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Stoke-on-Trent

ISSUE 17: SEPTEMBER 2010

Our City

ALL SYSTEMS

COVER PICTURE: Zara Latif, left, and Jade Weston – both students at the REACH short-stay school in Trent Vale – celebrate the green light for the Building Schools for the Future programme. They are pictured on the site where a new £4.3 million complex will be built for the REACH school.

T E G O T Y T I C

d l i u b o t £250m s l o o h c s new SEE CENTRE PAGES

0 0 3 £ rs n i e h w c o ou 22 t e V c E s n G d a r Ch alfoSEE PA H


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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

Determined to fight for progress in difficult times

Grand designs for historic Spode site

A panoramic view of the former Spode pottery factory which will be cleared to make way for exciting new developments.

By City Council Leader Councillor MOHAMMED PERVEZ THE tremendous news that Stoke-on-Trent’s Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme is to go-ahead must spur us on to make sure these much-needed buildings are built and opened as soon as possible. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to spend £250 million on transforming secondary education in the city with new buildings and new ways of working. Better quality education will have a knock-on effect for our young people and for the regeneration of Stoke-on-Trent for decades to come. But at one stage we were genuinely concerned that the Government’s cost savings programme might mean the funding already committed would be taken away. At this time I wrote on behalf of the city council to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government. In it I pressed the city’s case for special consideration explaining that it is amongst the most deprived areas in the country, weekly wages are significantly below both regional and national averages, unemployment is above the national average and it has been badly affected by the recession. It proves that it is worth fighting the city’s corner, to make sure we get our fair share of support from the Government to help us meet the challenges of the future. We all know there are difficult decisions to be made on how we can save money to help the country cut its budget deficit. But another challenge is to make sure the city continues to prosper and move forward during the most difficult times. We have created a new Local Enterprise Partnership with Staffordshire County Council and private sector partners which will replace the regional development agency Advantage West Midlands and take forward the work of the North Staffordshire Regeneration Partnership, set to be disbanded. Our decision was based on the economic benefits for our city and the need to accelerate the transformation we have already started. As well as consulting the public on what city council services they value most and which they might be prepared to see cut, the cabinet has also announced a series of important achievements which will be completed by the end of March 2011. Our City is printed on recycled paper. When you have finished with this publication please help the environment by passing it on to a friend or recycling it.

Former pottery land at centre of regeneration plans LEGENDARY piece of Stoke’s history will soon be playing a major role in securing a better future for the town – thanks to the development of the former Spode pottery site.

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vision for the new Stoke Town Masterplan, and subsequently the URBED design team – who were behind the popular Bristol waterfront Temple Quay 2 development – were selected by a panel of experts which included city council representatives.

A masterplan for the redevelopment of the town centre will be ready early next year, and the ten-acre piece of land where the famous Spode factory once stood in Elenora Street will be at the heart of the proposals. The major regeneration programme will transform the town over the next 10 to 15 years – and residents have been given their say about what they would like to see happen. The former Spode site, which has remained empty since the company went into administration in 2008, has been purchased by Stoke-on-Trent City Council as part of the plans to breathe new life into the area. Meanwhile, the Spode brand is once again being produced in the town by Portmeirion Group. Residents were able to express their views at an exhibition of the five short-listed design teams’

Aspirational Councillor Mervin Smith, Cabinet Member for City Development (Regeneration) said: “Spode offers a fantastic opportunity to revitalise Stoke town and it is important that any regeneration undertaken is sympathetic to the history of the town and in keeping with needs of the rest of the town centre.” Stoke Regeneration Manager Kevin Bell said: “The town of Stoke enjoys a wealth of industrial heritage, has great connections with the University Quarter and Stoke railway station and is the civic heart of the city. “We are taking an aspirational approach to the town with inspired design that will attract the investment needed to develop a thriving town full of opportunity.”

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: City Council Leader Mohammed Pervez, left, and Councillor Mervin Smith, Cabinet Member for City Development (Regeneration), visit the former Spode site site after the agreement had been signed to acquire the land.

Residents have their say on spending priorities LOCAL people have taken part in the Let’s Talk consultation exercise to ask residents how they think the city council should make a predicted £30million worth of cuts from its budget. A copy of the Let’s Talk consultation was delivered to 120,000 homes in the last issue of Our City, people could comment online at the city council’s website, and teams of officers and city councillors have been out and about listening to the public’s views.

Meeting dates are now online A full list of dates and times of full city council meetings and committee meetings can be found on our website stoke.gov.uk/meetingdates

City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez, who talked to members of the public, said: “People understood the fact that we needed to make cuts and savings because of the national situation. “The figure of £30m we have discussed is an informed estimate and it was important that we held these discussions before the Government announces the results of its spending review later in the year. “But as well as identifying where we can

make cuts, everyone who lives and works in the city can help us to save money by working together. For instance, if nobody dropped any litter, we would not need to pay so much to tidy up our streets. So people can help us to protect the services they value by not creating a need to spend money elsewhere.” Results of the Let’s Talk consultation will be published in the next issue of Our City.

Give us your feedback on this issue of Our City by emailing ourcity@stoke.gov.uk or write to: FREEPOST Our City.


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SEPTEMBER 2010

Our City

Ex-guardsman squares up to

Down Your Way

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News from South Eastern Neighbourhood

youth job challenge NDY Johnson is squaring up to the challenges of his new job as a Youth Development Worker with military precision. As a former Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) with the Coldstream Guards he is using people skills honed in the Army to bring out the best in local teenagers. Already during the first few months of his work in the South Western Neighbourhood, expert planning by Andy has given youngsters two highly valuable and character-forming experiences. A group of 17 young people from St Peter’s High School, Penkhull, accompanied by three war veterans, travelled to Dunkirk for the 70th anniversary of the historic World War II evacuation, as part of an inter-generational initiative called Project 1940. In addition six young people ran the Potters Half Marathon with Andy to raise £500 for the Douglas Macmillan Hospice, after doing team building with Army survival gear at a camp-out in the Peak District. Andy’s work with 13-19-year-olds, helping them to achieve wellbeing by becoming more rounded people, has a common link with his distinguished career in the Army.

FLORENCE AND LONGTON: Part of the area has been designated a Section 30 Dispersal Zone to help police deal with antisocial behaviour – 40 posters have been put up mapping the order area and outlining police powers to move groups on and return under 16s to their place of residence. Dispersal zone conditions will remain in place until 25 January next year.

MEIR: Bowlers from a 150-year-old club are on course to move to a permanent new clubhouse and green. The Kings Arms Bowling Club lost its last home more than 12 months ago to a health centre development. But it now has planning permission to build on old allotments next to Meir Sports and Social Club. Funding of £50,000 is coming from council ward budgets and Stoke-on-Trent NHS Primary Care Trust.

Brilliant young people After joining up at the age of 16, he served with the Coldstream Guards for 24 years. He taught as a military instructor at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst for four years and served in Iraq as a Drill Sergeant, carrying out security sector reform. Having reached the prestigious post of RSM, Andy commanded 650 soldiers in Afghanistan in a multi-faceted role involving frontline leadership, training and community influence and welfare. The 41-year-old, who decided to change his career path last year, said: “I have always been passionate about young people achieving their full potential. “The Army’s membership is about 80 per cent under the age of 25, and the young people I worked with in the Coldstream Guards were not very different to the brilliant young people on the streets of Stoke. “At Sandhurst there were numerous international students, and I worked with people from different cultural backgrounds, many of them from Asian and Muslim countries.” So far in his new job Andy is especially proud of the way the students from St Peter’s High School have benefited from a trip to World War II battlefronts in France and

Two students from St Peter’s High School pictured during their visit to a Commonwealth War Cemetery at Arras, France.

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NORMACOT: Outdoor play Josh O’Rourke, aged 14, is shown how to cook in the field by Youth Development Worker Andy Johnson during a survival training course at Park Hall Country Park.

Belgium. The trip formed part of the school’s weekly lunchtime history group. Students and veterans together laid a total of 11 wreaths at five locations, including the Menin Gate First World War memorial at Ypres in Belgium, and on each occasion the young people read a short passage of war

poetry. Now the students, parents and teachers are planning a Project 1940 presentation night and the young people who made the historical wartime pilgrimage will play a leading role in this year’s Cenotaph Parade on Remembrance Sunday, after which they plan to host a veterans’ reception at Stoke Youth Centre. Andy said: “The young people and veterans on the trip were constantly together, swapping stories and experiences and taking part in various activities side by side. These young people have had a life changing experience and they will be better citizens for it.” At the centre of Andy’s work is an ambition to help the young people of Stoke-on-Trent prepare themselves for their lives ahead. “During the camping in the Peak District we discussed various life issues and the main aim of my youth development work is to give young people a successful start in life,” he added. Do you think that young people benefit from making visits to historic war-time locations to learn about the sacrifices made to preserve our freedom? Let us know your views – write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

facilities at the Westfield Children’s Centre and Nursery School have been transformed. The space has been re-vamped to feature natural materials and includes play hills, tunnels, dens as well as state-of-the-art sensory equipment. The idea of the play area, which is accessible to children with additional needs, is to spark creativity and imagination.

LONGTON NORTH: A Respect week has been staged in five streets to tackle a variety of issues. Council officers joined forces with the police and Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service to carry out benefit checks, address litter and fly tipping problems and to offer fire assessments. The operation centred on Waterdale Grove, Rochester Road, St Mary’s Road, Bambury Street and Caroline Street.

MEIR: Free fitness advice, health checks and membership were on offer as Meir Fitness Centre staged an open day to attract new customers.Visitors were able to get blood pressure and weight checks at the fully-equipped centre. For details call 01782 235177.


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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

HILDREN at a Stoke-on-Trent primary school have celebrated a year of highflying lessons in a specially equipped aeroplane in their playground.

Teachers and pupils at Kingsland Primary School in Bucknall organised a special party complete with cake and balloons as they remembered the day their decommissioned Short S-360 passenger plane first landed on site. It was lowered into place by crane. Youngsters had help from aerospace designer Howard Guy, who worked on David and Victoria Beckham’s private jet, as they set about re-designing it as a classroom. The plane, kitted out with a state of the art touch-screen television, notebook laptops, a green screen and a recording studio in the cockpit, is the perfect place to learn IT skills. Special projects involving filming and editing help the children improve literacy, numeracy, history and geography as they also gain valuable problem solving and critical thinking skills for later life. Pupils named the plane Phoenix and all 375 children aged

Pupils just love highflying lessons in classroom with a big difference four to 11 get the chance to have exciting and innovative lessons inside. Deputy headteacher Sara Goddard said: “It’s working really well. The children enjoy coming to school and working hard in the plane. They love it. It makes lessons more exciting and really special.” Current Year Five pupils will mentor the rest of the school next year in how to get the best out of lessons in Phoenix. Ten-year-old Jaydn Wall from 5W said: “It’s like being in a different dimension. It’s really awesome. It’s easier to learn and you can get the computers out which is better than the old sheets.” His classmate Courtney Hood, aged 10, is also impressed. “I love the plane,” he said, “It’s better than being in a normal classroom. You can imagine you’re going to another place.” Jordan Houghton, also 10, summed up the feelings of many

Winging their way to another exciting lesson are Kingsland Primary School pupils Jaydn Wall, left, Courtney Hood and Jordan Houghton with the aeroplane classroom in the background. when he said: “It’s a different way of learning. It’s great that we’re the only school with a plane and the teachers make it fun to go into.” The “Kings Wings” project, undertaken with partners Pablo Productions and Creative Partnerships Stoke-on-Trent, has attracted worldwide interest and

nationwide praise from the teaching profession. The school, which has just recorded its most improved SATS results and has been oversubscribed this year for the first time ever, is just completing its latest project… Kings Swings, a new playground and leisure facility for community use.

Jaydn and Courtney in the plane’s cockpit.

FREE

Support and advice for families

Your local Family Information Service provides free, friendly and impartial information, advice, assistance and signposting on a wide variety of subjects including: ● Childcare – we can support you through the whole process of choosing a childcare provider that is right for the needs of you and your family. ● Family friendly financial benefits – including what is available to help with childcare costs. ● Parental rights and entitlements. ● Signposting – advice on the many support services available across the city and much, much more. So if you are responsible for a child or young person aged 0-19 and are struggling to find the answers to your questions, please call us free or email us at: fis@stoke.gov.uk

More and more young people are flying the nest thanks to Orbit HomeBuy Agents. We are the HomeBuy Agent for Shropshire and Staffordshire, and we help people of all ages in all sorts of circumstances to find their dream home. In this role, we act as the first point of contact for all those seeking a home through one of the range of HomeBuy low-cost home ownership and discounted market rent products. For full details visit our website at www.orbithomebuyagents.co.uk or call us on 03458 50 20 50. Open the door to your new home with Orbit HomeBuy Agents

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Terms and conditions apply – ask for details. Orbit HomeBuy Agents is managed by Orbit Homes (2020) Limited, a member of Orbit Group Limited which is an exempt charity registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965.


SEPTEMBER 2010

Our pledges E: G D PLE

Clean and green another 100 sites across the city.

GE:To complete the refurbishment D E of the Mitchell Memorial PL Theatre.

E: G D PLE To build new homes at Coalville, Blurton and Fegg Hayes.

GE: D E PL To provide more activities for young people.

Cabinet promise to deliver key projects by next March OUNCILLORS have unveiled a pledge list of good news for the people of Stoke-on-Trent... initiatives which will bear fruit between now and the end of March 2011.

