Page 1

Our City p1

5/11/08

17:17

Page 1

COUNCIL PUBLICATION OF THE YEAR

Our City ISSUE 7: NOVEMBER 2008

King’s Hall stars in latest British cult movie Souled Out SEE PAGE SIX


Our City p2

2

6/11/08

09:07

Page 1

Our City N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 8

Mark Meredith

E L E C T E D M AYO R

Exciting times as city shapes up for future IT continues to be a busy and exciting time for Stoke-on-Trent. With each month that passes, Stoke-on-Trent continues to grow in stature. This month has been no exception. I was proud to launch the Regeneration Business Plan on behalf of the North Staffordshire Regeneration Partnership. It’s a 30 year plan for a £1.5 billion transformation of North Staffordshire. The focus is on boosting investment, creating jobs and repositioning our area. It’s important that at a time of global financial uncertainty, people know that locally we are planning properly for the longterm. It’s another packed issue including exclusive stills from the Souled Out film shot in the King’s Hall, a special report on the improvements in the health of our people, a new initiative to promote free access to leisure centres for thousands of people and lots, lots more. What Our City shows more than anything is how public services in Stoke-on-Trent are working together, pooling resources and planning ahead to improve all aspects of life in the Potteries. We’re getting there together, although there are still many challenges ahead. If there is anything I can help you with please e-mail me at mayormeredith@ stoke.gov.uk, call me on 01782 232827 or write to me at Civic Centre, Glebe Street, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 1RN.

PUTTING STOKE-ON-TRENT ON THE MAP... the city now has its very own version of the Monopoly board game, complete with Potteries place names. Our picture shows Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey with a giant version of what is sure to be a popular Christmas gift in the city.

Regeneration plan to bear fruit next year T

HIRTY year plans for the £1.5 billion transformation of Stoke-on-Trent and neighbouring areas in North Staffordshire will start to change the city landscape as early as 2009. As the North Staffordshire Regeneration Partnership launched its first business plan detailing major projects which will change the area forever, work was already under way to immediately start to deliver some of the landmark schemes. For the first time, the major partners and stakeholders in regeneration across public, private and voluntary sectors are all committed to a shared vision of the future. Plans include a multi-million pound new shopping centre for Hanley, central bus station and improved transport links, a vibrant business district creating new jobs on the former Unity House site, a huge new University Quarter, improvements to Newcastle, Cheadle, Leek and Biddulph town centres and knowledge-based developments at Keele University. Stoke-on-Trent’s Elected Mayor

Meeting dates are now online Our City is printed on 100 per cent recycled paper. When you have finished with this publication please help the environment by passing it on to a friend or put it in your recycle blue bag.

A full list of dates and times of full city council meetings and committee meetings can be found on the council website stoke.gov.uk/meetingdates

Mark Meredith, who is chairman of the NSRP board, said: “For the first time ever in the history of North Staffordshire we share a bold vision of the future and we speak as one voice. “Our vision for 2030 is to transform North Staffordshire into a place which offers prosperity and quality of life by design for the people who live and work here. The focus is on boosting investment, creating jobs and repositioning our area, both to the outside world and to people within North Staffordshire.”

Developers Progress towards the business plan’s aims has already started, with a planning application to redevelop Hanley’s East West Precinct already lodged with the city council. Preferred developers have been shortlisted for the city’s University Quarter, with new colleges, a hi-tech knowledge hub, media centre, performing arts centre and science building. The new buildings, including a new Stoke on Trent College campus and a

new City of Stoke-on-Trent Sixth Form College, are set to open between 2010 and 2012. Soon after Christmas the partnership expects to make an announcement on a preferred developer for the city centre business district, while environmental improvement works on public squares in Hanley will start next year. Elsewhere in the city centre, the huge new Tesco superstore at the top of Broad Street is expected to be open by the end of 2009, making way for the Hope Village housing development and the designs for a brand new bus station will be commenced next year. Mayor Meredith said the time for talking was over and North Staffordshire was entering a new era of delivering on a major regeneration strategy. He said: “We have a regeneration plan which sets specific milestones. The officers in charge of regeneration in North Staffordshire will be accountable for delivering by specific dates. “This is an exciting step forward and will continue to bear fruit over the next two decades.”

Give us your feedback on this issue of Our City by emailing ourcity@stoke.gov.uk or write to: FREEPOST Our City – next issue out January 24


Our City p3

6/11/08

11:42

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

‘Sick City’ becoming a ‘Fit City’ says health chief

W

HEN Dr Giri Rajaratnam first checked the pulse of Stoke-on-Trent 12 years ago the prognosis was not promising. More people died from acute illnesses like cancer and heart disease than in many other parts of the country, while life expectancy in the Potteries was alarmingly low. Little wonder that Stoke-on-Trent was then branded a “Sick City.”

Fast forward to the present and Dr Rajaratnam, the city’s Director of Public Health, is positively encouraged by the patient’s progress. The Director’s latest annual report shows that people in Stoke-on-Trent are living longer and fewer people are dying from the major killers – cancer, heart disease, strokes and respiratory illnesses. Now more schemes are being introduced with the aim of turning the once “Sick City” into one of the healthiest in the country. Efforts will be made to increase awareness of Lifestyle programmes aimed at combating problems like obesity. Midwives, Health Visitors and Early Years professionals will work together to offer improved support for pregnant women and their babies; vaccination for cervical cancer will be available in schools for teenage girl pupils and 17 and 18-year-olds who have left school can be vaccinated at their doctor’s surgery. Messages about sexual health, contraception and relationships will be spread in the city’s schools and bowel cancer screening for the over-60s has just started. One of the more important programmes is to help GPs and their practice teams to do the best they can for the communities which they serve.

This means that NHS Stoke on Trent is agreeing some standards and, more importantly, a support team to help practices increase the quality of care they provide. Dr Rajaratnam said: “Naturally I am pleased with the improvements that have been achieved, but I have to be cautiously optimistic. We need to wait another couple of years to see if the figures are sustainable or a false dawn.” The gap between people in Stoke-on-Trent and the rest of England is closing. Life expectancy in Stoke-on-Trent is now increasing faster than in comparable areas like Manchester, Wigan and Barnsley – though we are still around two years behind the national average. Fewer people in Stoke-on-Trent are dying prematurely of the most serious illnesses. Figures in the Director’s annual report show that between 2002 and 2006, the number of deaths from circulatory diseases such as heart disease, strokes etc. reduced by 35 per cent in Stoke-on-Trent, whereas nationally the reduction was only 23 per cent – bringing the gap between the national average to a quarter of what it was in the mid-1990s.

Healthier Future Likewise, the 743 deaths from cancer and 416 from respiratory illness also represent a considerable reduction in the gap with national averages, while infant mortality has fallen to its lowest-ever level with seven babies per 1,000 dying before their first birthday – four fewer than in 2002. So what is Dr Rajaratnam’s prescription for an even healthier future? Education and decent incomes are key ingredients of his medicine to make us even healthier. “Around 50 per cent of the city’s population live in deprivation, which accounts

Dr Giri Rajaratnam pictured at the new Shelton Health Centre with Health Visitor Debbie Lloyd, centre, mum Kerry Bloor and baby Lilymae, aged ten weeks.

for 30 per cent of ill health,” he explained. Changes in the health service could reduce the inequality gaps by up to 40 per cent, but the remaining 60 per cent is down to improving access to education which leads to affluence and an awareness of the need to change life styles such as stopping smoking, cutting down on alcohol, eating healthily and taking exercise. “People in Stoke-on-Trent are taking notice of these things – but not enough are.” A crucial part of the doctor’s remedy is working closely with the Local Strategic Partnership’s Forum made up of civic leaders, education providers, employers and many more groups and agencies as well as health professionals to bring about better housing together with the skills and training that lead to well paid jobs. As an example of this effective partnership approach he points to the North Staffs Warm Zone in which local authorities and the NHS work together to improve fuel poverty and enable people to heat their homes and thereby prevent worsening of chronic respiratory illnesses. Other factors helping Stoke-on-Trent to close the health gaps include the city’s increasingly popular smoking cessation programme, the ban on smoking in public places and advances in medicine and surgical procedures. Dr Rajaratnam said: “I am cautiously optimistic that if everyone in the city works together we can reduce and even eradicate the health inequalities that have plagued this city for so long.” What could be done to improve Stoke-on-Trent’s health even more? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk.

Our City

Rock around country park BUDDING geologists uncovered mysteries of the past at two special Park Hall Country Park open days. They were led around the Hulme Quarry by Dr Patrick Cossey of Staffordshire University, who showed how the landscape had changed through erosion and earthquakes over the last 200 million years. There was a rock quiz in the visitors centre, as well as displays showing how the quarry has eroded. Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sport and Leisure, said: “Geology is an incredibly interesting subject and Parkhall’s Geology Day is a great chance for people to learn about the history of the area. “Parks don’t have to be just green spaces and in Hulme Quarry we have an interesting natural resource that gives a big insight into a subject most people may not know too much about.”

Repairs alerts sent by text A TEXT message alert system has been set up to keep residents informed on when their city council homes are being repaired. Kier Stoke will now send a message to mobile phone owners who have requested works 24 hours before they are carried out. Councillor Hazel Lyth, Portfolio Holder for Enterprise and Culture, said:“This is a great way of improving communication between us and residents – ensuring they are in when works are set to take place. They will also still receive written confirmation, whether they own a mobile or not.” People who wish to be texted should give their mobile numbers to operators at Stoke- on-Call at the time of reporting a fault. Residents can phone Stoke-on-Call on 01782 234234.

Yo! Ho! Ho! for library fun NATIONAL Bookstart Day encouraged children to start reading at six city libraries with pirate story sessions. Children were treated to free pirate themed booty including a book, bookmark and sticker. Councillor Hazel Lyth, Portfolio Holder for Enterprise and Culture said:“Using themes like pirates is a great way of encouraging young people to take up reading and learn more about the past.”

3


Our City p4

6/11/08

4 Our City

11:25

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

New number to contact the police THE single non-emergency telephone number for Staffordshire Police has been changed to 0300 123 4455. The new number was chosen with the help of members of the public who are members of the force’s Citizens’ Panel as well as the Communications Independent Advisory Group because it’s easy to remember and dial. It replaces the previous 0845-type number following advice from Ofcom, regulator of the UK communications industry. The new number allows the public to make non-emergency calls to Staffordshire Police for the price of a local call from both landline and mobile phones – and they can be included in inclusive call minutes or discount schemes such as “Friends and Family” packages. Calls to 0300 123 4455 are handled by highly trained operators who are all experienced police staff. You can use this number to get in touch with your local beat bobby or Police Community Support Officer (PCSO). Details of how to do this are featured on page 22 of Our City. To contact police regarding an emergency you still dial 999. An emergency call is defined as an inquiry relating to: ● Violence being used or threatened. ● A danger to life. ● A crime in progress or an offender who has been disturbed. ● A road collision involving injury. ● A non-injury road collision causing serious traffic congestion.

The first point of call for non-emergencies – Jane Mulliner, one of the Public Service Desk Operatives based at Hanley Police Station.

The call handlers who

solve problems F

OR a person who spends most of her working life on the phone listening to other people’s problems, Jane Mulliner appears to be surprisingly happy in her job.

She is one of the Public Service Desk Operatives based in a first floor suite at Hanley Police Station who between them each day handle hundreds of non-emergency calls made to the police by members of the public. Like all her colleagues who run the service on rotating shifts between 7am and 2am the following day, Jane uses touch screen computer technology to pass on details to a relevant police officer or put callers through to other agencies who can provide the help they need. If she does consider a call needs urgent action, Jane passes it by computer to the Hanley Control Room downstairs where similar technology backed up by pinpoint accurate computer mapping systems means that 90 per cent of emergency 999 calls are answered within 30 seconds – one of the best response rates in the country.

Typically Jane deals with three to four calls each hour of her nine-hour shift, though there are no targets. The priority is to give each caller all the time needed to listen to their problem and deal with it in the best possible way. In fact when Our City visited the Public Service Desk unit it had already received 266 calls that day – and it was only halfway through the normal operating hours.

Crime details Jane has been a member of police staff for 16 years – and as a Special Constable she also gets to help the community with face-to-face contact rather than through her headset. She said: “Most of the calls I deal with will not involve sending a police officer to the scene – at least, not immediately. Typically, the crimes I deal with are vehicles that have been broken into overnight, handbag thefts, reports of anti social behaviour and assaults or robberies which have taken place. “I take all the crime details and investigate by phone. That means I ask the caller about CCTV in the vicinity of the incident, whether they heard or

saw anything suspicious and arrange for a scene-of-crime officer to visit them and arrange for a statement to be taken. “But you never know what the next call will be about. People use our number to talk to us about a whole range of problems, such as domestic violence, mental health issues or their children’s behavioural problems. “Some, like the elderly who may be worried about the presence of large numbers of young people near their home, often just need to be reassured, and usually we are able to put their minds at rest. “If we can’t offer direct police assistance, I can advise callers about the best people to contact – such as social services, Citizens Advice Bureau or the city council – and can often connect them to the relevant service through my computer.” Jane added: “To do this job you need to be experienced and have a knowledge of criminal and civil law – but the most important qualifications are common sense and the ability to listen. A lot of people who ring are grateful for the reassurance and advice we offer. “It just helps them to talk to

someone like us about a problem or something that’s worrying them. “I love the job. Every day is different and it’s very rewarding to be able to help someone even if you don’t see them face-to-face. It gives me a sense of achievement.” Public Service Desk Operatives like Jane sometimes receive touching letters and cards thanking them for their help. “That makes it all worthwhile. It’s nice to know that what we do is appreciated,” said Jane.

