicks ’94 Richard L. Hodgkinson ’96 Pamela D. Hogan ’83 Bianca G. Holm Dorothea D. Hooper Kathy Ireland Sarah Jacobs Elizabeth Jowdy Ellen Kalicki Scott J. Kalicki Veronica I. Kamerman Frances B. Kelly James Kuras Catherine La Forge Brenda A. Labrie ’87 Diane Lander Paul J. LeBlanc Christie L. Lenda ’05 Woullard Lett ’92 Cynthia R. Levandowski ’99 Ashley A. Liadis ’02 Robert C. Losik Tiffany A. Lyon ’00 William Maddocks ’96 Chad L. Mason ’98 Jason Mayeu Anne McCubrey ’99 Thomas M. McDermott William D. McGarry Lisa Jo Moher Kimberly F. Monk ’98 Debbie J. Moore Karen L. Muncaster Nicholas Nugent Helen M. Packey Maria E. Painchaud ’89 Steven R. Painchaud Melinda Palisi-Parker ’87 Jasmine P. Pandit ’03 * deceased

Ravindra V. Pandit ’77 Mark S. Patrick ’73 Laurence J. Pelletier ’74 Carmen Perron Karen M. Pinkos Joseph “Chip” Polak Anthony S. Poore ’96 Thomas Potterfield Jane P. Powers Brad Poznanski Cyrilla H. Prescott ’73 Janet E. Prince Raymond C. Prouty ’77 Terry A. Prouty ’88 Julianne L. Rain Lyra Riabov Nancy J. Richardson Susan F. Richardson Colin Roach Donna M. Robinson Deborah D. Robitaille Massood Samii Robert P. Schiavoni ’72 Susan Schragle-Law Karl J. Schwab ’97 Dawn Sedutto Dennis C. Shea ’98 Patricia A. Shrader Curtis C. Smith Steven F. Soba Patricia A. Spirou ’89 Stanley Spirou Lisa St. Hilaire Muriel F. Sterling Adrienne Stevens Michelle Strout ’96 Michael Swack Sintiki Tarfa-Ugbe Jill E. Teeters Judith A. Timney ’06 Jane E. Torrey ’90 Christopher J. Toy Gary P. Tripp John C. Van Santvoord ’68 James D. Walter James A. Whitmore ’95 Steven L. Widener Marbeth I. Wilde Sara J. Wilson Susan Youngs Christine Zimmermann Walter Zimmermann

Tribute Gifts Tribute gifts are those given in recognition of a special person. The following people were remembered or honored by a tribute gift from July 1, 2006 through July 31, 2007. Susan Bach Lawrence Connell Elaine Costigan * Jennifer L. Cotton-Grad ’94 * Joseph Gotkowitz ’94 * Herve A. Groleau * Constance E. Harvey ’91

Burton S. Kaliski Padma Maruvada Michael Mongeau ’71 * Christopher Polak * Janet E. Prince Jeanette Ritzenthaler * Judy Rogers *

Founders Society Southern New Hampshire’s Founders Society thanks the generous individuals who have made a commitment to Southern New Hampshire University through a deferred-gift arrangement including: • a bequest provision in a will. • asset gifts from cash to stocks to property. • life-income gifts such as gift annuities or charitable remainder trusts. • gifts of retirement plan benefits.

John W. Bowen ’68 John G. ’75 and Nancy E. Burk Jr. Cathy ’88 and H. Joseph Champagne Jr. Brendan T. Conry ’79 Bradford E. and Kathleen D. Cook Ronald J. Costigan ’79 Richard Courtemanche ’73 Bea ’73 and Mike Dalton Jeffrey ’72 and Mary Lou De Long Michael J. DeSimone ’69 Diane ’85 and Sam Dugan John P. Fleming Robert ’77 and Michele ’77 Garneau Morton E. Goulder Richard and Joanne Gustafson John D. Hankinson ’92 Edward ’75 and Judy Hannigan

Ernest and Juanita Holm Donald ’71 and Denise ’69 Labrie Rene ’71 and Fayne LeClerc Nicole Maharaj ’01 Jacqueline F. Mara John and Betty Miles Claira Monier David D. Myler ’69 Josephine J. Paquette Raymond ’77 and Terry ’88 Prouty John G. and Thora Russell Cynthia T. Sroda ’88 George Teloian Thomas N. Tessier ’74 Christopher J. Toy Raymond F. Truncellito Adelaide Walker James D. Walter Kimon S. and Anne Zachos

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 55


Corporations and Foundations Anonymous AAA Northern New England Abacus Management, Inc. Accurate Air, Inc. Adaptive Communications Agnes M. Lindsay Trust American Association of People With Disabilities Anagnost Investments, Inc. The Anthony Spinazzola Foundation Appledore Medical Group Area Agency of Greater Nashua, Inc. Aruba Wireless Networks The B & C Floor Store, LLC Bachand Associates BAE Systems Electronic & Integrated Solutions Bain Pest Control Service, Inc. Barrett Family Foundation Bellman Jewelers Ben’s Auto Body Better Comfort Systems, Inc. Bicycle Bob’s Bicycle Outlet Blue Ribbon Property Improvement, LLC Bradley R. Jones Roofing Contractor Brennan Food Vending Services

56 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Business Finance Authority C.B. Sullivan Company, Inc. C.R. Sparks Restaurant Cambridge Packing Company The Cerato Group of Wachovia Securities, LLC Chalk & Wire Chess Donuts, Inc. Citizens Bank of New Hampshire Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England, Inc. Comcast Community Development Finance Authority Construction Planning and Management Corporate Express Crotched Mountain Foundation Cummings, Lamont & McNamee, P.A. D.A. Bucci and Sons, Inc. Data Technology Davis Educational Foundation Delta Dental Plan of New Hampshire Desandre Builders Dinnerhorn Restaurant, Inc. Disabilities Rights Center, Inc. DMI Technology Durant Heating & AC, LLC The Edgewood Centre Elliot Hospital EMC Microsoft Practice

Ernst & Young Everett Sports Center Extrusion Alternatives, Inc. Fannie Mae Foundation Fantini Baking Company, Inc. Farrell Funeral Home, Inc. Favorite Foods, Inc. F.B. Huron Foundation Ferdinando Insurance Ferlins Foundation Fidelity Foundation Fidelity Investments Follett Higher Education Group Forbes Foundation The Ford Foundation The Fruit Center, Inc. Future Supply Corporation Garelick Farms Geoffrey E. Clark and Martha Fuller Clark Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation – Piscatagua Region GovConnection Granite Group Benefits, LLC Granite State Ambassadors, Inc. Granite State Management & Resources Grossman, Tucker, Perreault & Pfleger, PLLC Hallsmith-Sysco Food Services Harvey Construction Company Henderson Associates, Inc. Institute of International Education Integrated Solution Group J. Verne Wood Funeral Home, Inc. J.W. Kennedy Fire Protection, LLC The Jane Blalock Co., Inc. Jessie B. Cox Charitable Lead Trust JMA Consultants Joe’s New York Bar & Grill Josephine A. Lamprey Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation – Piscatagua Region Kanteres Real Estate Karen P. Lauze M.D., LLC Karim International Development Services Inc.