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The schedule of Key Deliverables – important steps forward for the whole city across a wide range of services – has been fine tuned by City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez and the other nine members of the Cabinet. Councillor Pervez said: “It’s no secret that we are having to make some tough decisions and come up with ways of significantly reducing our spending. “But there are many good things going on in Stoke-on-Trent which are improving quality of life in our city, and we are publishing our pledges to promote this good news.” The list of pledges is separated into commitments on Housing, Education, Employment, Health, Safety, Cleanliness and Value for Money. Among important pledges to be completed before 31 March 2011 are to: ● Deliver 100 Extra Care housing units to support older people.

● Build new homes in Coalville, Blurton and Fegg Hayes. ● Work in partnership to provide 100 affordable homes. ● Start a new adult learning programme. ● Open the new City of Stoke-on-Trent Sixth Form College. ● Start work on the new REACH short stay school at Trent Vale. ● Start the refurbishment of Haywood Engineering College. ● Support 2,000 people with advice on training and employment. ● Help 500 people into permanent jobs through the city’s JET centres. ● Provide more summer activities for young people. ● Introduce 11 more No Cold Calling Zones. ● Train 1,200 staff in safeguarding adults. ● Improve services for people with learning difficulties. ● Complete the refurbishment of the Mitchell Memorial Theatre. ● Start work on the development of a new city centre bus station.

● Hold the fourth Stoke-on-Trent Film and Animation Festival. ● Clean and green another 100 sites across the city. Councillor Pervez said: “There is so much happening in our city that we want to send out a very clear and positive message – that in spite of tough financial times we are driving forward. “Regeneration will continue in the city centre, the University Quarter and on our housing estates. Alongside that progress, people will also see the benefits of our efforts to make the city safer, cleaner and healthier, with better education, homes and job prospects.” The Cabinet meets regularly and in public to discuss important issues and decide on policies to take the city forward. Important issues up for discussion at Cabinet meetings over a three month period are published on the city council website at stoke.gov.uk/forwardplan The next issue of Our City will include a feature on how the Cabinet, and the 60 members of the full council, set policies for the future.

Our City

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Everyone needs to work together for the good of Stoke-on-Trent By City Council Chief Executive

John van de Laarschot PICK up any newspaper, listen to any radio station, watch any TV news programme and there’s a good chance you will see or hear something about reductions, cutbacks and financial uncertainty. It’s important to recognise the gravity of the situation ahead, but it would be wrong to ignore the positive achievements we can all make if we work together for the good of Stoke-on-Trent. We need to show strong political and managerial leadership, to be open, transparent and accountable in everything we do. Changing the way the city council works is something we want to achieve sooner rather than later. Our Transformational Change programme is already highlighting areas where we need to improve. Together with our partners we are already seeing some positive results in how people respond to the work we do. Our own standards of work and responses to people’s queries and concerns are improving but we will not stop until we are delivering what I call “customer admired services”. The key to that is a better understanding of what you want from us. The Let's Talk consultation has given us valuable feedback about what you value highest amongst city council services. We need to know what your priorities are when it comes to how your money is spent and we are determined to incorporate as much of your feedback as possible into our financial plans.

Stronger and better The news that we have been given the go ahead to rebuild and refurbish our secondary and special schools after months of uncertainty will come as a huge relief to everyone. Couple that with the news that our Children and Young People’s Services have now been bought back “in house” following the Government’s formal intervention being lifted, and there is a renewed confidence that education in Stoke-on-Trent is moving in the right direction. Our 2010 celebrations continue, highlighted in July by the visit of the Archbishop of York Dr. John Sentamu. There will be more events to round off the centenary year, including a spectacular finale event, details of which will be released soon. 2010 will also be remembered for another successful showing by Stoke-on-Trent at Tatton Park Flower Show. Our display this year marked 100 years of the federation of the six towns, and was awarded a gold medal and Best in Show at the prestigious event. These are occasions we should all take great pride in, and they show that we really do have something to shout about in Stoke-on-Trent. However tough the future may be, we must always view the glass as half full and not half empty and be rightfully proud of our city, its people and its successes. Together we have the ability to ride out the storm and to emerge with a stronger and better city – the City of Stoke-on-Trent.


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SEPTEMBER 2010 Ten metal benches have been installed alongside the paths.

BELT AND BRACES POLICY: Lord Mayor Councillor Denver Tolley is taking no chances in the trouser department.

One of the two bridges which have been repaired.

Residents transform

city beauty spot (with a little help and cash from the city council)

P Lord Mayor braces himself for the rest of his civic engagements AS wardrobe malfunctions go it was pretty spectacular. How I felt for the Lord Mayor of Leicester Councillor Colin Hall when he rose to give a speech to a library full of school children... and his trousers fell down. He had written on Twitter that he had been thinking of a way to promote his diet. His prayers were surely answered as news of his state-of-undress – caused, he said, because he had lost weight with the help of fitness guru Rosemary Conley –

was reported in every national newspaper. Still, every cloud has a silver lining. It’s often said we learn from other people’s misfortunes, and our very own Lord Mayor Councillor Denver Tolley has taken his colleague’s mishap on board. Denver said:“When I saw the story, I thought ‘There but for the grace of God go I!’ “So I made the decision to make sure I wear braces on all my civic engagements for the rest of the year!”

A cats’ chorus with a difference IT was not so much a cats’ chorus but more of a chorus for a cat. That’s what a city council environmental health officer encountered when he went to investigate a complaint from a resident about very noisy neighbours who had their music system turned up to full volume. The explanation for the ear-piercing blast was that their pet cat was unwell and classical music played loud soothed poor little Tiddles.

Well, that’s OK then, I hear you all cry. Or rather, of course, it is not – as the council officer politely explained. The bizarre excuse for playing music inconsiderately loud does beg the question how did the cat’s owners know the music was making the feline feel better? I suppose our intrepid officer could have asked the cat if he had requested the volume be pumped up. The answer would surely have been “ME – HOW?”.

EOPLE power has helped breathe new life into a Stoke-on-Trent beauty spot. Cockster Brook Valley bordering Heron Cross, Blurton and Longton has been transformed in just 10 months from an overgrown, muddy mess with few facilities into a peaceful haven for locals and wildlife alike.

The city council supported businessman Alan Alcock to set up the Friends of Cockster Brook when he and his wife moved back to the Potteries after 22 years in Scotland. He Alan Alcock, Chairman of the Friends of Cockster Brook, with his dogs Rhu knew action was needed and Pepsie, and Group Treasurer Paul Capewell, second right, are pictured after struggling around the at the beauty spot with city council Area Implementation Officers Kevin site with their two rescue Hawkins and Denise Cheadle. dogs, Rhu and Pepsie. “The paths were overgrown and when it drainage put in, the car park has than we could ever have dreamed rained they became impassable. been re-vamped, two bridges have of so the highest praise goes to There was no-where to rest, just been repaired, a gate has been council employees Paul Capewell one bench and that didn’t have a replaced, all 14 entrances now and Kevin Hawkins for their back in it,” said Alan, 65, who is have litter and dog fouling bins, support and encouragement.” chairman of the group. volunteers have cleared the site of Area Implementation Officer Now, with £20,000 from the rubbish during three litter picks Kevin Hawkins, based at Fenton city council’s Blurton and and 10 metal benches have just Local Centre, said: “The Friends Longton South ward budgets and been installed. helped us realise how highly £6,000 raised via city council “It’s a piece of land that divides valued this area is to residents so employee Paul Capewell, the the three communities which it’s only right that we commit to Friends committee of eight border it but we’re determined to improving it just like they have. people has begun turning make it an area which unites “The fantastic improvements Cockster Brook into a nature them. This is an important place. that have already been made and reserve everyone can be proud of. Somewhere to be cherished,” said the plans they have for the future Alan. “As a group, we’ve achieved show just how community groups Two-and-a-half kilometres of far more in a short space of time can make a big difference if they paths have been re-instated and get the right support.” The Friends are now looking Bins have been installed for funding for more big projects. at all 14 entrances. There are plans to dredge a silted up pond, improve reed beds and install pond platforms. The group is also encouraging the involvement of local schools. The community group meets at St Paul’s Church in Longton Hall Road on the second Monday of each month at 7pm. For more information call Alan Alcock on 07810 308782 or Kevin Hawkins on 01782 233265.


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SEPTEMBER 2010

Effective policing starts

at the grassroots

Former Port Vale stars Shane Tudor and Robin Hulbert have successfully ran a second 15-week course aimed at developing and guiding young people in the area. Three-hour sessions have been staged once a week at a football development centre. Healthy eating, help towards courses and employment issues were all on the agenda. Lessons learned are then fed back to families which benefits the community as a whole.

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However the Chief Constable pledged: “Any decisions I take will be based on avoiding adverse impact on the services we deliver. I’m determined to ensure our local communities continue to receive value for money, quality services from their local police and I am committed to protecting front-line services, as far as I possibly can.” By “front-line” Mr Cunningham does not just mean the bobby on the beat or in a patrol car, the Police Community Support Officer, the police station inquiry desk staff or the person who answers the phone when someone in trouble calls the police. “Behind the scenes much of the work we do investigating serious crime is veiled from the public who only become aware of what we do when there is an arrest.

Down Your Way PACKMOOR AND CHELL:

E planned to be a church minister, became a religious education teacher instead and now Mike Cunningham is completing his first 12 months as Chief Constable of Staffordshire.

Value for money

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News from Northern Neighbourhood

Chief insists officers are visible and accessible to the people

Arriving from his native Lancashire where he served for 22 years, rising to the rank of Deputy Chief Constable, Mr Cunningham has spent a lot of time on the streets of Stoke-on-Trent – not preaching, but listening to what people of the city expect from their police force. It’s part of his gospel that effective policing starts at the grassroots – in the local community. “I’m keen that my officers should be among the people, visible and accessible,” he said. “Effective policing is built on the relationship with local neighbourhoods. From that springs effective policing in dealing with organised crime, drugs and terrorism. How we deal with local neighbourhood issues forges a trusting relationship that is the bedrock on which we build the police service.” Impending public spending cuts mean Mr Cunningham is being asked to deliver the same high levels of service for less.

Our City

BALL GREEN: BMX riders now have their track back after a re-vamp has been completed at virtually no cost. Re-surfacing was paid for from the ward budget with other work carried out by the city council, Wildlife Management Services, the Werrington Young Offenders Institution and N and J Tree Services. Children from Ball Green Primary School were the first to try out the track and prizes were given in a poster design competition. WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP: Staffordshire Chief Constable Mike Cunningham and Stoke-on-Trent City Council Chief Executive John van de Laarschot pictured outside the civic offices at Stoke.

“For example, look at the success Operation Nemesis has had in combating drugs in Stoke-on-Trent. That’s based on weeks and months of patient police work and intelligence gathering. “I can assure people that we will continue to have the skills, professionalism and resources to investigate serious crime effectively.” Neither will the cuts affect the way Staffordshire Police will protect the public from incidents of public disorder. They will continue to be trained to deal with public disturbances – like the English Defence League demonstration in the city centre earlier this year. The Chief Constable’s own Communities First programme is already re-shaping the force to meet the challenges ahead by replacing four territorial divisions and 21 neighbourhood policing units with local policing teams. Neighbourhood beat officers will be stationed in the same area for at least two years, and spend 85 per cent of their time on duty in

GOLDENHILL AND SANDYFORD: Suspicious

the community, allowing them more time to tackle the issues that matter to local communities. Mr Cunningham is talking to other agencies about sharing public buildings from which they will provide all neighbourhood services under one roof – not, he insists, a move to close police stations, but to make the police even more accessible.

Quality service And the Chief Constable dismissed rumours that Staffordshire Constabulary is to merge with another force. “That’s off the agenda,” he said. “But we are looking at ways of working with other police forces as well as other agencies.” Over the last 12 months antisocial behaviour incidents in Stoke-on-Trent fell by a fifth, while overall crime was down by over 11 per cent and detection rates for serious violence rose sharply. Satisfaction rates are equally impressive – 97 per cent of victims of crime in the city were

satisfied with the service’s response, while 86 per cent of victims of antisocial behaviour were satisfied with the service’s response and how they dealt with it. “The public has an appetite for a high quality of service, and that is good,” said Mr Cunningham. “But there is no room for complacency and we must constantly look at ways of improving all aspects of our service.” The Chief Constable studied Theology at Durham University, intending to join the clergy, but before graduating in 1985 he changed his mind and for two years was an RE teacher at a Blackpool comprehensive before joining the police. He explained: “The link is that I’ve always wanted a job that makes a difference and improves people’s lives. I bring my personal beliefs to the job in the sense that I have a vocation and desire to help the most vulnerable and to protect people. As far as I’m concerned there is no finer vocation than that.”

callers are set to become a thing of the past now a No Cold Calling zone has been set up. Trading standards, fire and neighbourhood police officers joined forces to set up the scheme. There are warning signs on lamp posts and residents are being supplied with door and window stickers. Residents in the area, when filling in a questionnaire, have welcomed the scheme.

TUNSTALL: Fun and games were the order of the day at the Goldenhill Community Fun Day. People enjoyed a variety of activities at the event organised by Sandyford and Goldenhill Residents Association and opened by Staffordshire’s Chief Fire Officer Peter Dartford.

NORTON: Children from Norton Primary School joined Port Vale’s mascot Boomer the dog to officially launch the new play area at the Norton Activity Centre. The Playbuilder scheme funded the main part of the play area while ward budgets paid for the toddler section.


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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

Boxing sessions help knock out

antisocial behaviour B

OXING has proved so successful in helping cut antisocial behaviour in Norton that city council-funded sessions have been extended at a local gym.

