Page 1


UK’s Credit Union Welcome to better banking From savings accounts and free checking to home equities and mobile banking, we have everything to meet your family’s financial needs. Find out how you can join! For more details visit ukfcu.org, call 859.264.4200 or stop by one of our five convenient locations.

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

Are you in the wrong shoe? If you didn’t shop with us, you probably are! • We measure and help choose the right shoe for your foot.

Stop by and visit our booth at The Keeneland Concours d'Elegance.

• You’ll get service from a professional adult staff with 35 years experience.

tyle store. Your healthytwolifeslocat ions! Now with

A PROFESSIONAL GARAGE FOR THE HANDS-ON ENTHUSIAST 391 UNITED COURT • LEXINGTON, KY 1-844-LUG-NUTS • LUGNUTSAUTOCLUB.COM

317 S. Ashland Ave.

859.269.8313

PRICES THE SAME AS THE BIG STORES! GET EXPERT HELP AT NO EXTRA COST!

140 Palomar Center

859.219.3161


July2014

contents 7

17 IN THE KITCHEN WITH CRAVE

BEST IN LEX EATS SERIES

Top Five Fried Chicken Spots A look at five of our favorite local spots for fried chicken

What’s In a Lamb? Dan Wu takes “eating local” to the next level by purchasing an entire animal directly from the farmer

21

23

ON OUR TABLE

SOUTHSIDER’S DRINK OF THE MONTH

Seared Lamb with Curried Cauliflower

Lemon Balm Gin and Tonic

Impress your next dinner guests with this simple and delicious recipe

A refreshing and “prescriptive” take on the classic cocktail, featuring the abundant summer herb

BANKING & FINANCE FOCUS

Kentucky Bank steps up as title sponsor of the state’s only professional tennis tournament TimeBank: Using time as currency BitCoin Revisited: regional folks weigh in on the fledgling digital currency

33

page 27

page 29

38

JULY TADOO LIST

REAL ESTATE

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

Southsider Properties

Live music, film, theater, fairs, festivals and more

page 24

A list of recent residential property transactions for this magazine’s distribution area

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 3


Finding a work/life balance is hard enough. But when it comes to money, Kentucky Telco Federal Credit Union has me covered. It is the one place I can rely on for all my financial needs.

“Catering to cowards” ★★★★

“ Making dentistry affordable” ★★★★

t t t t t

Free financial credit counseling Online Banking Direct Deposit Low interest rate loans Extensive network of free ATMS The best part? They are conveniently located off Nicholasville Road.

Visit kytelco.com or call 800-292-9490 to learn more. Kentucky Telco. Your financial GPS.

“ Creating winning smiles” ★★★★

SAME DAY EMERGENCIES SEDATION ROOT CANALS EXTRACTIONS WHITENING

(IN OFFICE & TAKE HOME)

DENTURES • PARTIALS BRIDGES • CROWNS IMPLANT RESTORATION FULL SERVICE FAMILY DENTISTRY A+ RATING WITH BBB NEW PATIENTS WELCOME PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE

PREFERRED PROVIDER FOR MOST INSURANCES

SMILE DESIGNS FAMILY DENTISTRY 2549 Regency Road l Lexington, KY 40503 l yourfinancialgps.com 4 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

SHANNON KEMPER, D.M.D.

3340 Clays Mill Rd. • Lexington, KY • 859.224.3200 • www.smiledesignslexington.com


Southsider

Smiley Pete Publishing

Contributors

Chris Eddie chris@smileypete.com Chuck Creacy chuck@smileypete.com

magazine

PUBLISHERS

MANAGING EDITOR

Ryan Filchak is the bar manager at downtown Lexing-

ton restaurant Table 310 and an art history graduate student at the University of Kentucky School of Art & Visual Studies. A digital assistant for tadoo.com, he contributes to the monthly “tadoo list” arts and entertainment calendar for this magazine (page 33). Brian Powers (“TimeBank,” page 27 and “The Other

Side of the Bitcoin,” page 29) is a lawyer, a multimedia designer, a musician and an amateur woodworker. He lives in Nicholasville, where he spends his time falling in love with his adopted home state of Kentucky when he isn’t roller skating with his daughter.

Saraya Brewer saraya@smileypete.com COPY EDITOR Rena Baer ART DIRECTOR Drew Purcell drew@smileypete.com

FIRST TOOTH FIRST BIRTHDAY FIRST DENTAL VISIT

DIRECTOR OF EVENTS AND SPONSORSHIPS Robbie Morgan rmorgan@smileypete.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Sarah Jane Sanders (photography for “Top Five Fried

Chicken,” “In the Kitchen with Crave” and “Drink of the Month”) is a freelance food and editorial photographer based in Lexington. Her work can be seen in various publications such as Bravetart.com, Food & Wine's blog, and Cake & Whiskey Magazine. Visit Sarah Jane at the Bread Box Studios behind West Sixth Brewery or www.sarahjanesanders.com.

Dan Wu (“In the the Kitchen with Crave,” page 17) page is a self-appointed “culinary evangelist,” spreading the gospel of good food. His favorite words are omakase, charcuterie, and yes.

Linda Hinchcliffe linda@smileypete.com Steve O’Bryan steve@smileypete.com Ann Staton ann@smileypete.com Amy Eddie amy@smileypete.com Carmen Hemesath carmen@smileypete.com ADMINISTRATIVE Sheli Mays sheli@smileypete.com Another fine publication from

Publishers of Chevy Chaser & Southsider Magazines and Business Lexington

434 Old Vine Street Lexington, KY 40507 859-266-6537 fax: 859-255-0672 www.smileypete.com

Want more Southsider? Sign up for our free weekly e-newsletter at www.southsider magazine.com!

J&H LANMARK STORE 189 MOORE DR., LEXINGTON • 859.278.0730 • JHOUTDOORS.COM M-F 10-8 SAT 10-6 SUN 1-5 • LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 5


Our tomatoes grow just 39 miles away.

THE

POWER TO OWN YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE

FREE

Plus, Link with

CASH

To earn & automatically save!

KASASA

KASASA SAVER

2.01% 0.25% 0.01% APY*

On Kasasa Cash balances up to $15,000 if qualifications are met

APY*

On the portion of the balance over $15,000 will yield 2.01% - 0.48% APY depending on the balance.

APY*

On all Kasasa Cash balances if qualifications are not met

*APY = Annual Percentage Yield. Qualifications, limits and other requirements apply. Minimum of $100 to open an account. Contact us at 859-233-4500 for details.

Local in Lexington, KY since 1972. Southland Drive • goodfoods.coop • #eatlocalky

HIGH RATES AND REFUNDS ON ATM FEES NATIONWIDE FROM KASASA CASH*

101 East High Street • 215 Southland Drive • Lexington, KY • 859-233-4500 www.bankofthebluegrass.com

*Qualifications apply. Visit www.bankofthebluegrass.com to learn more.

6 | Southsider Magazine June 2014


SOUTHSIDER MAGAZINE PRESENTS

TOP 5 FRIED CHICKEN SPOTS BY CHRIS EDDIE | PHOTOS BY SARAH JANE SANDERS

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 7


Indi’s My favorite dining experiences often include incredibly flavorful food at very reasonable prices; few places accomplish this better than Indi’s. The restaurant is drive-thru or carry-out only, but it’s worth it. If you don’t believe me, Esquire Magazine named Indi’s to its “Best Late-Night Food in the U.S.A.” list. This. Is. Not. Health. Food. My personal favorite meal is the spicy chicken (dark meat), potato wedges and a roll. The chicken is perfectly cooked and has a nice heat. They claim to use West Indian spices — I’m not exactly sure what that means, but it tastes like hot sauce to me. The wedges are fried in a spiced batter, and the roll is as basic as it gets. The combination is amazing. (Note the lack of anything healthy, whatsoever.) If you like white(ish) meat, try the keel. An Internet search may still leave you confused as to what exactly a keel is, but allegedly it is in the vicinity of the bone between the breasts.

INDI’S 670 NORTH BROADWAY (859) 233-7985

8 | Southsider Magazine July 2014


Parkette Drive-In Most of the retro drive-ins are gone today, but Parkette remains. The restaurant opened in 1951, with the now-famous sign erected in 1957. The Belt Line Highway (now New Circle Road) was a dirt and gravel road that ran from Broadway to Liberty Road. Current owners Randy and Jeff Kaplan have done a remarkable job remodeling this icon and recently completely remodeled the interior in a retro-’50s style. All of the retro fun aside, we’re here for the fried chicken. Originally called “Kentucky Fried Chicken,” Parkette makes theirs fresh. Cut, battered, dipped and fried in lard, it comes out crispy and piping hot, and served with a side of gravy, fries or tots (go with the tots), plus a hot roll and cole slaw. A “1/2 mixed” (leg, thigh and breast) will set you back a mere $8.99. You can also substitute homemade onion rings for $1.50. PARKETTE DRIVE-IN 1230 EAST NEW CIRCLE ROAD (859) 254-8723

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 9


2014

JULY 19-20 JULY 26-27

GrandTourofHomes.com UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY RESEARCH

Do You Smoke Marijuana? Are you between 18 and 50 years old? Have you been smoking marijuana in the past 30 days? Are you interested in decreasing or stopping your use of marijuana? If you answered yes to these questions, you may qualify for a research study evaluating an investigational drug to help stop using marijuana. If you are interested, call us for a confidential phone interview.

Taking good care of your trees is one of the most environmentally responsible decisions you can make. Expert tree care from the ISA Certified Arborists you know and trust. Providing a full range of professional tree care services: Pruning • Planting • Preservation • Removal/Replacement Insect & Disease Treatment and Prevention

Call toll-free: 1-866-933-4UKY Or E-mail: ACCENT@uky.edu Participation will require multiple outpatient visits across 18 weeks. You will be paid for your participation.