Keene Medical Products, Inc. KPMG Lakes Region Linen Lambert Funeral Home The Lawrence Group Leddy Group, Division of Work Opportunities Liberty Mutual LPM Charitable Foundation Lyric Healthcare Holdings III, Inc. M.D.C. Recovery Services, Inc. Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Ltd. MacWilliam Financial Group Manchester Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. McDowell & Osburn, P.A. Merchants Automotive Group Miville Remodeling LLC NASD Investor Education Foundation Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Nellie Mae Education Foundation, Inc. New England Document Systems New Hampshire Charitable Foundation New Hampshire Glass New Hampshire Housing & Finance Authority The NHHEAF Network Organizations Northeast Federal Credit Union Northeast Food Service NTI Data Product, Inc. One Communications PaeTec Communications Pax World Management Corporation PFPC Distributors, Inc. Philbrick’s Fresh Market Pinpoint Power, LLC Portsmouth Family Practice Portsmouth Regional Hospital The Premier Companies Presidium Learning, Inc. Prestige Painting & Home Improvement, Inc. Prince Communications Public Service Company of


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Northeast Utilities Northern Trust Peoples Bank Philip Morris USA Pioneer Investments Polaroid Corporation Public Service Electric & Gas Raytheon Company RiverStone Resources State Farm Companies Sun Microsystems Foundation Travelers Companies Inc. Tyco Verizon White Mountains Capital Xerox Corporation

Gifts-in-Kind New Hampshire Puritan Backroom Restaurant R.H. Ripley and Son, Inc. Rath Young & Pignatelli Professional Association Revised, LLC Richard Horan Agency Robert P. Mongan, Realtor Roger J. Belanger Agency, Inc. Rye Fuel Company S & F Communications Salem Co-Operative Bank Scrivanos Group Servpro of Dover-Rochester Sheehan Phinney Bass + Green Shorty’s Forward, Inc. Sisters of St. Francis St. Mary’s Bank Sterling Financial Services, LLC Stonyfield Farm Yogurt TD Banknorth Teloian Family Foundation TenBroeck Insurance Group Toshiba Business Solutions/NE Uniformly Yours United Automation, Inc. Universal Business Forms, Inc. Waterside Power, LLC Watson Insurance Agency, Inc. Wheeler, Ring & Dolan, P.C. Work Opportunities Unlimited, Inc. Worldwide Traffic Solutions, Inc.

* deceased

Companies Making Matching Gifts Autodesk Avaya Bank of America Bath Iron Works Corporation Chubb & Son, Inc. The Coca-Cola Company Colgate Palmolive Company Dream Dinners Eastern Bank Ernst & Young Exxon Mobil Fannie Mae Fidelity Foundation Fidelity Investments Geico Companies General Electric Grainger Guardian Life Insurance Company H & R Block Foundation Houghton Mifflin International Business Machines Johnson & Johnson Lincoln Financial Group Markem Corporation Massachusetts Mutual Life National Grange Mutual Insurance Company National Grid USA

Auto Wholesalers Martha M. Balado Bedford Prime Meats Bedford Village Inn Bellman Jewelers Ben Franklin Printers, Inc. Billy’s Sports Bar and Grill The Black Brimmer American Bar & Grill Bonneville & Son, Inc. David Bosak Cactus Jack’s Southwest Grill Chalifour’s Flowers, Gift & Gourmet Dell Higher Education Sales Derryfield Country Club Domino’s Pizza Elm Street Automotive Service Everett Sports Center Tyrone Faust Four Points by Sheraton Manchester Fratellos Ristorante Italiano George’s Apparel Golf & Ski Warehouse Granite State Baseball School Great State Beverages Greater Manchester Family YMCA Bill Gurzi Highlander Inn Horizon Beverage Company Tuan Huynh Hyatt Grand Champions

Jacques Flower Shop Jacques Pastry Shop Kaleidoscope Salon Network Kristina E. Kintzer ’01 La Carreta Mexican Restaurant Legends Golf Range Norris S. Lewis M. S. Walker, Inc. Manchester-Boston Regional Airport Manchester Country Club Manchester Monarchs Hockey Club Margaritas Robert M. Mason Mount Washington Cruises New Hampshire Fisher Cats NH All Star Basketball Camp Steven J. Nussear Eugene G. Owens Passaconaway Country Club Persian Rug Galleries Piccola Italia Ristorante Puritan Backroom Restaurant R & D Cleaners Reebok, Inc. Ronald Ruedi Sagamore Spring Golf Club Sara Lee Foods Richard Schmidt Scrivanos Group Shorty’s Management Group, Inc. Skymeadow Country Club Springhill Suites Stonebridge Country Club Szechuan House Paul Thompson Villa Banca Water Country The Westin Mission Hills Resort Wild Rover WZID Sherman Zelinsky

Government Grants National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research NH Department of Education State of New Hampshire U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 57


2006-2007 Alumni Giving Totals

$13,719

2001-2006

3.5%

$14,991

1996-2000

19.7%

$84,467

1991-1995

11.7%

$49,946

1986-1990

9.8%

$41,852

1981-1985

9.5%

$40,550

1976-1980

37.2%

$159,190

1971-1975

5.1%

$22,060

1932-1965

Total alumni giving: $428,400

1932-2007

In a class of their own The class of 1972 had the largest giving amount this fiscal year. Members donated a total of $113,031 on just a 12.9 percent participation rate.

Participating in class The class of 1954 had 18.2 percent of its members donate to the alumni fund, the highest participation percentage this fiscal year.

100%

(number includes $1,625 in donations from the class of 2007 or unknown class years)

58 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Graduating class year

Percentage of total alumni giving amount

3.2%


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Alumni Donors Southern New Hampshire University recognizes alumni who made a gift to the university in fiscal year 2007 (July 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007). They are listed here under their years of graduation. A “+” next to a donor’s name indicates that the donor is an Alumni Leader Corps Class Agent. These agents are involved in many alumni activities and help keep their classmates engaged with the university. 1937

1952

Gertrude B. Leoutsakos

Mildred M. Ashooh Elmer Dunbar

1939 Helen K. Waldron Harold V. Young

1953

1940

1954

Rowland H. Schmidtchen

Claude R. Ferron Shirley Lemay

1941

1955

Constance D. Lein

1942

Philip E. Gilmore Lucille L. Potvin Walter S. Wheeler

Dorothy M. Brendle Leonidas V. Chalas

1959

Andrew F. Stotski

Norman R. Cullerot

1943 Ralph L. Isenburg

1960

1945 Audrey Brown

John E. Burke Richard O. Columbia Lawrence A. Smith

1946

1961

Fay E. Bulcock

Linda E. Lacasse Oliver E. Niemi

1948 Howard R. Clark

1962 Nancy D. Baradziej

1949 Maurice J. Lacerte

1963 Sheila L. Niemela

1950 Joseph P. Heleniak

1964 Kathryn J. Younker

1951 Walter J. Lubelczyk Yvette Weymans

+ Alumni Class Agent

1966 Joan M. Drake

John W. Kennedy Stephen Kriteman Donald McDonnell Muriel M. Parris Christine A. Turner Marie S. Webster

1967 Roland R. Bergeron Ernest J. Bergevin Ralph H. Berube Robert E. Caron Roy Currier Edward E. Dame David P. Erikson Janice M. Koblenzer John E. Layton Susan E. Lewis Floyd L. Mundy Robert Sanderson Kenneth Trott Dian H. Van Santvoord Bruce D. Vanni Priscilla E. Wheeler

1968 William W. Burgess George W. Clark Robert A. Cruz Richard C. Ducharme Charles W. Ermer Peter R. Gagnon William T. Galasso Stephen P. Karp Richard S. Kaszynski Raymond E. Lessard Robert O. Martel Frederick J. McDowell Dennis G. Merrow Kenneth N. Mills David C. Murphy Paul A. Neville Fred A. Para Ronald J. Rioux Patricia Rogers Harry R. Rosenblad Armand E. Roy Melvin J. Severance Gail Skrzyszowski Donald E. Talbot Herve M. Tremblay John C. Van Santvoord

