Page 1

vol. 43 | aug. 15, 2011

northwest

[ freshman magazine ]

photo illustration by bailey kopp

A KEY TO FINDING YOUR WAY 09 Lost around school? Here are some of the most difficult places to find.

43 things to do before graduation

08

how to join a club

12

a new students’ guide to nw sports

14

In honor of Northwest’s 43rd year, here’s a graduation bucket list. Find the right club, activity or organization for you to join. Find out when each sport is in season.


northwest

EDITOR’S NOTE: [ staff ] Co-editors-in-chief MARIA DAVISON DAVID FREYERMUTH Copy Editor BRIANNA LEYDEN Design Editor BAILEY KOPP Assistant Design Editor BROOKE GOLLADAY Photo Editors DAVID FREYERMUTH MIKALA COMPTON News Editor HAYLEY BATTENBERG Opinions Editors MARIA DAVISON DAVID FREYERMUTH Entertainment Editor ASHLEE CRANE Sports Editors BRADY KLEIN LOGAN COFFMAN

This special edition of the Northwest Passage has been designed with you in mind. While planning the issue, we asked ourselves what we wished we had known coming into high school. We discussed maps, school supplies and bell schedules, but also wisdom about getting involved in sports, clubs or other organizations as early as possible (page 7), friendships (page 6) and not sweating the small stuff (page 6). We hope we have answered most of your first day questions and you learned something from our experience as freshmen. Just like this issue of the Passage, freshman orientation day is specifically for you to get to know each other and the school before upperclassmen arrive. Take advantage of the uncrowded emptier halls to find the fastest way to get to your classes. Ask the questions you’ve been wondering about all summer. Introduce yourself to the person next to you; he or she may become your best friend one day. Over the course of the next four years, you will learn about geography, algebra, politics, biology, literature and other subjects you choose to pursue. But maybe more importantly, you’ll learn about who you are and discover what you’re passionate about. You’ll find out that, most days, high school is nothing like the movies. But other days, you’ll find yourself saying, “I can’t believe that happened.” Your friends and interests will change more times than you can count. And unlike finding the derivative and integral of any curve, those are the lessons you will carry with you for the rest of your life. So during the coming year, I encourage you to throw all your old labels away. The things that once made you who you are don’t necessarily matter anymore. Join a new club, meet some new people, make a few mistakes; it’s the only way you’ll learn. With the exception of this issue and the special edition for seniors in the spring, the Passage is the official tri-weekly, student-run publication at Northwest. We cover the issues surrounding the school and community. If you ever have anything to contribute to the Passage, please write a letter to the editor and email it to newspaper@smnw.com or bring it room 151. We always appreciate input from the student body. Welcome to high school. They say the next four years will be the best of your life. Whether or not they’re right, we hope you love high school. Sincerely, Maria Davison and David Freyermuth

The purpose of The Northwest Passage is to relay important and interesting information to the community, administration and students of the Shawnee Mission Northwest High School. As a newsmagazine, The Northwest Passage will cater to the interests and concerns of the student body. Outside concerns and activities will only be covered if they somehow affect the school or students. The Northwest Passage is a 24-page newsmagazine. The paper will be distributed every two weeks during third hour. Subscriptions will be available to the community for $25. The Northwest Passage firmly supports the First Amendment and opposes censorship. The content of the newspaper will be determined and created by the entire staff. When questions concerning word choice, legal problems or ethics arise the editorial board and adviser will discuss the problem to find a solution. In these cases, the co-editors-in-chief will the have final say in all decisions. Letters to the editor will be accepted and encouraged, but will only be published if signed. The staff reserves the right to edit for grammatical mistakes, length and good taste. Letters may attack policy but not people. In no way will ideas or viewpoints be changed. The co-editors-in-chief reserves the right to refuse any letter.


CONTENTS

VOL. 43 AUG. 15, 2011 Shawnee Mission Northwest 12701 West 67th St., Shawnee, Kan., 66216

04 | BASICS

Check here for bell schedules, counselors, and administrators.

05 | 6 THINGS I COULDN’T SURVIVE HIGH SCHOOL WITHOUT

These are the supplies and other things you need to make the most of your school experience.

06 | COLUMNS

Four staff members give their advice about how to make the most of high school.

08 | 43 THINGS

In honor of the school’s 43rd anniversary, here’s your graduation bucket list. photo by peter kang

09 | A KEY TO FINDING YOUR WAY Not sure where you’re going? Check these color-coded maps of the school.