TOWN BRANCH

TREE EXPERTS, INC. 859-967-6907 • info@townbranchtreeexperts.com • townbranchtreeexperts.com

LEXINGTON’S ONLY TCIA ACCREDITED TREE SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES AND EVALUATIONS 10 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

An Equal Opportunity University

w w w. U K c l i n i c a l r e s e a r c h . c o m


Merrick Inn Merrick Inn has been a Lexington tradition for 40 years. When it comes to upscale Southern cuisine, this is the place. Located in the Lansdowne-Merrick neighborhood in the farmhouse of a former horse farm, the dining rooms are serious old Kentucky, while the patio is modern and casual. Merrick’s name is synonymous with fried chicken. By far, its most well-known dish, the chicken, lives up to its reputation. A large portion and cooked to perfection, it never disappoints. I don’t know their recipe, and I know they won’t tell me. It doesn’t matter. If I want it, I’m going there anyway.

MERRICK INN 1074 MERRICK DRIVE (859) 269-5417

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 11


Mandarin Lunch Specials Chinese Lunch Special Buy 1 meal receive 2nd meal 1/2 price

Expires: 6.30.14 Dine in only. Only with coupon. 1 coupon per visit.

Sushi Lunch Special With minimum $10 sushi order receive free order of edamame or cup of miso soup Expires: 6.30.14 Dine in only. Only with coupon. 1 coupon per visit.

$175 OFF EVERY WINDOW PLUS

$500 OFF All Front Entry Doors

Ask about our QUICK, ONE CALL Payment Options

0

Down Payment

0

PAYMENTS Up To

24 Months

0

INTEREST Up To

60 Months

with even payments

For a FREE In-Home Consultation, Call:

859.629.3641 ORIENTAL CAFE´ & SUSHI BAR

12 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

Zandale Plaza • 2220 Nicholasville Rd. 859.275-4300 859.275.1666 www.mandarincafeandsushi.com

RenewalKY.com

Offer good on appointments set through 7/31/14. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. *Loans provided by EnerBank USA (1245 E. Brickyard., Suite 600, Salt Lake City, UT 84106) on approved credit, for a limited time. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation © 2014 Andersen Corporation all rights reserved.


Wallace Station Chris and (James Beard Award nominee) Ouita Michel have made a career out of creating destination restaurants in the Bluegrass. The owners of Holly Hill Inn, Windy Corner Market, Smithtown Seafood and The Midway School Bakery opened this restaurant in 2003 on scenic Old Frankfort Pike in a former country store. Fair warning: Fried chicken is not on the regular menu. Monday night is Wallace Station’s fried chicken night. Get there early because it often sells out.

WALLACE STATION 3854 OLD FRANKFORT PIKE (859) 846-5161

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 13


Photos court ©Charlie Baglan

ENJOY SAVINGS OF 50% OFF! Why Pay More $$$ for National Brands?

PREMIUM VISCO MEMORY FOAM

10” VISCO MEMORY

The Double Decker.

A Cincinnati classic and now a Gold Star Chili favorite! Freshly toasted bread piled with your choice of thinly sliced Blue Grass quality deli meat and finished off with cheddar or swiss cheese, crisp lettuce, fresh tomatoes and real mayonnaise.

100% PURE LATEX ECO.

12” VISCO MEMORY

12” NATURAL LATEX

2550 Regency Rd., Lexington, KY • 859-296-5991 • www.anothermanstreasurefurniture.com LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! OPEN M-TH 10-7, FRI & SAT 10-5

14 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

Your bread runneth over.

Palomar Centre

3735 Palomar Centre Drive 859-219-8444


Winchell’s Winchell’s is an extremely casual neighborhood restaurant and sports bar that is packed morning, noon and night. And for good reason. Its motto of “Better Food, More Televisions” doesn’t really do the place justice. Owned by Culinary Institute of America grads Eric “Abe” Lansdale and Graham Waller, the restaurant strives to “make the people of Kentucky proud by serving fresh, homemade food in a casual and friendly environment.” On the plate you get a well-seasoned half chicken fried to perfection with gravy, mashed potatoes and green beans. This is also one of the rare places that serves fried chicken livers anymore. Kick back, eat some chicken, grab a beer and take in a game. You’ve found a great neighborhood joint. ss

WINCHELL’S 348 SOUTHLAND DRIVE (859) 278-9424

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 15


July 7-12 at the Red Mile. Join the Junior League for the 78th annual, and world’s largest outdoor American Saddlebred show and the first leg of the Saddlebred “Triple Crown.” Eat, drink and be social! Meet up with friends for summer fun at the track. Don’t miss special events including our 1st Annual Dog Show, Family Night, and our Friday Night After Party featuring Encore Lexington. General Admission tix available at the door. $5 Mon-Thurs / $10 Fri-Sat Children under 6 free

Proceeds benefit non-profit agencies sponsored by the Junior League of Lexington.

Learn more about our signature event at www.lexjrleague.com

THE HARBOUR AT L A K E W O O D

Luxury Waterfront Townhomes OPEN HOUSES EVERY FRI-SUN 1-5PM New this year: On-site food trucks & beverage vendors!

V I S I T W W W. T H E H O U S E S T O R E K Y. C O M F O R M O R E D E TA I L S

General Admission Tickets: $15 adv. / $20 at the gate For tickets and table opportunities, call The Lexington Center Ticket Office: 233-3535

Natalee Southworth, Agent 3268 Beaumont Centre Circle Lexington, KY 40513 859-489-7802 Natalee@TheHouseStoreKY.com

16 | Southsider Magazine July 2014


IN THE KITCHEN WITH CRAVE

In our second article of a four-part series accompanying our “Crave Kitchen Shorts” –– a series of short videos leading up to this year’s Crave Lexington food + music festival (Sept. 13-14) –– local chef Dan Wu, featured on this season of “MasterChef,” walks us through the process of purchasing an entire animal from a local farm. Watch the video at www.cravelexington.com.

BY DAN WU CONTRIBUTING WRITER PHOTOS BY SARAH JANE SANDERS

W

hen you walk into your local grocery store, you’re entering a bit of a fantasyland. The produce section is chock-a-block with glossy, colorful, out-of-season fruits and vegetables. The meats are portioned out, packed in Styrofoam trays and wrapped in clear plastic. Don’t get me started on all the processed foods in boxes and cans. The good news is that healthy, sustainable, delicious alternatives exist, and they’re more accessible than you might think. Lots of us agree that despite any perceived obstacles to buying local –– it can be more expensive, it’s not always convenient, etc. –– ultimately, it is worth it. Why? Not only does local food support local people who in turn spend their money on other local businesses (as opposed to sending your money to national companies in faraway lands), but buying directly from the source also gives the buyer the opportunity to make sure firsthand that the animals are well treated, allowed to pasture and live a more natural, cagefree, cruelty-free life. Happier animals produce better meat. But for me, it all comes down to taste. Locally grown/raised food simply tastes better, like it’s meant to taste. Juicy berries, succulent meats, crisp vegetables. Since they are harvested at the peak of freshness, locally grown products are bred for taste and nutrition, not simply appearance, durability and shelf life. Why eat those firm, tasteless strawberries when you don’t have to?

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 17


FULL BAR!

The Original

“Celebrating 11 years in business”

HAPPY HOUR MON - FRI 3PM-6PM

$1.25 DOMESTIC, $1 OFF IMPORTS, $2 WELLS

BIG SCREENS

FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS FOR GAMES!

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS PIZZA BY THE SLICE

OPEN

COMING SOON! PATIO & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

MON-THURS 11AM-10PM FRI-SAT 11AM-11PM SUN 12PM-9PM 3330 PARTNER PLACE LEXINGTON, KY 859-388-9318 ORDER ONLINE AT WWW.OBPLEX.COM

15” ONE TOPPING

LEXEATIN.COM WILL NOW DELIVER ANYWHERE IN LEXINGTON

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. EXPIRES 7-31-14

$11.00

Purchasing an entire lamb provides a variety of different cuts of meat with which to experiment. Here, Wu prepares the loin chop (recipe on page 21).

Taking “buying local” to the next level Lots of us are well-versed by now with the abundant options for purchasing locally raised meat and produce via the Farmers’ Market, Community Supported Agriculture packages (CSAs) and even local and national grocery stores. But an often overlooked option for the adventurous and locally conscientious home cook is to purchase an entire animal from a local farmer. Several area farms, including Pike Valley, Elmwood Stock, Triple J, Hood’s Heritage Hogs, Brookview, Stone Cross and several others provide this option for various animals, from chickens to hogs to cows. Just ask your favorite local producer if they offer it next time you see them at the Farmers’ Market; chances are they would be thrilled you asked. We are fortunate to live in the Bluegrass, which is dotted with small farms that are growing and raising some of the best food around. Recently, I traveled to Four Hills Farm, just 30 minutes outside Lexington, to

film the latest “Crave Kitchen Short” video (now available to view online at www.cravelexington.com). Nestled along a bucolic winding road in Salvisa, about halfway between Lawrenceburg and Harrodsburg, Four Hills is home to Jim Mansfield and his flock of happily bleating lambs. All it takes is a quick guided tour of the grounds to see the care and kindness that goes into this operation. The lambs are raised and weaned in pasture, allowed to graze and run free. The favored breed at Four Hills Harm is Katahdin sheep, a single purpose American heritage breed (i.e., no wool), known for their high fertility and low maintenance as well as the delicate, mild flavor of the meat. Above and beyond the type of animal raised, it is the way in which they are cared for that differentiates this local farm from industrialized food. Talking with Mansfield, you begin to understand that the care he puts into his animals –– and one bite of his lamb proves that his approach translates directly to simply better food.

At left, Four Hills Farm's Jim Mansfield. The Salvisabased farm raises a breed of sheep called Katahdin, which it calls the “New American Lamb” due their unique and favorable qualities.

18 | Southsider Magazine July 2014


Dan Wu does a quick sauté on some fresh arugula to serve with the lamb loin chops.

Buying directly from the source ... gives the buyer the opportunity to make sure firsthand that the animals are well treated, allowed to pasture and live a more natural, cage-free, cruelty-free life. Happier animals produce better meat.

Why buy the whole animal? Paul McCartney once said, “If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be a vegetarian.” While he was making a call to vegetarianism, the core critique is directed at the commercial animal factory farm system that has not only amplified our disconnection from our food but also produced meat of questionable health, nutrition and ethical standards –– not to mention taste. When you buy a whole animal directly from the source, you know exactly what you’re getting; it also means you get all the cuts and nothing is wasted. All of Four Hills Farm’s meat is processed off-site and packaged in individual cuts that include chops, rack, loin and even sausage; many other local farms provide the processing and packaging for no additional cost as well, pricing it to be ultimately less expensive pound-for-pound than grocery store cuts. Many farms will also include helpful recipes to guide buyers with how to prepare some of the less common cuts. Read on for a recipe created with one of my favorite cuts from Four Hills Farms lamb: the loin chop, prepared with a cool yogurt, dill and mint sauce and curry-roasted cauliflower. ss

What’s in a lamb? Prices and exact cuts vary from farm to farm, but as a point of reference, here’s the breakdown of what you’d get if you order an entire lamb from Four Hills Farm.