1969 Donna L. Benson Gene A. Besaw Barbara E. Bridges Richard D. Cartier Thomas J. Copadis Thomas S. Couture Philip Daigneault Samuel Dillard Philip N. DiMarzio Edmond J. Duchesne Carole A. Duclos Euclid A. Dupuis Forrest S. Evarts Diane L. Gallant Larry E. Geoffrion Dennis P. George Jerome D. Guthro Amelia S. Houtchens Denise M. Labrie Mark E. Lareau Thomas J. Morelli David D. Myler Donald R. Pinard John S. Pratt Guy P. Riendeau Dennis A. Torrisi Jerry L. Whiteford Donald F. Williams Nancy A. Woods Kenneth P. Zacek

1970 Robert Bivone Maurice Boucher Ronald T. Cerow Terry J. Chase Clifford Cornell Patricia M. Cote John T. Danis Maureen DeBlasi Michael DeBlasi Elaine P. Demers Charles J. DiStefano Roger A. Duhaime David Frederick James S. Frederick Eugene Friedman Philip E. Gates Thomas F. Hardiman Donald C. Heath Michael M. Kaleel

Joseph B. Lacasse Larry J. Lanata William A. Larrivee William J. Locke Laurence R. LoVuolo David M. Manseau Russell R. Marcoux Thomas E. Martin William L. Merrow Gary P. Nachajko Jeffrey B. Palmer Robert T. Pariseau Daniel J. Seabourne Philip J. Stuart Thomas Tarr Anthony J. Troia William Tummillo Donald Weitzel Antonio J. Yemma

1971 David R. Ball Allen G. Barclay Daniel M. Bator Marc A. Boyd Stephen R. Callis Sidney M. Casel Michael J. Daley Ronald V. Dimambro William O. Duffy Edward G. Dumm Jean H. Dumm Thomas F. Fallon Jay T. Fornwalt Marcel F. Girouard Linda S. Haeseler Daniel A. Hanagan Vivian M. Johnson Patricia Kazakis Donald R. Labrie Guy L. LaPerle Rene C. LeClerc Ronald E. Leshinski James E. Lurie Denise T. Mc Carthy John A. Piecuch Alan J. Rand Robert E. Richardson John C. Roach Kathy L. Seaver Karen L. Smith Richard T. Walsh

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 59


1972 Marie Absmeier Richard J. Andreoli Thomas Bartram

Kathleen Bellville Nathan Chapman James K. Cummings Theresa M. Desfosses Robert M. Fitts Alan J. Frio George A. Gilman Andrew W. Greene Bruce D. Griffin Donald R. Hodgkins Raymond P. Jolin Donald L. LaCroix Roland A. Martin John W. Mohr Nikki Moutsioulis Pauline T. O’Reilly

Charles E. Paquin R. William Poulin Karl D. Rice Robert P. Schiavoni Karen Sloper David J. Snow Don S. Stohl Salvatore J. Toscano Ronald L. Trott Wayne B. Williams

1973 Gary F. Alamed William V. Barber Ronald Beaulieu Arthur G. Belair Frederick W. Bishop Barry J. Bodell Michael B. Brody Brian C. Coffin Richard Courtemanche Bea A. Dalton Gerard C. Doiron Winston L. Dookram Thomas P. Hand Paul F. Jeannotte Thomas Lafortune Jeanne E. Manseau Steven E. Marek Richard W. Meade Arthur A. Molderez Raymond R. Murphy James J. Nacke Joanne K. O’Leary Mark S. Patrick Robert A. Peterson Cyrilla H. Prescott Robert D. Ruais Glenn V. Santini Owen Spargo David R. St. Cyr Allen G. White Linda B. Wright David J. Zingaro

1974 John F. Alfonse Michael J. Asselin Benjamin G. Barkhouse David R. Bothwell Catherine A. Bowers Deborah Campo Lindley H. Churchill

60 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Arthur T. Clinton John P. Conley Warren B. Cronk James M. Cunningham James D. Dufoe William E. Dunn Robert J. Gerardi Martha J. Griswold Normand L. Guilbert Warren Hern Philip B. Hippert M. Susan Jackson Rupert I. La Rose John M. Lafond William F. Love Brian P. McGovern Dennis P. Moore Edward O’Reilly Laurence J. Pelletier Charles S. Pettigrew Claude F. Reed Barbara Schlegel Craig A. Schreck William A. Serin Jerry A. Smith Wellesley A. Stokes Paul V. Tardif Thomas N. Tessier Ronald G. Vaillancourt John C. Willenbucher Edward S. Wolak

1975 William G. Downer David Flynn Laurence A. Franco Channing H. Fuller Robert Hall Edward J. Hannigan Diana Jamieson Joseph J. McCall Arthur A. Pelletier Martha W. Perich Deborah S. Schreck Mark S. Singer Robert M. Spry Charles N. Stewart Allen Thurber John W. Wadsworth Robert E. Wildman

1976 Nicholas D. Antonecchia

Steven M. Bachner Jeffrey M. Barrett Alan F. Bernier Nick D. Brattan Tony A. Cromwell Donald D. Desmond Douglas E. Dunn Barry D. Factor Kristi S. Firliet Manuel S. Garganta Armand R. Genest Nancy E. Gesuelle Charles P. Hempfling Joseph P. Jarnutowski Cathy B. Martin Richard A. McGrath Emily C. Mercier Thaddeus Michalak Peter R. Perich John E. Roberts Harry P. Sheldon Casey Sweet-Valenti Leon R. Tessier Patricia L. Thompson Lawrence A. Winzurk Gail S. Wood

1977 Jacqueline R. Alukonis Mark L. Aronson Raymond J. Boire A. Kenneth Bonanno Henri P. Boucher Carol J. Buchalski William P. Buckley Malcolm L. Card Stephen V. Carter Edward C. Enman Michele A. Garneau Robert N. Garneau Gerald G. Gelinas Robert J. Germain William A. Gizara Richard O. Hanson Rebecca C. Jollymore Richard R. Joyal Nina P. Kelly Elizabeth M. Knowland Marilyn R. Lermond Gerald J. Martel John J. McCabe Norman C. McCoy Henry R. Metz + Alumni Class Agent


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Keith D. Mooradian Patrick J. Moquin Mark A. Ouellette Ravindra V. Pandit Anthony G. Pappafagos Raymond G. Potvin Raymond C. Prouty Harold F. Rice Gary R. Rowe Lucia C. Savage Thomas J. Shields Robert I. Suanet Raymond J. Weber Elizabeth A. Widman

1978 Barbara C. Agel Ann L. Alpert James G. Anderson Douglas L. Bartlett Charles P. Bascom Francine Bigney John R. Bloomquist Christopher F. Bolgiano Kenneth A. Broadbent John R. Chakmakas Charles W. Clark Roger C. Clark John H. Daniels Robert J. DeColfmacker Robert E. Deschene Heather J. Emery Deborah S. Giard Gary C. Goldberg James B. Hall Daniel N. Hebert Richard A. Hering Donelda E. Horne Gary M. Johnson George H. Johnson Peter J. Kiriakoutsos Richard P. Klaxton Ronald P. Lafond Arthur J. Learned Judy A. Leeds Joseph F. Levin Michael P. Lussier Ernest W. Mander William G. Mc Nichols Peter T. Mullin David P. Patryn Pauline E. Powers Stewart L. Richardson + Alumni Class Agent