Help and advice Steve Clews, Deputy Manager of the Hanley Control Room which works closely with the Public Service Desk and handles the 0300 non-emergency calls when operatives are busy, said: “The Public Service Desk staff do a superb job by taking pressure off the Control Room and allowing us to focus on reacting in the fastest and most efficient way to emergency calls. “The operatives are able to provide non-999 callers with all the help, advice and time that they need and the operatives are an effective first point of contact for many people who need the help of the police.”


Our City p5

6/11/08

09:36

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

5

Continuing the series on unsung heroes, Our City talks to John Heath, one of the council’s small army of dedicated gritter drivers...

W

HEN winter . temperatures dip towards freezing or the first flakes of snow start to fall, motorists welcome the reassuring sight of a gritting lorry on the city’s roads. But how many give the driver in the darkened cab a second thought?

A50 which are the responsibility of the Highways Agency) and, like John, it will be their second job of the day. The team of gritters are drawn mainly from the refuse collection service, while others are Highways department and road sweeper staff. John said: “I have salted all ten routes over the years. Sometimes we would be back on the road after midnight for another run if it had rained and washed away the salt, and when that happened we did not work the next day. However from this year there are new shift arrangements which mean we can never be called out

twice on the same night. “We are loaded with between 30 and 80 tonnes of salt, depending on the conditions, and if more than two inches of snow is forecast, the gritter is fitted with a snowplough. “The vehicle is programmed to scatter 10 grams of salt per square metre for frost and 40 grams for snow. “It sometimes gets a bit bleak, especially on the early morning runs when sometimes I seem to be the only person on the road, but the cab is warm and comfortable. I’m used to seeing a line of traffic form behind me as

Photograph courtesy of The Sentinel

He could well be John Heath who will have already done a day’s work before turning out on a gritting run to keep main roads and bus routes throughout Stoke-on-Trent safe and prevent traffic from slipping and sliding into gridlock. John joined the city council’s small army of 30 or so gritter drivers 14 years ago when he started driving skip vehicles for the local authority, and now assists with that department’s administration at the Cromer Road depot in Northwood. He works 7am to 4pm on the “day job.” But when the special weather-watch website monitored closely by Highways Responsive Maintenance staff, also at Cromer Road, warns of freezing conditions for that night, John collects his gritter lorry loaded with salt at around 6pm and for the next three hours treats the roads of his regular “patch” around Hanley city centre. Then it’s back to work at 7am the next day. Teams of ten gritters go out each time to treat all primary roads and main bus routes in the city (apart from the A500 and

TRUE GRIT... John Heath all set for the big freeze.

FLASHBACK... to January 2004 when the city’s gritters battled against freak weather conditions.

most drivers feel safer following a gritter when the roads are icy, but sometimes a boy racer does overtake me.” As well as routine gritting runs, John and his colleagues are also called to the scene of accidents caused by the winter conditions in order to treat that particular stretch of highway and he often goes to the rescue of stranded buses and heavy goods vehicles to spread salt to give them enough grip to get going again.

Snowballs John has so far avoided coming to grief – but gritting crews do face dangers. “I once tried to salt an ice rink created by kids pouring water on the freezing road and they pelted me with snow balls, which made it difficult for me to concentrate on my driving. “A colleague using a snow plough was hit by a car whose driver turned out to be three times over the legal drink-drive limit.” Bob Brock, Highways Responsive Maintenance Manager who scrambles the gritting crews by calling their mobiles when the weather website he monitors moves from amber to red alert, said: “If the roads are clear and we get no complaints,

then we know we’ve done our job properly. The drivers are real unsung heroes, and it’s easy to take them for granted. But without them the main routes in the city would come to a halt.” John said: “Occasionally I get stopped by people who complain we haven’t salted the road where they live, and I always try to explain that our job is to keep the main roads and bus routes clear. Salting all the side roads and lesser used routes in the city would not be possible.” He added: “I suppose you have to be a glutton for punishment to volunteer for this job. Every day is different and I have had to turn out on Christmas Day. We check on weather forecasts more than most people, and our families worry about us when we are called out. I always get a call from my fiancée checking I’m all right. “But in all the years I’ve been a gritter I never fail to get a lot of personal satisfaction from knowing that what I do is helping to make roads safe and keeping the city moving.” Now, how’s that for a touch of True Grit? What do you think about the city’s gritting service? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk


Our City p6

6/11/08

6 Our City

11:27

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

A stylised townscape of Burslem by Rob Pointon.

Artistic views of the city in a very distinctive style ARTIST Rob Pointon has made it his mission to put the sights, scenes and architecture of his home city on to canvas – in a very distinctive style. The 26-year-old fine art graduate (pictured below) has produced more than 50 oil paintings of Stoke-on-Trent landscapes and buildings – ranging from terraced houses in Shelton and a footbridge over the A50 to Burslem’s iconic old town hall and the Wedgwood Institute. His “wide-angled perspective’ treatment of his subjects has already been critically-acclaimed and his work has been exhibited at the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery as well as featuring in private collections in France and the UK, including those of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Devonshire. “I like to capture the whole scene rather than a tight framing of a scene,” said Rob who sets up his easel on the street and paints while being watched by passers-by. I like to soak up the atmosphere of what I am drawing or painting.” He is currently working on a five-painting commission from Potteries-born comedian and TV personality Nick Hancock – one of which is a view looking up at the roof of Stoke station. Another is a landscape of the only part of Stoke City’s old Victoria Ground that remains – some steps, now covered in undergrowth, that once took fans to the original Boothen End. For a life-long Stoke fan like Nick, that will be an evocative painting – and one, which given the Rob Pointon treatment, is bound to a very special work of art.

A job not to be sniffed at... IF the pottery industry’s saggar maker’s bottom knocker is the world’s most unusual job title, then Stoke-on-Trent also has one of the most stomach-churning jobs... making sure the globe’s biggest collection of loos and sewers has an authentic pong. Gladstone Pottery Museum’s operations officer Ian Watson runs a hi-tech sound and light system which welcomes thousands of visitors to the Flushed with Pride gallery. But the exhibition’s jewel in the crown is an open sewer complete with authentic smell, thanks to a “perfume” called Flatulence, which is more expensive than many ladies’ high street brands. Ian, who works with a dedicated band of volunteers to run the popular museum, said:“It’s concentrated stuff and smells foul so we keep it on the lowest setting and it still makes their eyes water!” ● A saggar maker’s bottom knocker made the bottom of a saggar – used when firing pots – by placing clay in a metal hoop and literally knocking it into shape.

A dance scene from Souled Out – filmed on location in Stoke-on-Trent.

Movie makeover for the King’s Hall S

TOKE’S King’s Hall, the venue for many a glittering occasion over the decades, has a starring role in a new movie to be shown at next May’s Cannes Film Festival... but few will be able to recognise it on the big screen.

The hall was chosen as a main location for the filming of Souled Out, set in the 1970s Northern Soul scene, because it closely resembled the legendary club, the Wigan Casino. However, before filming began, producers gave the hall a period makeover including major changes to the stage. In the interests of authenticity, walls were painted, exit signs became red and even the toilets made to look dirty with a brown wash put on the tiling. (Soulies – as the Northern Soul afficionados were know – recall that the Casino toilets were notoriously gruesome). Tim Steele, a city council Venue Officer, said: “It was an amazing transformation. When people go to see the film I don’t think they will recognise the place as the King’s Hall.” Souled Out, which stars BAFTA award-winning actor Martin Compston (featured in our cover picture), Alfie Allen, Craig Parkinson, Nichola Burley and Felicity Jones, is tipped to be another British classic. It is a love story set against the backdrop of 1974 Wigan and the famous “All Nighters” at the Casino. Natasha Carlish, the film’s

The toilets at the King’s Hall were given a makeover to give them the authentic look of 1970s Wigan Casino. Pictured are actresses Nichola Burley, right, and Felicity Jones. co-producer, said: “We were very appreciative of the help and support we received from people at the city council. “We may well be back next year because there’s a strong chance that we will stage the local premier at the King’s Hall.” It is perhaps entirely appropriate that Souled Out should be filmed in Stoke-on-Trent as, like Wigan, it was a hot-bed for Northern Soul in the seventies, staging All Nighters at

Tunstall’s Golden Torch and Hanley’s Top Rank. Hundreds of extras were recruited for the film’s big dance scenes including students from Staffordshire University. But some original 1970 local Soulies who donned their old “baggies” and turned up for the auditions hoping to get in on the act were sadly disappointed. “Of course, we were just too old – but it was worth a try,” one of them lamented.


Our City p7

6/11/08

11:28

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

7

Mary’s new home is

best of both

worlds S PRIGHTLY Mary Flanaghan has always looked on the bright side – and despite an illness that put her in hospital and having to cope with failing eyesight, the 84-year-old widow still enjoys life to the full.

That’s largely due to the fact that as a resident of Rowan Village, a luxury extra care housing development for the elderly in Meir, Mary can still live under her own roof while having friends, help, support and lots of activities literally on her doorstep. She was one of the first residents to move into the sumptuous development that boasts 75 apartments as well as a gym, shop, hair salon, restaurant, healthy living suite and gardens. She moved to Rowan Village when the flagship development – the first of a series of similar developments planned for the over-55s throughout the city – opened its doors earlier this year. Architects drew up a development which is modern, light and airy, using stimulating colours and modern furnishings. There are eight apartments specifically reserved for people who need extra support when

they come out of hospital or prevent admission to hospital in the first place. Six apartments are reserved for older people who care for a dependant with a learning disability. It’s not just the village’s impressive facilities tailored to suit the needs of each resident that Mary appreciates. Knowing she can count on first class support from staff, while Mary enjoying the independence of Flanaghan having her own apartment, has her hair means just as much to this done by outgoing lady with a bubbly hairdresser Wendy personality. Locker at the Mary said: “I have made lots Rowan Village of new friends and the staff are salon. marvellous. I particularly look forward to meeting up with about 30 other residents every morning for coffee – we have a good always enjoyed life to the full and gossip!” is usually the life and soul of the Highlights of her busy social life party, it’s lovely to be able to mix include Saturday night bingo, with the other residents and join bake a cake sessions, fish and chip in all the activities.” suppers, quiz nights and watching Rowan Village, owned and TV in the lounge. managed by Staffordshire Housing Mary added: “Like a lot of Association, is purpose-designed people of my age I want to be for people who need independent independent with my own accommodation, with care and accommodation, but with my bad support on hand 24 hours a day, eyesight it’s reassuring to know seven days a week, as, when and if there are people around me to needed. It also provides short help if I have a problem. term rehabilitation from either “Also, as a person who has hospital or home.

The scheme was funded by the city council, the Housing Corporation, Staffordshire Housing Association, West Midlands Regional Health Authority, the Department of Health and Renew North Staffordshire. Michila Goodwin, Manager of Rowan Village, said: “Residents can continue to enjoy an independent lifestyle while at the same time knowing that any care or help they may need is always on hand.”

What do you think of plans to provide more homes and support to older people? Write to freepost ourcity or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk Alternatively to obtain a Housing Options for Older People booklet and questionnaire please contact the Housing Enabling Team on 01782 233330 or email housing.strategy@stoke. gov.uk

Speed camera volunteers help to make roads safer

Volunteer Bill Harvey with a laser speed gun in Barlaston Road watched by, left to right, fellow volunteer Pam Pearce, PCSO Paul Muller and PC Sean Woodward.

A PIONEERING scheme which arms volunteers with speed guns is set to be rolled out across Stoke-on-Trent after a successful pilot in the south west of the city. Speedwatch, run by Staffordshire Police, uses hi-tech laser equipment to track the speed, registration number and make of a vehicle. Offenders are sent an advisory warning letter telling them to slow down and keep to the speed limit. If the same vehicle is caught twice, a follow-up final letter is issued and enforcement action considered. Following the launch of three schemes in Newstead, Trentham and Penkhull, other areas could soon be using the technology to catch offenders. PC Sean Woodward, of the South Western Neighbourhood Policing Unit, said: “The three pilot projects are doing well and have proved themselves as a great way of raising

awareness for drivers. We could soon be seeing this in many other areas of Stoke-on-Trent – it has certainly had an effect in the areas currently being targeted.” The initial scheme was launched in Newstead – the first of its kind in Stoke-on-Trent – where six residents signed up to monitor speed in Barlaston Road and Waterside Drive. It was then introduced in Trentham – where four volunteers monitor Burrington Drive and New Inn Lane and, as Our City went to press, a scheme was getting underway in the Newcastle Lane area of Penkhull. Bill Harvey, who volunteers in Newstead, said: “It’s had a really substantial impact, especially in Barlaston Lane. As soon as drivers see the speed camera and the hi-vis jackets they slow right down. People are now driving at 30mph rather than 40 or 50 mph.”