For $325, you will receive approximately 40 pounds. of processed meat, vacuum packed and frozen (averaging out to just over $8 per pound). Standard cuts include the following: • Two leg roasts • Two racks of lamb • Five packs of loin chops • Two lamb shanks • Two boneless shoulder rolls or nine packs of blade chops (your choice) • Eight packs of ground lamb • One pack of liver, kidneys and heart. The meat can be cut up to your specifications, if requested. The farm also offers frozen lamb by the retail cut at the farm.

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 19


Growing Stronger Neighborhoods

On Our Table

Seared Lamb with Curry Roasted Cauliflower BY DAN WU CONTRIBUTING WRITER PHOTOS BY SARAH JANE SANDERS

One of my favorite cuts of lamb is the loin chop, a simple and small cut shaped like a mini T-bone. Treat it like steak and grill it to medium rare, making sure to get the pan or grill nice and hot to get that amazing sear. You can rub it with any combination of spices (five spice, ras al hanout, paprika and cumin) or simply salt and pepper. Then dress it up with a cool yogurt sauce accented with dill and mint, and pair it with roast vegetables –– potatoes, carrots or cauliflower. Pure, wholesome ingredients cooked simply. Does it get any better?

Donate furniture, building materials and more to the Lexington Habitat ReStore.

www.LexingtonReStore.com • 451 Southland Drive, Lexington

Seared Lamb Loin Chops

Private Duty Nursing Service Skilled & Non-Medical Services Offering 24 Hours/7 Days a Week RNs • LPNs • CNAs • Sitters • Home Making • Meal Preparation Personal Care • Respite Care • Escort To & From Appointments Medication Management • Errand Services • Pet Care

CALL TODAY

when you can’t be there, we can

Treflan® Preventer Hollytone® 10 LB. BAG

Curried Cauliflower

Available 24 Hours (859) 296-0513

www.extracareprivateduty.org

Triple Crown Elite Grass Seed

40 LB. BAG

50 LB. BAG • 25 LB. BAG • 5 LB. BAG

THE LARGEST SELECTION OF NATURAL CUT STONE IN CENTRAL KENTUCKY Standardbred Compost OMRI Listed™ • Blended Topsoil • 50/50 Blend Organic Living Mulch™ • Premium Hardwood Mulch • Pinebark Nuggets Pinebark Fines • Baled Pine Needles • Color Enhanced Mulches

ELAINE PENCE, OWNER

1305 Old Frankfort Pike • Lexington, KY 40504 859.225.9433 • Delivery Service Available on Select Products Spring Hours Starting Mar. 1st: Mon-Fri 7am-5pm & Sat 7am-Noon www.LandscapersCorner.com

20 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

FOR MORE INFO AND A FREE CONSULTATION

Neurofeedback Affiliates of Lexington Balance your brain. Balance your life.

Drug Free Solutions for Children and Adults with ADHD.

Neurofeedback addresses many neurological problems:

Neurofeedback, is a painless, non-invasive treatment approach that measures the natural electrical activity of the brain as it performs a task, and is thought to reset these patterns so that the brain performs at optimal levels.

• Anxiety • Depression • Migraines • Sleep Difficulty • Addiction • Peak Performance

Visit www.nfbalexington.com for more info. Call to make an appointment 859-227-7878.

• Season with salt, pepper and a bit of cayenne. • Sear on a griddle for 3-4 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 145 degrees. • Top with Yogurt Mint Sauce (recipe below) and a bit of fresh arugula, wilted in a hot pan with a dash of olive oil and salt. Serve with curried cauliflower or any other variety of roasted vegetables (potatoes, carrots, etc.).

• Chop a head of cauliflower and toss it in a bowl with one tablespoon of duck fat, along with a considerable pinch of each of these spices: curry, cumin, cayenne and paprika. • Salt to taste. • Roast at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until it starts to brown.

Yogurt Mint Sauce Combine the following until well mixed: • 7 ounces Greek yogurt • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • ¼ cup chopped fresh mint leaves • 4 scallions, chopped fine • 2 tablespoons minced fresh dill • A pinch of crushed red pepper flakes.

Cash & Check Accepted

The America Academy of Pediatric place Neurofeedback as a Level 1 “Best Support” intervention for ADHD. July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 21


Ready, Set, Retire

M

any people view retirement as a prize they’ll win if they work long enough, save enough, and invest well. But when you think about it, retirement isn’t the finish line, it’s the starting line. It’s the start of a new lifestyle and for many it’s an opportunity to enjoy family, hobbies and travel. Enjoying retirement should be easy, but the modern retiree faces many challenges.

The Retirement Challenge Retirees commonly face three major hurdles when trying to secure a reliable stream of income in retirement. The first challenge is called ‘Sequence risk’ which is the danger that you’ll retire at the “wrong” time and your savings will suffer from the effects of an economic downturn. Those that retired in late 2007 or 2008 experienced Sequence Risk. The nearly 37% drop in the stock market in 2008 caused irreparable damage on their retirement savings. ‘Inflation Risk’ is another major challenge for retirees. A retiree must be able to build enough growth potential in their retirement investments to guard against future increases in the costs of goods and services, especially healthcare. Even a relatively benign 3% annual inflation rate could boost a $500 monthly grocery bill to $903 over 20 years. Addressing the potential effects of inflation is important for protecting purchasing power during retirement. A recent survey found that three out of five individuals ages 44 to 75 fear outliving their money more than they fear death.

About the Author

‘Longevity risk’ or the risk of outliving ones retirement resources, is a major concern for those in or nearing retirement.

What’s your plan? A recent study reported that 81% of preretirees think a retirement income plan is important. However, 77% of preretirees have no plan. Research from AARP provides a different take. Of the Baby Boomers AARP surveyed, 40% said their plan for having a “retirement” paycheck is to work until they drop.

Dr. Gregory W. Kasten, MD, MBA, CFP®, CPC, AIFA®, began his career as a board certified anesthesiologist. In 1985 he founded what is now known as Unified Trust Company, a nationally chartered trust company with offices in Lexington and Louisville. Dr. Kasten was inducted into the Advisor Hall of Fame by Research Magazine in 2012 and was recently named the 2013 Retirement Plan Adviser of the Year by Employee Benefit Adviser Magazine.

Gregory W. Kasten

A Better Choice Whether you want to travel the world or stay close to home, your retirement should be exactly what you want it to be. It should be a time for you to enjoy all that you have worked for without having to worry about your funds running out. But as we’re learning, retirement can be challenging and the first step is to make sure that you have a fiduciary, like Unified Trust, by your side. A financial expert that’s bound by law to act in your best interest. We also know that retirement isn’t a one size fits all solution. So it’s important that you have a personalized retirement solution that addresses the retirement challenges in terms of your goals and expectations — a solution that anticipates lifestyle changes as you age and professionally manages your assets to provide you with a reliable and sustainable income stream throughout your retirement.

Chief Executive Officer Unified Trust C ompany (859) 296-4407 x 202 Greg.Kasten@unifiedtrust.com

Unified Trust, a fiduciary based in Lexington, KY, has spent years prudently developing a retirement income solution to help you achieve a reliable income stream in retirement. Unified Trust’s solution, called the Unified IncomePlan® integrates all your financial components — your investments and other financial assets, tax-efficiency planning, trust and estate planning, health care and insurance coverage, lifestyle spending, and cash flow planning — and addresses the challenges that can get in the way of enjoying your retirement years. Retirement is the starting line. Are you ready?

YOUR GOALS ARE OUR GOALS

NOT FDIC INSURED | NO BANK GUARANTEE | MAY LOSE VALUE

THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY

“Your Community Realtor”

| de Movellan Properties

HomeServices

FOR SALE

814 Cindy Blair Way Lexington, KY 40503 Horse farm setting in city limits! Custom 4BR 4.5BA, 5000 SF updated home. 2 masters. Atrium, deck, patio & more! Ride horses on 20+ acres in your own backyard. Includes barn, etc. MLS# #1410160

Price: $524,000

Jennifer Mossotti REALTOR®, CCIM

859.312.7683 jennifer@mossotti.com www.mossotti.com

WE BUILD APPS. Plus, websites, custom publishing and graphic design services

Flash in the Pan STUDIOS

Call 396.8176 • www.flashinthepanstudios.com or email chris@flashinthepanstudios.com

22 | Southsider Magazine July 2014


Southsider’s Drink of the Month

Lemon Balm Gin and Tonic Taken from the book “Apothecary Cocktails: Restorative Drinks from Yesterday and Today” by “cocktail whisperer” Warren Bawbrow, this summer-fresh cocktail features the lemon-scented herb lemon balm, an easy-to-grow herb related to mint. Used in the production of digestive liqueurs such as amaro, Bénédictine and chartreuse, lemon-balm boasts a long history of being a natural painkiller that relieves tension and stress. Often used in herbal teas, here it is infused in simple syrup and served on ice with a generous dose of gin, for a “prescriptive” take on the classic gin and tonic.

Lemon Balm Simple Syrup Make a batch of simple syrup by adding one cup of sugar to one cup of boiling water and mixing until sugar has dissolved. Pour it into a medium-sized bowl, add 10 to 12 torn lemon balm leaves to the mixture and let it cool. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, place it in the refrigerator, and let the lemon balm steep in the syrup for one to two days. Strain before using. If desired, add up to two ounces of botanical gin as a preservative and keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a month.