Ten places costing a total of £1,000 were offered at professional fighter Gary Reid’s Knock Out boxing gym on a first come first served basis back in January in a joint city council and police initiative. But so many young people turned up that an extra £2,500 from the Norton and Bradeley ward budget is now funding sessions three times a week at the Bellerton Lane facility for up to 30 boys and girls. Rod Stockwell, the city council’s Area Implementation Team Solutions Officer, said: “This has been a really successful

scheme. Through this and other projects we’ve seen a drop in antisocial behaviour in Norton of between 45 and 50 per cent. “It’s had a massive effect which has reflected in fewer calls to the police and an increase in quality of life for people in the area. We’re really pleased.” Children as young as six are trained as juniors while teenagers and young adults take part in senior sessions. They run, do circuit training and work on punch bags and pads on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays as they improve their fitness and behaviour at the same time. Boxer Gary Reid, who fights at light welterweight level, said: “They’ve done really well. Some have given up smoking and they’re not getting into so much trouble. “Their behaviour is improving

GLOVES UP: Daesha Reid, left, and Keeylin Johnson-Thomas in training at the Knock Out boxing gym, Norton.

at school as well. It’s all about discipline. I feel dead proud that we’re able to help them stay out of trouble.” Police Inspector Mark Hardern said: “We’re pleased this

partnership project is proving so successful. Gary, through the discipline you need in boxing, is helping us improve life for everyone in the area. “Boxing isn’t all about violence,

it’s about self control and that’s what we’re giving our young people.” Anyone interested in taking part can contact Gary Reid at the gym on 07810 354570.


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SEPTEMBER 2010

Health service revolution

puts GPs in control A

HEALTH service revolution will soon be happening at your GP’s surgery as a result of the biggest NHS upheaval since it was formed in 1948.

Down Your Way News from Eastern Neighbourhood SNEYD GREEN: Swimming pool improvements costing £300,000 at Holden Lane High School and Specialist Sports College are set to make it more accessible. Changing facilities are being upgraded and enlarged. The Amateur Swimming Association has contributed £50,000 to help improve the health of local people with the rest coming from the city council.

Under the Government’s White Paper proposals, the present system of paying for services such as hospital treatment and expensive drugs through commissioning by primary care trusts (PCTs) will be abolished. Instead the funding will be managed directly by GPs. That means the city will lose its own NHS Stoke on Trent PCT – but the man who currently heads the body that faces the axe is reassuringly optimistic about the future. Chief Executive Graham Urwin said: “It’s wrong to assume that nothing will change for the patients, but we are committed to ensuring that through these changes the NHS in Stoke-on-Trent will go from strength to strength.”

BUCKNALL PARK: More accurate records are being kept of visitor numbers to the popular City Farm. An electronic visitor counter has been installed at the entrance, which uses a light beam connected to a computer, as part of moves to upgrade the family facility.

Smooth transition Under the Government’s plans the purchasing of services will be transferred from PCTs to family doctors who will join together in local “clusters” or consortia – probably around 500 across the country – to organise health care and decide which services to buy from hospitals and other providers in their area. In one sense this change is not so fundamental, as most NHS resources already rest in the hands of GPs. What will change, however, is that in future they will also be responsible for managing their own budget. Like other areas throughout the country, NHS Stoke on Trent is harnessing its expertise to ensure the transition in the city is achieved as smoothly as possible. Not surprisingly, the prospect of doctors taking over the NHS budget from managers has captured the headlines – but the White Paper details other changes just as far-reaching. For instance much of the public health budget will transfer to Stoke-on-Trent City Council who will be totally responsible for issues such as smoking cessation, alcohol dependency, teenage pregnancy and drugs misuse.

Our City

ABBEY GREEN: Cycle racks GPs like Dr Steve Fawcett, pictured with Practice Nurse Sarah Pedlar at the Moorcroft Medical Centre, Hanley, will soon be managing local health service budgets. Again the change is not as radical as some may think, for the city council is already a key partner with NHS Stoke on Trent in tackling these sort of public health problems. “It’s fitting that the city council should be directly involved in public health, because the one thing that has the greatest effect on health is the level of household income, which can determine lifestyle, diet, exercise and so on,” said Graham. “In turn, income is usually determined by educational achievement, which is the responsibility of the local authority.” In order to give patients greater choice, the Government also proposes to do away with GP practice boundaries, providing access to information such as satisfaction levels so that patients have the option to register with a

practice anywhere in the city. Graham is confident that the PCT – listed in a Department of Health survey as the top Trust in the West Midlands and winner of a national Community Service Employer award – has developed a high calibre team of staff well placed to transfer their skills and experience to the GP consortia, the city council-led public health services and the regional office of the new NHS Board. Graham said: “The Government has said that PCTs are best placed to make these transitions, and my task over the next three years is to make sure we transfer our legacy and ensure that staff are given the chance to continue with their good work in new roles. “At the moment there is still a lot of consultation to be done – the Government is talking about making these changes over 2011

‘‘’’

The idea to make GPs totally responsible for the patient’s journey through the NHS can only be better for the patient. Graham Urwin, Chief Executive, NHS Stoke on Trent

and 2012, but PCTs will not be abolished until 2013 onwards.” He added: “The idea to make GPs totally responsible for the patient’s journey through the NHS can only be better for the patient. The GP is and always should be the first point of contact, and GPs’ ability to negotiate their way through the system is better for the provision of health services in Stoke-on-Trent.”

Invitation to attend AGM NHS Stoke on Trent’s AGM and annual conference is being held in September. The public, key partners and stakeholders are invited to attend the event at Stoke City’s Britannia Stadium on 22 September starting 10.30am and finishing around 3.30pm. It will focus on the PCT’s achievements over the last 12 months and look forward to the coming year. The keynote speaker will be Stoke City’s Chief Executive Tony Scholes. If you wish to attend or would like to find out more about the AGM and Annual Conference please call 01782 401048.

are being installed at Carmountside Primary School thanks to funding of £663 from Abbey Green ward councillors. The idea is to encourage more children to exercise through bike riding to and from school as they learn road safety and cycling skills while helping cut road traffic and environmental pollution.

HANLEY EAST: Changing attitudes have helped cut the nuisance caused by household rubbish, dog fouling and fly tipping in five streets around Joiners Square. Latest figures show a year-on-year drop in city council enforcement cases from fifteen to just two. The downward trend is continuing. ABBEY HULTON: Designers are now working on plans for a new £48,000 play area in Abbey Road. More consultation is planned with the Playbuilder funded scheme scheduled for completion by March next year. Feedback is already being incorporated into the future look of the site.

BUCKNALL: Eight new plots are being created at the Fellbrook Lane allotments site. Overgrowth is being cleared with drainage and paths put in to help cut waiting lists. It comes as more people adopt the city council’s “Healthy Eating” strategy and grow their own vegetables.

9


Our City p10

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10 Our City

14:25

Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2010

Ethel celebrates her very own

A HUG UNITING FIVE GENERATIONS: Ethel Brough pictured on her 100th birthday with her great, great grandson Luca. Bottom left, the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress congratulate Ethel on her milestone birthday.

centenary CENTENARY year for Stoke-on-Trent has been very special for Ethel Brough as she also celebrated her 100th birthday… bringing together five generations of her family. Her 46 children, grandchildren, great-grand children and great, great-grandchildren helped make her big day a memorable one as she enjoyed a party at city council-run Meadows care home in Berryhill where she has been recovering after a brief spell in hospital. Ethel’s eldest granddaughter is 35. She also has a great, great, grandson, little Luca, who is just three months old. The Queen sent her a card and Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Councillor Denver Tolley and his wife Lynne, joined family,

friends and carers at a tea party. A few days later, Ethel’s 18 grandchildren organised a surprise meal for her at a Leek restaurant after picking her up in a specially organised Rolls Royce. Ethel was born the year Stoke-on-Trent author Arnold Bennett’s book Clayhanger was first published. It mentions the pot-bank task of “mould runner”, a tough job Ethel would take up when she was just 11. She gave her earnings of sixpence to her mother. She worked hard all her life at two pottery companies, making bullets at two munitions factories during World War II and as a cleaner and a dinner lady in two schools. Ethel married the “love of her life” Charles in 1931 and has two children Jean and Ken. Daughter Jean Marshall, 77, from Park Hall, said: “Mum has always been a hard worker and used to like a tea spoon of whisky in her coffee every day. She worries if any of her family are sick, she’ll carry the burden on her shoulders. “We’re so proud of her, it’s a real achievement to reach a hundred these days. She comes first and we’ll always be there for her. All of us love her to bits.”

Stoke know how Your local family information directory

The easy way for families with children and young people aged 0-19 (25 with a disability or additional need) to find out about family services across the city and beyond. G Search for family services and support groups G Search for childcare — close to home or work

Energetic bid to boost economy A NEW partnership has been announced for the future economic development of Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire. The new Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) will be the main vehicle for driving forward regeneration. The city council along with Staffordshire County Council and private sector partners have agreed the new framework and will now work on the detail and consult with businesses. City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez said: “This is a landmark agreement that will herald a

new focus on delivery and development using our collective efforts. “It will bring together the knowledge, expertise and leadership of the private sector, the skills and knowledge of universities and colleges with local democratic accountability and the resources of the public sector.” Staffordshire County Council Leader Philip Atkins said: “Through this partnership, Staffordshire and Stoke-onTrent now have a unique opportunity to establish ourselves as an economic player on the regional, national and international stage.”

Free for EVERYONE regardless of circumstances* This is a limited offer on a first come, first served basis Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................................... .................................... Telephone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Please complete and send the above section to: North Staffordshire Warm Zone, Initiative House, Campbell Road, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 4DE or contact us online at: www.nswz.co.uk *Cavity wall insulation can only be installed in properties with a cavity construction. Some very large properties and the requirements of scaffolding may be subject to an excess payment although this is relatively uncommon


Our City p11

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SEPTEMBER 2010

Cutting through the waters of Rudyard Lake on one of the Sailability dinghies is Emma Rigby, right, when she took her Rehabilitation Officer Chris Tyler for a sail.

Tailor-made care helps Emma

sail to new lifestyle W

HEN cerebral palsy sufferer Emma Rigby was first introduced to a charity sailing club as part of her tailor-made rehabilitation programme of social care, she admits her confidence had sunk low and she didn’t know the first thing about boats, yachts or dinghies.

Nevertheless, 15 months later, Emma not only has a much more confident outlook on life but she has taken to her new hobby… well, like a duck to water. As well as learning how to sail competently she is also now training to be a volunteer instructor herself so she can pass on her new-found skills. Emma cast off on her new course to confidence after she was referred to city’s council’s Day Rehabilitation Programme by her social worker. With the help of Adult Social Care Rehabilitation Key Worker, Rob Littler, a six-week individual course was devised taking into account Emma’s individual tastes – which meant linking her up with Sailability, the charity sailing club for people

living with disabilities, based at Rudyard Lake. Emma, 28, of Little Chell, said: “I told Rob I was interested in sport and would like to do something outdoors. He helped me arrange some time at the YMCA gym and also arranged for me to enrol on a course with Sailability. “I really loved it from the beginning and once the six-week course was over I decided to keep coming back.

Confidence “It’s one of the best things I have ever done. Not only have I learned a new skill but also my confidence has really improved and I am much better at talking and working with people.” Chris Tyler, the city council Rehabilitation Officer who helped co-ordinate the programme, said: “It is wonderful to see Emma flourishing in this way. The Day Rehabilitation team provides a person-centred programme which supports individuals to optimise their confidence and independence giving them greater choice, control and stability over their every day living.

“Our team works with individuals to provide a personalised service which identifies social, recreational and educational activities which are of real interest to them. “We are very proud of how Emma has progressed since finishing her Day Rehabilitation Programme, she has continued to develop her skills and is now supporting Sailability, which is wonderful.” Dennis Prieve, co-founder of Sailability and principal of the training centre, said: “It was clear from the outset Emma had a keen interest and an exceptional sailing talent. She came on in leaps and bounds in a few months and is now training to be an assistant instructor. She really is remarkable.” Emma Rigby – now training to be an assistant instructor with Sailability.

Centenary sculpture set for October unveiling WORK is on schedule for an October unveiling of Stoke-on-Trent’s latest piece of public art. The £130,000 five-metre-high sculpture called Light Source features male and female figures cast in bronze and standing on a stainless steel hexagonal plinth. Sculptor David Annand has

included LED lights to bathe the artwork and surrounding area with light. The plinth will contain a time capsule of six objects chosen by children and young people from the city’s six towns. The sculpture, commissioned by the city council after extensive

public consultation to mark the centenary of the federation of the Six Towns, is being installed outside the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery in the heart of the city’s Cultural Quarter. ● Pictured left is an artist’s impression of how the sculpture will look.

Our City

11

Countdown is on to next census which will help shape public services IN six months time Stoke-on-Trent residents will be asked to help shape future services in the city – by taking part in the 2011 Census for England and Wales. The Census, which will be carried out by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) on Sunday, March 27, 2011, takes a numerical snapshot on a single date to gain an accurate picture of the population. Census statistics, as the most comprehensive source of data for population numbers and characteristics, drive central government policy decisions. At a local level, Census statistics are vital to the NHS, schools and local authorities as they determine the funding local services receive for the next ten years. The statistics also help to ensure that funding is allocated according to need and demand. Residents are legally required to complete the Census form which arrives by post and can be returned using a pre-paid envelope – or, for the first time, can be completed online via a secure internet site. The Census is carried out every 10 years. It takes around 10 minutes to complete the questionnaire and all personal information provided is protected by law and kept confidential for 100 years. ONS Census Director Glen Watson said: “Returning the 2011 Census questionnaire is really straightforward – and it can be done securely online too. “The results paint a unique picture of our community that is used to help plan local services and allocate funding.” ● Hundreds of temporary Census jobs will be available in Stoke-on-Trent. For details visit www.censusjobs.gov.uk To find out more about the Census visit the Facebook group at www.tiny.cc/2011Census


Our City p12/13

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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

SEPTEMBER 2010

Our City

13

First construction work to start in weeks and all new academies and buildings will be finished within three years

£30m ICT package to provide pupils with very best technology

The future’s bright for

city’s schools ‘‘’’ T

Vicky Tunstall, Assistant Collections Officer at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, uses a magnifying glass to examine one of the new artifacts – thought to be inlay decoration from a drinking horn.