Our City p8

6/11/08

8 Our City

11:29

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Public asked for views on future of council elections ELECTIONS held almost every year in Stoke-on-Trent could soon be a thing of the past following the City Council’s latest consultation on improving local government. Earlier this year the Governance Commission made 14 recommendations, the first of which was a move to ‘whole-council’ elections every four years. This would result in the whole council of 60 councillors being elected at once every four years. Other Governance Commission recommendations, such as reducing the overall number of councillors, having only one councillor per ward, and increasing the number of wards are dependant on a move to ‘whole-council’ elections being carried out first. The city council is now writing to organisations in the city to ask their views, which will be put to a meeting of councillors in January. Readers are invited to tell the city council what they think. Further information can be obtained from our web site: stoke.gov.uk/ourfuture or by calling 01782 232485. Comments can be made on-line using the link from this web site, or by writing to Our Future, Freepost Our City, ST4 1RN.

Bluetooth messaging targets thousands A

NYONE with a Bluetooth mobile phone could soon be getting a message from Staffordshire Police.

They are using a revolutionary transmitter device called The Blue Zone that can send messages to 28 Bluetooth handsets at a time within a radius of up to 50 metres. The device will be used in busy locations such as the city centre or at big public events like football matches to send

messages such as the new police non-emergency number 0300 123 4455, helpful information like how to contact domestic violence helplines and even photographs and contact details of local neighbourhood officers. Phone owners will be alerted that Staffordshire Police would like to contact them, and they can decide whether or not to receive the message.

All messages and pictures sent by the Blue Zone service can be stored on phones so the information is always instantly available if needed. Staffordshire Police’s Media and Communications Manager David Bailey said: “With the increasing use of Bluetooth phones, this is an effective way of communicating with a large number of people in just a short space of time. “Using the Blue Zone transmitter means that around 1,000 people can be contacted by phone in an hour.”

Enlightening displays which help cut campus crime.

The writing’s on the wall for university safety THE writing is on the wall for Staffordshire University students, thanks to a giant digital projector that Staffordshire Police are using to project safety messages and useful information on to the exterior of the Stoke campus. This spectacular hi-tech method of beaming huge images on to buildings has been used by TV style and fashion guru Gok Wan in his How To Look Good Naked programme. Now its displaying helpful information to students, such as how to keep their laptops safe, the new nonemergency number 0300 123 4455 for Staffordshire Police and a picture and contact details of the campus’s own police officer.

Cancer screening scheme looks for volunteers VOLUNTEERS are being sought to help pilot a new health scheme that aims to identify people with bowel, lung and breast cancer earlier in Stoke-on-Trent. The project, being delivered by the city’s Primary Care Trust, uses local residents and professionals to educate and raise awareness of the symptoms of cancer. The teams deliver health-related information to get people to go to their GP earlier. From early next year, schemes will get underway in Burslem, Longton and Norton and Bradeley. The initiative, which is funded by the Department of Health’s Improvement Foundation, is also being trailed in 10 other PCT’s across the country. To get involved phone Project Manager Jill Davies on 01782 298064 or 07850 924753.

Staffordshire Police Media and Communications Manager David Bailey uses the hi-tech Bluetooth device to contact thousands of fans at the Stoke v Spurs Premier League game.

Free leisure access to boost city health A LARGE-SCALE project to improve the city’s health and fitness has been launched after the city council was awarded a £500,000 grant. The city is engaging in the Be Active, Be Healthy 20-week Lifestyle Programme, designed to help people either lose weight or avoid heart disease. Sport England has awarded the funding to implement the project – run in conjunction with NHS Stoke on Trent. It allows anyone involved free access to the city’s leisure

facilities. Criteria to be eligible for the scheme include being at risk or suffering from heart disease, having recovered from heart problems, or being diabetic. Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sport and Leisure, said: “Stoke-on-Trent is committed to improving the health and fitness of everyone living in the city.” Following completion of the programme, participants will be presented with an Energise Plus Card, giving them discounts to

city council leisure facilities for 12 months. Rauf Mirza, Chairman of Sport England West Midlands Regional Sports Board said: “Taking part in sport and physical activity can have such an impact on improving the health of individuals. This award has been given to make a real impact across a high number of people in the city whose health is seriously at risk.” ● For further information please contact Marie Jenkins on 01782 234992.


Our City p9

6/11/08

11:19

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

Strategy to help keep households warm this winter

Plan protects city residents from the cold M

AJOR efforts are being made to ensure that everyone who lives in the city can afford to keep warm during the winter months.

The city council’s three-year Affordable Warmth Strategy targets homes in fuel poverty – that is where more than ten per cent of household income is spent on fuel to keep warm. Last available statistics showed that 31 per cent of private sector households across the city were living in fuel poverty – but it’s likely that figure has increased, particularly in view of the recent steep rises in domestic gas and electricity prices. The Affordable Warmth Strategy aims to tackle fuel poverty by promoting and achieving affordable warmth. The strategy sets out a raft of initiatives, which include: ● Installing up to 20,000 insulation measures in homes across the city. ● Referral of 3,000 households for benefit health checks. ● An energy efficiency training programme

for front-line staff, including health, housing and social care workers, to help them identify households living in fuel poverty and advise them on what help is available. ● Supporting and strengthening the local energy efficiency advice service. Councillor Joan Bell, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Neighbourhood Management, said: “This strategy is a pledge by the city council and its partners to play a key role in improving housing conditions, raising incomes, tackling health inequalities and reducing energy usage in the city over the next three years.” For free independent advice about saving energy and keeping warm, call the local energy efficiency advice line on 0800 389 2258. A copy of the Affordable Warmth Strategy can be downloaded from stoke.gov.uk/affordablewarmth What more could be done to help residents stay warm this winter? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

20,000 homes in Stoke-on-Trent will benefit from energy efficiency measures such as grants for cavity wall insulation

Mrs Hannah Cotton, of Newstead, should have a warmer winter this year thanks to loft insulation installed by Kieren Jordan and Kevin Dale, kneeling.

Tree planting offsets conference carbon footprint ELECTED Mayor Mark Meredith joined school pupils to plant the first of 500 trees in the city to help highlight environmental concerns. The trees were planted to offset carbon emissions generated by a climate change conference and workshop to be held later this month. Around 150 delegates, including schoolchildren, will attend the event. The children have been invited to pose questions to a panel of city leaders at the King’s Hall conference. The event will create around 3.5 tonnes of carbon which will be offset by planting the 500 trees. Mayor Meredith planted the first Mayor sapling at Sandon Business and Meredith plants a tree at Enterprise College – the first Sandon Business school in the city to be named a and Enterprise Green Flag Eco School. College with students Others are being planted in Charleigh Smith, local schools, community 13, and Adam gardens and open spaces Allcock, 12. nominated by the public.

HOME INSULATION! Yes, the maximum you pay for loft or cavity wall insulation is £99* each and often it’s entirely FREE!

Call Warmzone for details:

01782 238443 *Subject to a property suitability survey

9


Our City p10

10

6/11/08

10:55

Page 1

Our City N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 8

Readers scoop book prizes THREE lucky readers have scooped book tokens after taking part in our National Year of Reading competition. M Chesworth of Fenton scooped the first prize worth £100. Linda Burns of Trentham won the £50 runners up prize and Hilda Peacock of Tunstall won the £25 third prize voucher. Their names were picked from scores of entrants who correctly answered a question about Stoke-on-Trent’s favourite read J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. We asked: Which famous actor played Gandalf in the film versions of the popular trilogy? The answer is: Sir Ian McKellen. Congratulations to our winners – and everyone who got the correct answer. Meanwhile, the Books in the Wild competition being run by the city’s Library Services, is continuing across the city. People are being encouraged to review books left in public places, shops and other attractions and post in a review. Everyone who sends in a review is entered into a prize draw for a Nintendo Wii games console. To learn more about the competition or for details about National Year of Reading log onto stoke.gov.uk /libraries or call 01782 238455.

Bags give a green boost WINNERS of a competition to design the best “Eco-Bag” have been announced after an influx of creative entries. Design students from schools across the city designed an image for biodegradable bags that would be given out at market stalls. Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey announced the winners in a prize giving ceremony at the Civic Centre. The competition was devised to highlight markets in a positive way as places that consider their impact on the environment. Traders and Markets Management will be handing out the bag with the winning design as soon as it has been produced. Councillor Adrian Knapper Portfolio Holder for Economic Development, said:“The competition itself was a huge success and demonstrates the wealth of talent amongst students and the enthusiasm of the teaching staff involved.” He added:“These students have shown a real desire to play an active role in environmental issues.”

Dr Sam Reddy gives a flu jab to Ronald Bourne, 68, of Shelton.

Experts issue flu warning F

LU is set to strike again this winter but many people in Stoke still haven’t had their winter jab.

The flu jab is a free vaccination available to everyone over 65 and to people classed as “at risk” which includes anyone with diabetes, liver or kidney disease, or who has had a stroke or suffers from a chronic respiratory or cardiac disease. Although there has been a strong take up of vaccination from local people aged 65 or

over, there has been a slow response from people in the at-risk group who are entitled to the free flu vaccination. Dr Simon Elsdon, Associate Medical Director at NHS Stoke on Trent, said: “Vaccination rates for the over 65s are currently running at around 70 per cent, which is in line with the national average, but there is a disappointing take up from people in the at-risk group. “People don’t realise how important it is to get the flu jab. For many people flu is just a bad cold but if your immune system has

been compromised, through ill health, then it can actually be a very serious illness, which can even require hospital treatment.” As well as being offered the flu vaccination people are also being offered a vaccination against pneumonia which provides potential protection for up to 10 years. GP surgeries across the city are now carrying out flu vaccination clinics so to book an appointment contact your GP surgery or, for more information, click on to www.immunisation.nhs.uk/Vaccines/Flu

Lively carnival a fun packed day for all

Workers help cut exhaust emissions THOUSANDS of city centre workers left their cars at home to show they care for the environment as part of a day of organised activities to promote sustainable transport. Councillor Joy Garner, Stoke-on-Trent City Council Portfolio Holder for Environment, said: “We know that 22,000 people work in the city centre. “If only 10,000 of these people drive an average of a 10 mile round trip each day, they each add 2.7 kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. “That comes to 27,000 tonnes per day in the city centre alone. “If just 10 per cent of those same daily travellers take the bus just one day a week, it would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 2,000 tonnes each week – in a year it would be over 100,000 tonnes. “The average round trip to work journey costs £6 in fuel and car running costs, plus parking. The same journey by bus is £3.50. “Car sharing is generally half the price and much more social and cycling is good for your health.”

Mountain bikers Danny Bitler and Rob Poyser perform in the city centre.

RESIDENTS enjoyed a fun-packed carnival and community day launched by the Lord Mayor – helping to boost community relations in Shelton. Bhangra drummers, dance workshops, Punch and Judy, a surfboard simulator, bouncy castle and obstacle course were all part of the event at the Rectory Road Community Centre. The festivities took months of organisation and were funded by Stoke-on-Trent City Council, RENEW North Staffordshire and Beth Johnson Housing Association. Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey said:“I was pleased to see so many local residents taking part. “There was everything from a live band to face painting and a community wildlife mural.”


Our City p11

6/11/08

11:48

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Name change reflects

city’s own NHS T

HE organisation which delivers health care to Stoke-on-Trent’s people has changed its name.

Stoke on Trent Primary Care Trust has been renamed NHS Stoke on Trent to make it more identifiable to residents and to better represent its changing role in delivering services. Chief Executive Graham Urwin said: “The public know what the NHS is and for the people of Stoke-on-Trent we are their local NHS. Our new name means that local people can identify more easily with who is responsible for meeting their health needs. And for us, our new name better reflects our role, which has evolved into being more than just about primary care.” Meanwhile, NHS Stoke on Trent has appointed a new chairman. Health Improvement Worker Viv Hawken helps Chris Dawes worked at visitors to the Health Fayre at King’s Hall brush Michelin for nearly 30 years, up on their oral hygiene. where he held senior roles in the UK and France. Before retiring in 2007, he held The event at the King’s Hall in Stoke executive positions of Managing Director of Michelin UK and Managing Director of included more than 60 stalls with experts in sexual health, tackling childhood Michelin Lifestyle Ltd. obesity, healthy eating, exercise and He said: “I am delighted to take up the mental health on hand to give advice. chair of NHS Stoke on Trent. I have Acting as a one-stop shop for healthy worked in Stoke-on-Trent and I feel I living, visitors to the fayre were also know the city well. It has issues – not least offered a free MOT health check and in health – but I know I am joining an information on smoking. Lord Mayor organisation that is improving the health of Councillor Derek Capey and Mayoress the city and tackling health inequalities.” ● A Health Fayre showcased the vast range Joyce Capey attended the event to present of services available in Stoke-on-Trent to swimming passes and fruit and veg keep locals in good shape. hampers.