Ingredients • Ice • 3 ounces botanical gin • ¼ fresh lime, cut into chunks • 2 tablespoons lemon balm simple syrup (recipe at right) 10-12 torn lemon balm leaves 1 cup of sugar 1 cup of boiling water • 1 ounce of tonic water

Directions Pack a highball or tall glass with ice; then slowly pour the gin over the ice so it is well chilled. Add the lemon balm simple syrup and mix well. Top it with the tonic water and garnish with a lime chunk or two for an extra spritz of citrus –– it’s sure to clear the head and chase pesky headaches away (when consumed in moderation, of course!). ss

PHOTO BY SARAH JANE SANDERS

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 23


A Grand Slam Parntership Kentucky Bank steps up as the title sponsor of the state’s only professional tennis tournament

!

 

the to

A

rt

e of suppo cad e d

Kurami Nara, winner of the 2010 Women’s Lexington Challenger championship PHOTO BY CHARLIE BAGLAN

#

tu

pi t

Ke n

ky

c



al

SOUTHSIDER STAFF REPORT

'

Children’s

s Ho

$

& Illustrations by

In support of

Concours Saturday, July 19 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Celebrate Exquisite Cars And Motorcycles Tickets: $20/gate, $15/In Advance Online Free Parking/VIP Parking Available Keeneland Race Course Other events July 17-20 in Lexington, Kentucky www.keenelandconcours.com

859-422-3329

24 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

N

ow in its 20th year, the state’s only professional tennis tournament has a new title sponsor in Kentucky Bank, who just took over the reins from Fifth Third. “We are very proud to be able to usher the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships into a new era,� said Louis Prichard, president and CEO of Kentucky Bank. “The championships are important not only to tennis enthusiasts but also to virtually all of us in this region. “This one-of-a-kind tournament brings national and international attention to Central Kentucky and to our entire state. Throughout our history, Kentucky Bank has been committed to projects that support our communities and region, and that is why we are so pleased to be able to help keep this tournament in Kentucky.� Taking place July 21-27 at the University of Kentucky’s Hilary J. Boone Tennis Center, the tournament will celebrate its 20-year milestone with seven days of exciting professional tennis and additional community events, including free tennis clinics and workshops for kids, and special tournament nights in which local amateur players can participate. As part of the USTA Pro-Circuit, the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships will award $100,000 in both the men’s and women’s divisions. The event has helped launch the careers of many tennis stars, including last year’s Wimbledon women’s singles champion Marion Bartoli, James Blake, Lleyton Hewitt, Melanie Oudin, Mardy Fish and John Isner.

And now with a newly granted non-profit status, the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championship’s proceeds will be used to benefit several children’s tennis programs in Kentucky that promote healthy activity and teach kids a sport they can play for a lifetime. “Kentucky Bank’s title sponsorship demonstrates its continued commitment to support and give back to the community through this charity-run event,� said Guy Colson, president of Lexington Challenger Tennis Charity, Inc., a new non-profit formed in 2012 to help raise funds to benefit the local and state community. “The bank’s excitement about this tournament has elevated everyone’s enthusiasm as the professional players descend on Lexington for the 20th year.� Prichard said Kentucky Bank’s 10 locations, primarily based in Central Kentucky counties, have a history of supporting events in those markets; however, the USTA Challenger-level tennis tournament allows the bank the opportunity to associate themselves with a single major event that not only brings recognition to the entire state but that has also had a huge economic impact for its markets, he added. Tournament director Brooks Lundy said Lexington is lucky to have corporate partners that realize the importance of hosting Kentucky’s only professional tennis tournament. “The tournament not only brings worldclass sporting entertainment to our door but also gives us the opportunity to raise charitable dollars to promote healthy living in our community,� she said. “We are so appreciative of the energy and commitment to success that Kentucky Bank has brought to the table.�


Misaki Doi, competing in the 2013 tennis championship, which recently found a new title sponsor in Kentucky Bank. PHOTO BY CHARLIE BAGLAN

One of the most common refrains heard from Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships’ players is how much they appreciate the Southern hospitality shown by residents and how much they look forward to coming to Lexington; many families in Lexington, including Prichard’s, also host players and officials during their stays here, making it a favorite stop on their often-grueling schedules. Friendships forged through these stays have led to local families traveling to New York City for the U.S. Open or to London, England, for Wimbledon and the chance to see “their players” compete on hallowed Grand Slam grounds. Another fun and popular way to involve the family in the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championship is for children to participate as ball kids –– kids ages 10 and above can volunteer for a morning, an afternoon, an evening or all week if they’d like, helping on the court and experiencing the players and the action closer than even the fans with the best seats. Ball-kid training is provided before the tournament, and kids are fed, given breaks and monitored during their on-court shifts. For more information on the 2014 Kentucky Bank Tennis Championship, visit www.lexingtonchallenger.com or contact tournament director Brooks Lundy at lblundy1@gmail.com or (859)509-9707. ss

IF YOU GO ... Kentucky Bank Tennis Championship University of Kentucky’s Hilary J. Boone Tennis Center Sports Center Drive (located off Cooper Drive) July 21-27, 2014, with qualifying tournaments on July 19-20 (Most days feature morning, daytime and evening sessions) www.lexingtonchallenger.com Free Kids Tennis Festival/Clinic Lexington Tennis Club 410 Redding Rd. July 15, 6 p.m. Kids ages 6-18 are invited to spend the evening learning to play tennis or improve their game in a friendly, fun-filled atmosphere. Contact Joanne @LTCtennis.com to register.

LOCAL FOOD

LIVE MUSIC SEPT 13 & 14 MOONDANCE AMPHITHEATER @ BEAUMONT CIRCLE

SPONSHORSHIPS STILL AVAILABLE CONTACT ROBBIE MORGAN AT 859.266.6537

WWW.CRAVELEXINGTON.COM

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 25


HERE FOR YOU

BEING LOCAL HAS ITS ADVANTAGES. And our team is just that. LOCAL. Like “Keeneland Race Course” local. That means we know the needs of you and the area. Call us today to see how being “local” works for you. (859) 389-7927 coletaylormortgage.com/lexington 1218 S Broadway, Suite 375, Lexington

Member FDIC

26 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

NMLS #493677


TimeBank

both individual and community worth: Each person has assets they can contribute, and giving and receiving is empowering for individuals and the community, Scott said.

Saving money and building community through sharing skills BY BRIAN POWERS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Y

ou’ve only got so many hours of life. What are you going to spend them on?”

That’s the question posed by Annalee Scott, one of three coordinators for the newly founded Lexington TimeBank. The thrust of the organization is the idea that these hours can and should be spent in the community, giving to and receiving help from others –– revisiting neighborly principles of earlier days. With official TimeBank chapters in 44 states and 32 countries, “timebanking” is a proposition that is gaining a national foothold. Scott refers to TimeBank as a website that connects people, utilizing technology to encourage neighborly practices and community involvement. Technological advances in recent years have extended to the delivery of goods and services, with services like Uber, Airbnb, Craigslist and Lyft (a recent Lexington arrival) rising up to create what is becoming known as a “sharing economy.” This sort of peer-to-peer connection is upending traditional notions of commerce and barter.

tive members must both fill out an online application and attend a face-to-face meeting where they fill out a paper application. Once membership is verified, they create an online profile at the TimeBank Lexington website, outlining any skills or services that they might be able to offer for other members. This work can include a virtually infinite array of services — weed-pulling, guitar lessons, cooking, house painting, legal work, dentistry, etc.; even the time spent baking cookies or making art for another member can count as earned hours. For every hour a member spends working on behalf of another member (or member organization), they earn one “TimeBank Hour,” which is tallied up on the TimeBank website. Likewise, any member can request services that they need or desire, and if another member sees something posted that they can contribute, they are able to connect with the member though the TimeBank platform and arrange the gift of service.

TimeBank and earn hours volunteering for them. Pretty much anything you want to do for something or somebody else — that’s what makes timebanking work,” added Scott.

Time, according to Scott, is a far more equitable measure than money.

Miller and Scott are confident that this program will successfully translate to the Lexington area as well.

“Each person’s time is just as valuable as anyone else’s,” Scott said. “We want to upset that notion that value is whatever amount of dollars is associated with it. The things that are most valuable are things that don’t have dollars attached to them. ”

TimeBank takes this one step further, however. “It’s more like a gift economy,” said fellow Lexington TimeBank co-coordinator Sarah Miller. The key difference is that unlike the other services mentioned, money doesn’t actually change hands with TimeBank; the currency in circulation is time itself. The mechanics are relatively simple — prospec-

Earning the hours is straightforward as well, as the needs and wants of the community are far-reaching. “Anything that builds the community can count for hours,” said Miller. “You can earn hours for tasks you’re already performing.” “If you have a favorite organization you like to work for, you can register them with the

It’s important to note that Lexington TimeBank is exactly as the name implies. It isn’t merely a volunteer organization — it’s an exchange of time for time, ultimately, and reciprocity keeps it functioning. As Miller noted, it can be hard sometimes to ask for hours back out of the bank. “People have a hard time saying, ‘I need help,’” she said. “It’s important to emphasize both giving and receiving.” Since forming in February, the Lexington TimeBank has garnered a few dozen members.The local incarnation follows the lead of a successful Louisville TimeBank that now boasts over 300 members.

“We’re a relatively small town, and we’re relatively close knit, and we can come together,” said Scott. “We’re looking forward to the point where there’s a critical mass of these exchanges. We’re looking forward to attracting more people with the mindset of the gift economy,” she added. The group exists for more than just connecting members to provide services to each other, however –– the strong undercurrent of community runs through nearly every statement about the organization’s core values and broader goals. Core principles emphasize

“Building home, family and community is real work, and we are all stronger when we are interdependent,” she said. According to Miller, TimeBank serves to connect people from a variety of backgrounds. “We have professors, we have business owners, we have retired people, people with little kids, empty-nesters,” she said. “It allows diverse people to come together in ways they normally might not have.” To knit the TimeBank members even closer together, Lexington TimeBank holds a social potluck on the fourth Sunday of every month as a way of meeting face to face and getting to know each other. The social aspect of the group belies what initially sounds like a counter-intuitive proposition. “Our goal is to eventually not exist,” said Miller, reiterating that the end result of a truly successful TimeBank would be a community connecting closely and seamlessly integrating these sorts of exchanges themselves, rather than operating through a coordinated effort. “We’ve kind of lost that skill of neighbor helping neighbor. People are stronger when they stick together,” said Scott. Miller agreed, and added that a certain phrase has become a one-sentence thesis for the larger TimeBank movement: “A bank built on goodwill never needs a bailout.” For more information on Lexington TimeBank, visit lexington.timebanks.org or the Lexington TimeBank Facebook page. The group’s next informational meeting for prospective new members will take place on Thursday, July 18 at 7 p.m., at the Central Library Conference Room C on the Fourth floor –– anyone is welcome to attend. ss

PLEASE DON’T TRASH OUR BLUEGRASS PUT LITTER IN ITS PLACE. What we leave on the ground–cigarette butts, bottles, cans–washes directly down VWRUPVHZHUVDQGÁRZVXQWUHDWHGLQWRRXUEHDXWLIXO%OXHJUDVVVWUHDPV ,WKDUPVRXUZLOGOLIHDQGSROOXWHVRXUVRXUFHVRIGULQNLQJZDWHU

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 27


OPEN MEMORIAL DAY THRU LABOR DAY!

www.SomerSplash.com

Located on HWY 27 • Stop Light #1 2 miles North on HWY 2227 1030 HWY 2227 • Somerset, KY 42503 Call for information. (606) 679-7946 MUST BE 48” TALL TO RIDE THE TUBE SLIDE, BODY SLIDE, BOWL SLIDE, AND SPEED SLIDE.