More Anglo-Saxon treasures on display PREVIOUSLY unseen treasures from the Staffordshire Hoard have gone on display to the public. A total of 19 new pieces, from the largest and most valuable collection of Anglo-Saxon treasure ever found, are now being exhibited at The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery in the city centre. And the arrival of the new items has marked the start of a new campaign to raise £1.7 million to conserve and research the hoard. The latest exhibits include intricate gold filigree snakes, sword hilt collars, a silver sword pommel and the possible inlay decoration from a drinking horn. City council Cabinet Member for Leisure and Culture Councillor Hazel Lyth said:“These new items demonstrate the scope of this incredible collection. We are still learning what many of these items are, why they were made and what they were used for.

HE city skyline is about to change dramatically as the massive £250 million building programme to transform Stoke-on-Trent’s secondary and special schools finally gets into full swing.

Construction work starts in just a few weeks – after the welcome news from Education Secretary Michael Gove that the city’s Building Schools for the Future (BSF) scheme is not included in Government cutbacks that have affected other local authorities. Clearing the final hurdle for the ambitious scheme first envisaged seven years ago came as a huge relief for pupils, teachers and parents. Over the next three years cranes and towers of scaffolding will be appearing on building sites all over the city as five new academies take shape and all secondary schools and special schools in the city are either rebuilt or extensively refurbished. The building programme will create a

There will be a new era of superb educational facilities that will help our young people to realise their full potential.

Councillor DEBRA GRATTON CABINET MEMBER FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S SERVICES “family” of schools, academies and post-16 centres that will increase learning opportunities by offering specialist teaching and facilities to all pupils living in the city. And the major project will boost the local economy by bringing much-needed jobs and training opportunities to the city. Main contractors Balfour Beatty and the Thomas Vale/Wates

“But we want as many people as possible to view these entirely unique treasures, to experience these marvels and share in the wonder of how they became buried in Staffordshire soil all those centuries ago.” The city council and Birmingham City Council are joint owners of the collection after a huge public campaign, and a substantial donation from the National Heritage Memorial fund, raised £3.3 million to acquire it. The treasure was found by metal detector enthusiast Terry Herbert on land owned by farmer Fred Johnson near to Lichfield.

consortium have pledged to employ local skilled people wherever possible and to offer apprenticeships in most of the construction trades involved. Building starts as soon as November this year with work commencing on a £6.5 million new build and remodelling project at Haywood Engineering College, Burslem, and a new build

£4.3 million REACH Short Stay School, Trent Vale (both scheduled to be completed in February 2012). The final phase – which will involve some rebuilding at St Joseph’s College, Trent Vale, St Thomas More Catholic College, Longton, and Abbey Hill Special

School, Bucknall – is listed to start in August 2012 and finish in August 2013. A total of £30 million of the £250 million BSF budget has been ring fenced to provide cutting edge Information Communication Technology (ICT) packages in

every one of the schools involved in the programme. Councillor Debra Gratton, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People’s Services, said: “The confirmation that Stoke-on-Trent is to receive the full £250 million BSF funding is tremendous news

for the city. The building programme will boost the area’s economy by creating employment and training opportunities for local people. There will be a new era of superb educational facilities that will help our young people to realise their full potential.”

New academy students get to work together STUDENTS representing the two Stoke-on-Trent schools coming together to form the Discovery Academy held their latest working together event at Stoke on Trent College, the academy’s sponsor. Around 30 student ambassadors from Mitchell High School and Edensor Technology College attended their third workshop, this time to discuss ideas for their future academy logo. Part of their ambassadorial role is to liaise with the college sponsor, council education officials and academy project managers on a series of issues and report back to fellow pupils at their respective schools. Building work on the Discovery Academy –

‘‘ A selection of the 19 new Staffordshire Hoard items on display for the first time.

Celebrating news that work will start in May on a £14.9 million new school building project for Thistley Hough High are Head Teacher Rob Haynes and BSF Project Director Tracey Penrose-Gould along with students, back row left to right, Toy Thanasin, Pearce Procter, Liam Roberts and Tanya Balderson, and, front row, Jemma Nichols, left, and Cameron Pye.

REACH Short Stay School Head Teacher Lorna Matley, back left, and students Jade Weston, front left, and Zara Latif visit the site in Trent Vale where a £4.3 million new complex will accommodate the school. With them is Colin Harper, Project Manager for Balfour Beatty, the main contractors for the school construction work.

The ambassadors meetings are quite interesting because it’s letting us have our say. Our teachers are nice, push us hard and give us opportunities. I’ve got one GCSE in Expressive Art and I’m working towards another.

’’

Becky Lees, 13, MITCHELL HIGH.

sited at the Willfield Centre, Lauder Place North, Bentilee – is due to start in the Autumn of 2011 and it is anticipated it will open its doors in September 2013. During the one and a half hour workshop the school ambassadors were joined by around half a dozen college student ambassadors as well as Sarah Robinson, Principal and Chief Executive of Stoke on Trent College. She said:“The student ambassador workshops have been an effective way to help young people from the two schools to meet up, have a real voice in the shaping of their future education and establish a positive relationship well before they merge to form the new academy.”

‘‘

It’s alright. I don’t want to wear a blazer and tie though. I hate uniforms. There’ll be a few arguments, that’s only natural, but it’ll be better, a new opportunity. I’m not worried about the new school. Sam Nicklin, 12, EDENSOR TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE.

’’

Sarah Robinson, Principal and Chief Executive of Stoke on Trent College which is sponsoring the new Discovery Academy, chats with Travis Johnson, a student at Edensor Technical College, and Becky Greasley, a student at Mitchell High School, at a working together event.

‘‘

It’s okay. It’s good giving our ideas and it’s going to be bigger with more facilities. It’ll be interesting getting to know who new people are. The thought of a new school is not too scary.

’’

Bilal Malik, 12, MITCHELL HIGH.

‘‘

Some pupils want to stay where they are but on the other hand they want a new school. I’m not really worried, just looking forward to making new friends and the new technology.

’’

Bryony Chadwick, 13, EDENSOR TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE.

THE BSF programme gives pupils in Stoke-on-Trent schools access to cutting edge information technology facilities that will develop their computer skills. The leading educational solutions provider RM Group has been appointed by the city council to provide and manage innovative ICT services for all academies, secondary and special schools in the city. The six-and-a half-year contract, worth around £30 million and financed out of the £250 million BSF package, starts in September 2010. It includes the provision of in-school hardware, networking and communications services, as well as day-to-day systems management and support. In addition RM will offer its Kaleidos learning platform, identity management services and ongoing professional support. Sharon Menghini, Director of Children and Young People’s Services, said: “RM responded well to the city’s requirements, demonstrating that they understood what was important to schools. “They submitted an excellent bid which reached the very high standards set out in the selection process. We look forward to them working with our schools to drive forward this element of education which will aid both students and staff alike.” Councillor Debra Gratton, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People’s Services, said:“This is another major step forward in our BSF programme. “The agreement with RM means pupils across the city will have access to the latest hi-tech ICT, giving students the opportunity to develop their computer skills to the highest level.”


Our City p12/13

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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

SEPTEMBER 2010

Our City

13

First construction work to start in weeks and all new academies and buildings will be finished within three years

£30m ICT package to provide pupils with very best technology

The future’s bright for

city’s schools ‘‘’’ T

Vicky Tunstall, Assistant Collections Officer at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, uses a magnifying glass to examine one of the new artifacts – thought to be inlay decoration from a drinking horn.

More Anglo-Saxon treasures on display PREVIOUSLY unseen treasures from the Staffordshire Hoard have gone on display to the public. A total of 19 new pieces, from the largest and most valuable collection of Anglo-Saxon treasure ever found, are now being exhibited at The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery in the city centre. And the arrival of the new items has marked the start of a new campaign to raise £1.7 million to conserve and research the hoard. The latest exhibits include intricate gold filigree snakes, sword hilt collars, a silver sword pommel and the possible inlay decoration from a drinking horn. City council Cabinet Member for Leisure and Culture Councillor Hazel Lyth said:“These new items demonstrate the scope of this incredible collection. We are still learning what many of these items are, why they were made and what they were used for.

HE city skyline is about to change dramatically as the massive £250 million building programme to transform Stoke-on-Trent’s secondary and special schools finally gets into full swing.

Construction work starts in just a few weeks – after the welcome news from Education Secretary Michael Gove that the city’s Building Schools for the Future (BSF) scheme is not included in Government cutbacks that have affected other local authorities. Clearing the final hurdle for the ambitious scheme first envisaged seven years ago came as a huge relief for pupils, teachers and parents. Over the next three years cranes and towers of scaffolding will be appearing on building sites all over the city as five new academies take shape and all secondary schools and special schools in the city are either rebuilt or extensively refurbished. The building programme will create a

There will be a new era of superb educational facilities that will help our young people to realise their full potential.

Councillor DEBRA GRATTON CABINET MEMBER FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S SERVICES “family” of schools, academies and post-16 centres that will increase learning opportunities by offering specialist teaching and facilities to all pupils living in the city. And the major project will boost the local economy by bringing much-needed jobs and training opportunities to the city. Main contractors Balfour Beatty and the Thomas Vale/Wates

“But we want as many people as possible to view these entirely unique treasures, to experience these marvels and share in the wonder of how they became buried in Staffordshire soil all those centuries ago.” The city council and Birmingham City Council are joint owners of the collection after a huge public campaign, and a substantial donation from the National Heritage Memorial fund, raised £3.3 million to acquire it. The treasure was found by metal detector enthusiast Terry Herbert on land owned by farmer Fred Johnson near to Lichfield.

consortium have pledged to employ local skilled people wherever possible and to offer apprenticeships in most of the construction trades involved. Building starts as soon as November this year with work commencing on a £6.5 million new build and remodelling project at Haywood Engineering College, Burslem, and a new build

£4.3 million REACH Short Stay School, Trent Vale (both scheduled to be completed in February 2012). The final phase – which will involve some rebuilding at St Joseph’s College, Trent Vale, St Thomas More Catholic College, Longton, and Abbey Hill Special

School, Bucknall – is listed to start in August 2012 and finish in August 2013. A total of £30 million of the £250 million BSF budget has been ring fenced to provide cutting edge Information Communication Technology (ICT) packages in

every one of the schools involved in the programme. Councillor Debra Gratton, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People’s Services, said: “The confirmation that Stoke-on-Trent is to receive the full £250 million BSF funding is tremendous news

for the city. The building programme will boost the area’s economy by creating employment and training opportunities for local people. There will be a new era of superb educational facilities that will help our young people to realise their full potential.”

New academy students get to work together STUDENTS representing the two Stoke-on-Trent schools coming together to form the Discovery Academy held their latest working together event at Stoke on Trent College, the academy’s sponsor. Around 30 student ambassadors from Mitchell High School and Edensor Technology College attended their third workshop, this time to discuss ideas for their future academy logo. Part of their ambassadorial role is to liaise with the college sponsor, council education officials and academy project managers on a series of issues and report back to fellow pupils at their respective schools. Building work on the Discovery Academy –

‘‘ A selection of the 19 new Staffordshire Hoard items on display for the first time.

Celebrating news that work will start in May on a £14.9 million new school building project for Thistley Hough High are Head Teacher Rob Haynes and BSF Project Director Tracey Penrose-Gould along with students, back row left to right, Toy Thanasin, Pearce Procter, Liam Roberts and Tanya Balderson, and, front row, Jemma Nichols, left, and Cameron Pye.

REACH Short Stay School Head Teacher Lorna Matley, back left, and students Jade Weston, front left, and Zara Latif visit the site in Trent Vale where a £4.3 million new complex will accommodate the school. With them is Colin Harper, Project Manager for Balfour Beatty, the main contractors for the school construction work.

The ambassadors meetings are quite interesting because it’s letting us have our say. Our teachers are nice, push us hard and give us opportunities. I’ve got one GCSE in Expressive Art and I’m working towards another.

’’

Becky Lees, 13, MITCHELL HIGH.

sited at the Willfield Centre, Lauder Place North, Bentilee – is due to start in the Autumn of 2011 and it is anticipated it will open its doors in September 2013. During the one and a half hour workshop the school ambassadors were joined by around half a dozen college student ambassadors as well as Sarah Robinson, Principal and Chief Executive of Stoke on Trent College. She said:“The student ambassador workshops have been an effective way to help young people from the two schools to meet up, have a real voice in the shaping of their future education and establish a positive relationship well before they merge to form the new academy.”

‘‘

It’s alright. I don’t want to wear a blazer and tie though. I hate uniforms. There’ll be a few arguments, that’s only natural, but it’ll be better, a new opportunity. I’m not worried about the new school. Sam Nicklin, 12, EDENSOR TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE.

’’

Sarah Robinson, Principal and Chief Executive of Stoke on Trent College which is sponsoring the new Discovery Academy, chats with Travis Johnson, a student at Edensor Technical College, and Becky Greasley, a student at Mitchell High School, at a working together event.