Healthy eating advice to help tackle growing childhood obesity issues OVERWEIGHT youngsters in Stoke-on-Trent are being taught how to keep trim on a new healthy lifestyle programme. The Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do it programme (MEND) was developed by experts at Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Institute of Child Health to combat the rising problem of childhood obesity. Children aged between seven and 13 attend sessions of fun and interactive activities aimed at both children and their parents – including practical tips on healthy eating, food labelling and portion sizes. The sessions will take place after school across the city in local venues including community centres, youth centres, high schools and Port Vale FC. Sui-Ann Pang, Senior Health

Promotion Specialist for Obesity for NHS Stoke on Trent, said: “With childhood obesity on the increase, programmes like MEND can provide the essential support for children and their families to identify and make practical changes towards being more active and healthier. “MEND also has an important part to play in helping young people build their confidence and self-esteem.” For more information and to find out where your nearest MEND programme is contact the Health Improvement Team on 01782 289179 or 298057. MEND programme dates in 2008/09 in Stoke can be found at: http://www. hpns.nhs.uk/news/mend.htm or for further information on MEND visit www.mendprogramme.org

Our City

Hi-tech beats the thieves STATE-OF-THE-ART satellite tracking is being used in the fight against metal thieves in Tunstall and Fegg Hayes. Electronic GPS devices will be fitted to boilers in abandoned properties – a prime target for thieves eager to cash in on rising metal prices. The initiative forms part of Staffordshire Police’s Operation Amalgam which was launched in April. The team of dedicated officers tackle metal theft and have so far made around 100 arrests. Inspector Mark Hardern, Commander of Tunstall Neighbourhood Policing Unit, said: “The message we want to get across to offenders with this initiative is ‘we’re after you, we know who you are and we will arrest you.’ “Thefts of boilers and copper pipes have gone up in Fegg Hayes and Tunstall – which creates danger for people living nearby and their properties. “We are working with the local authority and landlords to solve this – and will also be fitting GPS to boilers in random locations – acting as a rat trap for offenders.”

11


Our City p12-13

12

6/11/08

10:14

Page 1

Our City N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 8

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

13

Police pledge to target anti social behaviour A NEW police commander for the north of Stoke-on-Trent has vowed to make anti social behaviour his top priority and is planning a raft of new initiatives to tackle the problem. Inspector Mark Hardern, who has helped police Tunstall and surrounding areas since 1991, says he will be stepping up highvisibility patrols, organising community meetings, working with partner agencies and sending officers into schools to educate youngsters. He said:“The message I have been getting from the public in Tunstall is that anti social behaviour is a big problem. We receive around 10 to 15 calls about it every day. I want the amount of incidents to be drastically reduced by this time next year and through working with the public and our partner agencies I think there are a number of steps we can take to achieve that.” More officers will be patrolling during the evening and night as part of the crackdown. Neighbourhood officers will be visiting secondary schools like James Brindley High and St Margaret Ward. And six bicycles are also being bought to help officers cover a greater distance on their patrols. Inspector Hardern said crime in Norton,

Stoke-on-Trent’s Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress open a new shelter at Carmountside Crematorium.

Public given insight into crematorium Inspector Mark Hardern on the beat in Tunstall. Tunstall, Goldenhill, Bradeley and Smallthorne has fallen in recent years. However, incidents of anti social behaviour have significantly increased. “People have the perception that hundreds of burglaries are occurring across Stoke-on-Trent every day – but that simply isn’t the case. The average is about four a day. “However, respect and discipline among the younger generation has fallen sharply – meaning anti social behaviour is one of our top concerns.”

Public have say on museums MUSEUMS in Stoke-on-Trent took on board the views of their visitors in consultation days to help develop and improve their futures. The Outreach team gave people the chance to have their say about Gladstone Pottery Museum in Longton, Etruria Industrial Museum and Ford Green Hall in Smallthorne. Each person was given post-it notes and a pencil and asked to write down what they thought, good or bad, about the museum and its staff. Outreach and Community Development Officer Victoria Martin said: “When we did this at the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery we had many useful comments. Hopefully we can learn even more about our visitors and how they see the museums. All comments will be used to help develop the Museum Service over the next few years.” Have your say: Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

Brownies earn badges A HANLEY-BASED Brownie pack learned all about crime reduction after an informative visit from their local police officer. PCSO Lucy Stevenson and PC Samantha Casey, from the Bucknall Neighbourhood Policing Unit, visited the 7th Hanley group at their weekly meeting at All Saints Church in Kempthorne Road, Hanley. The officers helped the youngsters to obtain their crime reduction award by hosting a talk and discussion. She then presented badges to the Brownies. At the same time she helped raise awareness of the new non-emergency number for Staffordshire Police – 0300 123 4455.

AN AWARD-WINNING cemetery and crematorium has given residents a behind-the-scenes look at its new facilities. Carmountside – which was rated first in the country for its burial and cremation services out of 125 councils – staged an open day where locals could view facilities, remembrance tributes and features like the new Victorian shelter in the garden of remembrance. The shelter, which was officially opened by Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey, includes a specially designed seating area where families can lease plaques. Councillor Joan Bell, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Bereavement Care, said: ”We can help people select an option when arranging a funeral which best suits their needs.” Carmountside is the city’s largest cemetery and crematorium with areas including babies’ and children’s remembrance gardens and a natural woodland park area alongside the more traditional garden of remembrance and cemetery.

New sport and leisure access scheme spearheads drive for

more fit and active city A

NEW scheme aimed at giving tens of thousand of adults and children free and discount access to sport and leisure facilities is spearheading the city’s drive to be more active than ever before.

Energise Plus is a swipe card which gives holders the opportunity to take part in sports and recreational sessions and facilities at reduced rates at council-run leisure centres. It replaces the old Recreation Key scheme but it is available to more people than ever before as Stoke-on-Trent gears up to be more fit and active in time for the London Olympics of 2012. Anyone who is on low or no income, or is affected by a disability, could be entitled to one of the Energise Plus cards. Those entitled include: ● All 42,000 children up to the age of 16 in the city. ● Everyone aged over 60. ● Job seekers, people on income support and/or incapacity benefit. ● People registered with hearing and visual impairments. ● Householders on low income i.e. Tax Credits. ● Carers and foster carers. ● Students, people on youth training projects and enrolled on apprenticeship schemes. Service and Development Manager for Sport and Leisure Louise-Ann Smith said: “This is an exciting project which really broadens the accessibility of affordable sports activities to more people than ever before. “Our aim is to have 30 per cent of people in Stoke-on-Trent reasonably active

by 2012. By this we mean exercising for 30 minutes five times a week. “This is a real step forward in improving the health and well-being of everyone and with the London Olympics as a backdrop for this we believe it will inspire people to become more active.” The scheme also keys into the Lifestyle Support Programme – a large-scale partnership project involving the city council and NHS Stoke on Trent. Anyone completing the £2million project will be presented with an Energise Plus card. Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sport and Leisure said: “Stoke-on-Trent is committed to improving the health and fitness of Lord Mayor everyone living in the city. Councillor Derek “The Energise Plus scheme is part of Capey is presented our continuing commitment to ensure with a giant-sized access to sport and leisure facilities is Energise Plus card as widespread as possible.” by scheme mascot The Energise Plus cards cost £5 Fitzy the Fox. and have to be renewed every 12 months but open up a whole range of free and concessionary activities. These include free swimming sessions at one of the city council’s pools from Monday to Friday 10am until 4pm. Similarly, people can get access to free sports hall sessions and ENERGISE Plus was launched with a facilities – such as table tennis week of awareness-raising activities and badminton – during those and free giveaways all around the city. times. The scheme was unveiled at an open

Pools boost lessons for disabled swimmers STOKE-on-Trent pools can now offer more types of swimming lessons after three teachers successfully completed a disabled teaching qualification. Debbie Ralph, Dan Ralph and Janet Slack have all passed the ASA Level 2 Disability Qualification following a two-week intensive course in Cambridgeshire. They can now teach both children and adults with learning disabilities, physical disabilities and those recovering from illnesses such as strokes. Swimming Lesson Co-ordinator Debbie Ralph said: “Swimming is a great form of exercise for people with disabilities or those rehabilitating because the body is supported by the water. We can now offer one to one swimming lessons at Shelton Pool and Fenton Manor Sports Complex.” For more information, contact Fenton Manor Sports Complex 01782 233222.

Greenhouse offers Premier League blooms

Fitzy the Fox leads high-profile launch

Anyone wishing to apply for one of the cards can do so at their local sports centre. Alternatively details are available online by logging onto stoke.gov.uk

event at Dimensions Leisure Centre in Burslem, before being rolled out around the city. Fitzy the Fox – the Energise Plus mascot – joined city council staff to publicise the card at the Britannia

Stadium for Stoke City’s Premier League clash with Arsenal in front of more than 25,000 fans and to nearly 6,000 supporters at Vale Park for Port Vale’s home game against Morecambe. It culminated in an event at Fenton Manor sports complex attended by Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey. And, being over 60, the city’s first citizen was presented with his own

giant-sized Energise Plus card by Fitzy. Louise Ann Smith said: “We decided to launch the scheme by giving the first 2,000 Energise Plus cards away free. “It is also being supported by a campaign of advertising on billboards around the city which is helping spread the message about the advantages of the card.”

GREENHOUSE 2000, the city council’s giant nursery at Festival Park, has teamed up with Stoke City FC to provide matchday flower displays at Britannia Stadium. The Premier League club’s supporters and visitors will be able to enjoy the floral arrangements in four troughs that separate the bar from the dining facility, as well as in corporate hospitality areas, the boardroom and chairman’s room. Greenhouse 2000 already supplies a number of events such as weddings, the Lord Mayor’s Ball and Keele University’s Graduation Ball – but this is the nursery’s first venture into sport. To make a booking call Greenhouse 2000 on 01782 235068.


Our City p12-13

12

6/11/08

10:14

Page 1

Our City N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 8

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

13

Police pledge to target anti social behaviour A NEW police commander for the north of Stoke-on-Trent has vowed to make anti social behaviour his top priority and is planning a raft of new initiatives to tackle the problem. Inspector Mark Hardern, who has helped police Tunstall and surrounding areas since 1991, says he will be stepping up highvisibility patrols, organising community meetings, working with partner agencies and sending officers into schools to educate youngsters. He said:“The message I have been getting from the public in Tunstall is that anti social behaviour is a big problem. We receive around 10 to 15 calls about it every day. I want the amount of incidents to be drastically reduced by this time next year and through working with the public and our partner agencies I think there are a number of steps we can take to achieve that.” More officers will be patrolling during the evening and night as part of the crackdown. Neighbourhood officers will be visiting secondary schools like James Brindley High and St Margaret Ward. And six bicycles are also being bought to help officers cover a greater distance on their patrols. Inspector Hardern said crime in Norton,

Stoke-on-Trent’s Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress open a new shelter at Carmountside Crematorium.

Public given insight into crematorium Inspector Mark Hardern on the beat in Tunstall. Tunstall, Goldenhill, Bradeley and Smallthorne has fallen in recent years. However, incidents of anti social behaviour have significantly increased. “People have the perception that hundreds of burglaries are occurring across Stoke-on-Trent every day – but that simply isn’t the case. The average is about four a day. “However, respect and discipline among the younger generation has fallen sharply – meaning anti social behaviour is one of our top concerns.”

Public have say on museums MUSEUMS in Stoke-on-Trent took on board the views of their visitors in consultation days to help develop and improve their futures. The Outreach team gave people the chance to have their say about Gladstone Pottery Museum in Longton, Etruria Industrial Museum and Ford Green Hall in Smallthorne. Each person was given post-it notes and a pencil and asked to write down what they thought, good or bad, about the museum and its staff. Outreach and Community Development Officer Victoria Martin said: “When we did this at the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery we had many useful comments. Hopefully we can learn even more about our visitors and how they see the museums. All comments will be used to help develop the Museum Service over the next few years.” Have your say: Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

Brownies earn badges A HANLEY-BASED Brownie pack learned all about crime reduction after an informative visit from their local police officer. PCSO Lucy Stevenson and PC Samantha Casey, from the Bucknall Neighbourhood Policing Unit, visited the 7th Hanley group at their weekly meeting at All Saints Church in Kempthorne Road, Hanley. The officers helped the youngsters to obtain their crime reduction award by hosting a talk and discussion. She then presented badges to the Brownies. At the same time she helped raise awareness of the new non-emergency number for Staffordshire Police – 0300 123 4455.

AN AWARD-WINNING cemetery and crematorium has given residents a behind-the-scenes look at its new facilities. Carmountside – which was rated first in the country for its burial and cremation services out of 125 councils – staged an open day where locals could view facilities, remembrance tributes and features like the new Victorian shelter in the garden of remembrance. The shelter, which was officially opened by Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey, includes a specially designed seating area where families can lease plaques. Councillor Joan Bell, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Bereavement Care, said: ”We can help people select an option when arranging a funeral which best suits their needs.” Carmountside is the city’s largest cemetery and crematorium with areas including babies’ and children’s remembrance gardens and a natural woodland park area alongside the more traditional garden of remembrance and cemetery.

New sport and leisure access scheme spearheads drive for

more fit and active city A

NEW scheme aimed at giving tens of thousand of adults and children free and discount access to sport and leisure facilities is spearheading the city’s drive to be more active than ever before.