LOCATED 78 MILES FROM LEXINGTON, KY

$3.00 OFF

ANY ONE DAY ADMISSION (Offer not valid during half price admission or for Dock Side Pass) Not valid with any other discount. One coupon allowed per visitor. Managament retains the right to invalidate at any time. Originals only. Copies are not valid.


The other side of the bitcoin Despite market uncertainty, regional investors hedge their bets on the unregulated digital currency BY BRIAN POWERS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

rg

Rd

PBI BANK

de na

2424 Harrodsburg Road, Suite 100 Lexington, KY 40503 859-296-4822 I www.PBIbank.com

Dr

“It's a beautiful technical innovation,” said Ry Walker, a partner at the Cincinnati-based startup Differential. “I call it ‘open sour ce money.’ It took years for open-sour ce software to impact commer cial software, but now it's an unstoppable for ce. I look for-

r

bu

sa

That eternal optimism is characteristic of others who own or mine bitcoin and other cryptocurrency, despite the incr easing difficulty of the mining pr ocess (which creates and secures the currency and drives transactions), the general volatility of the value, and the collapse of some high-pr ofile currency exchanges.

Ha

s rod

Rd

“I thought I’d hedge my bet, and so I bought a second one,” he said.

Call or visit us today to secure this competitive rate!

Circle

“I’ve always thought that it’s kind of dangerous that your central gover nment also controls your central bank,” said Smithwick. “A pure, decentralized currency intrigues me.” Out of a sense of experimentation, Smithwick decided to purchase a bitcoin, but the task was daunting. Bitcoin is traded on a series of independent exchanges, and purchasing bitcoin can r equire converting a local currency (U.S. dollars) into another curr ency that is accepted by an exchange (i.e., the Euro, or Linden Dollars, the curr ency of the online community SecondLife). After numerous financial transactions, account creations and several weeks, Smithwick bought his first bitcoin for $120. The next day, however, the value plummeted to around $7.

15 Month CD

New

This curiosity drove his interest in bitcoin, the current leading cryptocurrency, a digital, unregulated currency that derives its value from complex cryptography. Bitcoin, Dogecoin and other cryptocurrencies are the product of the collision of the digital age and the idea that currency shouldn’t be controlled by any government or institution.

The mining process is the first challenge for those getting a foothold in the cryptocur rency realm. Bitcoin miners use their computers to process other bitcoin transactions through a series of complex computations designed to confirm the legitimacy of those transactions. These transaction r ecords are called blocks, and they ar e added to a ledger known as a block chain. When this takes place, a miner is r ewarded a certain number of bitcoins. The process is designed to require effort and take time, so that bitcoin itself is equivalent to any other commodity that is extracted slowly and with effort, thus giving it value. As more bitcoins are mined, the difficulty in mining then increases to compensate by keeping the rate of mining down.

APY

Pa

t was only natural that John Smithwick would be interested in bitcoin. “I’ve always been fascinated with the idea of what currency is,” Smithwick said. “Maybe 10 years ago, I started reading the works of Ludwig Von Mises and Frederick Hayek, these economists who taught about pure free-market economy.”

ward to watching the same thing happen with bitcoin.”

0.70

* %

*Minimum balance to open and obtain annual percentage yield (APY) is $500.00. Rates and APY are accurate as of the date of publication and are subject to change without notice. A penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. Any withdrawal of principal, either partial or full, will close the account. No rate exceptions. Not available for brokers, agents, public funds and financial institutions. Member FDIC.

PBI Bank NMLS ID #450016

“I've been involved in bitcoins for about four years now, going back until someone could still mine successfully with just the CPU [central processing unit, also known as the processor] from their home computer,” said Chris Hall, who works in information technology at the University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Hospital. “W ith each jump in mining technology, the older bitcoin miners become obsolete and the quest to have the fastest and most stable miners is never ending.” Ben Cichanowicz, an employee of the Commonwealth Office of Technology in Frankfort, mines both bitcoin and Dogecoin, another cryptocurrency, as part of mining pools. He mines bitcoin thr ough an investment of processing power in a shared server, while he uses his graphics card in his home computer to mine Dogecoin. “I wasn't too sure about it but read enough to know that the earlier you started mining, the more money you would make as mining difficulty climbed and more people got into doing it,” he said. “The network dif ficulty in solving the [bitcoin] blocks is much higher than a year ago and requires significant hardware resources, which cost money. It’s hard to break even, even in a mining pool. Timing is critical. You have to get strong hardware in place early. That's how you win.”

BOOTS BLANKETS HUNT COATS HELMETS & MORE

1510 Newtown Pike, Ste. 124 ✦ Lexington ✦ 859.368.0810 ✦ tackshopoflexington.com July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 29


SMILEY PETE’S

DINING GUIDE The Original

beaumont centre lexington, ky

Chinese, Asian & Vegetarian Cuisine 10 and under with the purchase of an adult entrĂŠe

3735 Palomar Centre Dr., Lexington (Corner of Man O’War & Harrodsburg Rd.) 859.223.0060 • www.asianwindrestaurant.com OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 3256 Lansdowne Dr. 859-317-8307 Sun-Wed 11am-1am Thu -Sat 11am-2:30am Happy Hour Mon - Fri 4-7 Daily Lunch and Dinner Specials Wed night Trivia • NFL Sunday Ticket Beer & Food Specials for all College and Pro football games

105 Eastern Ave. • 859.255.0270 www.acupofcommonwealth.com BRING IN THIS AD FOR 10% OFF TOTAL PURCHASE

COUNTY CLUB Our creations of smoked meats & fish, pickles, pastries, vinegars, and jerky are offered for lunch and dinner, along with sides, daily salads and blackboard specials, craft beer, wine, Magic Beans coffee, and bottles of soda. ALSO OFFERING CATERING SERVICES. 555 Jefferson St., Lexington, KY 859-389-6555 • countyclubrestaurant.com Open Tuesday-Sunday 11am-10pm

THE BEST HAPPY HOUR IN CHEVY CHASE Mon-Fri 4-7 Enjoy $2 off: All glasses of wine, specialty cocktails, wells and calls and appetizers MODERN AMERICAN CUISINE

438 S. Ashland Ave. (859) 317-8438 www.thedishlex.com

Share Pitchers of Fresh Mojitos every Wednesday! $10 off all bottles of wine every Thursday!

When taste matters, choose Heavenly Ham to make lunches, dinners and holidays more special.

Crazy Dogs Deli Where to go for your CARRY OUT. Lunch or Supper! Hot Dogs, Sandwiches, Drinks and Special Deli Meals 3101 Clays Mill Rd. Ste 401 (Fronts Wellington Way) Fax in your order for quick pick up! Fax 859-223-0111 Open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am-7pm

Contemporary ambience in historic Midway. Cuisine with French foundations and a California accent. Every Wednesday night half price wine by the bottle with purchase of entree. Lunch: Tues. - Sat. 11:30-2 • Dinner: Tues. - Sat. at 5:30pm 125 E. Main St. Midway, KY • 846-5565 heirloommidway.com

doodles Join us Downtown for Beignets & Brunch

Tuesday-Sunday 8-2pm 262 N. Limestone • 859.317.8507 doodlesrestaurant.com

Seafood Grill

Wood grilled seafood, steaks, chicken & ribs.

PATIO DINING SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-2 2012 Regency Rd. Lexington, KY 40503 (859) 277-5919 www.ketchseafoodgrill.com

Only Tap Tables in Kentucky! (APP(OUR s.IGHTLY3PECIALS NEW MENU! ÂŽ

20512ICHMOND2DIN)DLE(OUR0LAZA RICHMOND RD. (IN IDLE HOUR PLAZA) 266-4488 • INFO@ONEILLSLEXINGTON.COM  sONEILLS)RISHPUBCOM

• Eat • Drink • Be Entertained FOR MENU & PERFORMANCES VISIT WWW.PARLAYSOCIAL.COM 249 W. Short Street • Lexington, KY

TWO LEXINGTON LOCATIONS! 4750 Hartland Pkwy 859-245-9504

French and Japanese Cuisine featuring Lexington’s only Kaiten Conveyor Sushi and Culinary Cocktail Lounge Complimentary Event Planning - Private & Corporate Modern Party Room with Digital Karaoke 162 Old Todds Road • Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 269-0677

154 Patchen Drive 859-269-7621 Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-7 (food and alcohol) Daily Lunch Specials Trivia Tuesday (Hartland), Trivia Thursday (Patchen) NFL Sunday Ticket - all the games Beer Specials for all College & Pro Football games

Fine Wine, Beer & Spirits.