12 | HOW TO JOIN A CLUB

If you want to feel like you belong at Northwest, look here for clubs and organizations to join photo by david freyermuth

photo by daniel magwire

(dominant) NW graduate Connor Haley cheers during a football game. (left) Senior Emma Wendler plays clarinet during a marching band performance. (right) Junior Galen Gossman passes the ball to a teammate during a varsity soccer game.

14 | THE NEW STUDENTS’ GUIDE TO NW SPORTS Check here to find out what sports are in season.


REGULAR SCHEDULE PERIOD 1

7:40-8:30

PERIOD 2

8:35-9:30

PERIOD 3

9:35-10:25

Check out the bell schedules and take time to figure out who the various administrators and counselors are. Can you find your counselor?

PERIOD 4 10:30-11:20 PERIOD 5 11:25-12:50 LUNCH 1 11:25-11:50 LUNCH 2 11:55-12:20 LUNCH 3 12:25-12:50

PERIOD 6

12:55-1:45

PERIOD 7

1:50-2:40

meet the administration:

odd block PERIOD 1 PERIOD 3 PERIOD 5 LUNCH 1 LUNCH 2 LUNCH 3

PERIOD 7

7:40-9:10 9:15-10:50 10:55-1:00 11:35-12:00 12:05-12:30 12:35-1:00

LUNCH 1 LUNCH 2 LUNCH 3

PERIOD 6

PRINCIPAL

Lisa Gruman

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL

7:40-9:10 9:15-10:50 10:55-1:00 11:35-12:00 12:05-12:30 12:35-1:00

12:55-2:40

Eddie Lyday

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL

Dr. Marybeth Green

Susan Hartman

Erin Barnett

Jim Mowry

Counselor Department head Academic counselor Joi-Me Academic counselor Sj-Z ELL students, PLAN testing, Career Exploration

Angelo Giacalone

Academic counselor Di-Joh Scholarships, Financial Aid

Personal/Social counselor Group Counselor, Crisis Interverntion, Exchange Students Academic counselor Mf-Si AP testing, College Now

Christy Schmitt

Academic counselor Ad-H PSAT

Chris Nick

Counselors' secretary

04

Aug. 16, 2011

Tom Moss

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL

meet the counselors:

12:55-2:40

even block PERIOD 2 SEMINAR PERIOD 4

Dr. Bill Harrington


I COULDN’T SURVIVE HIGH SCHOOL WITHOUT by brianna leyden

1. WORKING COMPU

UCINO

TER

RAPP 2. CARAMEL F

Trust me, n after the fi ks is ofte rst day, yo t Starbuc teachers w a ik n m ri se d u y r on’t accep mary an sta t, “My [in electronic d e My custo asons I c iv re ss sert a ly m evice] brok n o if y. But of the e; it ran out a e d I had no po n g r o n fo lo ink; wer,” for as work ugh a an explanat ake thro doesn’t as to why w e a p e in e e sl ff io a f n you don’t of c ack o have an es that was as eping. L , amounts e y sl rg y e say n ll e a signed ago us and try actu , or a succ c , u fo Turnitin.co o y in r. io essful m submis decrease e behav sion. Mak sure you causes a aggressiv ens need e d n a have acce in a te g ss to a working co weight – 9 hours et, mputer, bec ard 8 ½ ard to g ause you will he stand mes be h an lead T ti e m so definitely c can need one. elf down to sleep Carrying lesson I ing yours n a n ru s, pounds t m u le b b ro p and pounds of us way in textbooks to serio e hard th d and a collect e rn lea ion of junk ar. and debris at junior ye the bottom of my backpack does nothing to improve m y health or the condition of m y back. Plan ti mes in the day it is most conven ient to stop by yo ur locker and drop off your book s. g-term Besides countless lon It is also essen it’s er, tia notes in my plann layers y rar , sw l to inves po tem ve t in helpful to lea e for t multi t he c atshirts tha ces pla in tes pl o a temp Post-it No eratu nstantly-ch nd hood e the — re ie angin The I’ll see as I wake up g ro s contr s here the car om at N ast b cold bathroom mirror, orthw etwee Facul inding rem — n th ty Lo classr steering wheel e alw est. unge, ooms that ng eni pp a ha s y a ng t is so n s h me of thi metim at do not d the stu ek We ff h here e day, like a Spirit is yet s extrem ave windo y th ma in t tes a e, so ws a store theme, or in yo nother ite fe li ur loc m to class. y ker. ved m rade) This sa g y m , er e (or rath , as it becam p es ee k m ti ld u y man at I co th , e c e la p nm nts the only mework assig t n e id o s h e lub pr c , track of s ie r c dan e per sto ents, newspa tm in o p p a n. Use duties, nd so o a s e c n a perform not to lose it. y tr d n a , it