Energise Plus is a swipe card which gives holders the opportunity to take part in sports and recreational sessions and facilities at reduced rates at council-run leisure centres. It replaces the old Recreation Key scheme but it is available to more people than ever before as Stoke-on-Trent gears up to be more fit and active in time for the London Olympics of 2012. Anyone who is on low or no income, or is affected by a disability, could be entitled to one of the Energise Plus cards. Those entitled include: ● All 42,000 children up to the age of 16 in the city. ● Everyone aged over 60. ● Job seekers, people on income support and/or incapacity benefit. ● People registered with hearing and visual impairments. ● Householders on low income i.e. Tax Credits. ● Carers and foster carers. ● Students, people on youth training projects and enrolled on apprenticeship schemes. Service and Development Manager for Sport and Leisure Louise-Ann Smith said: “This is an exciting project which really broadens the accessibility of affordable sports activities to more people than ever before. “Our aim is to have 30 per cent of people in Stoke-on-Trent reasonably active

by 2012. By this we mean exercising for 30 minutes five times a week. “This is a real step forward in improving the health and well-being of everyone and with the London Olympics as a backdrop for this we believe it will inspire people to become more active.” The scheme also keys into the Lifestyle Support Programme – a large-scale partnership project involving the city council and NHS Stoke on Trent. Anyone completing the £2million project will be presented with an Energise Plus card. Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sport and Leisure said: “Stoke-on-Trent is committed to improving the health and fitness of Lord Mayor everyone living in the city. Councillor Derek “The Energise Plus scheme is part of Capey is presented our continuing commitment to ensure with a giant-sized access to sport and leisure facilities is Energise Plus card as widespread as possible.” by scheme mascot The Energise Plus cards cost £5 Fitzy the Fox. and have to be renewed every 12 months but open up a whole range of free and concessionary activities. These include free swimming sessions at one of the city council’s pools from Monday to Friday 10am until 4pm. Similarly, people can get access to free sports hall sessions and ENERGISE Plus was launched with a facilities – such as table tennis week of awareness-raising activities and badminton – during those and free giveaways all around the city. times. The scheme was unveiled at an open

Pools boost lessons for disabled swimmers STOKE-on-Trent pools can now offer more types of swimming lessons after three teachers successfully completed a disabled teaching qualification. Debbie Ralph, Dan Ralph and Janet Slack have all passed the ASA Level 2 Disability Qualification following a two-week intensive course in Cambridgeshire. They can now teach both children and adults with learning disabilities, physical disabilities and those recovering from illnesses such as strokes. Swimming Lesson Co-ordinator Debbie Ralph said: “Swimming is a great form of exercise for people with disabilities or those rehabilitating because the body is supported by the water. We can now offer one to one swimming lessons at Shelton Pool and Fenton Manor Sports Complex.” For more information, contact Fenton Manor Sports Complex 01782 233222.

Greenhouse offers Premier League blooms

Fitzy the Fox leads high-profile launch

Anyone wishing to apply for one of the cards can do so at their local sports centre. Alternatively details are available online by logging onto stoke.gov.uk

event at Dimensions Leisure Centre in Burslem, before being rolled out around the city. Fitzy the Fox – the Energise Plus mascot – joined city council staff to publicise the card at the Britannia

Stadium for Stoke City’s Premier League clash with Arsenal in front of more than 25,000 fans and to nearly 6,000 supporters at Vale Park for Port Vale’s home game against Morecambe. It culminated in an event at Fenton Manor sports complex attended by Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey. And, being over 60, the city’s first citizen was presented with his own

giant-sized Energise Plus card by Fitzy. Louise Ann Smith said: “We decided to launch the scheme by giving the first 2,000 Energise Plus cards away free. “It is also being supported by a campaign of advertising on billboards around the city which is helping spread the message about the advantages of the card.”

GREENHOUSE 2000, the city council’s giant nursery at Festival Park, has teamed up with Stoke City FC to provide matchday flower displays at Britannia Stadium. The Premier League club’s supporters and visitors will be able to enjoy the floral arrangements in four troughs that separate the bar from the dining facility, as well as in corporate hospitality areas, the boardroom and chairman’s room. Greenhouse 2000 already supplies a number of events such as weddings, the Lord Mayor’s Ball and Keele University’s Graduation Ball – but this is the nursery’s first venture into sport. To make a booking call Greenhouse 2000 on 01782 235068.


Our City p14

6/11/08

11:32

14 Our City

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Walking to school launch PUPILS in Packmoor are being encouraged to walk or cycle to school following £160,000 worth of improvements to footpaths and bridleways. Stoke-on-Trent City Council carried out the works to widen and re-surface 1.5km of paths. The project also included replacement gates, extra fencing and stone to create safer, more presentable routes to school.

Minister backs city pledge A GOVERNMENT Minister has given his full support to Stoke-on-Trent City Council and its plans to tackle climate change. Phil Woolas, Minister of State for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, urged residents to add their views to the consultation over Elected Mayor Mark Meredith’s Green Paper on Climate Change. ● Write with your views to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

Crucial Crew face up to exciting safety challenge Y

OUNGSTERS across Stoke-on-Trent are being taught how to deal with issues like anti social behaviour and substance misuse during a series of interactive workshops.

By early next year, the Crucial Crew scheme will have educated more than 2,800 children in staying safe and recognising threatening situations. The aim is to fill in gaps in the knowledge of year six pupils and show them how to approach issues which are often overlooked by the curriculum. Workshops also include basic first aid, road, rail, fire safety and “Respect” education – with pupils undertaking practical challenges. The sessions have been organised by the Children's Safety Education Foundation (CSEF) in conjunction with Stoke-on-Trent’s Safer City Partnership. And Staffordshire Police, British Transport Police, West Midlands Ambulance Service, Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service,Young People’s Drug Service and A1+Highways Service are all running sessions for the youngsters. The scheme forms part of Stoke Won’t Stand For It Campaign – run by the Safer City Partnership born from local residents telling partners that dealing with anti social behaviour is a key priority.

Don’t delay... ...call today! Do you have a child who is about to, or has recently celebrated their third birthday? If so, then you could both benefit from 12.5 hours per week (38 weeks per year) of free Early Education. All children are eligible to free part-time early education from the term following their third birthday, until they reach compulsory school age. For more information about the free entitlement and a list of childcare settings who deliver Early Education in your local area, please contact Stoke-on-Trent Parent Direct on

You can also email us at parent.direct@stoke.gov.uk or visit our website at www.stokeeycs.co.uk

stoke.gov.uk

Tom Eaton, 10, of Goldenhill, enjoys the Crucial Crew day at Cobridge TA Centre.


Our City p15

6/11/08

11:35

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

15

Council’s TV effort praised

Hanley Town Hall

A NATIONAL accolade has been won by Stoke-on-Trent City Council for their work in preparing for the switch-over to digital TV. The Homes Set for Digital certification mark is awarded to organisations that have taken all “reasonable steps” to guarantee delivery of digital TV services. The city council has devised a two-year plan in which 7,000 aerials will be replaced and advice given on converting televisions and equipment. The plans are in preparation for 2009 when Granada, which covers Tunstall and Hanley, switches over. In 2011, the old analogue system in the Central region will also be discontinued. Residents are being advised that the changes do not mean old televisions should be thrown away as most can be converted for around £25. Anyone claiming pension credits, income support or job seekers allowance are eligible for free help, including the conversion of one television. More information can be found on teletext or by logging on to www.digitaluk.co.uk

Conservation takes flight

H

ANLEY Town Hall is being seen in a new light – thanks to an illumination project that bathes the front of the historic 19th century building in a fabulous array of colours.

The £250,000 LED lighting system incorporates a spectrum of more than 200 colours to showcase the fine architecture of the Grade 1 Listed building in a new and exciting way. This light show at the heart of the city’s Cultural Quarter is a permanent attraction from dusk until dawn during summer and from 7pm to dawn over the winter months. Hanley Town Hall started life in 1869 as the Queen’s Hotel designed by Robert Scrivener and became a civic building in 1886. The regeneration project to illuminate the building took 12 months to complete and was funded by the Single Regeneration Budget (SRB6) through Advantage West Midlands.

SHINE A LIGHT a fisheye lens photograph of Hanley Town Hall lit up at night.

Now the city’s mature students are being invited to create their own light show by computer for Hanley Town Hall incorporating the colours of the spectrum. Those selected will be informed on which night their creation will be displayed so they can come along to see it live or they can view it by webcam – go to the city council’s website stoke.gov.uk for details of how you can take part.

Cultural Olympiad Originally the project was designed to improve the image and attractiveness of a major public building. However the switch-on also coincided with the national launch of Cultural Olympiad, the four-year national programme of events celebrating Britain’s arts and culture in the run-up to the 2012 London Paralympics and Olympic Games. The weekend event’s theme was Open Up and Light Up so it became a joint celebration enjoyed by everyone in the city centre. As well as enjoying the spectacular light

display, visitors were given a fascinating behind-the-scenes look around the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery and the impressively lit Bethesda Chapel was also opened to visitors. Nationally, a William Shakespeare festival and 12 new public works of art will form part of the Cultural Olympiad and in the West Midlands a host of activities, including dance, film making opportunities for young people and community Olympic Games, are planned in the run-up to the London Games. David Wilshaw, the city council’s Senior Engineer who led the lighting project, said: “This is an impressive addition to the night scene in the Cultural Quarter and contributes to the exciting atmosphere of the city centre.” Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sports and Leisure, said: “It was a happy coincidence that the switch-on happened at the same time as the launch of Cultural Olympiad so it was a successful double celebration for the people of Stoke-on-Trent.”

A PROJECT led by primary school pupils to save an endangered species of butterfly has taken flight. Pupils at Burnwood Primary School in Chell Heath have been harvesting and planting wild flower seeds from a former coal mine known to attract the rare Dingy Skipper butterfly. Once the seeds have grown into flowers, the children will transport them back to Chatterley Whitfield – where it is hoped they will attract the creature. The Dingy Skipper is high on the conservation priority list and the project is part of a co-ordinated effort to improve their numbers across the West Midlands. The pupils are being helped by Stoke-on-Trent City Council’s ecologist Suzanne Wykes.


Our City p16

5/11/08

16 Our City

16:50

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Bid to bring Tour of Britain back to city THE city council is bidding to bring the Tour of Britain back to Stoke-on-Trent next summer following the outstanding success of staging a leg of this year’s event.

Edval BoassonHagen crosses the line to win the Tour of Britain stage which finished in Stokeon-Trent City Centre.

Thousands lined the streets in the Potteries to watch an exciting climax to the fourth stage of the UK’s premier cycle race. An uphill sprint involving some of the world’s top cyclists to the finishing line in the city centre provided a memorable spectacle – and further raised the city’s fast-growing reputation as a leading sporting location. Now, talks between race organisers and city council officers are well advanced with a view to the tour returning next year. Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sports and Leisure, said: “Race organisers told us that the Stoke-on-Trent leg was one of the best in the whole country. I think we have a very good chance of getting it back to the city next year. “There is no doubt that the event raised the city’s profile in a very positive way and local people

Racers in an uphill sprint to the finishing line in Hanley. enjoyed the occasion. The city is a hotbed for cycling and we are looking to host other national cycle racing events in the future.” To coincide with Tour of Britain

coming to the city, more than 200 local cyclists of all ages and abilities took part in the Pied Piper 10-mile community fun ride which started at Fenton Manor Sports Complex.

College in the Community

New Opportunities for Adults in the New Year Fancy trying something NEW?

Looking for a Change?

Want to improve your Skills?

We have courses starting soon in a venue near you… Computing - Beginner to Advanced, Internet, Email and more… Essential Skills - reading, writing and maths Languages - French & Spanish Hobbies and Leisure - local history, art and crafts - plus much more... For further information see your copy of College Live, call your local Neighbourhood College or the Schools & Community Venues number below or email us: cicenquiries@stokecoll.ac.uk Tunstall Neighbourhood College

Tel: 01782 835032 Willfield Neighbourhood College

Tel: 01782 234620 Longton Neighbourhood College

CIC Advert 1-13

Tel: 01782 599946

College in the Community is part of Stoke on Trent College and works in partnership with Stoke on Trent City Council

If you own your own home or rent it from a private landlord you may be able to claim a grant of up to £2,700 under the warm front scheme.

You may be able to claim if you receive one or more of the following:

✓ Working Tax Credit ✓ Child Tax Credit ✓ Attendance Allowance A warm front grant will pay towards gas, electric or oil ✓ Disability Living Allowance central heating in your home. ✓ Income Support The work may include ✓ Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance the installation of a ✓ Housing Benefit combination boiler, up to five radiators and all ✓ Council Tax Benefit valves and pipework. ✓ War Disablement Pension We may also repair your existing heating ✓ Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit system with the grant ✓ Pension Credit money.

To find out more call our national office free between 9am and 4.30pm Monday-Friday. Call BGC FREE ON:

Schools & Community Venues

Tel: 01782 234775

Do you qualify for a £2,700 grant towards a new heating system in your home?

...just pop in

0800 043 0345

5 Furlong Parade, Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 3AX

Apply now for a grant to make you home warmer, healthier, more energy efficient and reduce fuel bills too!


Our City p17

6/11/08

11:36

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

17

VIP patient opens centre

DECISION TIME... the panel who will decide on a new home for the statue of Josiah Wedgwood which has been in storage since the 1986 National Garden Festival. Pictured left to right are Garden Festival fan Elsie Walker, Councillor Adrian Knapper, local historian Fred Hughes, BBC Radio Stoke journalist Tim Wedgwood – who is related to Josiah – and Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey.

Panel set to decide on new home for Josiah T

HE face of Josiah Wedgwood – sculpted in red brick and kept under wraps since the 1986 National Garden Festival – is to be relocated to a new home thanks to the people of Stoke-on-Trent.

A panel has been set up to decide on a new home for the sculpture after residents responded to a call for suggestions in a supplement distributed with the last issue of Our City. Local media followed up the story and BBC Radio Stoke even managed to track down the widow of the sculptor in California. A shortlist of ten sites has been drawn up, including Burslem town centre near Wedgwood’s first factory, Festival Park near the master potter’s famous Etruria pottery and the Trentham roundabout on the A34. Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey,

Portfolio Holder for Regeneration, Councillor Adrian Knapper, historian Fred Hughes, BBC Radio Stoke journalist Tim Wedgwood (a descendant of Josiah) and Elsie Walker, a regular visitor to the Garden Festival 22 years ago who called the radio station with information about sculptor Vincent Woropay, will decide on the brick face’s new home. Head of Neighbourhood Management, John Evans said a decision would be made quickly so the head could be in place in time for celebrations to mark the 250th anniversary of Wedgwood’s first factory next year. He said: “The public has shown tremendous enthusiasm and we had lots of responses with ideas for sites. We want to move things forward now so once the panel has made a decision on a new site we will set the wheels in motion to have the sculpture in place during next year’s anniversary.”