The Bistro at Wines on Vine

30 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

Lexington’s only Prime Beef Steakhouse featuring Chicago style steaks, fresh seafood, pastas and other house favorites in a casual yet upscale environment. Open daily 11:15 am - 11:15 pm. Three locations. Lansdowne Hamburg Palomar 335-6500 264-8023 977-2620

Sports Music Food Drinks

Open Monday-Thursday: Lunch: 11am-2:30pm Dinner: 4:30pm-10:30pm Friday: 11am-11pm Saturday: 11pm-11pm Sunday: 11am-10pm

Sav’s Grill is the finest authentic west African Cuisine in the bluegrass region. Healthy, delicious and reasonably priced dishes that combine the flavors of Africa with traditional southern favorites. Come visit and share the African food experience with us and our patrons. Dine in, take out, catering. 304 S. Limestone St. 859-368.SAVS (7287) • Open Mon-Sat 11am-9pm, Sunday 11am-5pm • www.savsgrill.com

With a 12-month commitment, you will be able to purchase display advertising in any issue at the discounted 12x rate. SOUND YUMMY? Contact us at 266-6537 for all the dining guide details!

“Comfort Food with a Conscience�

Oriental CafĂŠ & Sushi Bar

Zandale Plaza • 2220 Nicholasville Rd. 859.275.4300 • 859.275.1666 • www.mandarincafeandsushi.com

YOUR restaurant should be here.

“Voted Best New Restaurant in Kentucky for 2007 by The Lane Report.�

NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS

New Location in Regency Centre (Across Lowry Lane from Kroger’s) 171 West Lowry Lane, Ste. 180 • 859-271-7050 Hours: Mon-Sat 10AM-7PM (Closed Sunday) *We will have extended hours for the holidays.

Full Bar - Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-6pm Open Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 12pm-9pm 3330 Partner Place • Lexington • 859-388-9318 Order online at www.obplex.com

Heirloom Contemporary Cuisine

Embrace community. Serve others. Create culture. A Cup of Common Wealth

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS • PIZZA BY THE SLICE

ph 859.296.1007 www.azurrestaurant.com

KIDS EAT FREE ON TUESDAYS

lunch • dinner • full bar wireless internet located at 147 n. limestone across from courthouse www.sidebar.com • 859.225.8883 open: mon-fri 11am - close • sat 5pm - close

Lexington’s Most Unique Wine Bar & Bottle Shop

Pizza, Burgers, Salad Bar Open 7 Days a Week, Lunch and Dinner Delivery Available

GREAT FOOD! GREAT WINES! Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30am-2:30pm, Sat 11am-5pm Dinner: Mon-Wed 5pm-9pm, Thurs-Sat 5pm-10pm

Try our signature fruit & cheese board with a glass of your favorite wine. Let us host a private wine tasting for your group!

www.villagehostlex.com • 859.455.3355

400 Old Vine Street 859.243.0017

At the corner of Moore Dr. & Nicholasville Rd. 859-278-WINE (9463) www.WineStylesLex.com


Isn’t it time to upgrade? Call us now to find out how easy it can be. IMAGE FURNISHED

Cichanowicz currently has about $46 worth of bitcoin and $38 worth of Dogecoin, but he is loathe to actually spend it. “[It] took so long to ear n the little bit I have,” he said. “It's better to keep whatever is earned thus far and into the futur e and hope the value rises in what I have.” The value has been anything but stable. Cichanowicz noted that the Dogecoin he owns was worth mor e than $50 a few weeks prior. Still, the prevailing sentiment is one of investment in the future rather than present payoff. “It's true that the bitcoin market has been volatile at times, however it pr ovides a hedge for other commodities,” said Hall. “Bitcoin seems to have a negative corr elation with gold, and this can be a very useful addition to your investment portfolio.” “I own them personally, and a business venture that we own also holds bitcoin,” said Walker. “Most of my business partners at Differential are holding bitcoin as well. Not an ungodly amount, because we bought in during the up cycle last year . But we're all long on bitcoin.” “Anything can happen. It's fun thinking it might be worth an incr edible amount someday,” said Cichanowicz. “I'd rather not spend any I have earned and see what happens as a novelty.”

859-885-3388 • HaydenCo.com EXCELLENCE

IN

C ONSTRUCTION

The novelty aspect of bitcoin is not without its own attraction. The chief of police in the town of V icco, Ky., has asked for his salary to be paid in bitcoin, the first such transaction of its kind. The FEC now allows bitcoin to be used as campaign contributions as well. “It's still so early, I'd say we're in the final stages of experimental usage. When bitcoin has its next br eakout upswing, I expect the pendulum swings from ‘curiosity’ to ‘useful.’ For now, it's mostly the potential of bitcoin and the blockchain [the encryption that gives the curr ency both security and value] that holds my interest,” said Walker. For Smithwick, just acquiring them was hard enough, let alone figuring out how to spend them, but then the worst happened. Mt. Gox, the exchange wher e his two bitcoins resided, collapsed and declared bankruptcy in February , ostensibly taking his bitcoin with it. Smithwick estimates that they were worth $600-$700 each at the time. Despite the loss, his enthusiasm for the cryptocurrency hasn’t waned. “I’m not scared away by the bankruptcy situation,” said Smithwick. “When the Silk Road [an online black market site shut down by authorities in October of 2013] was raided by the FBI, everyone thought it was the end of bitcoin. It bounced back; it’s totally resilient. The concept of it I’m totally still behind.” ss July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 31


SOUTHSIDER MAGAZINE’S

MARKETPLACE LEXINGTON LIMO

S P R I N G S P E C I A L A T:

Best Impressions Salon

Ride in style for $1 per minute! Limo service to Keeneland, Blue Grass Airport, concerts, birthdays, weddings, quinceaneras.

Consultation + Hi-Lite, Color, or Perm, Haircut, Shampoo and Style | $75 ($145 value) Eyebrow/Lip Waxing | $10 Plus, Prom Up-dos, Weddings, ect.

CHEAPER THAN A D.U.I. UP TO 10 PEOPLE $10 FUEL FEE ADDED

Call for an Appointment (859) 433-0838 231 Nicholasville Rd. Ste. 100 Lexington KY 40503

859-294-9928 @ threesixty limo

Dr. Vivien M. Smith OPTOMETRIST Primary Eye Care Glaucoma Management Specialty Contact Lens Fitting

370 Longview Drive Lexington, KY 40503

859-275-1212

WHITE HAVEN GOLF

Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance Companies 1316 Versailles Road Lexington, KY 40504

JOHN WOOD AGENCY MANAGER

Driving Range Miniature Golf Golf Lessons

MARY LEGGE & CHRISTIAN JENKINS AGENTS

Office: (859) 253-1626

100 Yorkshire Blvd off Richmond Road (859) 263-5310

John.Wood@kyfb.com kyfb.com/fayette/versailles/john-wood

“We have all of your bathroom solutions.”

CALL TODAY!

Bathrooms

In 1 Week.com A Simple Way to Remodel

“Quality Service You Can Trust” “Quality Service You Can Trust” Specialize Individual Cremations WeWe Specialize in in Private, On-Site Cremations

Bluegrass Pet Crematorium • Complete Selection of Urns & Caskets • Hours By Appointment • All Cremations Done on Premises

Amy Bailey MASTER STYLIST Member

Specifically Request Our Services From Your Veterinarian

Nathan Cravens (859) 221-0531 32 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

868 Floyd Drive • Lexington • 258-2052

CASWELL CARROLL SALON

1040 Monarch St., Ste. 100 Lexington, KY 405013 859.296.1595

J


July

tadoo.com

events calendar

Live Music

PHOTO FURNISHED

Leon Russell

July17. Russell began his musical career at age 14 in the nightclubs of Tulsa, Okla. He and his group, The Starlighters, which included J.J. Cale, Leo Feathers, Chuck Blackwell and Johnny Williams, were instrumental in creating the style of music known as the Tulsa Sound. The legendary Hall of Fame rocker is back at Buster’s, with a special guest to be announced. 8 p.m. Buster’s Billiards & Backroom, 899 Manchester St. www.bustersbb.com.

Live music picks curated by our arts, culture and entertainment website, tadoo.com Sunday Soul Jazz Brunch at Willie’s. Sundays. This weekly brunch at local restaurant and venue Willie’s Locally Known features food specials, drinks, free coffee from Magic Beans Coffee Roasters and jazz/soul “house band” Lee Carroll’s Home Cookin', an organ-centered trio. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Willie’s Locally Known, 805 North Broadway. www.willieslex.com.

installment of the free, monthly music series presented by local NPR affiliate WUKY. Saintseneca, a Columbus-based indie act that melds influences from folk to Americana to post-modern pop, will headline; Lexington-based folk act Small Batch, led by the vocals of Reva Dawn and Warren Byrom, will also perform. 5 p.m. Phoenix Park, 1 E. Main St. www.wuky.org.

Lexington Summertoberfest. July 5. During warmer months, Al's Bar presents a regular “block party” style event, utilizing the indoor stages of Al's Bar and Sidecar, as well as a newly constructed outdoor stage. This month's live music includes Driftwood Gypsy, Warren Byrom & The Fabled Canelands, Englishman, Fleece, Public Housing, Shawnthony Calypso, Between The Tide and DJ Jesse Saxon. 7 p.m. www.alsbarlexington.com.

J.D. Wilkes and the Dirt Daubers. July 31. A Southern, goth and hillbilly blues artist from Paducah, Ky., Wilkes is a founder and only remaining original member of the Legendary Shack Shakers, a rockabilly/blues band he formed in Murray, Ky., in the mid ‘90s. 8 p.m. Willie’s Locally Known, 805 North Broadway. www.willieslex.com.

Same As it Ever Was. July 11. This sevenpiece outfit of Knoxville musicians came together out of their mutual love and respect for the music of the Talking Heads in the summer of 2004 and have been hitting it hard ever since. Over the years, the band has performed extensively, and now have nearly the entire Talking Heads catalog at their fingertips. 10 p.m. Cosmic Charlie’s, 388 Woodland Ave. www.cosmic-charlies.com.