Ramona E. Roch Jeffrey A. Roy Dawn M. Silver Donna M. Snyder Richard E. St. Onge Linda S. Stucchi Janet L. Weisner Wendy A. Williams

1979 Mary E. Ahlquist Richard G. Biron Kevin F. Coakley Brendan T. Conry Ronald J. Costigan Donna M. Cullen Michael P. DeAtley Lori A. Deconinck William M. Denker Francis A. Donovan Reginald R. Dubay Linda A. Enman Katheran L. Fisher R. Daniel Ford Lisa A. Gallivan-Reed Roger F. Geilen Robert J. Guilbault Heidi Hammell Herbert J. Hodgdon II Gary D. Hodgson William E. Hoysradt Ray P. Hutchinson Phyllis M. Isbell Robert D. Jaffin Donald H. Johnson Linda L. La Plante Ann Lally Ronald W. LaPointe Mark L. Le Page Steven M. Logan Lynda R. McPhee Virginia Miller Robert L. Morin Melanie C. Ohrem Joseph J. O’Neill Noreen J. Page Denise E. Pichette-Volk Marc Robillard John P. Roch Sharon F. Rohrbacker Peter A. Romein John F. Sterling Edward Vasconsellos

Michael J. Villano James A. Virgulto Charles E. Welton Franklin H. Welton Daniel T. Wright David M. Young

1980 Craig P. Ahlquist Francisco Amador Alamo Walter I. Batchelder Roger E. Belanger Leslie K. Blair Raymond W. Bouchard James H. Brock Darryl M. Brown James V. Buatti John J. Corey Edwin Dalley Janice E. Danese J. Michael Degnan Michelle E. Desrosier James H. Fairclough David E. Fairfield Patricia E. Garrity Wayne H. Gehris Arnold E. Green William J. Hall Gene M. Hayes Joseph U. Hedrich Robert M. Hodge Karyl A. Horn

James E. Hoy Patricia D. Latham Paul H. Leclair Richard L. Marchant Kay A. Marcus Thomas J. Marshall Michael D. Matthews Arthur P. McDeed Stanley G. Mitchell Michael M. Monteith Timothy J. Morelli Walter H. Oczkowski Anthony J. Patti Glen A. Pesquera Michael P. Pfalzgraf Marilynn J. Randall Vagalebre Muriel D. Schadee Richard S. Schoff Edward Shepard Patrice M. Shevlin Gerald R. Tanguay John F. Toomey Thomas A. Vitale Douglas L. White Douglas D. Willey Ute I. Winzurk Jeremiah S. Yankauskas Alan E. Zalewski

1981 Charles W. Ahto

Richard F. Ayers Nancy M. Bartolotta Gregory H. Beal Margaret M. Benson Thomas S. Biggs William C. Blaisdell Lisa A. Bock Nancy B. Bormuth David P. Brown Patricia T. Cerins Anne T. Collins Dianne Dalpra Ronald E. De Lano Kevin L. Draper Janet M. Dunn M. C. Farrell Peter V. Ferris Robert W. Fogg Ronald J. Gadwah Bruce S. Gelly Clifford S. Gideon John L. Good John F. Goodrow Ernest M. Greenberg Arlene H. Hallatt Robert J. Hamilton Greg J. Hedrich John D. Keese Martha A. Lachance David M. Letourneau Allan H. MacDougall Faith T. Marrotte

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 61


Robert H. McDermott Philip J. McGlone Robert F. McPherson Donna B. Miller Denise D. Mitchell Gregory T. Moe Allan M. Moses Nancy M. Nesson Scott E. Nesson James A. Nielsen Richard E. Osberg Richard E. Page Jessica S. Pfalzgraf Linda A. Pineau Robin E. Reed Wayne E. Robinson Thomas J. Roche Brien G. Rousseau Greg D. Sargent Sally S. Sargent Lori E. Spencer Robert P. St. Jean Mary M. Stone James F. Welch Michelle M. Williams Lucille Williams-Grange Thomas M. Wnuk Robert N. Worthington Jeannine G. Zins

1982 Janet R. Beach Janice L. Bouvier Ronald F. Campbell Cathleen V. Cavanna Julie A. Cleary Richard Colfer Ray A. Crowell Stephen P. Curtis Susan C. Dietz Thomas A. Dillon Richard N. Durham Jane E. Dyer Donald P. Foley Mark A. Giangregorio Michael A. Given Rosa C. Guy David C. Hahn Sherman V. Hawkins Dania R. Keisling James C. Kelly Joseph S. Kulik Erik C. Lanzer

Charles L. Lefebvre Daniel J. Macek David C. Mariotti Cecile R. Merrill Michael R. Morin N. Joan Murray Lake R. Patterson

Arnold Burke Gertrude M. Carey Daniel L. Chalifour Richard P. Chumsae Jerri L. Clayton Ellen Crowley Vincent J. D’Alfonso

Ramiro Melendez Calderon Lisa S. Mitchell Bryan D. Mitofsky Robert J. Montminy Richard R. Morency Bruce L. Morris

Kenneth E. Pickett John M. Puchacz Joan C. Reuter Linda B. Riddle W. Paul Schwabe Susan I. Seskevich Richard U. Simoneau Gregory D. Smith Janet C. St. Jean Patricia A. Volpe Steven J. Walters Debra J. Wentworth Frank E. Wing Cecil H. Wright

Aleks L. Dessanti James A. Elliott Edward N. Emond Larry S. Enman Betty E. Eveland Louis F. Gaudette Kenneth L. Georgevits Ernest Gonsalves Sean P. Grady Linda S. Griffin John R. Gulick Michael J. Harris Janet D. Hertje Pamela D. Hogan Anna M. Johnson David A. Landry Bibb G. Longcrier John W. Lui Robin E. Maloney Donald J. Malpass Rosemary D. Malpass Mary C. McGinnis Susan D. McLoughlin

Ida Nadeau Scott A. Newbury Linda M. Nicholson Curtis W. Nutt Stephen B. Nye Gregory J. Palmer Christine Piacentino Thomas M. Pignatiello Jeanne M. Polito Shelley M. Proulx Suzanne M. Puchacz Jaime R. Reatiraza Susan Rigione Dennis J. Riley Christine A. Robinson Richard A. Roy Jerald N. Sandler Elba I. Schulman James E. Scullen Paul W. Soares James P. Stone Margaret Sweeney Joyce B. Tetu Lauren A. Tregor

1983 Peter B. Alden Michael G. Argiropolis Pamela M. Beauchamp Dwight A. Berner Michael Bradford Charles G. Bridgewater Robert D. Bryant Nelson S. Burbank

62 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Dale L. Trombley William D. Ward Lewis N. Whittum Donna D. Woodfin

1984 Debra Achramowicz Theresa Adinolfi Thomas B. Anthony Daniel Archambeault Anne V. Baumeister Carolyn N. Belliveau Allan Benowitz Kelly J. Bergeon Richard Cabral Lisa Carlson-Edelstein Kathleen E. Crawford Michael Curran Robert L. DeAngelo Tonya F. Douglas Paul A. Dube Natalie L. Ducharme Arlene N. Dupuis Joseph V. Elia Ethel M. Fairweather Stephen W. Faulkner William L. Fiddler Gerald A. Gagnon James E. Goldman Jonathan A. Grollman Bonnie J. Halsey Linda Irons Spencer M. Jackson Steven Jacunski Sandra A. Jenkins James E. Knee Virginia G. LaMarsh Linda J. Lambert Donna K. Lamontagne Ingrid Lemaire Shawn M. McCarthy William M. McGowan Marcelle A. Morton Robert L. Munro Laura M. Nanof William Norton Bert H. Noyes Alice Pion Michael P. Poitras Laurence J. Polk Ann M. Pozerycki Priscilla Rawles Roger Retzke + Alumni Class Agent