Sculptor Vincent Woropay, who died in June 2002, has another sculpture on show in Stoke-on-Trent. Hand with Kronos, commissioned by British Rail for the National Garden Festival at Gateshead in 1990, is now at Stoke-on-Trent railway station, and consists of a tiny figure poised within the confines of a gigantic hand. BBC Radio Stoke’s Stuart Fear contacted Woropay’s widow Chloe Chard and she will be invited to the ceremony when the sculpture is unveiled. For more information on the sculpture see stoke.gov.uk/ourcity and see the Our Neighbourhoods supplement, or go to www.bbc.co.uk/stoke Where would you like to see a sculpture or public art? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

A FORMER miner, who has been registered with his GP practice for more than 90 years, became a VIP for a day to officially open the £8 million flagship Shelton Primary Care Centre. Charles Lovatt, aged 92, pictured right, unveiled a plaque to commemorate the opening of the Norfolk Street centre on behalf of NHS Stoke on Trent. Mr Lovatt is one of the longest registered patients at the Queen Anne Street Practice, one of three GP practices to move into the centre. He first became a patient of the surgery when he was born in nearby Havelock Street in 1916. The former pitman was guest of honour at a community fun day at the centre where he performed the official opening. Unveiling a plaque, he said: “This is a lovely building and it is to everyone’s liking. You have all done a fantastic job to get us in something as good as this in Shelton.” The centre will cater for a total of 15,000 patients and provide services including midwifery, nursing, family planning, health visitors, child health and minor surgery. It was funded through a partnership between NHS Stoke on Trent and Prima 2000.

Advice served at lunchtime A SUPPORT centre aimed at giving young people a wide range of advice has been officially launched at Blurton High School. The Multi Agency Centre (MAC) operates before and after school and during lunchtimes with trained pupils on hand to give advice to other students. The range of agencies on offer includes the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Team, Connexions, Mental Health Services, Youth Service and Health Services. Portfolio Holder for Children and Young People’s Services, Councillor Roger Ibbs said: “We don’t want to preach to young people, we want to inform and educate them about subjects they wouldn’t necessarily find on the curriculum.” The centre is one of seven in the city. The others operate at Haywood, James Brindley, Trentham, Mitchell, Thistley Hough and Birches Head High Schools.


Our City p18

6/11/08

18 Our City

10:26

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Jonathan Wilkes is the Prince.

LoveStoke volunteers pledge to transform city D

Win a VIP night out at the panto YOU won’t be Grumpy... just Happy – if you win the top prize in our Christmas pantomime competition. A VIP family night out at The Regent to see the spectacular production of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is up for grabs. The winners will be the theatre’s guests for the show for an evening in early January which will include the chance to meet the cast backstage. And there are two runners-up prizes of family tickets, for two adults and two children. This year’s panto again stars Stoke-on-Trent-born singer and television personality Jonathan Wilkes, who plays the Prince. Co-starring as the Wicked Witch is Claire Sweeney, who has played leading roles in West End musicals. All you have to do for your chance to win one of the prizes is answer the following question: Name three of the seven dwarfs. Send your answers along with your contact details to: Panto Competition, FREEPOST, Our City, or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk by Wednesday December 17. First correct answers drawn out of the hat win the prizes. The editor’s decision is final and the winners will be contacted before Christmas. ● Parminder Takhar of Trentham won a state-of-the-art mountain bike in a competition in the July issue of Our City.

Claire Sweeney is the Wicked Witch.

EDICATED teams of volunteers who have already transformed three vandalised play areas have set their sights on helping some of the city’s most needy families. Organised under the LoveStoke banner – a growing community of people and organisations dedicated to making Stoke-on-Trent a better place – they have launched an ambitious project to distribute clothes, shoes and toiletries donated by national retailers around the city and abroad. A 15,500 sq ft warehouse in Hanley has been filled with 60 tonnes of vital everyday products, and distribution has already started through hostels and women’s refuges in Stoke-on-Trent. Jim Halliday, a community pastor from Bethel City Church in Abbey Hulton, said initiatives run by LoveStoke were capturing the imagination of residents across the city. He said members of the public had been quick to join in when teams moved in to give facelifts to play areas at Abbey Road, Bucknall Park and Joiner’s Square, in partnership with the city council and Staffordshire Police. Now the organisation is planning a new programme of initiatives and events, and is keen to attract new

LoveStoke volunteers Andrew Swan and Kirsty Scullion with some of the clothing and toys being distributed in the city and further afield. volunteers. Mr Halliday said: “People from all walks of life are joining our initiatives to improve life in the city, from retired people to people out of work, families and people who have come off substance abuse. We also have lots of younger people aged 15-30 who want to make a difference. We’ve found lots of people want to do something to help but are just waiting for something to latch onto.”

Plans for the run up to Christmas include a switch-on of festive lights in Abbey Hulton, complete with Santa train rides and a concert in the community centre. A Gardens Association for the Abbey Hulton area is also being set up to promote healthy eating and healthy living to residents. Mr Halliday added: “We are working across the city, from Fegg Hayes and Chell

Heath to Longton and Meir, and we are looking for more projects.” To find out more about volunteering, or to suggest a project, visit www.lovestoke.org or phone the Bethel City Church on 01782 537079. Can you suggest a project for the LoveStoke volunteers? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.gov.uk

Kier Stoke serve up new kitchen

Kier Stoke apprentices Richard Leyland, left, and Alex Tapner, who installed the new kitchen.

RUN-down domestic facilities at Bentilee Volunteer Centre were improved when the city council’s building maintenance partner dished up a brand new kitchen free of charge. Employees at Kier Stoke set to work on the centre in Chelmsford Drive as part of their ongoing Decent Homes programme, providing and fitting the kitchen as a goodwill gesture for the benefit of the local community. Apprentice plumber Richard Leyland and apprentice joiner Alex Tapner, pictured left, installed the kitchen as part of their training. Ian Dyke, a voluntary worker for the centre and a member of East Bentilee Residents’ Association, said: “As a volunteer trying to get funds it’s very difficult, so we were overjoyed when Kier Stoke agreed to do the work. They were amazing. “We use the centre for residents’ association meetings and there are also a number of disabled groups who benefit from the facilities, so this really is a tremendous boost for the community. It’s very important to us.”


Our City p19

6/11/08

11:37

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Our City

19

Ground breaking academies will form important part of city’s secondary education ‘family’

Academy success... student Shareeba Kaur at the Shirelands Academy in Sandwell.

Lord Mandelson, Secretary of State for Business and Enterprise, is pictured with Sandon Business and Enterprise College student Calum Whitfield, 15, after officially opening the new school. Lord Mandelson praised facilities, saying: “What you are doing here is so very important. This is not only about encouraging enterprise – the need for enterprising employees will also grow.”

Opportunity knocks for every single pupil E

DUCATION experts have unveiled an exciting vision of how five new academies built as part of a £230 million investment programme will help to transform education in the city. As well as offering students unprecedented quality facilities and learning choices, 13 new state-of-the-art schools, including the academies, will improve opportunities for every single high school student. The academies will complement the other schools, providing learning and training brought in by a range of sponsors who will run the showpiece sites. Organisations from universities to businesses, the charitable sector to faith communities and existing educational foundations could become involved to help create a thriving, exciting educational “family” of schools and academies. In a new document explaining how the academies will work and mesh with other schools, the city council sets out its vision for potential sponsors. It explains that they will work alongside the city's other schools, and how they will sign up to important principles such as including students of all abilities and from all sections of the community, allowing wide use of school premises out-of-hours, schools admissions, and staff pay and conditions.

‘‘ TRACY PENROSE, Building Schools for the Future Project Director

At the very heart of our plans is an entitlement for each young person to receive the very best education available.

As has happened elsewhere in the country, Stoke-on-Trent’s first academies will be launched in existing buildings so students start to benefit immediately while new schools are built. Tracy Penrose, Building Schools for the Future Project Director, said: “At the very heart of our plans is an entitlement for each young person to receive the very best education available. “Flexible use of space, extensive and innovative use of facilities and technology will help make learning effective, more personal and accessible. All our schools will offer a core of high quality teaching and learning, but will also provide a particular contribution to the city-wide curriculum – through existing and new special opportunities. “They will work together and with colleges and other learning

’’

providers for the benefit of all young people in the city, whatever their learning needs.” A special DVD has been produced as part of efforts to explain the benefits of academies to students and parents in Stoke-on-Trent. A city council delegation was filmed visiting Shireland Collegiate Academy in Sandwell, which has already earned an outstanding accreditation from school inspectors Ofsted. The academy has a reputation for excellence, and for instilling in its students a sense of pride and a vibrant enthusiasm for learning. Shireland Principal Sir Mark Grundy agreed with Stoke-on-Trent’s plan to set up an academy ethos before new buildings were built. He said: “We need to get over to people that you don’t have to wait for your

buildings before you become an academy. When we get new buildings it will just take us to a new level. It's the whole spirit of what it means to be an academy and what goes on inside here that is important." Councillor Roger Ibbs, Portfolio Holder for Children and Young People, said: “This is a really good example of exactly what you can do. It’s about hearts and minds – not bricks and mortar. “There’s no reason why we can’t be making a start in Stoke-on-Trent now in terms of the cultural shift: such as looking at the teachers and how they are going to be working within a structure that is actually more flexible and building a system round the child rather than the other way round. “The whole programme is about making some radical changes, but also about thinking about the future and how we can use technology to widen educational access to as many people as possible.” STOKE-on-Trent’s academies will be built on the current sixth form college site at Fenton, Parkhall, James Brindley High at Chell, Brownhills High and a site to be determined in the Trentham and Blurton area. They will replace St Peters, Edensor, Mitchell, Berry Hill, Trentham, Blurton, Brownhills and James Brindley High Schools.

Sandwell students testify to benefits of academies STUDENTS at Shirelands Academy in Sandwell have given top marks to their new way of learning. In a special DVD they send a message to their peers in the Potteries about the benefits of academies and the difference they make to the community. Head boy Gwilym Evans, aged 15, who is studying history and drama, says: “Everything at the academy is a lot more definite than in your average secondary school. “There are set rules we all stick by so everybody knows the direction they're going in.” Student James McKenna, 15, said:“I’m studying construction, which is my favourite subject, and one of the great things about studying it at the academy is the fact that I get to do a lot of practical work off-site, so I get real hands on experience which I wouldn’t get at other schools.” Shareeba Kaur, aged 14, who specialises in music and cookery, said:“When you are selecting your GCSEs there are so many different options you can choose from which you just can’t find at other schools. It’s amazing.”


Our City p20

6/11/08

20 Our City

11:38

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Accolade for chlamydia text campaign A PIONEERING approach to encourage young people in the city to protect themselves against the sexually transmitted infection Chlamydia has been presented a prestigious national award. The Stoke-on-Trent and North Staffordshire Chlamydia Screening Team were highly commended in the annual Guy Rotherham Award – which celebrates the best community health services – for using text messaging and the Internet to reach 15 to 24-year-olds. Judges were impressed with the B-clear programme – the first in the country to use text messaging for young people to receive their Chlamydia test results. The team has also made significant improvements to its website www.b-clear.org.uk so users of the service can get their results confidentially on-line. The website also offers an on-line form to receive a free postal Chlamydia screening kit. This facility has more than trebled the usual number of kits returned for testing. Programme Leader Carol Latham said:“We have used new technology to target young people and put information right at their fingertips in a way that they find interesting. “Chlamydia affects one in ten sexually active young people. It doesn’t have any immediately noticeable symptoms, but if left untreated it can lead to long-term health problems.”

Stokeon-Trent’s World Firefighter Games medallists, left to right, Paul Robinson, Simon Bills, Steve Turner, Jacqui Slack, Jim Cooke, Robin Smith, Mark Hancock and Ruth WatchornRice.

Sporty firefighters scoop world games medal haul F

IREFIGHTERS from Stoke-on-Trent blazed a trail of glory as they scooped top honours at the World Firefighter Games.