3. MY LOCKER

5. POST-IT NOTES

4. JACKE

T

6. PLANNER

Six Things

05


THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS TO EVER HAPPEN IN HIGH SCHOOL by brianna leyden

I

...And how they actually aren’t.

remember the day my “little” brother Nick passed me in height. A casual remark of, “Oh, how big you’ve gotten!” from a relative during a family gathering turned into a back-toback measurement of how tall he was, and how he officially passed me by a quarter of an inch. I was horrified. As the older sister, I am supposed to be the older one, the wiser one and, most importantly, the one that is tall enough to claim the coveted front seat in the car on road trips. But this year, he and his gawky, bad-joke-cracking, rapidly expanding self is going to be joining me here at Northwest. And for the past few weeks (OK, maybe just last night), he has been rushing around getting school supplies, finishing summer homework, finding out if his friends are in his classes and, in general, panicking about what high school will be like. The only reason I know that he and probably a majority of freshmen are like this is because I was exactly the same three years ago. I psyched myself out over way too many little things. So here is a list of the most over-rated events that may happen during freshmen year (or every time you go someplace new, for that matter). 1. Those first steps through the door... are probably not going to be exactly the same as Taylor Swift’s song Fifteen, where everyone knows everyone, and is still nice to them. In fact, I imagine it is probably a little intimidating to walk in and feel dwarfed by a new student body of over 1800, no matter how close to six foot you are approaching (insert shoutout to my big little brother). Within the more than 100 clubs, organizations and sports, there are numerous opportunities to stand out and make your mark. You just have to find them. 2. The first time your locker jams, when the minute bell has rung and the classroom is across the school, when that last test didn’t go as well as hoped — those are just a number of life-ending, catastrophic situations that are encountered in high school. Except they aren’t. The world will not implode on itself, the sky will not fall, the apocalypse will not happen early simply

06

Aug. 15, 2011

because of a tardy or an “F.” There are usually numerous several opportunities to redeem yourself, particularly if it happens in the first few weeks when there is still an entire quarter to improve. However, don’t take this to mean that every grade can be blown off — in a couple of years when the time comes to send out your high school transcript, you will be regretting that decision to not study for that one final, etc. 3. That first audition/tryout/election/ etc. is going to be scary. In fact, I still have a ritual of working myself into a nervous frenzy before every highpressure event, and then having twitchy, shaky hands throughout it. But everyone has to go through them at some point or another and, once it is in the past, you’ll realize that it, too, was not such a big deal. 4. The first breakup won’t break you, and like I mentioned before, life is not a Taylor Swift song. The end of a relationship won’t seem like isn’t the end of your life, even if it seems like it. 5. Those first awkward moments where you don’t know where to sit or who to sit with. Situations like these occur throughout life. If you hope to avoid them, find your family. And no, not a literal one, because although I’m sure he loved all the praise this column gave him, my little brother probably won’t be in the same circles as me. But find a place to fit in, whether it’s in a music organization like orchestra, or a cocurricular class like journalism or a club you decide to join or even start with your friends, like Yoga Club. Right now, it seems daunting to think about all the possibilities outside the classroom, because the details like the lockers, the passing periods and the lunch lines all seem like monumental tasks that you know nothing about. These first days are the time to figure out that passing periods are five minutes, lunch lines are places to make decisions quickly and lockers may not open on the first try without hitting them a couple times. So don’t worry about getting lost in the crowd, or just plain getting lost, because no matter how small or how tall one is, there is a place for every one of you, and every one of you will find it.

JUST GIVE IT TIME The first few weeks, or even the first year of high school, can be difficult. But with time, it will gets better.

C

by ashlee crane

oming from a private Catholic school of about 90 kids that I’d grown up with (pretty much the only kids people my age that I knew since kindergarten), all the stress of a new school, with a completely different environment and the constant nagging thoughts of, “Do I look good?” and “Was that girl looking at me because I’m an awkward, fat, unpopular freshman?” ruled most of my first year here. My freshman year was tough. After being the skinny girl all my life — the one that everyone always says is the equivalent of a broomstick or that will float away when a strong wind picks up — I finally started to put on weight. When clothes started not to fit anymore, I worried that was the reason why I didn’t have very many friends. But since then, I’ve gotten more and more comfortable with the idea of high school. After the initial shock of being in a new place with all new people faded, I was able to get used to the building and the people in it. I’ve had teachers that I loved and teachers that I’ve less than favored. There have been boys, and there has been heartbreak. I’ve had plenty of friends, and, regrettably, I’ve lost a few. I found my “family,” a group of people that continually amaze me and make me feel at home inside the walls of Northwest. The fact of the matter is, high school will is most likely not provide going to be the worst or the best days of your life. It may not turn out the way like you plan, but there’s no need to worry about ruining your life during these next four years. Don’t get me wrong, you’ll make mistakes, and you’ll have to pay the consequences for those mistakes, and that may seem like it’s the end of the world. But trust me, it’s not. So no matter how tough it is, no matter how many problems arise from the seemingly millions of papers you get from math class, no matter how many times you trip over your own shoelaces in gym class; it’ll always get better. If it’s not all you hoped and dreamed, just give it time, and it’ll be great, or at least tolerable.