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Richard J. Riviere Daniel Robertson Daniel S. Robinson Mark C. Roth Debra Royce-Druge Priscilla A. Sanborn Patricia Sargent Donald Sillars Douglas A. Smith Robert A. Soucy + Raymond J. Sourdif Mark M. Stinson Gerald D. Taillon Joan Tessier John Therrien Tamara L. Thomas Susan M. Thompson Scott W. Thorp Annette L. Tuttle Gary D. West Mark Winne Robert E. Yasutis

1985 Ronald L. Armstrong Michael Barber Davida J. Barnes David J. Beauchesne Daniel J. Beauregard Clifton Below Philip J. Boyatsis Anne L. Brown Corinne M. Chumsae Susan M. Cowan Jerome Daigle Francis A. Dayton Michael Douglas Carol A. Drew Mary E. El-Massih Frederick W. Elwell Robert N. Fenn Daniel P. Fortin Michael A. Galea Stephen L. Gangi Gerald H. Giberson Leslie J. Graham Jacqueline M. Hartwell Frederick T. Hast Steven D. Henderson Gilbert U. Hoss Debra A. Irish Deborah A. Ithier Janice G. Kaliski + Alumni Class Agent

Barbara B. Labonte Paul A. Labonte Kelly M. Lamanna Timothy A. Leach Marc E. Levitre Steven L. Marram Caryn G. Martin Brian M. McCoy Gaylene M. McHale Lowell J. McPherson James J. Muccigrosso Dawn Najarian James E. Naro Mary Sue Nutt April L. Patrick-Lemmo Robert E. Patriquin Lori Peixoto Leslie A. Peterson Norton R. Phelps Wade A. Philbrick Carol Pontious Jean Potillo John J. Rainone Paul E. Ramsey Phyllis L. Riviere Martin D. Roche Geoffrey B. Ruggles Paul Ryan Susan Sanders Jean E. Sandmann Susan Sci Stephen Szostek Susan M. Takesian Sharon A. Testa Gordon W. Tuttle Deborah F. Vitarelli Dennis G. Walters David Wheeler Nikki J. Wheeler Peter C. Willey Donna Woodcome Andrew J. Yasment

Dana R. Bull Susan P. Bunker Jack B. Caldwell Nina B. Calkins Jeffrey D. Cameron Daniel F. Cleary Michael P. Cloutier Fotis C. Colocousis Anne M. Conboy Kenneth J. Cullerot Lawrence E. Decato Margaret Di Tulio William A. Dodge David C. Donohue Ann M. Doolittle John E. Dustin Saul W. Ellerin Marianne Farrar Carolyn M. Fields Mark Fortin Jean M. Foster Victoria Fowler Paul K. Freeman Joan E. Fye William M. Gahara Vera J. Garrant Patricia Gately Carmen P. Giampetruzzi Mark P. Godfrey Steve D. Goff Rita E. Granfors Robert J. Groleau Michael G. Haggerty Barbara C. Hanson Charles E. Hayes Lisa A. Hopkins Jay A.

Randal F. Jacunski Ronald C. Jobel Paul E. Juneau Wayne E. Justason Marjorie L. Kilkelly Kathryn M. Kirkwood Maureen J. Kirshy Janice M. Kozlowski Michael E. Lavoie Gregory B. Lemay Thomas Lenkowski Ronald R. Lessard David P. Longo John W. Loose Earl R. MacDonald Carol Maleska Thomas W. Mallory Edward F. Mapp Craig W. Marble Anthony Mascolo Brenda J. McCartney Charles W. McInnis Charles F. Morgan Debra J. Morgan Dennis C. Morgan Linda Morse

Tandee Newman Kristen A. Ng Karen M. Nilsen Christopher T. O’Brien Cristina Pefianco-Heins Cheryl A. Pierce Richard J. Rizza Arthur H. Ryan Stephen J. Schade Kathy M. Simpson Sherleene Sissell Julie A. Sleeper David L. Snell

1986 John H. Alden Debra J. Allen Lauren Barber William F. Barratt Valerie M. Benowitz Michael T. Black Ramona J. Blais Robert L. Blais Ruth G. Boland

Hoyt

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 63


Joseph V. Soboleski Andre J. St. Pierre Efstathios Stathopoulos John G. Sullivan Steven R. Towle Jeffrey M. Wlodyka

1987 Gary W. Amadon Irene M. Andrea Christopher C. Baker

Alice P. Barber Kathy M. Barbone Byron G. Berry Joseph R. Boisvert Edward M. Breen Jeffrey Cammuso Nancy A. Casey Elizabeth A. Castro Nancy G. Charest Margaret B. Coolican David B. Cormier Robert E. David Michael W. Docter Francis H. Donovan Coleen F. Dreher Joy L. Dunn

64 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Jon E. Eckles Jo Ann Faris Peter G. Farno Karna E. Feltham Earleen M. Fernald Robert J. Ferrara Michael J. Frechette Tara A. Geibel Margaret Georgia W. W. Gerety Nancy J. Gilbert Richard Godbout Laurie A. Grenus Robert M. Grenus Bryan L. Hammond Thomas Hampton Donald E. Hayes Paul A. Houle Edward S. Ithier Susanne Jackson Hanna B. Jacoby Stanley W. Janiak Neil A. Johnson

Michael Juralewicz Virginia Jurofcik Robert E. Kantor Brenda A. Labrie Gordon A. Lesage Margaret Lins Janice Lison Donna T. McCarthy Nancy J. McCormack Patrick F. McDermott Michael J. McDonough Albert R. Melaragni Timothy R. Miller Kevin C. Mock Barry M. Moskowitz Andrew P. Murphy John Mynster Linda S. Oelkuct Melinda Palisi-Parker Debra A. Patrick Thomas E. Peacock Vgee Ramiah Valerie M. Randazzo John D. Roller Judith S. Romein Mary P. Sanady Kathleen A. Schoonmaker Nancy W. Schroeder Audrey J. Scotti Paul R. Seguin Dennis K. Sentenac Karol A. Skoby Christine Smith Karen L. Soucy Wayne W. Stiles Judith A. Tammaro David J. Taylor Joseph M. Todd Jean Van Stelten Christopher R. Vance Vera M. Wingate

1988 Alberta T. Adams Arthur D. Anderson John Arico Scott Aubertin Robert I. Bailey Paula M. Baker Ann T. Barbagallo Suzanne M. Beaumont Douglas D. Blais Cathy Champagne Wayne J. Charest Julia Chmura Catherine T. Cocco Charles E. Collins John A. Couillard Michael W. Crocker Philip Deconinck David A. Deselle Maura P. Doherty Stephen J. Doherty Anna Doody Arico Andrew T. Dudek Laurie A. Edelman David W. Elliott Ella B. Ellison Kathleen M. Fitzgerald Brenda L. Ford Philip Fratini Marjorie S. Frazier William Gallant Gary A. George Jennifer E. Griffin Joanne H. Gutt William J. Hammond John E. Hart John M. Ioli John J. Jason Judith M. Jumper James M. Keenan Janet C. Kennett Elaine S. Lentz Mark B. Leventhal Robert Madison Philip A. Malizia Robert P. Marcotte Margaret W. Martin K. Brian McLaughlin Georgina Miranda de Pineiro Susan J. Mitchell Al A. Molin Kristin M. Molin + Alumni Class Agent