‘‘

It’s okay. It’s good giving our ideas and it’s going to be bigger with more facilities. It’ll be interesting getting to know who new people are. The thought of a new school is not too scary.

’’

Bilal Malik, 12, MITCHELL HIGH.

‘‘

Some pupils want to stay where they are but on the other hand they want a new school. I’m not really worried, just looking forward to making new friends and the new technology.

’’

Bryony Chadwick, 13, EDENSOR TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE.

THE BSF programme gives pupils in Stoke-on-Trent schools access to cutting edge information technology facilities that will develop their computer skills. The leading educational solutions provider RM Group has been appointed by the city council to provide and manage innovative ICT services for all academies, secondary and special schools in the city. The six-and-a half-year contract, worth around £30 million and financed out of the £250 million BSF package, starts in September 2010. It includes the provision of in-school hardware, networking and communications services, as well as day-to-day systems management and support. In addition RM will offer its Kaleidos learning platform, identity management services and ongoing professional support. Sharon Menghini, Director of Children and Young People’s Services, said: “RM responded well to the city’s requirements, demonstrating that they understood what was important to schools. “They submitted an excellent bid which reached the very high standards set out in the selection process. We look forward to them working with our schools to drive forward this element of education which will aid both students and staff alike.” Councillor Debra Gratton, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People’s Services, said:“This is another major step forward in our BSF programme. “The agreement with RM means pupils across the city will have access to the latest hi-tech ICT, giving students the opportunity to develop their computer skills to the highest level.”


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Committed to business district STOKE-ON-TRENT City Council has confirmed its commitment to a 1.2 million square foot Central Business District in the city centre that will create thousands of jobs. The exciting development will include 750,000 square feet of prestigious office space, 60,000 square feet of leisure and retail space, 250 hotel rooms and 80 apartments. Public open spaces will link the new Central Business District to the rest of the city centre, including the main shopping area, the planned £285 million East West Centre, the Cultural Quarter and the University Quarter. City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez said:“It will create more than 4,000 new jobs for local people and provide career opportunities for students from our new University Quarter.” The design will integrate with the rest of the city centre and the wider North Staffordshire conurbation.

Chance to manage COMMUNITY groups are being invited to take over the management of the Voluntary Centre at Beverley Drive, Bentilee. The building is there to provide community services to benefit residents in the Bentilee and Townsend area of the city. Interested parties need to submit an expression of interest and an outline business case to the Neighbourhood Manager by 5pm on Thursday 30 September. Current users of the building need to continue to be accommodated. For further information and/or to arrange a site visit please contact Linda Boys, Neighbourhood Manager at Bentilee Neighbourhood Centre in Dawlish Drive, Bentilee or telephone 01782 231563.

A N I E R E I M E R P M FIL

y t i c l u o s true

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TOKE-ON-TRENT played host to the premiere of the first UK film about Northern Soul… followed by an all-night party to celebrate.

SoulBoy, which pays tribute to the Wigan Casino, a legendary music club in the 1970s, was shown in the King’s Hall last month – a full week before it was released in cinemas nationwide. The film was shot almost entirely in the city. Back in the seventies Stoke-on-Trent and Wigan were the capitals for Northern Soul music in the UK. City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez said: “We had a huge response from city residents when the film was being made, at the end of 2008. “The King’s Hall was chosen as the backdrop for the film because of its close resemblance to the Wigan Casino club. “Hundreds of local people were recruited as extras for the film’s big dance scene. So it was fantastic news that the premiere came to the city.

A dance scene from SoulBoy which was shot on location at the King’s Hall, Stoke. is one the film’s ed tur Pic stars Nichola Burley who plays Jane Rogers, known as “queen of the dance floor”.

“We’re proud to have been involved and show our city’s rich heritage and culture.” SoulBoy is a coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of the Northern Soul movement and stars young and upcoming British

actors Martin Compston, Alfie Allen, Nichola Burley and Felicity Jones. Colourful Fun Lovin’ Criminals frontman Huey Morgan also has a cameo role in the film and made an appearance at the after-show VIP party. Director Shimmy

Marcus said: “We couldn’t have made this film without the support of the people of Stoke-on-Trent, so it’s only fitting we returned here for our premiere.” Star Martin Compston said: “It’s very exciting to premiere our film back where it all started. It felt like I was coming home.”

City backs Pakistan flood disaster appeal COLLECTION points have been set up at city council centres throughout Stoke-on-Trent so the public can support the Pakistan Flood Appeal. The city council has linked up with the nationally-co-ordinated Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) to assist flood relief work by sending much-needed aid to Pakistan. Collection points are available to receive cash donations at the main civic offices in Stoke and local centres in Tunstall, Chell Heath, Norton, Burslem, Hanley, Abbey Hulton, Bentilee, Stoke, Blurton, Fenton, Longton and Meir. City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez said: “This is one of

the biggest disasters in the world at this point in time affecting millions of people. “The people of Stoke-on-Trent are generous and I am sure they will want to support this appeal. We want to make that as easy as we can. “The city council has registered with DEC, which brings together a unique alliance of the UK’s aid, corporate, public and broadcasting sectors to rally the nation's compassion, and ensures that funds raised go to DEC agencies best placed to deliver effective and timely relief to people most in need.” The public can also donate online at www.donate.bt.com or by telephoning 0370 6060 900.

Business loan scheme could create 400 jobs MORE than 400 jobs could be created in Stoke-on-Trent as a result of a scheme, introduced by tyre giant Michelin which is dedicated to breathing life into small and medium-sized businesses. Michelin Development Limited (MDL) has been set up by the global company – which has its UK headquarters in the city – to help inject regeneration and growth into the communities surrounding its factory. Over the five years since the

company was formed, it has helped over 130 new enterprises in industries as varied as engineering, construction, IT and fine china by offering unsecured loans and expertise. Mike Cole, Director of Michelin Development Limited, said: “With over 40 loan offers to date and potentially 400-plus jobs being created, this Michelin initiative is playing its part in helping to regenerate Stoke-on-Trent. MDL is part of the Michelin Group’s Corporate Social

Responsibility Charter and its desire to put something back into the communities surrounding its factories.” Meanwhile, the tyre company is also taking on new apprentices at its Stoke plant – the first since the restructuring of the site in 2001. Mr Cole added: “Last year saw the re-introduction of engineering apprenticeships again at the Stoke plant after a gap of almost 10 years. “Modern apprenticeships have always been part of Michelin’s

investment in young people but the return to engineering craft apprenticeships is good news and a sign of the times with the shortage of skilled engineers in the area.” City Council Leader Councillor Mohammed Pervez joined Stoke-on-Trent Central MP Tristram Hunt for a tour of Michelin’s Remix Plant in Campbell Road. Anyone interested in the loan scheme should log onto www.michelindevelopment. co.uk to apply.


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SEPTEMBER 2010 Minton tiles were set among lustrous carpet of plants.

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Down Your Way News from Western Neighbourhood

The coats of arms of each of the Six Town were featured on the six chairs in the garden – above, the one for Tunstall.

Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress Denver and Lynne Tolley toast the garden’s success with tea drank out of Stoke-on-Trent made best china – of course.

Best in Show hat-trick is

icing on the cake “The one to beat.” That’s how green-fingered rivals at the Royal Horticultural Society Tatton Park Show now regard the amazing garden displays created by Stoke-on-Trent City Council. The accolade is well deserved after the city council’s entry once again wowed the judges at the 2010 show – and became the only local authority to achieve three Best in Shows at one of the most prestigious events in the horticultural calendar. Success bloomed once again with the Centenary Celebration flowerbed designed to mark 100 years of the federation of the six towns. It beat off competition from 17 other parks and local authority entries to scoop a gold medal and Best in Show. It took around 6,750 plants grown at the city council’s Greenhouse 2000 and a hard working team to continue the record-breaking success story. The city council in the last five years has won four gold medals, one silver gilt, the unprecedented Best in Show hat-trick and the Wigan Cup for the best local authority exhibit shown to the RHS during the year. This year’s winning garden was made up of an array of brightly coloured flowers which set the scene for the first ever council meeting after the six towns became the single new authority of Stoke-on-Trent. The room was filled with lustrous carpets and cushions with Minton tiles set amongst vibrant marigolds and colourful coleus.

NORTHWOOD: Mental health issues are being targeted in a new 18-month project launched in the area by artist-led combined arts company B arts. The Growing Hearts and Minds project was launched in Northwood Park with funding from the city council, the Big Lottery and Ecominds. The scheme aims to combine creativity and the natural environment to help people better manage their own conditions. HANLEY PARK: Samba Mela, a citywide celebration of different but complimentary cultures, will be staged at the park on 19 September. It features around 50 acts and includes some of the biggest names from the worlds of Bhangra and Bollywood as well as mainstream music. BIRCHES HEAD: Carnival time came to the area thanks to a fete organised by the Bridge Centre. A craft fair, bouncy castle, face painting and the Kingsley Bird of Prey Centre all added to the fun. The event was well attended with support from ward funds to help make it happen.

A cascading planted table cloth covered the table which was surrounded by six chairs, each with one of the towns’ crest as the backrest. A celebration cake evoked Stoke-on-Trent’s 100th birthday celebration. Mike Sheppard, one of the city council landscape architects’ team that designed this year’s floral

Best in Show – the winning garden.

Members of the city council team who created the Best in Show garden are, left to right, Landscape Architect Mike Sheppard, Bedding Foreman Anthony Cain, Head Gardener Andy theme, said: back from planting Finch and Senior “Quite a few of out the flowers on Landscape Architect our competitors the show site until Andrew Mander. told us that the the Sunday before Stoke-on-Trent Tuesday morning’s garden was the one to judging – a decision that beat, and even before the judging ensured the flowers looked their had started, someone else came very best. to our garden and said they During the show, members of wanted to see the winning entry!” the city council’s communications The winning plants were team distributed more than 1,000 carefully nurtured by a team of leaflets in just two days to visitors Greenhouse 2000 gardeners at eager to find out the story behind Festival Park. One of them, Stoke-on-Trent’s latest success. Anthony Cain, also spent much Mike Sheppard added: of his own time making the “Winning an RHS Gold Medal is wooden table and fireplace and a real honour and being the only altering the chairs featured in the local authority to achieve three garden. Best in Shows is icing on the The Greenhouse 2000 team’s cake! We are all delighted that timing proved to be impeccable. success at Tatton Park is putting With an expert eye on the Stoke-on-Trent in the spotlight in weather conditions, they held a positive way.”

HANLEY: Goalposts behind Whitehaven Drive near Central Forest Park were repaired and repainted in time for the school summer holidays. Ward budgets funded the Groundworks re-vamp designed to encourage young people to get some exercise and fresh air. NEIGHBOURHOOD WIDE: A total of 80 new bins are being installed across the area in the latest crackdown on littering and dog fouling. More than £17,500 from ward budgets is being spent on 66 litterbins and 14 dog-fouling bins. They are being sited at known problem hotspots.

NORTHWOOD PARK: The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community staged their annual pride event at the park. Stoke Pride 2010 featured a number of headline acts as well as a community stage.


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Down Your Way News from South Western Neighbourhood FENTON: Overgrown and derelict allotments have been brought back to life thanks to the Fenpark Hilltop Allotments Association. The site, which had been out of use for several years, has been transformed through Big Lottery funding and ward budgets and now has fencing, a car park, landscaping and sheds. Call Tony Williams on 01782 311169 for more information.

BLURTON FARM: Older and younger generations joined forces to open the newly re-vamped £653,000 St. Albans Community Centre in Finstock Avenue. Former church warden Doreen Riley, who has lived on the estate since it was built, and Summer Hill Yates, a competition winner from Sutherland Primary School, cut the ribbon together. TRENT VALE: Free help and advice is now on offer after the launch of a training and information hub at the St John’s Centre. About 28 different agencies attended the event with advice covering a variety of issues including health, employment, money and training. TRENTHAM: Scouts have been given a helping hand to clear undergrowth and remove unwanted trees from the wooded area of their grounds. The Area Implementation and Environmental Teams helped the 114th Trentham Scout Group during a five-day clean-up operation.

BLURTON: Volunteers have set up a new family based community group. Family Zone aims to bring families together through social activities and by providing support. For more information please email family.zone@ymail.com or telephone 07958 216680. PENKHULL: Two new playgrounds costing approximately £120,000 have been officially opened. Richmond Street features a climbing frame, slide and swings while Lodge Road has an all-weather sports area for football and basketball. Feedback on local issues was invited at the launches.

Reading aloud will improve people’s well-being A £30,000 city-wide reading scheme has been set up which targets older people and adults with mental health issues and aims to improve wellbeing, build stronger communities and extend the enjoyment of literature. “Get Into Reading” involves trained volunteers reading aloud short stories, novels and poetry to groups of people followed by an informal discussion of what has been read. The sessions can take place in a range of public settings including libraries and community and health centres. The Library Service team is working with NHS

Stoke on Trent to deliver the imaginative programme, which has been externally funded by the Government’s Transformation Fund, and is based on a successful model developed by The Reader Organisation. Although the scheme is in its early stages in the city, many different groups have been identified who may benefit. These include young homeless people, those suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease, young mums, care home residents, residents in social housing and groups of older people. Those taking part report improved levels of

wellbeing as a result of the weekly sessions as well as improved concentration, greater personal confidence and a growing sense of community. Anne Mackey, Principal Librarian – Service Development, said:“The whole idea of the project is that reading and discussing great writing can make you feel better. A typical session involves the reading aloud of a short story, followed by a poem at the end while group members take it in turn to read aloud and discuss books.” For more details contact Anne on 01782 238401 or email anne.mackey@stoke.gov.uk

Apprentices give popular park

much-needed facelift OUNG apprentices who have enrolled on a training programme which helps to combat worklessness have been helping give a popular community facility a facelift.