IT’S A LEARNING EXPERIENCE

“I

f you always do what you’ve always done, then you will get what you have always gotten.” This quote, originally said by self-help expert Tony Robbins, and preached by many of Northwest’s greatest coaches, like Van Rose and Ben Meseke, simply means this: you will achieve only what you give yourself the opportunity to achieve. It is something that can be applied to life and academics just as easily as running across a finish line or making a lay-up. I remember the feeling of excitement when I first walked through Northwest’s double doors. It’s a pretty big adrenaline rush, and that feeling of excitement is something that you should savor. During the first few weeks of my freshman year, I, like many of my peers, held on to my “too-cool-for-school” attitude a little too long. But I would encourage you to lose that attitude as quickly as you can and get involved in anything and everything. When I was a freshman a lot of my friends ran for Student Council, but my best friend at the time wasn’t running and I didn’t really know a whole lot about what StuCo was or how it worked so I didn’t run. I shouldn’t have made my decision based on what other people around me were doing, even if they were my best friends.

BEST FRIENDS FOR AWHILE Just like almost everything else, friends change during high school.

A

by hayley battenberg

s a 13-year-old, I thought my friends were always going to be the most important people in my life. We didn’t make Friday night plans — we knew we would be together in a basement, watching bad movies and eating our parents’ food. Our relationships were dependable and strong and, for two years, things remained unchanged. I imagined us graduating high school and college together, working in the same city, going out on weekends, and staying best friends forever. It may have been a far-fetched fantasy, but I had hope. I had assumed that because of our bond we were always going to be on the

by logan coffman

Get out of your comfort zone and try it all.

It wasn’t until the spring of my sophomore year that I finally made the decision to run. It takes guts to get up in front of 400 people and give a speech, anyone will tell you that. But just like anything else in life in order to achieve things you want to achieve there will be situations when you have to get out of your “comfort zone” and be bold. The greatest thing about Northwest is that there is a sport, club or activity for anyone and everyone. I found my niche with Journalism. It was something I always thought was kind of cool, so I gave it a shot. I didn’t know what to expect, what the teacher was like, if any of my friends were in the class. I just did it. And it turned out to be a great decision. Don’t be afraid to fail, to get cut from the basketball team or to not get a part in the school musical. That’s what freshman year is for — making mistakes. It’s how you learn from those mistakes and build character and deal with adversity that helps you to find the person that you truly are.

Freshman year is the opportunity to try things you never thought you could do, play sports you never played. That’s what’s so great about it, it’s an opportunity to mess up. Things that happen during freshman year are not as big of a deal as they may seem at the time. You will have every bit of sophomore and junior year to change your mind about classes, girlfriends, boyfriends, sports, and all the other things that come with public education. Learn from freshman year in order to have the best senior year imaginable. I have a long list of things that I wish I would have done differently my freshman year, but that’s alright, because most people do. The best advice I can give you all is to not be the kid that looks back and says I wish I would have. Be the kid who can say I gave it all my absolute best and did everything I could, and walk out those double doors with memories to cherish and lessons to use in life.

same page about the “big issues.” Moral choices wouldn’t be an issue. Then freshman year arrived; I was terrified. High school was something I’d always looked forward to, but it was only just beginning to hit me that it meant change. Some of those transitions scared me beyond belief. As time passed, I began to realize that Northwest was nothing like I had planned. My friends and I had different classes, joined different clubs and sports and began making new bonds with other people. We were growing up, and that was more intimidating than any senior I’d met. What I hadn’t realized at 13 was how different we all were. We all did the same things in middle school, and I figured that trend would continue into high school. But then my friends got absorbed in their new clubs and sports, their new friends, their new hobbies. Some of them experimented with drugs, some of them

didn’t, and it finally hit me that maybe it was time to let each other go. We weren’t best friends forever after all, and it was probably for the best. I met tons of great new people, and so did they. Each year all friendships transition and morph. None of us are entirely sure who we are yet — new bonds are going to strengthen and wane, if only because we’re discovering ourselves. Be flexible. If you can maintain a healthy friendship for all four years of high school, congrats. If it takes you a few tries to find the people you really connect with, join the club. This is high school, the in between stage for so many of us. We’re not adults, but we’re not children. It’s awkward, scary, thrilling, boring and a plethora of other adjectives. Don’t be afraid of the change. Sticking to the same seven people for four years just isn’t possible, so embrace the transformations, including those of friendship. Columns

07


32.