Honor Roll of Donors Report

Maureen O’Dea Michael J. Paris Thomas A. Podawiltz Terry A. Prouty Irene P. Reshetar Claire M. Roberge Nancy J. Robitaille John R. Samson Nancy L. Simard Amy L. Sirois Eileen M. Sleeper Debra Ann Smegelsky Cynthia T. Sroda Louis M. Stafford Raymond J. Stahl David Sturniolo P. Derek TenBroeck Thomas F. Tetu Frank Thelen Christine L. Tintle Veretto Pamela J. Vance John J. Waterworth Marie A. Whitney Allan J. Wilayto

1989 Elizabeth A. Ammerman Amber A. Arndt Gail Bates James C. Blackadar Sharen K. Brady Laurie A. Brothers Joan O. Cartelli Michael Cartelli Thomas A. Cassidy Laurie A. Chandler Sheryl R. Cheney David C. Choate Barbara Clinton Brenda A. Crosby John R. Deakyne Cristina L. Desmarais Julie A. Ford Robert A. Freese Gerard J. Hallahan William H. Jackson Joseph P. LaRocque Ellen M. Lavin Vern J. Laws Jill L. Lepisko Douglas W. Libby Louise T. Major Patricia J. Mandravelis + Alumni Class Agent

Linda F. McLaughlin Michelle C. Mersereau Chester L. Mills Walter P. Milne Wilfred G. Nadeau Karen L. Naro Duncan L. Noyes Millard A. Owens Maria E. Painchaud Dennis F. Peltier Nancy F. Perkins Jo Anne Precourt Diana J. Reilly Kevin S. Smith Leo A. Soucy Martha S. Soucy Patricia A. Spirou Louis B. Tallarita Elizabeth A. Thomas Leon F. Veretto Jeanne Wormelle

Alfred R. Muskett John J. Occhionero George H. Partridge Steven J. Patrick Joseph R. Phillips Frank T. Roach

Mark R. Dachel Michael J. D’Amato Elroy J. De Xavier Barbara Demeter Suzanne M. Dickie Robert H. Duffley

1992

1990 Benjamin L. Addison Steven S. Allen Steven F. Baker Corbitt Banks Michael R. Beauchamp Veronica J. Beeson Jane C. Belanger Vivian F. Bisbee Pachareeya Carkin Donna M. Cassidy Gloria C. Clark Michael D. Cooney Tami A. Dennison Steven N. Devoe Patricia C. Duffey Christine D. Dunlop-Mele Michael R. Dupuis Kolby T. Gallant Steven N. Gore Richard M. Greenslade Valerie J. Hamilton Spencer V. Hertje David N. Hilton Jodi L. Keane Sandra J. Lakin Susan M. Lemieux Daniel R. Livingston Susan Martore-Baker Patricia M. McCaughey Tami L. McNamara

David B. Soha Mark S. Stafiej Stephen J. Sugar Lynn L. Sweeney John W. Thiers James P. Villa Laura L. Walta Gretchen A. Whiting

Lois V. Rostanzo Edward R. Sadoway John C. Scribner Franz C. Shattuck Kevin M. Sweeney Jane E. Torrey Harold Turner Darren H. Unger Bonnie A. Vadala John E. Vadala Jeanne E. Welivar Sally G. Wilson Sharon A. Zacharias

1991 Richard C. Bailey Douglas A. Baker John S. Bentley Susan M. Bonenfant Heather M. Bradley Monique M. Bunton Pamela M. Carr William M. Cassidy Diane M. Cobb Kevin G. Collimore Ivan Colon Sandra M. Comer-Cooper Eugene J. Coulombe Moira A. Cristy

Gail C. Eaton Steven J. Elliott Scott A. Feenan Grant M. Flinn Gia F. Florian Elizabeth M. Fogelgren Malcolm J. Ford Mark H. Frampton Patricia R. Gerard Michael F. Gertner Tammy R. Gitter Thomas P. Hagen Constance E. Harvey Marie A. Hurd Charles F. Keller Kevin C. Kennedy Claire M. Lawlor Richard K. Letourneau Paul F. Loveless David J. McGee Eric M. Moreau Susan A. Murphy Nancy A. Newton Christos Papoutsy Michele L. Petersen Richard G. Pierce Pamela M. Sapienza John S. Scheeler Tracey A. Sherman +

Michael J. Alamo John P. Beauregard Roland Bechard Russell F. Bellemare David H. Bellman Brian Bradley Jean P. Burbank Nancy Callanan Alexander Colon Elise C. Cuvay Lana Dearborn Lisa Denningham Elizabeth L. Desmarais James A. Devlin Mike A. D’Urso Perry Engle Rodney C. Fenstermaker Robert J. Finlay Diana L. Gilbert Klara Grape Rodney Guldenstern John D. Hankinson Brian K. Jackson Karl A. Jaeger Scott T. Latimer George R. Leach Woullard Lett Marcus E. Mann William E. McMahon Susan Naimark Michael A. Pepin Linda C. Ralston Anna M. Rego Steven D. Rodrigue David A. Sewall Deborah L. Smith Stacy L. Trottier Susan Wefald Marcell R. Wood

1993 Vanessa A. Bartlett Michael Boisvert

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 65


Jeffrey P. Bourassa Dolores R. Boutin Barbara W. Brown Ralph J. Campilio Jennifer L. Connor Donna L. Cooper Louise Corbin Rueben R. Cortez Russell C. Crevoiserat Lois T. Debisz Barbara A. Deguise Stanley G. DeMello Eugenia Diamantopoulou Janice A. Fitzpatrick Andrew Fries Julia M. Gargus Min Gautam Beth A. Goscinski Tammy J. Harrison Janette U. Holton Sharon J. HusseyMclaughlin Alan L. Jenne Wilson G. Knight Dennis A. Lamper Christopher M. LaSalle Helen Leach David P. Lee Stephen D. Lent David Leonard Sandra M. Lewis Deborah M. Limoges Ann R. MacNaughton Michael W. Maki Laura L. Martinage Angela L. Maxfield Paul T. Maxwell Ann-Marie Murray Ray H. Ng James Mageto Nyambati Glen M. Ohlund Jacqueline K. Okonak Michael R. Order Daryl D. Pfaff Candace W. Portilla Renee Reiner Michael H. Sacks Edward H. Shaw Bonnie J. Shekarabi Denis D. St. Pierre Totty O. Totty Scott V. Truncellito Edmund H. Vasseur

Suzanne M. Verrill Jeffrey D. Watts Erik S. Wheeler

1994 James A. Adelstein Lisa M. Balch Richard V. Ballantyne Mary E. Barsamian Daniel A. Bilodeau Kelly L. Boston David H. Buck Lynn E. Campbell Suzanne T. Dice Barbara S. Divenuti Jacqueline F. Dunn Robin Figueroa Francis J. Ford Debra A. Frank Pauline Gagne Carole Hall Linda C. Hicks + Martha D. Holland Michel Kervyn de Lettenhove Eric R. Kruger Kathleen J. Lawlor Clayton L. Leblanc Debra A. Levy Paul H. Lusty Alice S. Macek Andrew J. Mendolia Harriet A. Miller Sharon A. MullenCampbell Michael J. Newman Ruth R. O’Hara James M. Palmisano Lorraine P. Palumbo John W. Pappas Ernest T. Pelland Jeffrey A. Pfeiffer Maurine Purcell Linda M. Raines Vivian N. Rowe Donna L. Severance Richard A. Soucy Darlene M. Spang Leslie A. Todis Paul N. Todis Roxanne A. Tufts-Keegan Phillip J. Woodhams Linda A. Wright