J.D. Wilkes PHOTO FURNISHED

Ha Ha Tonka. July 26. Ha Ha Tonka is an indie rock band originally formed in West Plains, Mo., and currently signed to Chicago’s Bloodshot Records, which describes them as “… the crossroads of Americana and indie, where Alabama meets Arcade Fire.” Up-and-coming rockers Feedback Revival will open. 8 p.m. Willie’s Locally Known, 805 North Broadway. www.willieslex.com. WUKY’s Phoenix Fridays: Saintsensca and Small Batch. July 25. The inaugural

Sign up to receive our weekly “tadoo list” in your email at tadoo.com/tadooweekly. To submit a live music, theatre, film screening, festival or other arts and culture event to tadoo.com, email the following information to info@tadoo.com with “TADOO EVENT” in the subject line: time, date, venue, address, cost, contact info and a brief description of the event. July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 33


Art & Exhibits Bluegrass Printmakers Cooperative Open Studio Sessions. July 5, 7, 19, 21. Know how to print and want to use a press? The Bluegrass Printmakers Cooperative will provide the press and inks; participants bring plates and paper. Participants must have a printmaking background and/or taken a class at the BPC to attend the Open Studio sessions, which take place the first and third Mondays and Saturdays of each month. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Bluegrass Printmaker’s Cooperative, 161 N. Mill St. www.bgprintmakers.org. Small Works. Through July. An exhibition of small paintings, sculpture and drawings, this exhibition will include works by Anne Leone, Daniel Ludwig, Bruce Riley, Patricia Bellan Gillen, Emil Robinson and other gallery artists. This year’s commissioned artwork for the Lexington Chamber Music Festival, “Quartet” by Steve Armstrong, will also be on display. Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. CMW Architects, 400 E. Vine St. www.heikepickettgallery.com. Ralph Eugene Meatyard: Photographing Thomas Merton. Through July 26. Ralph Eugene Meatyard was first introduced to Thomas Merton at the Cistercian Abbey of Gethsemani, near Bardstown, Ky., in 1967. The two men clearly made an impression on one another and quickly embarked on a friendship and creative dialogue that would last two years, cut short only by Merton’s untimely death. In that brief amount of time, they held intense conversations, exchanged letters, and Merton became the subject for a series of photographs by Meatyard, the focus of this exhibition. Gallery hours: Wed.Sun. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Institute 193, 193 N. Limestone. www.institute193.org.

Thomas Merton photographed by Ralph Eugene Meatyard PHOTO FURNISHED

WaterFest Come one, come all! Learn more about what it takes to deliver clean water to your tap every day. Thursday, August 7, 2014 Stop by anytime between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Kentucky American Water 2300 Richmond Road Lexington, KY 40502 Treatment plant tours. Educational demonstrations. Face painting. Light refreshments and more!

(800) 678-6301 • www.kentuckyamwater.com 34 | Southsider Magazine June 2014

More & More: a Juried Competition Defining Mixed Media. On display through July 31. From 175 entries from all over the United States, 35 artworks are selected by juror Jenine Culligan to “define mixed media.” Works include sculpture, painting, printmaking, photography, collage and many more. The only restriction was that the artist had to use at least two materials to create one image. Artist reception July 11, 4:30 p.m.-7p.m. Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. noon-3 p.m. and by appointment. M.S. Rezny Studio/Gallery, 903 Manchester St. www.msrezny.com. In Residence: Lori Larusso & Melissa Vandenburg. Tuesdays in July. Deepening an ongoing commitment to being a hub for working artists, the Lexington Art League presents ”In Residence.“ The debut program features Melissa Vandenberg and Lori Larusso, two nationally exhibiting artists currently living and working in Central Kentucky. Larusso, a painter, and Vandenberg, a fiber artist, will transform the first floor of the Loudoun House –– typically used as exhibition space –– into their own sprawling studio space. Visitors are encouraged to meet the artists, observe their art-making process, and learn more about the new work being created. Open studio gallery hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Lexington Art League, 209 Castlewood Drive. www.lexingtonartleague.org.


Festivals, etc... Thursday Night Live. Thursdays. Hosted by the Downtown Lexington Corp., Thursday Night Live features live music as well as food, beverages, and a lively social atmosphere. July’s lineup includes The Tim Talbert Project (July 3),The Twiggenbury’s (July 10), Better Off Dead (July 17), Superfecta (July 24) and Swing Street (July 31). 5-8 p.m. Fifth Third Pavilion at Cheapside Park, Cheapside St. www.downtownlex.com. Food Trucks for a Cause. Fridays. Each Friday through the end of October, the Bluegrass Food Truck Association will host a “food truck court” on the corner of Midland and Main streets. Several different trucks will post up, with a portion of the proceeds benefitting a different non-profit each week. 11 a.m.-7 p.m., 400 E. Main St. www.bluegrassfoodtrucks.org/t/foodtrucksforacause. Whippoorwill Festival. July 10-13. The goal of the Whippoorwill Festival is to promote sustainable living in Appalachia by sharing earth-friendly living skills with one another in a joyful, healthy, family-friendly atmosphere. Activities include various workshops, sustainable living practices, cooking, agriculture, live music and more. Music by Big Maracas, Maggie Lander, Eric George, Jeni & Billy, The Tillers, The New Coon Creek Girls, Mitch Barrett, the New Old Cavalry and more. Homegrown Hideaways, 500 Floyd Branch Rd. Berea, Ky. www.whippoorwillfest.com. Lion’s Club Bluegrass Fair. July 10-20. Presented by the Lexington Lions’ Club, this fair features carnival rides, games, pageants, ag-related events, food and other entertainment. From its beginnings, the funds derived from the Lexington Lions Club Bluegrass Fair have gone to support eye health, hearing and diabetes programs in Lexington. Additional funds are contributed to Lions activities throughout Kentucky and through Lions Clubs International. Masterson Station Park, Leestown Road. www.lionsclubbluegrassfair.com.

OF

JUST

PLAIN

AWESOME

J U LY 2 6

20% OFF EVERYTHING IN THE STORE FOOD & LIVE MUSIC

882 E. HIGH STREET

MORRISBOOKSHOP.COM

Summer Slam Music Festival. July 12. Barrel PHOTO FURNISHED House Distilling Co., producers of Pure Blue Vodka Galaxy Girl will be performing and Devil John Moonshine, presents the inaugural death-defying stunts three Summer Slam Music Festival. Featuring live music times per day at the Lion’s Club Bluegrass Fair. from Shooter Jennings, the Other Brothers, Ben Lacy and Josh Nolan, the indoor/outdoor festival takes place at Buster’s, just down the street from Barrel House Distilling. The festival will also include additional activities, including a pig roast by Hanley BBQ. 5-11:30 p.m. Buster’s, 899 Manchester St. www.facebook.com/ summerslammusicfestival. Moontower Music Festival. July 18. The inaugural Moontower Music Festival is a one-day event featuring music by Moon Taxi, Sundy Best, Machines Are People Too, Brave Baby, Tyler Childers, A Lion Named Roar and Buffalo Rodeo. Craft beer from Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. and tasty grub from local food trucks will be featured. 10 a.m. Equus Run Vineyards, 1280 Moores Mill Rd. Midway, Ky. www.moontowermusicfestival.com. Home Builders’ Association Grand Tour of Homes. July 19-20, 26-27. The Home Builders Association of Lexington presents an opportunity to view at no charge 44 beautiful homes built by local leading professional builders. 1-5 p.m. www.hbalexington.com. Lexington Restaurant Week. July 24-Aug. 2. Raise a glass and a fork to toast Lexington’s innovative local restaurant scene. Dozens of local restaurants will feature $25 prix fixe dinners every day for 10 days. Visit www.lexrestaurants.com for a full list of participating restaurants and their menus. Ballet Under the Stars. July 31-Aug. 3. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Ballet Under the Stars is one of Central Kentucky’s most anticipated events of the summer. This unique festival allows audiences to enjoy the beauty and grandeur of a professional ballet in the relaxed, casual setting of the park. The evening will begin with a pre-show youth production at 8 p.m., followed by the main show that will once again feature professional dancers. Lawn chairs and/or blankets should be brought for seating, and patrons may pack a picnic dinner or purchase concessions on site. 8 p.m. Woodland Park. www.lexingtonballet.org.

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 35


Literature & Film Summer Classic Film Series. Wednesdays. This month, the Kentucky Theatre Summer Classic Film Series will feature “Once Upon a Time in the West” (July 2), “Mary Poppins” (July 9), “Hard Day’s Night” (July 16), “Double Indemnity” (July 23) and “Tootsie” (July 30). Screenings at 1:30 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. The Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main St. www.kentuckytheater.com.

Kentucky Vineyard Society

Wine Festival AUGUST 9TH • 3-8PM

MASTERSON STATION PARK PAVILION 3051 LEESTOWN ROAD Kentucky Wineries in Attendance • Musician: Lisa Raymond Cooking with Wine Demos: Ranada West-Riley Owner of Lexington Diner, Executive Chef/Lexington’s Celebrity Chef

Food, plus Arts & Crafts Vendors will be onsite.

Tickets: $25 Includes a wine glass & 8 tasting tickets Designated Driver Ticket: $10 includes a wine glass & 2 tickets for bottled waters

More information at www.kentuckyvineyardsociety.org

Lyric Summer Film Series. Sundays. This month, the Lyric Theatre Summer Film Series will feature “Shaft’s Big Score” (July 6), “Shaft in Africa” (July 13), “Enter the Dragon” (July 20) and “Black Belt Jones” (July 27). Screenings at 3 p.m. The Lyric Theatre, 300 E. Third St. www.lexingtonlyric.com. Fountain Films on Friday. July 11. On select Fridays in the summer, Downtown Lexington Corp. presents outdoor movie events, with films shown on a blow-up screen at Triangle Park. This month’s selections include “Chicago” (July 11) and “Men in Black” (July 25). Attendees are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket. Screenings around 9 p.m. with activities on the lawn before. Triangle Park, 430 W. Vine. www.downtownlex.com.

