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Snelling Connection Newsletter of the Hancock/Hamline University Collaboration

Hamline University has been teaming up with Hancock Elementary for over a century. Over the years, this one-ofa-kind collaboration has enriched both university and elementary students’ education through friendship, shared learning, and cultural diversity. The two schools work together in a variety of ways, from offering kindergarteners a tour of the university’s campus to employing university students to work as tutors. This unique partnership has provided students of all ages countless opportunities to learn, grow, and develop a respect and appreciation for each other through the power of collaboration.

In This Issue: Kids Voting

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In the Mix Training

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Hand-in-Hand

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From the Desk of...

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On the Issues If I were president...

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Advice Column

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Volume 12, Issue 1

The power of going to the polls Kids Voting, a nationwide program, teaches young people to become more informed, engaged voters.

This assembly served as the kick-off event for the Hancock’s participation in the Kids Voting program. amline students from Kids Voting is a naProfessor David Hudtionwide program to son’s first-year seminar encourage students visited Hancock Elementary on and parents to go to Sept. 23 to put on an assembly the polls and vote on about the importance of voting. election day. AccordHancock students also participated ing to the Kids Voting in the assembly by holding up signs website, the mission with political hopefuls’ names on of the Kids Voting Hancock students hold up signs campaigning for this them and waving pom-poms. program is to make year’s most prominent political candidates. Hamline students were able to young people across staff will supervise the voting staprovide a mock election, offering the United States more educated, tion serving as a marshal, an instudents choices of more math or engaged voters. Ideally, students spector, judges, or clerks. By the more recess, however the students who are not yet of voting age will end of the day, the final vote will realized their voice didn’t count— be able to encourage their parents be announced. unless they were registered to vote. or other adults in their lives to go The concepts of Kids Voting are: Hamline students went on to teach to the polls and cast their vote. • My vote gives me power. the students about the voting proStudents will have an opportunity • I have a right and responsibility cess and why it is important to regto experience the voting process on to vote. ister and vote. November 4 as they cast their bal• I study the candidates and lots at Hanissues. cock’s poll• I register and vote. ing booths. • I continue to make a difference. The ballot will include: For candidate information, policy discusPresident/ sions and precinct locations, visit the Kids Vice Presi- Voting website at www.kidsvotingstpaul. dent, U.S. com. Senate, and U.S. House of Representative. H a n c o ck and HamstuHamline students visit Hancock to offer an assembly promoting the line dents and importance of being well informerd, registered voters. By Glynis Grospephan and Angela Froemming Hancock student advisor, Editor

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Fall 2008


Hamline tutors given lessons in diversity By Hannah Brugman Hamline Student

ers), race, culture and class. These classes are intended to teach Hamline students more about the iversity plays an im- students they work with when portant role in the col- they cross Snelling Avenue to laboration between enter Hancock Elementary. Hancock Elementary and Ham“It is important to think about line University. Both schools have how we treat the students we a multitude of cultures within work with, and recognize that them; however it is hard to over- we may treat students different look that Hamline’s population is because of their race and cultural significantly more homogeneous background,” said 4th-year tutor than the student population at Whitney Klein. Hancock. One way to help HamIn the Mix sessions are required line tutors grow in their cultural for every first-year tutor working competency is through In the Mix at Hancock Elementary. Another sessions. option for veteran tutors who In the Mix sessions are twohave already attended the seshour classes held four times a sions is called Mix it Up, which year that focus on a different top- encourages tutors to attend ic each time. The topics include speeches or other activities that ELL (English Language Learnhighlight diversity, such as the Commitment to Community speeches. “The requirement is wonderful and we need it,” said Klein, adding that although the subjects might be difficult or make people feel uncomfortable, they need Tutor Anne Jacques helps a first-grade student with his work. to be talked Jacques is one of about 60 new tutors at Hancock this year.