Team Staffordshire picked up 11 golds, six silvers and four bronzes as they competed against 4,000 Firefighters from 40 different

Warning over drug factories A WOMAN who acted as an interpreter for a drugs gang has been jailed as part of a police crack down on dealers. Xiao Quing Lin was given a three-year sentence at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court after pleading guilty to conspiring to produce cannabis. Chief Superintendent Jane Sawyers from Stoke-on-Trent division said:“We are targeting drug dealers of all types. This sentencing is a reminder to landlords to watch out for tenants who may be using their properties for illegal behaviour.”

countries at the games in Merseyside. Among them, Robin Smith of Trentham picked up two golds, two silvers and one bronze in athletics. Jacqui Slack of Bradeley won golds in the triathlon and open water swim. Meanwhile, Steve Turner and Simon Bills, both from Longton Fire Station won silver medals in the indoor rowing and cycle road

Chief makes VIP visit in big home safety campaign STAFFORDSHIRE’S top fire officer visited residents of Stoke-on-Trent in their homes to give them a personal home risk check. Chief Fire Officer and Chief Executive Peter Dartford accompanied officers in Longton and Dresden as part of the MORE for Less campaign. The initiative has been designed to reduce the amount of deaths and serious injuries from accidental house fires. Mr Dartford said: “MORE for Less is one of the biggest campaigns this service has ever run. I felt that it was important for me to go out with the crews and get a feel for what they’re doing.” Dorothy Lester, from Dresden, had a new smoke alarm fitted. She said: ”We’re very pleased we had the home fire risk check carried out – we feel much safer now. It was very nice to meet the Chief. He and the Firefighters were very friendly and so helpful.” To book a free Home Fire Risk Check phone 0800 0241 999. Checks are aimed at the elderly and vulnerable but are free and open to everyone.

race, while Jim Cooke, a Firefighter at Burslem Station picked up a bronze in the orienteering event. Chief Fire Officer and Chief Executive Peter Dartford said: “The team has done the county proud. I am delighted that these highly dedicated and professional people are delivering our services to the communities in Stoke-on-Trent.” Chief Fire Officer Peter Dartford pays a home fire safety visit to Dorothy Lester from Dresden.


Our City p21

5/11/08

15:44

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2008

Dedicated team creates some magic roundabouts THE city has 36 maintained roundabouts of which 20 are seasonally bedded out. These will be blooming lovely all year round thanks to reorganisation that has put a single dedicated city council team in charge of maintaining them. The team, made up of experienced horticulturists and skilled landscapers, will continue to use plants and flowers from the city council’s Greenhouse 2000 at Festival Park.

The roundabouts are available for sponsorship agreements, which helps to meet the cost of keeping the floral displays looking attractive. Andrew Mayer, the city council’s Commercial Services Manager, said: “The centralised team will continue to work on a rolling 12 month programme, visiting each roundabout on a regular basis to ensure they will always look their best and be a real asset for the city.”

Our City

21

Safety tops festive menu

Gerald Bott, Craig Pointon, Mick Bagnall and Paul Tipper pictured at the colourful Festival Park roundabout.

PC Kate Beardmore and Hanley resident Irene Myatt, 64, at the launch of the scheme to deter cold callers.

FOOD safety experts are urging Christmas cooks to make sure their turkey treat doesn’t cause a seasonal stomach upset. Their tips include: ● Defrost a frozen turkey thoroughly before cooking, ideally in the bottom of the fridge away from cooked food. ● Allow enough cooking time – 20 minutes per pound plus an extra 20 minutes. Allow for the weight of the stuffing. ● Wash your hands after handling raw poultry. ● Check your turkey is fully cooked by piercing the thickest part and making sure the juices run clear. ● Cool leftovers quickly, place in the fridge and use within two to three days. People making food which they intend to sell in a domestic kitchen – such as Christmas cakes and buffet food – must, by law, register with Environmental Health. Phone 01782 232065 for a registration form.

Public urged to register

Signs give cold callers

cold shoulder R

OGUE traders are being given a strong message in the city’s first No Cold Calling Zone... don’t come calling here.

Posters, stickers and signs on lamp posts have been put up in streets near Central Forest Park, Hanley in the project launched by the city council, Staffordshire Police and the local residents’ association. It is hoped the scheme will not only deter cold callers pressure selling dodgy products and services no-one wants, but will also put off criminals like those who prey on elderly and infirm people with distraction burglaries. Elected Mayor, Mark Meredith, said: “No Cold Calling Zone schemes have been successfully used in other parts of the country to reduce the levels of doorstep crime and to reduce the fear of crime, particularly amongst the elderly and other vulnerable groups.”

Reg Shaw, Secretary of the Union Street and Forest Park Residents’ Association, added: “We are really pleased we’ve been selected as the first place to have a No Cold Call Zone. “We have had a spate of cold callers in this area recently, and with quite a few pensioners living in the area we have been easy targets in the past. We are very keen to help out the city council, the police and their partners in any way we can.” Inspector Martin Brereton, Commander of Burslem Neighbourhood Policing Unit (NPU), said: “Residents should always follow the stop, chain and check rule when people call at the door. “If you are not expecting anybody and they don’t have an appointment – don't let them in. Use your door chain or bar before opening the door, and ask to see their identification and double check.” Are you plagued by rogue traders? Write to Freepost Our City or email ourcity@stoke.co.uk

RESIDENTS of Stoke-on-Trent were urged to make sure they are eligible to vote at a series of roadshows. City council officers hit the streets of Longton and Tunstall to encourage residents to return their electoral registration forms. Principal Elections Officer John Hammersley said:“We urged residents to fill in their forms and return them as soon as possible. “If residents’ names don’t appear on the electoral register, they can’t vote in elections held in the city. “They could also struggle to get credit or services that require a credit check.” ● For more information and advice please call the Elections Office on 01782 233800.

MAYOR ON AIR Every fortnight tune in to local community radio station Cross Rhythms City Radio, 101.8FM, to catch the latest update with Mayor Mark Meredith as he comments on all the latest news and issues in the city. Got a question for Mark? Then email radio@crossrhythms.co.uk.

For a list of forthcoming updates go to www.crossrhythms.co.uk/ mayoronair


Our City p22/23

6/11/08

10:43

Page 1

e c i l o P

22 Our City

NOVEMBER 2008

PC 0971 PC 4838 PC 4106

CONTACT NUMBERS IT’S easy to get in touch with a local beat bobby or Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) via their digital airwave radios. All officers have individual collar numbers which are either four or five digits long. For officers with four digit numbers dial 0300 123 2345 then enter ‘0’ followed by the four digit collar number of the officer you need to speak to. No ‘0’ is needed for officers with five digit collar numbers. If the officer is on duty, their radio rings like a mobile phone and you will be connected. If they are off duty or dealing with victims, witnesses or offenders, your call goes through to the officer’s individual voicemail box. Remember, in an emergency, dial 999.

Bucknall Neighbourhood

SNEYD GREEN PC 4837 PCSO 8980

NPU commander – Inspector 3283

NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTION TEAM PC 0735 Jo Pawell PC 0998 Peter Underwood

Steve Jones Bucknall Police Post, Ruxley Road, Bucknall, Stoke-on-Trent, ST2 9BG.

Sarah Griffiths Charlotte Barker

Tel. 0300 123 4455 email: bucknall.npu@staffordshire. pnn.police.uk All officers are based at Bucknall. SGT 3615 Paul Clarke SGT 3415 Dave Lowe ABBEY HULTON PC 4837 PCSO 16295 PCSO 8982

Dylan Morrey Steve Cowan Marie McCormack

BENTILEE PC 5078 PC 4755 PCSO 16226 PCSO 6612

Scott Turner Craig Shields Rachel Knight Andrew Meakin

BERRYHILL & EATON PARK PC 4953 Angela Broadhurst PCSO 8983 Rob Guthrie BUCKNALL AND TOWNSEND PC 975 Nathan Ames JOINER’S SQUARE PC 0970 Paul Sajdak PCSO 16232 Andy Alcock PCSO 8893 Lucy Stevenson MILTON, BADDELEY GREEN WEST AND NORTON HEIGHTS PC 0865 Clare Bowker PCSO 6514 Nicky Burton SMALLTHORNE PC 3911 PCSO 6613 PCSO 16231

Keiron Edridge Matthew Lockett Carl Radford

Longton Neighbourhood NPU commander – Inspector 0892

Asha Kaur Longton Police Station, Sutherland Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, ST3 1HH.

Tel. 0300 123 4455 email: longton.npu@staffordshire. pnn.police.uk All officers are based at Longton Police Station. Sgt 3890 Ian Jones Sgt 3862 Tony Godwin Sgt 4082 Adrian Hughes DRESDEN, FLORENCE, LIGHTWOOD & NORMACOT PC 5274 James Ibbs PC 5169 Toni Sunderland PCSO 6433 George Bould PCSO 6627 Nadeem Malik PCSO 16240 Leanne Sherratt LIGHTWOOD, MEIR PARK & MEIR SOUTH PC 4090 Russ Elliot PC 4725 Wayne Flowers PCSO 6500 Mark Simon LONGTON NORTH & LONGTON TOWN PC 3287 Frank Flannigan PCSO 16224 Zoe Garside MEIR HAY & SAXONFIELDS PC 0733 Donna Talbot PC 4991 Steven Meigh PCSO 6603 Gemma Price PCSO 8829 Kate Stevenson NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTION TEAM PC 4021 Andy Edwards

Paul Nixon Gareth Whitfield Paul Massey

Stoke Neighbourhood NPU commander – Inspector 3734

Christopher Harrington Stoke Police Station, Boothen Road, Stoke–on–Trent, ST4 4AH.

Tel. 0300 123 4455 email: stoke.npu@staffordshire.pnn. police.uk All officers are based at Stoke Police Station. Sgt 0583 Jo Blandford Sgt 4653 Phil Eaton Sgt 3851 Dave Fenton BASFORD, CLIFF VALE, HARTSHILL WEST & HOSPITAL PC 4685 Steve Wilson PCSO 6434 Kramer Caldwell BLURTON EAST PC 4822 PCSO 16234

Sean Woodward Stephen Sherratt

BLURTON & NEWSTEAD PCSO 6607 Philip McGlynn PC 5107 Simon Stone BOOTHEN & TOWN CENTRE PC 4433 Andy Birchenall PC 4941 Craig Flaherty PCSO 8825 Karen Billings FENTON EAST PC 0905 PCSO 8827

Robert Mountford Scott Holland

FENTON, HERON CROSS & MOUNT PLEASANT PC 4576 Steve Stuttard PC 4475 Ivor Owens PCSO 6443 Rachel Mountford PCSO 16229 Wendy Rodgers HANFORD & TRENTHAM WEST PC 4034 Malcolm Ford HARTSHILL WEST PCSO 5133 Scott Gidman PCSO 8958 Paul Muller HOLLYBUSH & PENKHULL PCSO 16234 Stephen Sherratt TRENTHAM EAST & TRENTHAM LEY PCSO 6609 Penny Carr TRENT VALE PC 4964

Andrea Oakes

NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTION TEAM PC 5050 Roy Barber PC 0762 Becky Harris PC 4382 Dave Ellis

Tunstall Neighbourhood NPU commander – Inspector 3573

Mark Hardern Tunstall Police Station, Scotia Road, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 6BG.

HEALTH CENTRES r u o Y Tel. 0300 123 4455

PC 4718 PCSO 8957 PCSO 6440

email: tunstall.npu@staffordshire. pnn.police.uk All officers are based at Tunstall Police Station. SGT Rob Bateman SGT 4594 Marcus Ferns

CENTRAL FOREST PARK PC 0805 Kate Beardmore PC 0806 Amanda White PCSO 8987 Liz Old PCSO 8831 Katie Sullivan

BALL GREEN & NORTON PC 4383 Andy Baddeley PCSO 16238 Masmino John BRADELEY PC 3822 PCSO 16235

ETRURIA AND SHELTON NORTH PC 4632 Andy Mander PC 4389 Guy Wain PCSO 8995 Lucy Slater PCSO 16230 Vicky Smith

Rob Thomas Sarah Wood

BRINDLEY FORD, OXFORD, PACKMOOR & TURNHURST PC 0944 Jaime Isaacs PCSO 8986 Andrew Wootton

LONGPORT AND MIDDLEPORT PC 4368 Andy Graham PC 0966 Adam Syred PCSO 6628 Tich Nyamayaro PCSO 8832 Adam van de Sande

BURSLEM NORTH EAST, BURSLEM PARK & SMALLTHORNE NORTH PC 5086 Craig Carpenter PCSO 16233 Hannah Mayer CHELL HEATH PC 4904 PCSO 6616

NORTHWOOD PC 3829 PCSO 9045

STAFFORDSHIRE UNIVERSITY PC 4483 Keith Emery

GOLDENHILL & SANDYFORD PC 4733 Glyn Talbot PCSO 8953 Michael Frost

NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTION TEAM PC 5106 Gareth Cheetham PC 5056 Andy Percy

STANFIELDS & MILL HILL PC 5055 Dan Marsh PCSO 16233 Hannah Mayer

CITY CENTRE NPU commander

Inspector 3509 Shaun Kerrigan

Adam Edwards Amanda Whitfield Richard Farrar

Hanley Police Station, Bethesda St, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, ST1 3DR.

Tel. 0300 123 4455

NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTION TEAM PC 4233 Dave O’Donnell PC 3755 Paul Harris PC 4858 Simon Price PC 3930 Steve Farmer

city.npu@staffordshire.pnn.police.uk Sgt 4151 Brevic Jones Sgt 4777 Jon Ward Sgt 4425 Phil White CITY CENTRE PC 4528 PC 0817 PC 0726 PC 0400 PC 4644 PC 4511 PC 4634 PC 5410 PC 0564 PC 4149 PCSO 16293 PCSO 8516 PCSO 8955 PCSO 8457

Burslem & City Centre Neighbourhoods BURSLEM NPU commander

Inspector 4465 Martin Brereton Burslem Police Station, Jackson Street, Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 1AF.

Tel. 0300 123 4455 email: burslem.npu@staffordshire. pnn.police.uk Sgt 4602 Paul Clarke Sgt 3840 John Hazeldine Sgt 4336 Craig Burton BIRCHES HEAD PC 0848 PCSO 8979 PCSO 16225 PCSO 8984

Special constables All NPUs are supported by a team of special constables.