Watch the marching band’s light show.

photo by bailey kopp

1. Be Student of the Day. Listen to the morning announcements each day to find out who the winner is. 2. Find all 49 of the Waldos hidden in the murals in the academic wing. 3. Become friends with your academic counselor. They’re the one who will help you get classes changed and, during your senior year, find schools and scholarships to apply for. 4. Explore the environmental lab. Better yet, take Environmental Education. 5. Participate in Sleep-in-a-Box, an annual benefit for the Shalom House where students sleep in boxes on the track to raise awareness for homelessness. 6. Take one of Van Rose’s math classes, even if you don’t like math. 7. Be quoted in the yearbook. 8. Persuade a teacher to conduct class outside. 9. Find a NW “family”. (Theater, journalism, football: the possibilities are endless.) 10. Complete a crossword puzzle every day for a week. They are available in the library every morning. Be sure to turn the completed puzzle in to be “crossword winner of the week” 11. Go to at least one game, match or meet for every sport. 12. Participate in the Coalition’s Walk to raise awareness for child soldiers in Uganda. 13. Drink as much cappuccino, hot chocolate and lemonade as you can on CCC’s Cappuccino Days. 14. Buy an Orange Army shirt. They will be for sale in the mall during the first few weeks of school. 15. Get a front row parking spot, but not until later in your high school career. Freshmen are not allowed to park on campus. 16. Look at the art in the gallery located next to the office. 17. Prepare a speech and run to be a Student Council Representative. Freshman elections will be held on Sept. 1. For more information, contact StuCo sponsor Sarah Dent in room 132. 18. Send someone a rose on Valentine’s Day from the rose sale sponsored by Prom Committee.

04

Aug. 15, 2011

19. Tryout for a sport. Even if you don’t think you’re good enough to make the team, you may be surprised. 20. Participate in Adopt-a-Tot along with the rest of your fourth hour class. In late November and early December, classes raise money to buy presents for toddlers in the SM Head Start Program. 21. Eat at The Bistro, a restaurant with food prepared and served by the Broadmoor culinary arts students. 22. Dress up everyday during Spirit Week. Posters around school will list the theme for each day.

things to do In honor of Northwest’s 43rd year, here are 43 things to make sure you accomplish before graduation. 23. See music teacher Doug Talley perform with his jazz quartet. 24. Find an issue you care about and write a letter to the editor of the Northwest Passage. Drop it by room 151 or email to passageletters@smnw.com You may see your letter published in the Passage. 25. Find a cause, some students, a teacher sponsor and start a new club.

41.

26. Find your name on the paw prints taped to the walls around the building during Prom Week. 27. Go out to breakfast on a late start day. 28. Complete at least 23 credits. Most people find this helpful if they want to graduate. 29. Go to Sheridan’s or Sonic after Bonfire. 30. Join a club or take a class that you don’t think you will be good at. You might be surprised. 31. Attend school dances. Homecoming is in the fall, Women Pay All in the winter and Prom in the spring for juniors and seniors. 32. Watch the marching band’s light show. After the final, home football game of the regular season, all the lights in the stadium are turned off and the marching band performs their show with glow sticks on their bodies and instruments. 33. Attend the fall and spring musicals. 34. Attend the talent show hosted by StuCo in the spring or, even better, showcase your talents in the show. 35. Visit smnw.com for all things Northwest. 36. Write and perform an original spoken word poem at the Poetry Slam in the spring. 37. Listen to a book on CD instead of reading it for an English class, but check to make sure it’s not an abridged version first. 38. Overthrow Todd Boren, Drew Magwire and Beth Jantsch’s classes in the canned food drive. They always win. 39. Dance to the beat of the drumline when they perform at football games. 40. Check out a book from the library, but don’t forget to return it. 41. As a class, win the school spirit stick at an assembly. 42. Read every issue of the Northwest Passage cover to cover. 43. Take at least one honors class during your four years at Northwest.