66 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

1995 Laura K. Baker Ronald A. Barone Ernest E. Beane Catherine M. Bettencourt Kristine K. Bouchard Sonya L. Boucher Bruce T. Boyarsky Harriet F. Buck Tonia S. Carr Mary A. Chatigny Edmund E. Correa Christine Corrigan Peter T. Corrigan Cynthia P. Curtis Tiffany L. Delworth Sampath Kumar Deva Thomas Devaney Michael P. Gregowske

John T. Hamre Tim Hitchcock Eugene F. Jones John C. Lamonday Keith P. Landry Brenda Bailey Lett Mark L. Maciolek Susan M. Maxfield Michelle R. McKinnon Kristopher K. McMorrow

Frederick T. Mitchell Gail K. Morrison Robert S. Moulton Amy P. Neville Richard P. Neville Sheryl M. Norwood David W. Nute John S. O’Brien George S. Ogin Nancy S. Osborn Lisa J. Ouellette Betsy A. Rosenbluth James E. Sacco Denise M. Sicotte Shawn Stephens Kurt P. Stinson Alison B. Torrey Julie A. Vasseur James A. Whitmore

Clarence T. Wyatt Marc J. Wydom

1996 Mark J. Bennett George J. Breslin James K. Butterfield Lori L. Cayouette Janet L. Chaves Mary B. Conboy

Angelo J. Constantino Gregory A. Couture Robert M. Defeo Jennifer L. Desrosiers Shari L. Drewes Linda R. Gaines Mark T. Giuliano James A. Hadley Richard L. Hodgkinson Melora C. Hosler Michael A. Hotchkiss Denise B. Hubbard Bradley S. Hunter Raheemah Jabbar-Bey James J. Johnson Kelly J. Johnson Karl L. Joslin Patrick D. Kirby Kerry D. Koch Michelle LamontagneStrout + Donald Leblanc Keith J. Lima Derek A. MacDermott Michael T. MacDonald Bryan S. MacLaren William Maddocks Thomas P. Maziarz Karen E. McEachern Shawn A. McNamara Michele L. O’Neill Marie C. Ouellette Jeffrey S. Passen Dwaine C. Perry Michael L. Place Anthony S. Poore Geraldine N. Provost Ellen L. Rice Colleen P. Santo Robyn D. Sealock Brian D. Seguin Peter R. Siconolfi William R. Simonds Mary S. Simpson Richard J. Sirois Jacqueline G. Taylor Roger R. Veilleux Kristen M. Waterman Paul T. Wentworth James T. White Todd R. Whitney Vanessa K. Williams

+ Alumni Class Agent


Honor Roll of Donors Report

1997 Linda M. Allen Michael F. Allen Darlene A. Atta Dale E. Austin Lee Ann Barron Leo Beliveau Christine C. Blais Kelly A. Blake Linda Burns Steven M. Buyck Jane S. Cargill Ann C. Demencuk Walter J. Domian Cecelia F. Esposito Guy D. Ford Lizbeth L. Good Mark A. Hardmon Anna M. Houde Robin Kazes Muriel Keraghan Samuel A. Koroma Becki M. Krueger Scott R. LaBreche Tara R. Landry Gregory S. Lawrence Stephanie W. Lewry Leif Martinson Deanna M. McWilliams Roy S. Morrison Stewart B. Oakes Richard L. Pelletier Therese P. Perrin David C. Rodis Susan I. Roy Ellen M. Savage Karl J. Schwab Leanne Tremlett Michelle Trull Rita M. Weir Michael A. Wheeler Jay A. Wolk

1998 Mark J. Ackerman D. Anwar I. Al Ghani Cliff Antell Laquita A. Brooks Ronald E. Carbary Arthur A. Chicaderis Louise A. Donington James R. Dowd Rachel Alice Dowd + Alumni Class Agent

Tiffany J. Ferreira Dean S. Flanagin John L. Fournier Brian C. Harrison Priscilla J. Jeffery Joanne M. Johnson Lisa C. Kirton David Lalumiere Eve Lindsey Hillary L. Louis Scott J. Maltzie Chad L. Mason + Kimberly F. Monk Jennifer A. Pistarelli Mark W. Ranalletti Jason R. Rayher + Marie T. Reeve Tracy A. Roche Dennis C. Shea G. Robert Smith Jennifer M. Sonker Nick J. Therrien Patrick S. Thomas Raymond L. Turgeon Jennifer A. Van Campen Brenda L. Vittner Kathryn A. Wallingford

David A. Turcotte Jean L. Wesinger Alan E. Wilkinson Kevin R. Willey

Patricia M. Rutko Patricia L. Sangillo Kevin P. Shea Brian M. Soares Benjamin M. Sutch +

2000 Gerard A. Bergeron Scott A. Bilodeau Ngaio M. Blake Michelle E. Caron

2001 Stephen E. Allen Amy T. Bilodeau Douglas E. Cote

2002

1999 Jennifer A. Allen Benjamin A. Alms Michele Beniamino Janice R. Bettencourt Scott W. Bursey Tricia L. Bursey Susan W. Davis Deborah L. Edwards Jamie L. Flint Anne Formalarie Dennis M. Granger Holly L. Hamelton Katherine J. Helm Donald L. Hill Sandra L. Hill Jillian P. Jurilla Abubakr M. Karim Cynthia R. Levandowski Anne McCubrey Keith J. Moran Mark Perec John F. Pfifferling Michael M. Shields Michael S. Trombley

David T. Mylott Dianne A. Osborn Matthew F. Pappas Dean K. Parmer Cheryl L. Peaslee Erica J. Perkins Ruthie A. Pistorino James M. Queenan Debra A. Robinson Dawn T. Roy Judah J. Siomos

Meghan J. Dalesandro + Thomas P. Dearborn Douglas R. Delavan Catherine B. Frazer Benjamin W. Gorman Sandra Guerra Philip P. Hardcastle Thomas M. Helm Libby M. Jensen Lynn D. Joslin Mara K. Khavari Gloria Levenson Tiffany A. Lyon + Karen A. McCaffrey Douglas E. McClure Diana L. McCourt Narcisa J. Moran Michael T. Oleksak James T. O’Neill Michael J. Prymak Bradley S. Reed Ivette I. Robinson Richard T. Ruddell +

Christopher H. Currier Laura B. Dionne Michelle L. Dozier Zelma X. Echeverria Georgette M. Gordon Joel S. Grace Gina M. Guinta Daniel C. Hall Beth C. Hallet Marjorie E. Hobbs Bonnie G. Hurley Corey N. Johnson Paula R. Johnston Shova Karki Kristina E. Kintzer + Daniel W. Lawrence Marc T. Leavitt Marc J. Lubelczyk Colleen D. Mahoney Beth Maltzie Marcel R. Marquis Keith N. McLaren Dennis R. Murphy

Susan M. Anderson John N. Banalya Kevin R. Beauchesne Russell J. Bilodeau Lisa D. Bryan Karen M. Burfeind Laurie J. Burke Jeffrey A. Camuso Adele M. Chertoff Donald E. Crowell Heather J. Digby Diane M. Dussault Ryan P. Gamache Reginald A. Giroux Carol M. Godfrey Pamela E. Harding Matthew M. Henzy Andrea Jenkins Angela J. Jennings Paula M. King Kathleen Kovacs Ashley A. Liadis + Carlos E. Lopez Ruth I. Medlock Peter G. Merrill Barbara J. Milon Nicholas Nugent Thomas A. Seymour Michael J. Warenda Meg M. York