Autumn Word Search

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Artwork by Jenou Lee

Artwork by Madison Hare

Artwork by Sabrina Yang

ACORN APPLES AUTUMN EQUINOX FROST HARVEST LEAVES NOVEMBER OCTOBER ORANGE PUMPKIN RAKE SCARECROW SEPTEMBER YELLOW

about. Megan Anderson, coordinator of the Hancock/Hamline Collaboration, noted how growing in cultural competency teaches Hamline tutors about Nuria Mohamed helps a second-grade student with her math work. growing within interested in learning more about their own culture as well as bevarious aspects of human relaing aware of others’ cultures. tions. He said the In the Mix ses“There’s always something to be sions are not only helpful to him learned,” she said. as a tutor, but also as a sociology According to In the Mix’s major. website, the three principle “It was a great meeting,” Misra tenets of the Hancock-Hamline said, adding that he would recCollaboration are intentionality, ommend other people to attend. sustainability and reciprocity. In Part of being a good tutor, acthe Mix workshops work to encording to Anderson, is knowing hance these tenets, making better about the students’ backgrounds. learning experiences for Hancock In the Mix sessions are just one and Hamline students alike, and way tutors might begin to learn further reinforcing the idea that more about the diverse popula“College Begins in Kindergartion at Hancock, and different ten!” groups of people in general. Amrit Misra, a first-year HamAnderson said, “It’s a two-hour line student and tutor, said that session, but it’s just an introduche has enjoyed attending the In tion.” the Mix sessions because he is

S E P T E M B E R A

N A C F Q J E L W U

R F P R R Q T O O T

X E D P U O R Q L U

I H B I L C S J L M

G R N O E E J T E N

H O M R T G S A Y E

X D A E H C N S K H

D C V B A M O A H E

S L K M R H R T R B

D F Z E V R A P P O

L G U V E A C O R N

X M P O S E V A E L

Y I N N T T E C K Z

N I K P M U P K U S

Fall 2008


Scholarship to aid future Hancock graduate By Anne Owczarzak Hamline Student

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ach year Hancock students are polled to find out how many want to further their education by attending college. An overwhelming 97 percent of the students report that they would like to go to college one day. For these collegebound Hancock graduates, there is a scholarship being prepared just for them. Four years ago, after a $5,000 personal donation by former Hancock-Hamline liaison Rita Johnson, a scholarship fund was started for Hancock graduates to be able to attend Hamline University. “This year we need to raise about $10,000 to have it fully endowed,” said current HancockHamline liaison Craig Anderson.

Currently, the scholarship has just over $9,000. Anderson plans on raising money for the scholarship through fundraisers such as T-shirt sales and an upcoming community event. “When it really comes down to it,” Anderson said, “if 1,000 students each give $10, we will have $10,000; this goal can easily become a reality.” Assisting a former Hancock student to attend Hamline University would further exemplify the collaborative relationship that exists between the two schools. “We have numerous teachers that work here [at Hancock] that got their degree at Hamline University, there are many current Hamline students that work and volunteer here, and there are many students at Hamline that have attended St. Paul public schools,” Anderson

said. An organization has seven years to endow a scholarship; Hancock is on its 4th year. “We will get it done,” Anderson said. “When my mind is set to

something, I will get it done.” Short-sleeved maroon and long-sleeved black T-shirts are currently available and on sale for $20 in Craig Anderson’s office.

All proceeds from the sale of T-shirts, worn above by Hancock 6th-graders, will go directly to Hancock’s scholarship fund. An upcoming community event will also take place to raise money.

Hand-in-Hand promotes friendship, fun By Caitlin Hare and Hue Houa Yang Hancock Student Editors

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ver since the 1880s, Hancock Elementary and Hamline University have been working together. The offi-

cial collaboration began in 1992. Since then, the two schools have done a lot to work together in order to create a better learning environment for students on both sides of the street. One way the schools have collaborated together is through the Hand-in-Hand

Hamline student Jana Anderson spends time playing a game with her firstgrade Hand-in-Hand buddy. Anderson is one of about 90 Hamline students volunteering their time this year to participate in the Hand-in-Hand program.

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program. at Hancock. Before a Hamline Hand-in-Hand is a volunteer student can begin spending time program that matches Hamline with their Hancock buddy they student volunteers with Hancock must go through both a group students. Heather Albrecht, and individual training session. president of Hand-in-Hand, said, The Hamline students come to “The name Hancock for “The name Hand-in-Hand Hand30 minutes in-Hand represents the friendship between each week to represents spend time the Hancock and the Hamline and play a the friendship buddy. They help one another, game or two between the or do an art hand in hand, no one more Hancock project with important than the other.” and the their Hancock Hamline buddy. There —Heather Albrecht buddy. is also a President of Hand-in-Hand picnic that They help one takes place another, twice a year. hand in hand, no one more “Hand-in-Hand’s goal,” important than the other.” Albrecht said, “is to pair Hamline This year, there are about 90 students with Hancock students Hamline students who volunteer in hopes that they will become their time to participate in the friends who will support one Hand-in-Hand program. Many another, teach one another, and of the volunteers taking part in most of all, have fun with one Hand-in-Hand are also tutors another.” Snelling Connection


Jenou

Lee

From the Desk of...