As a class, win the school spirit stick at an assembly. photo by bailey kopp


O T Y A KE YOUR WAY G N I D FIN

are some of the more confusing places to » Here find around school. Match the orange circles and yellow numbers to the ones on the map on the following pages.

NORTHWEST TARDY POLICY Five minutes are allowed for passing periods. Arrival after the final bell will result in a tardy. Tardy students must proceed to the table. The teacher at the tardy table will ask for The student’s ID is recorded the tardy in the book. The consequences received are based upon his or her prior record: first offense: warning second and third offense: detention with teacher fourth plus offense: consequence assigned by attendance office

Students will be sent back to class with a tardy pass. Arriving in class more than 10 minutes after the final bell is considered an absence.

FL 1 ROOM This room used to be the Faculty Lounge, but now it serves as a Social Studies classroom. It’s on the first floor in the third hallway between rooms 131 and 132.

2 THE MALL

The mall is the central hallway on the first floor of the school that connects the east and west doors. The main office and attendance office are located on the east side.

TABLES 3 TARDY The tardy table is located outside the office. If you are late to class, go to the tardy table and get a pass for your teacher. Make sure you take your student ID to the tardy table.

4 ATTENDANCE OFFICE

The attendance office is located across from the main office, under the world clocks. All attendance issues are taken care of here.

5 HALLWAYS

In the academic wing of the school, there are three hallways on each floor. Lockers are located in these hallways. The hall closest to the mall is the first hall. The hall furthest from the mall is the third hall and the hall in the middle is the second hall.

A Key to Finding Your Way

09


LUCKILY,

Luckily, all the classes in the same department are generally in the same area of the building. Here, each department is color-codedto help you find your next class before the bell rings.

Social Studies

5 12 123

122

Science

128

129

121

120

119

118

109

ELEVATOR

102

517 516

108

5 103

106 139

107

LOCKER NUMBERS

104

3

2

162

NURSE

MALL

OFFICE

LITTLE

THEATRE

AUDITORIUM

19 13

GYM 4

OFFICE

12 14 16 18

11

GYM 3

3

ATTEN.

4

KITCHEN 10

156

105

CAFETERIA

GYM 1 GYM 2

155

163

POOL

101

LIBRARY

154

157

Special Ed

153

117 137

116

152

138

338 1

ELL

5

LOCKER NUMBERS

115

151

869 868

127

114

111

131 130

126

112

113

W

LOCKER NUMBERS

692 339

Physical Education FACS

5

110

Business

1

M

103B

Math

124

FL

132

1054 693

Foreign Languages Fine Arts

133

136

135

150

English

134

MAP KEY

15

STAGE 4

17 7B

9

8

7

7A

6

34

30 32 31 33

1 FLOOR

36

ST

10

Aug. 16, 2011

LOBBY

37

38

39


2ND FLOOR 229

230

2108 1733

221

223

224

218

209

1565 1564

213

214

215

208

207

206

203

GIRLS’ TEAM LOCKER ROOM

239

241

1233 1232

LOCKER NUMBERS

202

238

237

LOCKER NUMBERS

204

BOYS’ LOCKER ROOM

POOL

234

216

217

1400 1055

201

225 236

211

210

1901 1900 235

222

1732 1401

212

233

226

LOCKER NUMBERS

220

219

227

228

243

231

240

232

205

242

J

I

TRAINING ROOM

L

K

GIRLS’

LOCKER ROOM D G BOILER ROOM

BOYS’ TEAM LOCKER ROOM

RECEIVING ROOM

C

E F

B

N M FA OO R

WRESTLING ROOM

A

AA

BASEMENT A Key to Finding Your Way

11


how to

JOIN A CLUB

Academic Decathlon Sponsor: Elaine Mick Student leaders: Alex Dang Students study all aspects of a historical period and then participate in competitions over the material. Amnesty International Sponsor: David Hunt Members raise awareness for international human rights issues, including hosting Jamnesty, a benefit concert held in January. Arts and Crafts Club Sponsor: Ben Pabst Student leaders: Lucas Verschelden Members make crafts like Thanksgiving turkeys and make cards for children with cancer. Business Professionals of America Sponsor: Jan Berg Student leaders: Sunny Dharod Members compete in business competitions simulating real business situations. Categories Sponsor: TBD Student leaders: Alex Dang and Lucas Verschelden Members compete in televised competitions similar to jeopardy. Chemistry Club Sponsor: Susan Hallstrom

1. Read through this list to find clubs you are interested in joining. 2. Listen to the morning announcements or contact the sponsor or student leaders for more information, like when and where the club meets. 3. Attend a meeting and introduce yourself to the other members.