Y

The trainees painted iron railings at Cobridge Park as well as staging an environmental clean up, as part of their Painting and Decorating course with the PM Training organisation. Funding for the scheme was provided through the Burslem South ward councillors budget and the work was organised by the Western Area Implementation Team (AIT). Nicola Poole, Acting Burslem South Officer for the Western AIT, said: “Several of the local residents had spoken to us about the state of the park and so we decided to act. It also means a lot to the three local councillors which is why they funded the improvements through their ward budget. “We drafted in PM Training and the young trainees have done a very good job in giving the park a facelift.” PM Training is a Staffordshire based social enterprise organisation which focuses on tackling worklessness among young people and offers more than 800 training and employment opportunities every year. Is it a good idea to train young people in trades by involving them in projects beneficial to the community? Let us know your views – write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

Painting and Decorating Apprentice Brandon Barker prepares rusty railings at Cobridge Park for a coat of paint.

Double bid to improve housing for residents THE city council is bidding for funding for two housing schemes as part of the Government’s Housing Private Finance Initiative (PFI) Programme. If successful the bids will bring investment of around £300 million of public sector investment into six of the city’s suburban estates. The two schemes, called Housing PFI Round 5 – Extra Care and Housing PFI Round 6 – Estate Transformation, aim to provide hundreds of new homes, either to buy or rent, and will enable the removal of obsolete properties. The Extra Care scheme aims to provide 390 social rent extra care housing units across three

sites in the city and will provide Stoke-on-Trent with the largest awarded PFI extra care scheme to date. It would substantially support the delivery of the city council’s Older People’s 10-year plan and the Older People’s Housing and Accommodation Strategy. It will also fill a gap of some 1,000 units of older people’s supported accommodation that is needed in the future. The three sites for development are Holdcroft Fields in Abbey Hulton, the former Brookwood Home/Depot site, Blurton and the former Westcliffe Hospital site in Chell. The Estate Transformation proposal comprises of transforming six of the city’s suburban estates. These are Abbey Hulton,

Bentilee (including Townsend), Blurton, Chell Heath and Fegg Hayes, Meir and Norton. The proposals include the removal of up to 506 obsolete houses, the provision of 575 new houses and the provision of improvements to surrounding public spaces. The city council’s PFI Project Team are developing an Outline Business Case and has been working closely with residents of these estates. It was hoped to report back to these communities during the summer but the project is being reviewed by the Government as part of its spending plans and may be at risk. A decision is expected in the Autumn which means further details will not now be available until later this year at the earliest.


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Residents given expert advice on ways to cut risks of fires in the home FIRE FIGHTERS have been giving expert risk reduction advice to residents in two streets in Stoke-on-Trent where blazes have broken out at three terraced houses within just a few weeks of each other. Fire prevention officers from Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service visited homes in Pinnox Street and Forster Street where the blazes happened in June and extended the initiative to other nearby streets. They carried out home risk checks and installed smoke alarms free of charge.

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Our City reports back on convictions secured to make Stoke-on-Trent safer for us all...

Burslem fire station Watch Manager Neil Cheshire, left, is pictured with Pinnox Street Residents Association Vice Chair Sheila Tudor and PCSO Richard Farrar during the fire prevention initiative in the area. Burslem fire station Watch Manager Neil Cheshire, who headed up the operation, said: “We wanted to reassure residents by giving them risk reduction advice to cut the chances of a repetition of the fires. Fortunately, no-one was injured in the fires that happened in June. We will be

extending this type of pro-active fire prevention work right across the city. In particular we will target area where fires have occurred.” The fire fighters were joined in the operation by representatives of the city council and Staffordshire Police who gave reassurance

and advice relating to antisocial behaviour. Members of the city council’s Northern Area Neighbourhood Management Team joined fire risk reduction officers to inspect alleyways – and dumped rubbish, which posed a fire hazard, was immediately removed.

WARNING: fake tobacco can

damage your health S

MOKERS in Stoke-on-Trent are being warned about the danger of fake cigarettes and hand rolling tobacco that are even more dangerous to health than genuine tobacco products.

The cut-price counterfeits are offered for sale in convincing packets that appear identical to the packaging of well-known brands – but these cigarettes are made from highly toxic materials that can even include rat droppings. The fakes are so dangerous that doctors have warned they are responsible for four times as many deaths as drugs. An increasing number of highly dangerous fakes are being sold in the city’s pubs and clubs, as well as venues like car boot sales, markets and even some corner and mobile shops. To combat the problem the city council’s Regulatory Services Team has launched a hard-hitting campaign to raise awareness with posters that are being displayed by the retail trade and in public places. The public is being urged to report any sales of counterfeit tobacco by telephoning the hotline 01782 238444 or going online at stoke.gov.uk/fakes The sale of “bootleg” tobacco on which duty has not been paid can also be reported in this way. City council Trading Standards Officer Charlotte Coleman said: “It’s easy to be fooled by the convincing packets, but often the print quality is poor and the packet soon falls apart. Most smokers also notice the difference in taste as soon as they light up. “Analysis of these counterfeit tobacco products has shown they contain highly dangerous ingredients like cyanide and have been found to contain plastic, sand and even rat droppings. In many cases the fake cigarettes have been found to be

EASTERN NEIGHBOURHOOD – DRUG DEALER JAILED: Drug dealer Matthew Windsor has been locked up for five and a half years for selling heroin to fund his own long-standing habit. Police twice caught the 27-year-old with several hundred pounds worth of the drug at his home in Milton Road, Sneyd Green. Nearly £1,200 in cash, seized at the time, has now been confiscated under the Proceeds of Crime Act. Windsor, who pleaded guilty at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court, has 20 previous convictions for 33 offences dating back to when he was 16. SOUTH EASTERN NEIGHBOURHOOD – BAILED ROBBER WIELDS KNIFE: Teenager Andrew Prince has started a substantial stretch behind bars for carrying out a street robbery and a stabbing. The 18-year-old kicked a man, aged 58, in the body and head in Longton before running off with his shoulder bag. He was on bail when he knifed his partner’s ex-boyfriend in the abdomen 10 days later. Prince, of Duke Street, Fenton, admitted both offences and was sent to a Young Offenders Institution for six years and eight months. The Judge at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court told him: “I hope you grow up while you serve this sentence.” SOUTH WESTERN NEIGHBOURHOOD – VICIOUS ASSAULT MAN JAILED: Five men, some of them hooded and carrying knives, burst into a family home in Fenton in a dispute over a woman. Jamie Fyfe, ignoring the suspended prison sentence already hanging over him, made threats to kill as he ran up the stairs. He stabbed his victim as other men downstairs stole mobile phones and a wallet. Fyfe, aged 22, of Hayfield Crescent, Fenton, admitted aggravated burglary and was sentenced to five years and three months. The Judge told him: “It must have been terrifying. This was pre-meditated group violence you orchestrated.” WESTERN NEIGHBOURHOOD – VIOLENT THUG GETS PRISON: Vicious attacks on three men have landed Gareth Shaw with a three-and-a-half year jail sentence. Shaw, from Scott Lidgett Road in Middleport, punched and kicked a man unconscious, leaving him with a fractured eye socket. The victim faces more surgery and might lose the sight in his eye. Two other men were injured in a separate incident when 21-year-old Shaw hurled glasses in a Burslem pub. Shaw, appearing at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court, admitted two charges of unlawful wounding and a third of assault causing actual bodily harm.

Trainee Trading Standards Officer David Mountford with a poster promoting the campaign to clamp down on the sale of fake cigarettes. much stronger than genuine ones. “The content of all cigarettes is harmful. However, people should be aware that fake tobacco is even more hazardous than the real thing, as you can never be sure what you are smoking. Many of the fakes come from China and Eastern European countries.” Charlotte added: “The fake cigarettes are being offered at a cheap price, often half the price of legal ones. “While most people believe they are

getting a bargain, many don’t realise the effect that buying fake tobacco has on their local area. “Cheap tobacco makes smoking affordable, which reduces people’s motivation to quit, encourages smokers to smoke more, makes it easier for children to take up the habit, takes money away from legitimate local businesses and is linked to low level and large scale organised crime.”

NORTHERN NEIGHBOURHOOD – FUNERAL WAKE BUST-UP: * Grieving teenager Norman Frost started a punch up after being asked to leave his girlfriend’s wake.The 19-year-old had been drowning his sorrows after the funeral for 16-year-old Tara Dawson, who had died in a crash, when he and his cousin Kevin, got involved in a fight. They admitted affray. Frost, from Goldenhill, was given a suspended six-month sentence at a Young Offenders Institution and ordered to carry out 180 hours unpaid work. His cousin received a suspended eight-month jail sentence and 200 hours unpaid work. * Picture courtesy Staffordshire Sentinel News & Media


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Creating a healthier and safer city

People urged to report hate crime CHALLENGE North Staffs (CNS) has been launched to encourage people to report, and ultimately help eliminate hate crime in the area. Hate crime is any criminal offence committed against people or their property because of who they are. This can include their physical or mental health, disability, race, colour, ethnic origin, nationality or national origin, religion or belief, gender or sexual identity, sexual orientation or age. Incidents include physical attacks, damage to property, theft, offensive graffiti, threats, intimidation and bullying. The team will also deal with other incidents, such as being refused entry into pubs or clubs. These crimes are not reported for various reasons, including a fear of not being taken seriously or not knowing how to report them. CNS is working alongside North Staffs MIND, Disability Solutions, the local authority, police and other organisations to increase reporting and offer advice and help to people affected. Victims or witnesses of hate crime should report them on 0330 1111 999 or email Julie.wood@stoke-cab.org.uk or visit www.challengenorthstaffs.org

Bar staff at the Varsity pub in the city centre with the t-shirts they have been wearing with crime prevention messages. Pictured are Safer City Partnership Officer Jennifer Lawson, second left, Special Constable Nathan Wallbanks and the bar staff, left to right, Hayley Mandley, Matt Coles, Stuart Davison and Nicole Dale.

Concerted action aims to tackle youth violence

Katie Ashley with her terrier at the dog chipping events at Norton.

GOVERNMENT funding is helping to make Stoke-on-Trent a safer place through the Tackling Knives and Serious Youth Violence Programme.

Special offer for four-legged residents THERE was something special on offer for four-legged residents of the Norton Estate during a Respect week. Dog owners were invited to bring their pets to Norton Community Centre to have their pooches micro chipped free of charge by the RSPCA in the Safer City Partnership marquee. The problem of dog fouling has been an increasing cause for concern in the area, so the micro chipping session also provided an opportunity to speak to visitors about

responsible dog ownership and give advice on the use of dog litterbags. Also in the marquee, vehicle owners were offered free non-removable number plate screws to help combat a rise in number plate thefts. A host of other community events that involved Norton residents during Respect week included a litter clean-up and the opening of a BMX site on the greenway where young cyclists can have fun in a safe environment.

A Home Office grant of £140,000 has allowed the Safer City Partnership to fund several projects aimed at supporting victims and offenders aged 17 to 24. In Marsh Street, Hanley, taxi marshalls help customers and taxi drivers by combating antisocial behaviour and making sure young people get home safely. During the World Cup, t-shirts were distributed to licensed premises and frontline city council staff. The messages on the t-shirts aimed to reduce violence and had two designs with the messages “A beaten team is no excuse for a beaten partner” and “Barred from one barred from all – violence will not be tolerated.” Extra police targeted areas of the city known for violent crime. Visits to pubs and

clubs were increased to clamp down on under-age drinking. The domestic violence helpline opening hours were extended during World Cup matches. Diversionary activities are also planned for younger people. Boxing clubs, for example, help to give young people an interest and keep them away from crime, and Arch North Staffs will employ a worker to help young victims of domestic violence.

Vulnerable people From November, a team of street pastors will provide a high-visibility presence in the city to help protect vulnerable people from potential harm. Nicky Jolley, Programme Lead for Personal Crime, said: “We have allocated funding to specific areas of the city where violent crime and domestic violence is most common.”


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A two-page special Our City report

New team to crack down on

environmental crime T

EN officers have been recruited to a specially formed city council Environmental Crime Unit dedicated to cleaning up the city and changing behaviour.

The unit won funding from the Safer City Partnership after showing how it would meet tough targets on antisocial behaviour, crime and the fear of crime, cleanliness, fly tipping and litter. The city council is rated poor in this area and has been told it needs to become “very effective” within three years. Principal Enforcement Officer Sarah Gray is heading a team of investigators, environmental crime and enforcement support officers who will target issues like fly tipping, noise nuisance, household and trade waste, abandoned cars, nuisance parking, dog control, graffiti, fly-posting and rubbish. Jarrod Bentley, an Investigations Officer with the new Environmental Crime Unit at the scene of fly-tipping incident in the city.

On-the-spot fines The street patrols are in addition to those already carried out by police community support officers, who themselves have newly delegated enforcement powers to deal with litter and graffiti. The unit is also dealing with more complex investigations, which can lead to an unlimited fine or five years in prison. Unit officers will also hand out on-the-spot penalties ranging from a maximum £80 for littering to £300 for those caught without a trade waste agreement. The unit will have improved and stronger links – meaning more information is shared between CCTV monitoring, social services, planning, legal

services and the Safer City Partnership’s antisocial behaviour database. Terry Follows, Cabinet Member for Environment, Waste Management and Neighbourhood Services, said: “This is a renewed start in our fight to improve Stoke-on-Trent and tackle areas that our residents said are problems, and in the long-term change people’s perceptions so they don’t drop litter in the first place.