BURSLEM AND SNEYD GREEN WEST PC 0896 Tracy Adams

OTHER USEFUL NUMBERS 0800 561 5610

EMERGENCY SERVICES

999

ABBEY HULTON

01782 427900

HANFORD

01782 421000

STOKE

01782 425220

GAS LEAKS (TRANSCO)

0800 111999

BENTILEE

01782 231300

HANLEY

01782 425120

TRENT VALE

01782 425260

SEVERN TRENT WATER

0800 783 4444

BLURTON

01782 227770

LONGTON

01782 425530

TUNSTALL

01782 425800

STOKE-ON-CALL

01782 234234

BURSLEM

01782 425700

MEIR

01782 425676

COBRIDGE

01782 525893

NORTON

01782 534599

For more information and advice on health issues please call NHS Direct on

WHITFIELD VALLEY

01782 425720

PACKMOOR

01782 794600

0845 46 47 or visit

FENTON

01782 423100

SMALLTHORNE

01782 425755

www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk or www.nhs.uk

Darren Belfield Kerry Grant Claire Harrison Diane Hoyle Rob Kelsall Richard Longmore Lee Robinson Steve Smith Lisa Trevor Jason Howell Mel Bartholemew Andrea Bolam Chris Hill Simon Holmes

ETURIA ROAD CORRIDOR & FESTIVAL PARK PC 4871 Lucas Hackney PC 0605 Nicola Humphries PC 4452 Roger Poole PC 4133 Craig Russell PC 5208 Andy Sherratt PCSO 6602 Chris Cantrell PCSO 16227 Daniel Nettleton PCSO 8830 Chris Stone

Ruth Barlow Michelle Chadwick Adrian Hemmings Rebecca Simon

ANTI SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Ian Martin Sue Wall

SHELTON SOUTH PC 4139 Dave Marshall PCSO 16299 Katie Brickley PCSO 6484 Lisa Donachie

John Swinnerton Sally Wright

FEGG HAYES & GREAT CHELL PC 4969 Sam Bray PCSO 6513 Sara Bowen

TUNSTALL PC 4835 PC 5158 PCSO 8954

Paul Rigby Justine Marsh Wendy Rigby

CRIMESTOPPERS Call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. Just tell us what you know, not who you are.

In an emergency dial 999

Your new 0 3 0 0

123 NUMBER 4 4 5 5 Staffordshire Police

NON-EMERGENCY


Our City p22/23

5/11/08

17:08

Page 2

r u o Y

NOVEMBER 2008

Abbey Green

COUNCILLORS

ELLIE WALKER (BNP) (01782) 397870 07917 854352 ellie.walker@stoke.gov.uk

Berryhill and Hanley East

Blurton

RITA DALE (City Independents) (01782) 267451 07778 858734 rita.dale@stoke.gov.uk

ADRIAN KNAPPER (Lab) 07714 334453/ 07825 732724 adrian.knapper@stoke. gov.uk

JOHN DAVIS (City Independents) (01782) 264126 07786 440876 john.davis@stoke.gov.uk

Burslem South

JAVID IQBAL NAJMI (Lab) 07846 879920 javid.najmi@stoke.gov.uk

DEBRA GRATTON (Lab) 07825 732713 debra.gratton@ stoke.gov.uk

MOHAMMED PERVEZ (Lab) 07919 917632 07825 732690 mohammed.pervez@ stoke.gov.uk

ALBY WALKER (BNP) (01782) 397870 07917 854342 albert.walker@stoke.gov.uk

DEREK CAPEY (City Independents) (01782) 319949 07752 851323 derek.capey@stoke.gov.uk

PAUL SHOTTON (Lab) (01782) 845323 paul.shotton@ stoke.gov.uk

TOM REYNOLDS (Lab) (01782) 342295 07783 414459 tom.reynolds@stoke.gov.uk

ZULFIQAR ALI (Lib Dem) 07838 262062 zulfiqar.ali@stoke.gov.uk

DEREK HALL (City Independents) (01782) 258715 07837 185310 derek.hall@stoke.gov.uk

BRIAN WARD (City Independents) (01782) 312670 07814 501534 brian.ward@stoke.gov.uk

BAGH ALI (Lab) (01782) 343246 07973 848428 bagh.ali@stoke.gov.uk

PETER KENT-BAGULEY (Potteries Alliance) 07773 464626 peter.kent-baguley@ stoke.gov.uk

ALAN JOYNSON (Non-aligned) (01782) 413683 alan.joynson@ stoke.gov.uk

JOAN BELL (Lab) (01782) 318998 07757 708703 joan.bell@stoke.gov.uk

Norton and Bradeley

DAVE SUTTON (Lib Dem) (01782) 542998 07512 564815 dave.sutton@stoke.gov.uk

ALAN RIGBY (City Independents) (01782) 542364 07790 374152 alan.rigby@stoke.gov.uk

JEAN BOWERS (Lib Dem) (01782) 262613 07712 350430 jean.bowers@stoke.gov.uk

KIERAN CLARKE (Lib Dem) (01782) 788010 07886 358143 kieran.clarke@stoke.gov.uk

Trentham and Hanford

ROGER IBBS (Conservative & Independent Alliance) 07824 867748 roger.ibbs@stoke.gov.uk

JANINE BRIDGES (City Independents) (01782) 851842 07989 385631 janine.bridges@ stoke.gov.uk

MEGAN RYAN (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 866761 07903 458768 megan.ryan@stoke.gov.uk

DAVID MARFLEET (BNP) (01782) 876661 07745 157918 david.marfleet@ stoke.gov.uk

MICK SALIH (Non-aligned) (01782) 533542 07977 843026 mick.salih@stoke.gov.uk

JEAN EDWARDS (Lab) (01782) 816171 jean.edwards@ stoke.gov.uk

DAVID CONWAY (Lab) (01782) 790922 david.conway@ stoke.gov.uk

JOY GARNER (Lab) (01782) 768846 07986 442770 joy.garner@stoke.gov.uk

HAZEL LYTH (Conservative & Independent Alliance) 07825 732680 hazel.lyth@stoke.gov.uk

GEOFF KNIGHT (Potteries Alliance) (01782) 765770 geoff.knight@ stoke.gov.uk

JOANNE POWELLBECKETT (Cons & Independent Alliance) 07913 483333 joanne.powell-beckett@ stoke.gov.uk

Hartshill and Penkhull

MOHAMMAD IQBAL (Lab) (01782) 266893 07792 071266 mohammad.iqbal@ stoke.gov.uk

IAN MITCHELL (City Independents) (01782) 314353 07885 104596 ian.mitchell@stoke.gov.uk

RANDOLPH CONTEH (City Independents) (01782) 256869 randolph.conteh@ stoke.gov.uk

BARBARA BEESTON (City Independents) (01782) 612072 07729 896622 barbara.beeston@ stoke.gov.uk

Meir Park and Sandon

MICHAEL BARNES (Lab) (01782) 870065 07877 652395 michael.barnes@ stoke.gov.uk

CLIVE BRIAN (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 315702 clive.brian@stoke.gov.uk

JOHN BURGESS (BNP) (01782) 394397 07889 137308 john.burgess@stoke.gov.uk

MARGARET PYATT (City Independents) (01782) 319372 margaret.pyatt@ stoke.gov.uk

Stoke and Trent Vale

SHEILA MATTHEWS (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 258374 sheila.matthews@ stoke.gov.uk

Tunstall

ROSS IRVING (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 335982 07900 135565 ross.irving@stoke.gov.uk

PHILLIP SANDLAND (BNP) (01782) 342372 phillip.sandland@ stoke.gov.uk

East Valley

Longton South

DENVER TOLLEY (Lab) (01782) 316815 07799 032939 denver.tolley@stoke.gov.uk

STEVEN BATKIN (BNP) (01782) 859054 steven.batkin@ stoke.gov.uk

Burslem North

Northwood and Birches Head

TERENCE FOLLOWS (City Independents) (01782) 318127 terence.follows@ stoke.gov.uk

MELANIE BADDELEY (BNP) (01782) 763615 07979 508837 melanie.baddeley@ stoke.gov.uk

Hanley West and Shelton

Longton North

MARK DAVIS (Lab) 07813 473625 mark.davis@stoke.gov.uk

ANN JAMES (City Independents) (01782) 836766 ann.james@stoke.gov.uk

23

Bentilee and Townsend

Chell and Packmoor

Fenton

MICK BELL (City Independents) (01782) 847760 mick.bell@stoke.gov.uk

ROY NAYLOR (City Independents) (01782) 313975 07833 183922 roy.naylor@ stoke.gov.uk

Our City

GAVIN WEBB (Libertarian) 07949 026660 gavin.webb@ stoke.gov.uk

PAUL BILLINGTON (Lib Dem) (01782) 413225 07743 566138 paul.billington@stoke.gov.uk

PAULINE JOYNSON (Non-aligned) (01782) 413683 07813 836057 pauline.joynson@ stoke.gov.uk

Weston and Meir North

MOHAMMED MATLOOB (Lab) (01782) 577658 07811 147372 mohammed.matloob@ stoke.gov.uk

LEE WANGER (Conservative & Independent Alliance) 07971 303729 lee.wanger@stoke.gov.uk

MICHAEL COLEMAN (BNP) (01782) 311697 07926 532922 michael.coleman@ stoke.gov.uk

JOHN DANIELS (Conservative & Independent Alliance) (01782) 396780 07885 894804 john.daniels@stoke.gov.uk

ANTHONY SIMMONDS (BNP) (01782) 334919 07855 885606 anthony.simmonds@ stoke.gov.uk


Our City p24

24

6/11/08

10:32

Page 1

Our City N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 8

Soccer action scores for teams of youngsters SCHOOLS across the city competed in a football tournament as part of an initiative to help children achieve their sporting goals. The Football Action tournament which took place at Dimensions Leisure Centre, Burslem put grass roots football in the spotlight. As the final whistle sounded Crescent Primary School won the Junior School tournament beating Whitfield Valley in the final. Meanwhile, JBR Academy (a combined team from James Brindley High and Brownhills) beat Blurton High in the high schools final. Other schools that took part included defending champions Thistley Hough High, Berry Hill High, Mitchell High, Birches Head High, Longton High and Blurton High. Other primary schools included Glebe, Kingsland and Burnwood. The Football Action programme is a partnership between the city council, Balfour Beatty and the Football Foundation. It currently organises fourteen coaching sessions per week for young people in Stoke-on-Trent, all staffed by FA certified coaches. Following the tournament, Lord Mayor Councillor Derek Capey handed out the trophies to the winners.

Members of the winning team from Crescent Primary School, Meir, are, left to right, Jason Holford and Teejay Manley, both aged 10, and Tristen Barker and Matthew Bell, both aged 9.

Little Stars shine with a little help from play staff S

TAFF at the Thomas Boughey Children’s Centre have every reason to be proud of their very own little stars.

They are youngsters with special needs who attend the centre in Shelton and benefit from its pioneering programme called Little Stars – developed specially to prepare the children for the world of school and provide support for their families at the same time. The Centre caters for pre-school children aged from birth to five – and the Little Stars initiative for those with special physical or mental health needs has proved to be a shining success since its launch two years ago. Through the group, the children play games and learn in a fun way. They are taught skills so that they can be stimulated and have fun in an environment relevant to the individual’s needs. Staff are trained in special educational needs so they can provide that specialist skill that can be so often missing in a child’s development. In addition, families are helped to share with their youngsters the skills of play and learning, while Little Stars also helps them access support from physiotherapists,

paediatricians, health visitors and other professionals. Centre Co-ordinator Phil Shemilt said: “Little Stars has been designed specifically to help both the children and their families. “The children with special needs benefit from the social aspect being with children from similar backgrounds and this helps break down barriers. “Many children have benefited from the programme and there has been extremely positive feedback from both parents and the nursery school.” Fazia Hameed, mother of Zain who is currently taking part in the Little Stars initiative, said: “The Little Stars group has helped me to make the best use of toys and equipment so I can help Zain build his confidence and self-esteem. “The group has also enabled me to talk and share my concerns with staff and meet other professionals such as Zain’s physiotherapist.” Senior Zain’s father Khalid Family Support added: “The group has Worker Mary given parents the Howard, of the opportunity to meet Thomas Boughey other parents and has Children’s Centre, given the children a with two-and-achange of environment half year old and the opportunity to Zain. make new friends.”

Our City is published by a partnership of Stoke-on-Trent

City Council, NHS Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire Police and Staffordshire Fire and Rescue. Contact us by mail at FREEPOST Our City or by email at ourcity@stoke.gov.uk or telephone 01782 232900

Sports help to cut crime COMMUNITIES worked together in a variety of sporting activities as part of a scheme dedicated to reducing crime. The Respect Sports Festival took place at Fenton Manor Sports Complex and was partnered with NHS Stoke on Trent, The Douglas Macmillan Hospice and the Youth Service. Residents were encouraged to take part in sports such as football, rugby, squash, fencing, martial arts and volleyball. The first 300 people to arrive also received a free lunch voucher and swimming lesson. Councillor Joan Bell, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety said:“The Respect campaign has been a great success so far but we need to keep working to ensure more people get involved.” Councillor Debra Gratton, Portfolio Holder for Sport and Leisure said:“I have always maintained that sport is an excellent way to cross traditional boundaries and encourage people to work towards an aim. In this case it is spreading the message of respect.”

Our City Issue 07  

Stoke-on-Trent City Coucil Newspaper.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you