Students meet to discuss chemistryrelated topics. Club 8 Sponsor: Fran Koenigsdorf Student leaders: Brianna Leyden and Hannah Wooten Members study vocab and play Minuteto-Win-It games. Club 121 Sponsor: Ken Summers Student leader: Aaron Terrill Christian students gather to connect with local churches and youth groups. Coalition Sponsor: Lindsay Kincaid Student leaders: Caleb Amundson and Victoria Banks Members raise awareness for human rights causes including Save Darfur, Love 146 and Invisible Children. Cougars United Sponsor: Jennifer Bilyeu Student leaders: Andrew Bateman Members broaden their minds by being exposed to other cultures. Cougars Uniting Beginning Students (C.U.B.S.) Sponsor: Susan Hartman Student leaders: Sunny Dharod and Timmy Li Members welcome new students to Northwest.

DECA Sponsor: Bob Jensen Members participate learn to market and present products for competitions. Disc Golf Club Sponsor: Melissa Terryberry Student leaders: Connor Mitts and Marcus Paccapaniccia Members meet to play disc golf. Fellowship of Christian Athletes Sponsor: Mike Cooper Student leaders: Colton Almos, Sam Arnold, Dallas Ernsdorff, Lyndsey Harrold, Shannon Knoll, Jessica Leichter, Davis Millard and Stephanie Smith Members meet to discuss how faith relates to athletics. French Club Sponsor: Leslie Ransdall Student leaders: Jenny Nelson and Toni Ruo Students with an interest in French meet to discuss the language and culture. Future Teachers of America Sponsor: Beth Koelker Student leaders: Megan Gasser and Kaycee Greenwood Students meet to discuss teaching carreers. Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Sponsor: Jennifer Quick Members participate in several LGBT youth awareness events during the year. German Club Sponsor: Karin Masenthin Student leaders: Abby Hoelting Current and former German students meet to discuss the culture and language. Harry Potter Club Sponsor: Jennifer Aytes Student leaders: Haley Jennison Members meet to discuss the Harry Potter series.

photo by ara cho

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Aug. 16, 2011

Health Careers Club Sponsor: Sarah Moles


Student leaders: Emelie Rogers Students are prepared to go into a health care career and receive information on how to shadow doctors, etc. H.E.L.P.E.R.S Sponsor: Deborah Mayer Student leaders: Chelsie Williamson Members raise money to protect wildlife and the environment. Interact Club Sponsor: Jan Berg Student leaders: Edelawit Hussien Members work on community service projects. Key Club Sponsor: Carolyn LaFever and Janine Deines Student leaders: Melissa Balino, Shannon Knoll and Jessica Leichter Members participate in community service projects through Kiwanis, an organization that promotes character building, leadership, inclusiveness and involvement in the community. Knitting and Crocheting Club Sponsor: Connie Lutz and Susan Nagel Members meet to work on knitting and crocheting projects. Latin Club Sponsor: Joe Gehrer Current and former Latin students meet to discuss the culture and prepare for Latin Convention. Math Club Sponsor: Aaron Sayers Student leaders: Timmy Li and Vicky Liu Members participate in local math competitions. Mural (Art) Club Sponsor: David Hunt Student leaders: Jesse Black, Shannon Doughty, Mary Hellmer and Maggie Stuart Members create and repair murals in the hallways throughout the school. Penpoint Sponsor: Ben Pabst Student leaders: Sean Amos Members choose the writing, photography and artwork that is published in Penpoint Literary Magazine. Photo Club Sponsor: Melinda Heaton

Members meet to discuss their photography. Pilates Club Sponsor: Elaine Mick Student leaders: Caitlin Beatty, Rachel Hoelting and Edelawit Hussien Members meet to do pilates. Poetry Club Sponsor: Lindsay Kincaid Student leaders: Laura Assmann and Paige Cook Members meet to discuss and share spoken-word poetry. Robotics Sponsor: Charleen Mankameyer Student leaders: Sean Amos Members design and build a robot to compete at a regional competition. Science Olympiad Sponsor: Ziba Vissoughi Student leaders: Sean Amos Members participate in various regional mechanical, electrical, electronic and scientific competitions. Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Sponsor: Fran Koenigsdorf Student leaders: Emily Maddox Members meet to listen to and discuss Beatles music. Skills USA Sponsor: Howard Newcomb Student leaders: Preston Rabe, Luke Schnefke, Colby Weishaar Students compete in events of technology and problem solving to create a better workforce in the future. Spanish Club Sponsor: Alicia Roberts Current and former Spanish students meet to discuss the language and culture. Spirit Club Sponsors: Drew Magwire Student Leaders: Liz Nelson, Jared Shafer and Taryn Vogel Members help run pep assemblies as well as support NW clubs and teams. Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) Sponsor: Susan Hallstrom Members promote alcohol and drugfree events for students and create the Chain of Life. Student Library Advisory Board Sponsor: Carolyn LaFever