“We’re absolutely determined to tackle issues which currently cost the city £350,000 a year and this unit will save us money and make Stoke-on-Trent a better place to live in, work in, and visit. “Public involvement is vital. We’ve set up a working group of partners including residents groups to confirm and direct our priorities. We want people to tell us where they need our help.

“We have other diverse and exciting plans from an environmental compliance business award to a Community Payback scheme for juvenile offenders – which are all designed ultimately to respond to the public’s concerns and act upon them.”

Achieving community goal through football STOKE City Football Club and the city council have teamed up to launch the Kickz scheme which gives young people aged 12 to 18 the chance to have fun, get fit and develop personal skills through football. Staffordshire Police also supports the initiative which uses the power of football to target some of the most disadvantaged areas of the country to create safer, stronger, more respectful communities through the development of young people’s potential. The national Kickz scheme was conceived by the Metropolitan Police, the Premier League, the Football Foundation, the Football Association and the Football League.

Three evening sessions a week are being held at Bentilee Park and qualified FA coaches supervise five-a-side soccer competitions on two of them. The third evening is devoted to activities such as other sports, music and development awareness activities like drug awareness, healthy eating and anti-weapons workshops. Opportunities include the chance to play in five-a-side games and competitions against other Kickz teams from other football clubs. Activities so far have included cricket, volleyball and dodge balls sessions, as well as football matches against Staffordshire Police and Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service.

Funding has been secured for 20 young people to take their junior football organiser course – the first step to becoming a qualified coach. For girls there is girls-only football, cheerleading, basketball and a variety of other activities. Greg Stuart, Stoke City’s Kickz and Community Engagement Worker, said:“Kickz is helping to build positive relationships with young people and is breaking down barriers with the local police.” Kickz sessions will be held throughout the year on Tuesdays and Wednesdays (4pm to 7pm) and Fridays (6pm to 9pm). For an application and consent form call at the Bentilee Park five-a-side pitch or contact Greg Stuart on 07512 207 307 or email greg.stuart@stokecityfc.com

Expert help for women to give up prostitution WOMEN are being helped to give up a life of prostitution by new legislation that empowers courts to issue a Section 17 Engagement and Support Order. Those who appear in court for soliciting can be issued with the order instead of a fine. Agreeing commits them to three sessions provided by Brighter Futures, an organisation that works to discover how the women got into prostitution and looks at steps to move them away from it. The programme also helps to break a crime cycle because research shows that prostitutes issued with fines often return to prostitution in order to pay the fines. The Safer City Partnership has launched a presentation to raise awareness of the new Section 17 Order option to relevant bodies such as the courts service, solicitors and the police.

Jon to head behaviour clampdown JON Connolly has been appointed as the new Antisocial Behaviour Lead by the Safer City Partnership to tackle antisocial behaviour and provide a quick and effective response for communities and individuals affected. Working with partners, Jon will coordinate two special teams of Police Community Support Officers and manage six Safer City Partnership Officers to deal with persistent antisocial behaviour. Jon, who has worked with Youth Offending and Community Safety for 10 years, will also introduce projects and will ensure effective use of Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs) and Antisocial Behaviour Orders (ASBOs).

Alcohol help HELP is never far away for those who need help or guidance about their alcohol consumption – thanks to an expansion of community services in Stoke-on-Trent. Support, from advice to detoxification, is now available. Ring Adsis for more information on 01782 271096.

More details next issue.


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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

Chance to visit incinerator that is one of the city’s ‘secret’ success stories

Can-do students raise cash for school CRUSHED cans are being turned into cash for projects at Mitchell High School. Students at the business and enterprise college have been saving their drinks cans in a giant can crushing bin especially designed for them by Emma Bridgwood, a Project Assistant with the Neighbourhood Renewal Team at Stoke-on-Trent City Council. Two loads have been collected since the bin was first installed as part of “The Big Tidy Up”, which was staged in Bentilee, and traded in as scrap metal. Twenty students were also sent for health and safety training to help them organise their own litter picks. Deputy Headteacher Debbie Campbell said: “Mitchell High School is definitely living up to the 20:20 challenge as we begin a recycling focus within the school. “Top of the list is our aluminium can crusher, which has been very popular with the students who have filled it twice already. “Mitchell also has an active Eco Team who have been awarded the Silver Eco Schools award and have now set their sights firmly on a Green Flag. Well done to all involved and keep up the good work.”

Collections for textiles MORE people are being encouraged to recycle their textiles through Stoke-on-Trent City Council’s fortnightly kerbside collections. Waste Minimisation Officer Rachel Gumbley said:“We’d like more people to use the special clear bags we provide to dispose of clothes and the like rather than throw them in the bin.” Anyone who needs a textile recycling bag should contact Stoke on Call on 01782 234000.

Hi-tech plant turns waste into

national grid electricity R

ESIDENTS are being invited to visit 21st century facilities which are helping Stoke-on-Trent meet strict Government recycling targets.

The Energy from Waste Plant at Hanford which is making a huge contribution to improving the city’s carbon footprint.

Stoke-on-Trent City Council offers a wide range of reliable waste collection solutions to businesses: • • • • •

Collections to suit your needs Fixed price contracts Reliable service Competitive rates None of the waste goes to landfill

Please contact us on

01782 234000 for further information.

produce energy. The 90,000 kilowatts of energy produced by the plant each year are enough to run it and supply one in five homes in the city. Plant Manager Dave Rockey said: “What we do goes largely unnoticed though we do encourage visitors. People who pass the incinerator would have no idea what goes on inside but it’s a real eye opener. “We would love to invite members of the public for a tour of the plant.” Councillor Terry Follows, Portfolio Holder for the Environment, Waste Management and Neighbourhood Services, said: “Residents have done a great job recycling over the last few years and we would like to encourage them to continue to do so. “It is especially important that we increase recycling of materials such as glass and tins, which we can’t burn to produce energy but which do contribute to our recycling targets.” ● Anyone who would like to visit the Energy from Waste Plant should email recycling@stoke.gov.uk

The Energy from Waste Plant at Hanford, which many people know as “the incinerator” is one of the city’s best kept secrets as it generates electricity by burning thousands of tonnes of rubbish from grey bins each year. The plant ties in with the council’s target of stopping sending any waste to landfill sites by 2020. Households in Stoke-on-Trent, each of which produces on average a tonne of waste every year, can play their part by recycling more. They can use the kerbside collections by separating out rubbish into different bins and boxes provided by the city council. They can also take the waste to either the household waste and recycling centres at Hanford or Federation Road in Burslem. These process tens of thousands of tonnes of waste each year. Kevin Ford, an Operator Thousands of at the Energy from people each week Waste Plant, uses a visit the recycling computer to monitor facilities at Hanford the output of the without knowing they incinerator. are yards away from one of the most efficient ways of reducing the amount of waste sent to landfill while generating electricity. Lastest figures show that in 2009 36,660 tonnes of rubbish in Stoke-on-Trent were recycled, 10,250 tonnes were sent to landfill and 36,700 tonnes were burned to


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SEPTEMBER 2010

Ashley overcomes dyslexia to land new job

HISTORIC buildings in Longton are set to get a facelift now that £600,000 in grant aid is available for improvements. Up to 30 significant Edwardian and Victorian buildings, some in need of repair, will benefit from the three-year scheme designed to protect the heritage of the town centre. Owners are now being approached to see if they want to take part in the scheme, which is being run by the city council and English Heritage.

Support from Jobcentre Plus lifts 21-year-old’s confidence Right 2 Write for 10 two-hour sessions, was given job searching support by Remploy and also gained his fork lift truck licences. Susan Budge, a Disability Employment Advisor at Jobcentre Plus, said:“His confidence has soared and I have been very impressed by his commitment to finding work.” Ashley, who works at Central Forest Park, said:“Susan is brilliant. She has helped me so much and I felt my life started to move

forward once I started getting help. “I could hardly read and had no confidence but Susan has really brought me out of myself. I really love my job and I have learned a lot. I enjoy the freedom of being outside and meeting people. Every day is different and my confidence has really lifted.” Anyone who is unemployed, aged 18-24 and needs extra support to get work should talk to their personal adviser at the local Jobcentre.

ALLOTMENTS SHOWCASE PUPILS’

gardening skills GREEN-FINGERED pupils showed off their blossoming talent for gardening as part of the city’s first schools allotment competition. All schools in Stoke-on-Trent are now encouraged to set up an allotment, or gardening plot – however big or small – to help young students learn about healthy eating and assist them in other lessons like maths and science. And to celebrate the scheme, a city-wide school’s allotment competition has been set up to reward their hard work. Entries were judged on several criteria which included creative use of space and materials, horticultural achievement, environmental responsibility, community participation, and next steps. The winner of the first annual competition was St Mary’s C of E Primary in Tunstall who will receive a trophy donated by former Lord Mayor and former city councillor Derek Capey. The runner-up was Forest Park

Primary in Hanley and third prize went to Brownhills Maths and Computing College in Burslem. The Dresden Diggers education project – which helps students with special needs – was highly commended by the judging panel. Allotments Officer Sue Radcliffe said: “The competition highlighted the great work that is being done at many schools to set up an allotment or gardening plot. “We were really delighted by the amount of effort the pupils had put in and the judging criteria meant that whether a school had the room to set up a large or small plot, they had a chance of winning.”

Pupils at St Mary’s C of E Primary who won the first annual schools allotment competition tend the tomato plant in their green house. Pictured, left to right, are Billy Khan, Tyler Beckett and Sam Brook, all aged 10, with former Lord Mayor Derek Capey, who donated the contest trophy and was a member of the judging panel.

21

Aid to restore buildings

3112

Assistant Park Keeper Ashley Kosciekowski at Central Forest Park.

SEVERE dyslexic Ashley Kosciekowski was low on confidence after all but two weeks of a year out of work. The 21-year-old struggled so badly with his reading that he had to get his mum to read his mobile phone texts for him. But he refused to give up and, with the help and support of Hanley Jobcentre Plus, has now landed a job with Stoke-on-Trent City Council as an Assistant Park Keeper. He was referred to an organisation called

Our City

Healthy picnic in the park DOZENS of families turned out for a picnic in Cobridge Park and tucked into nutritious snacks as part of a campaign to promote healthy eating. The event on 22 August was organised through the NHS Stoke on Trent’s Health Matters project in conjunction with the city council’s Western Neighbourhood Area Implementation Team. For more information about advice that can lead to a healthier life log onto www.myhealth matters.org

Board artwork brightens site SCHOOLS and youth groups have painted artwork on large boards to help brighten up the construction site for the new community fire station in Hanley. The eight metre high boards were provided by builders Thomas Vale and the young people painted scenes which reflected their association with the Fire and Rescue Service. Rehana Iqbal, Community Risk Reduction Officer for Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service, said: “This is a fantastic way to engage with our local community. The community groups involved have had some brilliant ideas.”

Key messages from the crew AROUND 1,500 Stoke-on-Trent school children are getting vital safety messages at this year’s Crucial Crew event at the Territorial Army barracks in Burslem. Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service and a range of partners are delivering fast paced advice sessions aimed at keeping youngsters safe. Year 6 children aged 10-11 are attending over two weeks up to 28 September.


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SEPTEMBER 2010

Archbishop urges city to

build for future T

HE Archbishop of York has issued a rallying call to the people of Stoke-on-Trent urging everyone to be brave and have faith during the current period of economic adversity.

Competition winner Jean Hill-Bailey is served afternoon tea by the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Councillor Denver Tolley and his wife Lynne.

Afternoon tea in Lord Mayor’s parlour is a right royal do. . . Being treated like a Queen is how former teacher Jean Hill-Bailey described her afternoon with the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress after winning an Our City competition. Jean, 73, of Hartshill, was treated to tea by Stoke-on-Trent’s first citizen Councillor Denver Tolley and his wife Lynne after telling how proud of her city she is. Other competition winners, who also enjoyed a visit to the Lord Mayor’s Parlour, included Winifred Wright, 72, of Milton,

who was accompanied by her friends from the Darby and Joan Club. Annette Hill, 51, of Meir Park won her tour by writing that it would be a great excuse to buy a new outfit. She splashed out on a new cardigan and said:“I never win anything. I’ve started entering other competitions now!” All the winners, including Sandra Clarke, aged 53, of Meir Park, were treated to a guided tour of the Lord Mayor’s Parlour, tea and cakes and a souvenir gift.

For all city council services

contact 234234

Your

HEALTH CENTRES

ABBEY HULTON (Main) 0300 123 0976 Children and Adolescents 0300 123 0987 Mental Health Service BENTILEE

01782 231300

BLURTON (Main) 0300 123 0971 Children and Adolescents 0300 123 0977 Mental Health Service BURSLEM

0300 123 0979

WHITFIELD VALLEY

01782 425720

FENTON

01782 743100

HANFORD (Main) Children's Airway Support Team

0300 123 0974 0300 123 0977

HANLEY

0300 123 0980

LONGTON

0300 123 0993

LONGTON COTTAGE HOSPITAL

0300 123 0993

MEIR

01782 425676

NORTON

01782 534599

PACKMOOR

01782 794600

PICCADILLY CENTRE (Main) 0300 123 0985 Sexual health helpline 0300 123 0970 SMALLTHORNE

0300 123 0982

STOKE Out of Hours District Nursing Service

0300 123 0986 0300 123 0989

TRENT VALE TUNSTALL (Main) Dental Advice Line

01782 425260 0300 123 0972 0300 123 0981

For more information and advice on health issues please call NHS Direct – 24 hrs a day

0845 46 47

or visit www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk or www.nhs.uk

The Archbishop of York Dr John Sentamu delivered an uplifting message to Stoke-on-Trent during his visit to the city.