am and I u Lee mentary. o n e J s e name i ock El ym, Hi, my ade at Hanc jects are g r b they g u s e h caus hool in 5t c e s b e g t n i or riti play My fav ading and w in school I TV. e t r o , c n wat h I’m math d n n e a h e k rit n. W are fu mes, read, w bout Hancoc a a e g e h r o t vide n mo with to lear orking I hope line while w m and Ha Connection. g n i l l Sne

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Ahmed A

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Hi, my n ame is A hmed Ab grade at di. I am Hancock in 5th , and I h brothers ave thre and one e sister w here too ho come . My fav orite cla compute sses are ra gym, playing b nd science. My h obbies a asketball re ,s I play th e violin in occer and footb all. orchestr home. I am aa Connectio excited to be in nd at the Snell n becaus ing e learning what it is I’m having fun a nd like to w newspap ork for a er.

Marjorie Abrams

Principal

of Hancock Elementary

My name is Marjorie Abrams and I am the principal of Hancock/Hamline University Collaborative Magnet School. I am extremely grateful for the relationship between Hancock and Hamline University. Did you know that this year we have over 80 Hamline tutors that provide $220,000 worth of tutoring for reading and math for Hancock students? Did you know that we have about 90 Hand-in-Hand buddies providing 1,250 volunteer hours for Hancock students? These Hamline University students provide immeasurable value and enhancement to our academic and social programs. And, Hamline students are role models that personify our motto, “College Begins in Kindergarten!” And this is not all; Hamline University provides enrichment for our students in many different ways. Sometimes, Hamline shares its facilities with us. For example, Hancock students use the swimming pool for water safety experiences, our Earth Day Festival is held on Hamline’s beautiful campus, our kindergarten students visit Hamline’s library and our 5th-graders prepare a mock trial in the Law School courtroom. These and many other collaborative activities and exchanges between the campuses serve students attending both facilities and bring the curriculum to life. How lucky to be located across the street from this major university! It is my hope that our collaboration will continue to prosper for many years to come! Fall 2008


On the Issues: Madison Hare and Sabrina Yang ask: “What would you do if you were elected as the next president of the United States?” ------------------------------------------“I would make sure everyone has health insurance, and people earn enough money to support their family and help get the gas and grocery prices down.” —Kim Proefrock, TA “ Try to stop the war in Iraq, bring the troops home.” —Jasmyne Jeter, Hamline student Artwork by Hue Houa Yang

“From working at Hancock I have seen the power of collaboration! I would collaborate with Congress, leaders around the world, and with people of the United States to lift all people.” —Craig Anderson, Curriculum Coordinater/Hamline Liaison

“Look at healthcare issues in the U.S.” —Kay Lee, Hancock school nurse Artwork by Kelsey Donnelly

“I would make sure that all schools are funded so that students have small classes and adequate materials.” —Marjorie Abrams, Principal

Do you have a fabulous idea? Does it foster learning? There is money waiting for you! The Hancock/Hamline Collaboration is currently accepting mini-grant applications. The fall deadline for applications is Friday, November 7. For more information and application forms, visit www.hamline.edu/hancock. Page 

Snelling Connection


Dear Hancock Husky ...

Introducing the 2008-2009 Hancock Student Editors

I’ve heard that the economy is not very good right now. What can my friends and family do to save money but still get what we need? — M.T. Pockets Dear M.T., There are many ways to get what you need for less. First of all, you can shop at second-hand stores such as Goodwill or the Salvation Army. Garage sales are also great places to find what you need without having to spend as much. Sometimes you can get what you need with no money at all by borrowing instead of buying. The public library, for example, has books, CDs, and even movies. Another way to save money is to determine what you need before you go shopping. This can help prevent you from buying things you want, but don’t necessarily need. All those little extras will add up over time. Remember the saying, “A penny saved is a penny earned.” —Kelsey Donnelly and Quinn Nelson Hancock student editors

Ahmed Abdi

Madison Hare

Hue Houa Yang

Jenou Lee

Kelsey Donnelly

Quinn Nelson

Caitlin Hare

Sabrina Yang

Snelling Connection Contacts:

Editor: Angela Froemming, Collaboration Assistant, Hamline University student afroemming02@hamline.edu Hamline Liaison: David Hudson, Hamline University English Dept. dhudson@hamline.edu 651-523-2893 Hancock Liaison: Craig Anderson, Hancock/Hamline University Collaborative Magnet School craig.anderson@spps.org 651-292-3499 Hancock Student Advisor: Glynis Grostephan, Hancock/Hamline University Collaborative Magnet School glynis.grostephan@spps.org 651-293-8715

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Snelling Connection


Fall 2008