photo by daniel magwire

Student leaders: Nina Gramajo and Simrun Hundal Members help select books to purchase for the library as well as organize the book fair and author speakers events. The Girl Effect Sponsor: Deb Brewer Student leaders: Zoe Phelps and Ashley Vining Members work to empower women on a local, national and international level. Thespian troupe #888 Sponsor: Keli Rogers Thespian Officer Board: Karen Baltzley and Savannah Bell Members perform in and do crew work for all the stage productions as well as participate in other acting, singing and improv events. Ukulele Club Sponsor: Drew Magwire, Mike Pisani and Scot Schwartz Student leaders: Isabel Zacharias Members learn how to play songs together on the ukulele. Ukuleles are suggested but not required. Woodworking Club Sponsor: Mark Schirmer Members meet to work on woodworking skills. Yoga Club: Sponsor: Janine Deines Student leaders: Sarah Crosley and Lauren Severance Members meet to practice yoga techniques. Clubs

13


a new student’s guide to

SPORTS FALL » FOOTBALL

GYMNASTICS

GIRLS’ TENNIS

GIRLS’ GOLF

VOLLEYBALL

BOYS’ SOCCER

Aaron Barnett

Karen Lee

Van Rose

CROSS COUNTRY Van Rose

Ken Clow

D. O’Nele

Todd Boren

WINTER » BOWLING

BOYS’ BASKETBALL

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

BOYS’ SWIM

Britt Haney

Jeff Dickson

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Aug. 16, 2011

Mike Rose

Matt Wolfe

WRESTLING

Howard Newcomb


SPRING » BOYS’ GOLF

Jim Bamburg

GYMNASTICS Karen Lee

TRACK + FIELD Mike Cooper

SOFTBALL

BOYS’ TENNIS

BASEBALL

GIRLS’ SWIM

Mark Balderston

Rich Kuzydym

BEYOND THE GAME

Ken Clow

Matt Wolfe

GIRLS’ SOCCER Todd Boren

Joining a high school sports team, is more valuable than one may think it to be.

I remember sitting in the wrestling room during a core workout for distance track. I was with a close-knit group of my friends, called “Group 3.” As we did our workout we started to get a little off task, cracking jokes and laughing hysterically. At that moment, one of my friends laughed out the words, “I love track, and this is why.” That was when I realized why I enjoy running cross country and track. I love the atmosphere and the people. All my coaches and teammates have made running my favorite high school experience. As a freshman, I didn’t realize how important it was to get involved in athletics. I had the opportunity to join cross country my freshman year, but was hesitant. At the time, I failed to find the fun in running miles and miles on end. But when I began running distance track in the spring, I discovered that it was more fun than anything else I had done and not because I love running six miles every day. It was because of all the friends I made. We realize that we are a part of something bigger than ourselves. There isn’t room on a cross country or track team for people to have big egos and be self centered, which is why we’ve become so close. But cross country and track aren’t the only sports that allow athletes to form close bonds with each other. Watching other sports from the stands, I have seen countless celebrations and pre-game rituals from our own sports teams, that show the close bonds our athletes have with each other. High school sports aren’t about how good you are, or how well your team performs. The most important aspect of high school athletics is just being apart of a team that all the members care about. Participating in an organized high school sport is an experience you will never have just sitting in a classroom. Sports provide a different sense of camaraderie that you cannot find anywhere else.

by brady klein

Sports

15


photo by bailey kopp

how to

RIDE THE COUGAR COASTER

1. Step into your imaginary Cougar Coaster cart. 2. Reach up and gently pull down on the safety bar until you hear a “click�. You are now secured into the Coaster. 3. As the Cougar Coaster begins the ascent, lean back and shake your arms as if the coaster is rattling on the track. 4. As the coaster reaches the top, throw your hands in the air, lean forward and scream for optimal awesomeness as the coaster descends (see photo).

5. Lean to the right, then left, then right, then left again as the Cougar Coaster takes turns at high velocity. Then repeat steps three and four. 6. Following the pattern shown, use your arms to illustrate the Cougar Coaster pulling off a loop-the-loop. 7. Imitate someone noisily vomiting. Then repeat steps three, four and five 8. As the ride comes to a sudden halt, throw your body forward.

Northwest Passage [Freshman Magazine]  

A special edition of the Northwest Passage