2003 Margie Aguilar Michael Aguilar Gayle A. Berube Alex R. Bickford + Philip J. Cargill Richard A. Day Karen S. Diaz David C. Dobbins +

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Matthew A. Doggett + Janet L. Donley Edward A. Dorval Lauren J. Faber April L. Gancarz Ingrid M. Gillespie John D. Greener Jayne B. Hall Richard W. Hindle Dianne B. Howe Emily J. Kaminsky Tracy L. Kinney Amy L. Laroche Nicole M. Lessard James Manoukian Sue-Ann McGorty Katherine A. McKenney + Louise McNeilly William D. Ogle Jasmine P. Pandit Victor H. Paul Tonya D. Peak

Tammy L. Plummer Alan E. Saffron Mary J. Searles Lisa M. Sessions + Dawn E. Stanhope

2004 Jamee J. Cates Carolyn A. Costello Brian P. Dalesandro Darlene M. D’Anna Anthony J. Defide Bryan J. Disko David E. Essex James M. Fialkowski Brynn M. Gestewitz Clare R. Greenlaw Meredith L. Greenlaw Eric M. Jackomino Pamela M. Jones Aaron Keyton Christopher C. Kolwicz Kim M. Lafleur Janice Lemieux Thomas G. Mansour Brian C. Martin Claudio Martinez Adrienne A. Morgan Mark S. Nichols Judith M. Pryde Gina M. Rogers Linda J. Rozolis Shawna L. Santos Matthew D. Sharp + Judy A. Watson Charles W. White Lillie T. Wilson Charles W. York

Trisha C. Dionne Michael A. Dipoto Kara L. Dufour Angela E. Estes Kenneth M. Fortin Anita Frye Kristianto Halim Cecilio Hernandez Janet W. Kepes Stacy A. Knapp Joanne Landry Christie L. Lenda + Dana M. Leone Christine A. MacKelvey Troy A. Malbon Eric C. Martorano David Miles Rosemary A. Murphy Brian A. Panteledes Jeffrey M. Penta Susanne D. Putvain-Gann Wayne E. Rawlins Charlene Ricci Lisa A. Seymour Joseph A. Torrice Tracy S. Wolford

Glenn M. Fiore Michael N. Fitzpatrick Barbara A. Gardner Eric A. Gildemeister Tera L. Hale James R. Horn Markelly Jean-Pierre Alana J. Kimball Joseph R. Lachance Donna Lacroix Elizabeth Ladu Jittiporn Nagapradip Gary T. Pepka Matthew J. Quimby Carlene M. Rose Ryan M. Sambataro John J. San Antonio Susan M. Schmitz Mark G. Somerville Megan A. Sprague Judith A. Timney Nicholas P. Turmel Utiang P. Ugbe Chen Fa Wu Elizabeth A. Yenkner Karen E. York

2006

2007

Melissa J. Ceppetelli Laura R. Chabot Vincent P. Corson Susan L. Daneault

Pierre B. Collins

The Office of Institutional Advancement acknowledges the leadership and generous support by the members of the University Board of Trustees Development Committee during the 2006-2007 academic year. With special thanks we recognize: Rick Courtemanche ’73 – Chair of the Board Cathy Champagne ’88 – Development Committee Chair

2005 Becky L. Alarie Darlene G. Alexander Donna L. Archambault Chantel L. Bonner + Adam R. Breen Frederic W. Browne Lori D. Centerbar LaPierre Patricia M. Damon Michael R. Diodati

68 | The Extra Mile | Fall 2007

Development committee members: Michael Brody ‘73, Cathy Champagne ‘88, Mickey Green ’72, Mark Ouellette ’77, Thomas Tessier ’74, Kimon Zachos The Southern New Hampshire University Office of Institutional Advancement staff made every effort to ensure accuracy in this report. The staff apologizes for any errors and invites you to contact us at 603.629.4696 with corrections. Thank you.

+ Alumni Class Agent


Spotlight on Scholarships

President: Dr. Paul J. LeBlanc Editor: Michelle Dunn Content Editors: Richard Erskine, Woullard Lett, Frederick Lord, Heather Lorenz, Tiffany Lyon, Tom McDermott, Judy Timney Director of Publications: Patricia Garrity Graphic Design: Jason Mayeu Photography: Brian Crowley, Jeremy Earl Mayhew, Gil Talbot Proofreader: Ellin Jean, Jean Creative Services Printing: The Lane Press Inc. The Extra Mile is published two times per year by the Office of Marketing and Communications. Class Notes and changes of address may be sent to alumni@snhu.edu. Visit us online at snhu.edu for more university news and information about upcoming events. Postmaster: Send address changes to the Office of Alumni and Community Relations, Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 North River Road, Manchester, NH 03106

2007-2008 SNHU Board of Trustees Chairman Andrew “Mickey” Greene ’72 Vice Chairman Mark A. Ouellette ’77 Treasurer Bill McGarry Secretary Bradford E. Cook President/CEO Paul J. LeBlanc Board Members Howard Brodsky Michael Brody ’73 Cathy Champagne ’88 Clayton M. Christensen Stephanie Collins Rick Courtemanche ’73 Robert J. Decolfmacker ’78 Theresa Desfosses ’72 Robert Finlay ’92 Donald R. Labrie ’71 David Lee ’87, ’93 Frederic “Rick” Loeffler Kyle Nagel L. Douglas O’Brien Steven Painchaud Martha Shen-Urquidez Beverly Smith ’00 June Smith Thomas Tessier ’74 Raymond Truncellito Kimon S. Zachos Student Observer Benjamin Barkhouse Trustees Emeriti William S. Green Jacqueline Mara

William Trueheart Scholarship Lasting Memory Phil King ’00 and Michael Provencher ’00 wanted their beloved information technology professor, William Trueheart, to be remembered long after his retirement in May 2000. So they created a university scholarship in the associate professor’s name. “Professor Trueheart’s commitment to developing a student’s potential, his passion for teaching and his compassion for his students are just part of his legacy.” King said. For Trueheart, it was more than an honor; it was an opportunity to help students after he left the classroom. After retiring from the U.S. Army in 1980, Trueheart came to SNHU to teach information technology. For the next 20 years he worked to guide and educate the many young men and women who passed though his classroom. Though no longer teaching, he will be able to continue helping students by easing their financial burden through this scholarship.

Professor Trueheart’s commitment to developing

a student’s potential, his passion for teaching and his compassion for his students are just part of his legacy.

– Phil King ’00

“I’d hate for a student to be held back for financial reasons,” he says. “Knowing that this scholarship will help to give a student a chance in life to go somewhere really means a lot.” Members of the Trueheart family have offered to match each dollar donated, up to $2,500. Once fully endowed, the William Trueheart Scholarship will provide a legacy to his teaching excellence and provide support for IT majors. Awards will be based on academic achievement, involvement in university life and financial need.

To support the William Trueheart Scholarship or learn more about other giving opportunities, please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement at 603.645.9688 or visit snhu.edu online.

The Extra Mile | Fall 2007 | 69


Go forth and lead.

Manchester

Leadership. Communication. Teamwork.

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These are the skills today’s CEOs are looking for in employees.

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Get the degree that will help take you to the top with a master’s degree in organizational leadership from Southern New Hampshire University.

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Fall 2007

Ed Ithier ’87

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The Extra Mile Fall 2007