Henry Fonda stars in the Sergio Leone classic “Once Upon a Time in the West,” showing July 2 at the Kentucky Theater as part of the Summer Classic Film Series. PHOTO FURNISHED

36 | Southsider Magazine June 2014


Theater & Performance Summerfest: William Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night.� July 2-3; 5-6; 9-13. Outrageous high comedy ensues as the pangs of unrequited love affect the unforgettable characters of Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night� in this outdoor theater production presented by the Kentucky Conservatory Theatre. This year’s performances take place outside the original Arboretum location for the first time in the theatre festival’s history. Box office opens at 6:15 p.m.; show at 8 p.m. MoonDance at Midnight Pass, 1152 Monarch St. www.mykct.org/ summerfest.html. Lexington Dinner Train Murder Mystery. July 12. The Lexington Dinner Train will host a new production, “How to Make the Perfect Pitch,� in which Minnesota housewife turned inventor Winifred Swenson seeks a new ad agency to promote her latest wacky product. After one of them is violently murdered, everyone’s creative energy goes into trying to come up with the perfect alibi. 6 p.m. R.J. Corman Lexington Dinner Train, 150 Oliver Lewis Way. www.lexingtondinnertrain.com. Summerfest: “Little Shop of Horrors.� July 23-27; July 30-Aug. 3. Based on the book by Howard Ashman and film by Roger Corman, a downand-out skid row floral assistant becomes an overnight sensation when he discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood in this musical. Soon “Audrey II� grows into an ill-tempered, foul-mouthed, R&Bsinging carnivore that offers him fame and fortune in exchange for feeding its growing appetite, finally revealing itself to be an alien creature poised for global domination. Directed by Jenny Fitzpatrick. Box office opens at 6:15 p.m.; show at 8 p.m. MoonDance at Midnight Pass, 1152 Monarch St. www.mykct.org/summerfest.html. ss

SMILEY PETE’S

RETAIL GUIDE

YOUR business should be here. “Not Your Ordinary Furniture Storeâ€? New, Used & Antique Furniture 2550 Regency Road • Lexington, KY 40503 859.296.5991 • anothermanstreasurefurniture.com

With a 12-month commitment, you will be able to purchase display advertising in any issue at the discounted 12x rate. SOUND GOOD? Contact our sales department at 266-6537 for all the reail guide details!

Get your chimney ready for the season now! FIREPLACES • WOODSTOVES • SUPPLIES • SWEEPING Visit our new showroom at: 1123 Delaware Ave, Lexington

859-219-8736 www.barnhillchimney.com

Unique A Accccessories ccessori cessor B Locaal Artists Artist sts B I nspirin ing Au uthor hors

ART SHOWS!

210 Rosemont 210 R Garden B 278-0300 B Tuesday-Saturday 10-6 0-6 TheBut utttterfl fly lyyT TrreeeGift Tr fts ts.co om m B Like Lik Li ike us us on on TheButterflyTreeGifts.com to to see see what’s what wh at’ t’s new! new! w!

869 EAST HIGH STREET LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 40502 859-268-2576 WWW.FORFRIENDS.COM

VÄÉà {|xĂœĂĄ àÉ ZxÇàÄxĂ…xÇ 400 Old Vine Street (Next to Wines on Vine) 859.259.3926 • www.HowardandMiller.com

LIVE MUSIC!

156 DEWEESE ST. • LEXINGTON, KY • 859.243.8545 FEATURING VEGAN-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS

189 MOORE DR., LEXINGTON 859.278.0730 • JHOUTDOORS.COM M-F 10-8 SAT 10-6 SUN 1-5 LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

119 Clay Avenue, Lexington, KY 40502 859-389-6552 www.lexingtonangler.com • Spoil Your Dog

• Enhance Your

Wardrobe

• Discover The

Fascinating World of Fly Fishing

• Outfit Your

Next Adventure

Like us on

Facebook

the Morris book shop.

South Hill Gallery/ Photo Therapy

everything for the book lover ŀRYHUnewERRNWLWOHVŀ featuring thousands of local interest and kids’ books ŀ ZH can special order DQ\ ERRN LQ SULQW ŀ IULHQGO\ DQG knowledgeableVWDIIŀFKHFNRXUZHEVLWHIRUXSFRPLQJevents ŀ FDUGV magazines,  JLIW LWHPV ŀ IRXQGLQJ PHPEHU Local First Lexington ŀ ORFDWHG LQ Chevy Chase next to Rite-Aid

NPSSJTCPPLTIPQDPNt &)JHI4USFFUt-FYJOHUPO ,FOUVDLZ

Quality candies including pulled cream candy, bourbon balls, caramels, assorted soft creams, and sugar-free chocolates 213 Walton Ave. • Lexington, KY • 859.268.1559 www.ruthhuntcandy.com • Like us on Facebook! U.S. Post Office on premises – Open during store hours

Gifts & Accessories The perfect gift for any occasion! 112 Clay Ave. • Lexington 859.255.3188 • www.peggysgifts.com Hours: Mon-Fri 10-5:30 and Sat 10-5

Custom picture framing & imaging Mike & Letha Drury, Owners 1401 Versailles Road Lexington, KY 40504 859-253-3885 www.southhillgallery.com

Boots • Blankets • Hunt Coats • Helmets • More 1510 Newtown Pike, Ste. 124 • Lexington 859.368.0810 • tackshopoflexington.com

July 2014 Southsider Magazine | 37


Pete’s Properties

Recent residential property transactions — Southsider

40503 808 Wellington Way, $318,250 3396 Drayton Pl., $235,000 817 Palomino Ln., $223,000 532 Wellington Way, $222,000 528 Wellington Way, $204,000 513 Wellington Gardens Dr., $202,500 495 Plymouth Dr., $153,250 3069 Arrowhead Dr., $145,000

40513 2208 Terranova Ct., $1,050,000 2192 Carolina Ln., $610,000 1233 Sebring Ln., $525,000 2217 Lovell Ct., $460,000 2620 Clubside Ct., $429,900 3261 Sebastian Ln., $429,900 3928 Peppertree Dr., $405,000 1065 Chasewood Way, $400,000 4076 Palmetto Dr., $369,000 3304 Mallory Cir., $325,000 2188 Madrone Way., $319,000 4172 Palmetto Dr., $318,000 2141 Mangrove Dr., $315,000 1197 Crossmann Ct., $263,000

2169 Sovereign Ln., $263,000 2828 Ashbrooke Dr., $252,900 2033 Parasol Dr., $245,000 2101 Sovereign Ln., $238,000 2548 Ashbrooke Dr., $116,000

40514 4788 Agape Dr., $260,000 4853 Dresden Way, $251,000 2295 Harrods Pointe Trce., $250,000 2286 Harrods Pointe Trce., $180,000 4344 Calevares Dr., $152,900

Biggest Mover 2208 Terranova Ct. | $1,050,000

40515

1000 Red Rain Cir., $323,500 925 Fiddler Creek Way, $323,000 4474 Rose Dale Ct., $322,500 3732 Kenesaw Dr., $305,000 753 Clayvis Ct., $285,000 1036 Kiawah Dr., $280,000 4613 Forest Lake Cir., $265,000 2352 Hartland Parkside Dr., $254,900 708 Pinnacle Ct., $254,000 900 Seneca Park, $242,000 1137 Shagbark Ln., $235,000 488 Amberley Dr., $228,000 825 Calypso Breeze Dr., $224,500

3712 Wembley Ln., $675,000 4891 Faulkirk Ln., $600,000 4853 Wyndhurst Rd., $505,000 5088 Ivybridge Dr., $480,000 912 Golden Bell Pl., $452,500 937 Firethorn Pl., $368,500 4785 Pleasant Grove Rd., $350,000 1008 Red Rain Cir., $340,000 5057 Ivybridge Dr., $334,700 729 Rose Hurst Way, $334,000 1100 Buttonwood Ct., $330,000

4157 Bridgemont Ln., $215,000 304 Angela Ct., $214,000 4072 Kenesaw Dr., $205,000 1121 Four Wynds Trl., $195,000 4652 Riverman Way, $190,000 392 Southpoint Dr., $187,500 716 Rose Hurst Way, $182,500 4409 Hartland Pkwy, $163,500 871 Jairus Dr., $159,900 120 Hidden Woods Ct., $126,000 4501 Hartland Pkwy., $125,000 1335 The Kings Ct., $117,000 4669 Hartland Pkwy., $110,900 ss

Recent arm’s length residential sales for this magazine’s distribution area. Information compiled by Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. For more information on any of these properties, or others, please visit www.fayette-pva.com.

106 W. Old Coach Road Nicholasville, KY 40356 $

442,000

A unique and rare stately home set amongst gorgeous equine views with bridle/walking trails, fabulous neighborhood clubhouse and horse boarding available. Complete with a new updated kitchen, 4 spacious BRs, 4 BAs and a large unfinished basement. Enjoy the pergola, patio, horses and pool this summer.

u-nit-ed. adjective 1. acting as a single entity: a united front. 2. formed by the uniting of persons: a united effort. 3. agreed; in harmony. 4. the most innovative, proven and supportive real estate brand in the U.S.

PLEASE VISIT OR CALL US TODAY. 2357 Huguenard Dr. Lexington, KY 40503

859-278-7501 www.unitedrealestatelexington.com

Elias Haddad

Bonnie Mays

Dir. of Operations (859) 948-1009

Broker (859) 396-6706

38 | Southsider Magazine July 2014

If you are an agent in Central Kentucky, we invite you to Find Your Freedom with United Real Estate, the fastest growing real estate company in the US today. Visit www.JoinUnitedRealEstateLexington.com today.


DonJacobsBMW.com 859-276-3546

BMW Available at Don Jacobs BMW. Special lease and financing offers available through BMW Financial Services. 1 For model year 2015 or later vehicles sold or leased by an authorized BMW center on or after July 1, 2014, BMW Maintenance Program coverage is not transferable to subsequent purchasers, owners, or leasees. Please see bmwusa.com/UltimateService or ask your authorized BMW center for details. Š2014 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

2689 Nicholasville Road Lexington, Kentucky 859-276-3546 DonJacobsBMW.com


Get ‘em while they’re hot! “These mini burgers are the real deal. Hot & cheesy, nothin’ better! Try ‘em with some bourbon, y’all!”

“My favorite game changers! Score big with these mini burgers!” – Coach Cal, UK Men’s Basketball Coach

– DeAnn Stephens, Radio/TV Personality

“Double money back guarantee if they’re not the best burger ever!” – Brian McCarty, Operating Partner Bluegrass Hospitality Group

new ! m e it “The best players in the food game are these Mini Bomb Burgers! Winning item, every time.”

“Harry’s new mini bomb burgers are so good I literally can’t even deal right now. Hashtag obsessed.”

“These mini burgers are the BOMB! They taste awesome!”

– Coach Stoops, UK Men’s Football Coach

– Drew Franklin, KSR

Sal’s & Harry’s Regulars

3735 Palomar Centre Drive

1920 Pleasant Ridge Drive

Limited Time Offer Through 7/31/2014

– Bob & Angie Parker,

3373 Tates Creek Road

Southsider Magazine July 2014  

Southsider Magazine July 2014