Dr John Sentamu, who is the Anglican Church’s second most senior figure, vowed to stand by “the great people” of the city and would help them “banish fear”. The Archbishop was addressing around 250 people as guest speaker at a multi-faith event held at the King’s Hall, Stoke, as part of the celebrations to mark the centenary of the six towns federation. He said: “Stoke-on-Trent is part of the country’s great heritage and people can look to these past successes to build for the future.” And referring to the economic hardships he added: “Great people of this city, may I be with you to banish fear. Fear has a crippling effect more than anything else. We will not be afraid.” The event was organised by the Hanley-based Saltbox Christian Centre in conjunction with the city council and followed the successful visit of Archbishop Desmond Tutu two years ago. Lord Mayor Councillor Denver Tolley who attended the event said: “Stoke-on-Trent is a multi-cultural city with many different faiths. I hope Dr Sentamu has had the chance to learn all about our city and its wonderful people.”

Sign up for chance to win £300 Halfords vouchers READERS are being offered the chance to win £300 worth of Halfords vouchers by saddling up for a popular charity cycle ride taking place in the city. The Prostate Cancer Charity Tour Ride hits Stoke-on-Trent for the second year running on 26 September – with local football legend Mark Bright and stars from TV soap Hollyoaks set to be among the hundreds who take part. In 2009, the city saw 1,300 people take to their bikes for the Tour Ride.

Riders can take part in the full 161km race, a 80km challenge event and a five to 25km route designed with families in mind. The charity ride costs £40 for the full stage, £30 for the 80km distance and £25 for a family of four to take part in the 5-25km ride. Anyone who signs up for the Tour Ride through Our City will be entered into the prize draw. To sign up contact Programme Manager for 2010 Richard Radcliffe on 01782 236423.

Fire & Rescue contact numbers S-O-T AREA COMMAND AREA COMMANDER

ASSISTANT AREA COMMANDER – BURSLEM

Wayne Bowcock 01785 898894

Ruth Watchorn-Rice 01785 898554

ASSISTANT AREA COMMANDER – LONGTON

Glynn Luznyj 01785 898693 ASSISTANT AREA COMMANDER – HANLEY

Andy Leedham 01785 898765

HEAD OF STOKE-ON-TRENT RISK REDUCTION

Kelvin Knapper 01785 898882 ADMINISTRATION MANAGER Paula Goodwin 01785 898895

COMMUNITY SAFETY ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS Chris Thompson 01785 898883

RISK REDUCTION OFFICERS Donna Broadhead 01785 898904 Jim Taaffe 01785 898976

Neil Cheshire Burslem 01785 898498 Mick Warillow Hanley 01785 898902

Dave Gallimore 01785 898885

Rehana Iqbal 01785 898891

Pete Hall Safer City Partnership Officer

Paul Shaw 01785 898755

Tracey Cresswell Longton 01785 898951

07967 573263

To book your home fire risk check ring: 0800 0241 999


Our City p23

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r u o Y

SEPTEMBER 2010

Abbey Green

COUNCILLORS

ELLIE WALKER (Community Voice) (01782) 397870 07917 854352 ellie.walker@stoke.gov.uk

Berryhill and Hanley East

Blurton

RITA DALE (City Independents) (01782) 267451 rita.dale@stoke.gov.uk

ADRIAN KNAPPER (Labour) 07714 334453 adrian.knapper @stoke.gov.uk

JOHN DAVIS (City Independents) (01782) 264126 07786 440876 john.davis@stoke.gov.uk

Burslem South

JAVID IQBAL NAJMI (Labour) 07846 879920 javid.najmi@stoke.gov.uk

DEBRA GRATTON (Labour) 07748 251695 debra.gratton@ stoke.gov.uk

MOHAMMED PERVEZ (Labour) 01782 232468 07919 917632 mohammed.pervez@ stoke.gov.uk

GWEN HASSALL (Labour) (01782) 263166 07851 751813 gwen.hassall@stoke.gov.uk

SARAH HILL (Labour) (01782) 845044 07584 607624 sarah.hill@stoke.gov.uk

PAUL SHOTTON (Labour) 07805 638609 paul.shotton@ stoke.gov.uk

TOM REYNOLDS (Labour) (01782) 342295 07584 174484 tom.reynolds@stoke.gov.uk

ZULFIQAR ALI (Liberal Democrat) 07838 262062 zulfiqar.ali@stoke.gov.uk

BRIAN WARD (City Independents) (01782) 312670 07879 115704 brian.ward@stoke.gov.uk

PETER KENT-BAGULEY (Community Voice) 07773 464626 peter.kent-baguley@ stoke.gov.uk

MARGARET BARBER (Labour) (01782) 305514 07825 882059 margaret.barber@ stoke.gov.uk

JEAN EDWARDS (Labour) (01782) 816171 jean.edwards@ stoke.gov.uk

JANINE BRIDGES (Community Voice) (01782) 851842 07989 385631 janine.bridges@ stoke.gov.uk

HAZEL LYTH (Conservative & Independent Alliance) 07825 732680 hazel.lyth@stoke.gov.uk

BAGH ALI (Labour) (01782) 343246 07973 848428 bagh.ali@stoke.gov.uk

AMJID WAZIR (Labour) 07747 830461 amjid.wazir@ stoke.gov.uk

OLWEN HAMER (Labour) (01782) 657133 olwen.hamer@ stoke.gov.uk

Norton and Bradeley

DAVE SUTTON (Liberal Democrat) (01782) 542998 07512 564815 dave.sutton@stoke.gov.uk

ALAN RIGBY (Christian Independent) (01782) 542364 07790 374152 alan.rigby@stoke.gov.uk

JEAN BOWERS (Liberal Democrat) (01782) 262613 07712 350430 jean.bowers@stoke.gov.uk

KIERAN CLARKE (Liberal Democrat) (01782) 788010 07886 358143 kieran.clarke@stoke.gov.uk

Trentham and Hanford

MARK WRIGHT (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 642653 07814 744775 mark.wright@stoke.gov.uk

MOHAMMAD IQBAL (Labour) (01782) 266893 07792 071266 mohammed.iqbal@ stoke.gov.uk

MEGAN RYAN (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 866761 07903 458768 megan.ryan@stoke.gov.uk

Information on city councillors was correct at the time of going to press.

DAVID MARFLEET (BNP) (01782) 876661 07745 157918 david.marfleet@ stoke.gov.uk

MICK SALIH (Community Voice) (01782) 533542 07977 843026 mick.salih@stoke.gov.uk

DAVID CONWAY (City Independents) (01782) 790922 david.conway@ stoke.gov.uk

JOY GARNER (Labour) (01782) 768846 07986 442770 joy.garner@stoke.gov.uk

MATT WILCOX (Labour) 07810 825600 matt.wilcox@ stoke.gov.uk

JOANNE POWELLBECKETT (Cons & Independent Alliance) 07816 518275 joanne.powell-beckett@ stoke.gov.uk

East Valley

KASSEM AL-KHATIB (Labour) (01782) 849823 kassem.al-khatib@stoke.gov.uk

RANDOLPH CONTEH (City Independents) (01782) 256869 randolph.conteh@ stoke.gov.uk

BARBARA BEESTON (City Independents) (01782) 612072 07729 896622 barbara.beeston@ stoke.gov.uk

Meir Park and Sandon

MICHAEL BARNES (Community Voice) (01782) 870065 07850 939611 michael.barnes@ stoke.gov.uk

CLIVE BRIAN (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 315702 07950 285366 clive.brian@stoke.gov.uk

JOHN BURGESS (BNP) (01782) 394397 07889 137308 john.burgess@stoke.gov.uk

ABI BROWN (Conservative & Independent Alliance) 07793 844169 abi.brown@stoke.gov.uk

Stoke and Trent Vale

DUNCAN WALKER (Labour) (01782) 533198 duncan.walker@ stoke.gov.uk

Tunstall

ROSS IRVING (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 335982 07900 135565 ross.irving@stoke.gov.uk

MERVIN SMITH (Labour) (01782) 537211 07584 607623 mervin.smith@ stoke.gov.uk

Hartshill and Penkhull

Longton South

DENVER TOLLEY (Labour) (01782) 316815 07799 032939 denver.tolley@stoke.gov.uk

STEVEN BATKIN (BNP) (01782) 859054 steven.batkin@ stoke.gov.uk

Burslem North

Northwood and Birches Head

TERENCE FOLLOWS (City Independents) (01782) 318127 07944 055379 terence.follows@ stoke.gov.uk

MELANIE BADDELEY (BNP) (01782) 763615 07979 508837 melanie.baddeley@ stoke.gov.uk

Hanley West and Shelton

Longton North

MARK DAVIS (Labour) 07813 473625 mark.davis@stoke.gov.uk

TONY FRADLEY (Labour) 07919 528515 tony.fradley@stoke.gov.uk

23

Bentilee and Townsend

Chell and Packmoor

Fenton

MICK BELL (City Independents) (01782) 847760 mick.bell@stoke.gov.uk

ROY NAYLOR (City Independents) (01782) 313975 07833 183922 roy.naylor@stoke.gov.uk

Our City

GAVIN WEBB (Libertarian Party) 07949 026660 gavin.webb@ stoke.gov.uk

JEREMY DILLON (Labour) 07505 777571 jeremy.dillon@stoke.gov.uk

PAULINE JOYNSON (Community Voice) (01782) 413683 07813 836057 pauline.joynson@ stoke.gov.uk

Weston and Meir North

MOHAMMED MATLOOB (Labour) (01782) 577658 07811 147372 mohammed.matloob@ stoke.gov.uk

MAJID KHAN (Labour) 07989 441707 majid.khan@stoke.gov.uk

MICHAEL COLEMAN (BNP) (01782) 311697 07926 532922 michael.coleman@ stoke.gov.uk

JOHN DANIELS (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 396780 07885 894804 john.daniels@stoke.gov.uk

RUTH ROSENAU (Labour) (01782) 501940 07870 503575 ruth.rosenau@ stoke.gov.uk


Our City p24

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25/8/10

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Our City S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 0

City of Stoke-on-Trent Athletic Club High Jumper Tom Baskeyfield, aged 14, in training at Northwood Stadium.

HOTBEDS OF

sporting

talent T WO of the city’s state-of-the-art sporting facilities are fast developing a reputation as premier regional and national competition venues as well as proving to be hotbeds for achievement and talent ahead of the London 2012 Olympics.

Fenton Manor Sports Complex and Northwood Stadium are providing training grounds for some of the area’s best sporting talent. And at the same time they are attracting a range of high profile contests and track and field meetings which are bringing a host of the best competitors from all over the country to the city. Fenton Manor is now the venue of choice for British Gymnastics – Olympic athlete Beth Tweddle has competed there – and it has also staged World Title Boxing fights promoted by former World Welterweight Champion Ricky Hatton and televised on Sky Sports. Other popular sports include swimming, badminton, table

tennis and squash. It is also the training venue for the City of Stoke-on-Trent Swimming Club (COSACSS). Events at the 2,500 capacity venue have included the British Gymnastics National Rhythmic, Acrobatic and Tumbling Championship, International Table Tennis events, including England v India, and regional and national swimming galas. Meanwhile Northwood Stadium, which is also operated by the city council’s Sport and Leisure Services is the only athletics centre in the area which is certified by the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) and is home to the City of Stoke Athletics Club.

Second Dan Class Kendo student Dave Boulton in training at Fenton Manor. Kendo is one of many sports available at the state-of-the-art facility.

It boasts an international standard running track and a grandstand which means up to 7,000 spectators have enjoyed regional, national and international events in recent years. Some of the country’s best up-and-coming talents have started their careers or trained there too. International sprinting siblings Alex and Ashlee Nelson, Team GB pole vaulters Steven Lewis and Kate Dennison and triple

jumper Ben Williams are among the local names who have trained there and owe much to the facilities Cabinet Member Councillor Hazel Lyth, whose portfolio includes Sport, Leisure and Culture, said: “Both Northwood Stadium and Fenton Manor are fantastic facilities that the city is rightly proud to have. “They can cater for grass roots level events right up to regional and national competitions, while at the same time offering families

scores of sporting and leisure opportunities. With the London 2012 Olympics now just two years away our attention is turning to what Team GB will be able to achieve. “It is nice to think that some of those who will be going for gold will have trained in the city at these excellent facilities.” For more details about sport and leisure facilities in Stoke-on-Trent log onto stoke.gov.uk/leisure-services

The race is on to find the area’s fastest sprint runners A CHALLENGE has been thrown down to would-be Usain Bolts to find the fastest sprinter in North Staffordshire. The competition has been organised by the City of Stoke Athletics Club as part of its Athletics Open Day being held at Northwood Stadium on September 25 from 11am.

The overall fastest male and female over 100 metres will win the Waterworld Trophy and prizes will also be awarded to the top three males and female runners in five age categories, from Under 11s through to Seniors. The 100 metre challenge is free to enter

Our City is published by a partnership of

Stoke-on-Trent City Council, NHS Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire Police, Staffordshire Fire and Rescue and Jobcentre Plus

Contact us by mail at FREEPOST Our City or by email at ourcity@stoke.gov.uk or telephone 01782 236703

and is open to anyone who lives in the city, Newcastle-under-Lyme and the Staffordshire Moorlands. Anyone wanting to take up the challenge must complete a race entry form. They can be found and submitted online at www.stokeac.org.uk


Our City Issue 17  

Stoke-on-Trent City Council Newspaper.

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