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M AY 2013 PUBLISHERS Chris Eddie chris@smileypete.com Chuck Creacy chuck@smileypete.com

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Robbie Clark robbie@smileypete.com MANAGING EDITOR Saraya Brewer saraya@smileypete.com ART DIRECTOR Drew Purcell drew@smileypete.com DIRECTOR OF EVENTS AND SPONSORSHIPS Robbie Morgan rmorgan@smileypete.com

ALL COOPED UP CLUCK! TOUR FEATURES SOME OF THE CITIES FINEST CHICKEN COOPS PAGE 9

OUT OF THE ASHES

AFTER A FIRE DESTROYED HER KENWICK HOME, TOMI ROSS HAS NEW HOME AND A STRONG BOND WITH NEIGHBORS

PAGE 13

IT TAKES TWO

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PAGE 19

ROOMS TO GROW

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chevy chaser N N EIGHBORHOOD

EWS

This recent rendering shows the new Kroger design from Euclid Avenue

Revisions released for Euclid Kroger before May’s Planning Commission meeting In April, representatives from Kroger formally requested a postponement of their application regarding the expansion of the grocery store on Euclid Avenue until the Planning Commission Public Hearing at 1:30 p.m. May 23. In late April, Kroger released revisions to the initial building design, which includes signage along Euclid Avenue and more windows along the building’s exterior wall along Marquis Avenue, as well as other new design elements. Earlier this year, Kroger announced plans to tear down the current Kroger structure and build a new 64,000 square foot outlet. Visit www.chevychaser.com to see the updated renderings and to let us know what you think about the expansion of the Kroger on Euclid Avenue.

Volunteers install Kenwick Victory Community Garden In late April, volunteers and organizers planted the first plants in the new Kenwick Victory Community Garden after first constructing five wooden 16 foot by 4 foot raised beds. The garden, located at the corner of Owsley and Cramer avenues in the backlot of Victory Christian Church, is a joint effort between the church and the Kenwick Neighborhood Association. The five boxes include green beans, Swiss chard, kale, radishes, tomatoes, sweet peppers, beets, lima beans, carrots, cucumbers, collards, various herbs, and a number of other plants. A variety of flowers will be included to add some color. The next planning committee for the garden will take place at 7 p.m. May 14 in the church’s basement, where organizers will coordinate a volunteer schedule and plan for harvesting and distributing the produce. The current plan is for

volunteers to take as much produce as they need; the remaining produce will go to a free distribution location (to be determined) and to the Victory Christian Church’s free monthly dinners. All remaining produce will go to Faith Feeds, God’s Pantry and similar organizations. Volunteers are needed to maintain the garden as well, and organizers have weekly time slots open for watering, weeding and harvesting – the more, the merrier, as many hands make light work. If you would like to sign up for a slot, please e-mail kenwickneighbors@gmail.com.

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Ashland hosting garden tour and peony sale in May Ashland’s venerable peony garden blooms once a year, an occasion many organizers and garden aficionados say is not to be missed. The public is invited to tour the formal and peony gardens , plus several gardens in the historic Ashland neighborhood on Fincastle Road, Ashwood Drive, Richmond Road and Victory Avenue.

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C O U N C I L M E M B E R ’ S

R E P O R T

Paving the Way BY BILL FARMER, JR. 5TH DISTRICT COUNCIL

A

s previously heralded, the paving season has begun in ear nest. I believe you will subtly notice several changes and question others. I welcome your input as we have already begun to compile a paving list for Fiscal Year 2014. It never hurts to plan ahead.

short “fits and starts� as we had so little money against the estimated $26 million overall need. For instance, you’ll see paving in the two blocks of Clays Spring Lane or the two blocks of Cochran Road from Hart Road to Providence Lane. That is the original budget being spent.

What’s Next

docket for final approval. Most district representatives, including me, have turned in lists to use those funds as quickly as possible. As soon as the original Fiscal Y ear 2013 budget funds are paved and spent, work on the bond funded lists will begin. This will look sometimes inef ficient. Clinton Road is such an example. The 400 block was paved in late April for the first time in recent memory – 30 years according to some neighbors. It was in poor shape and as the previous sur face was removed it did indeed reveal pavement failures. So that one block is now done and when we begin the bonded paving the rest of the street will be milled and paved.

But once leaving the “joint,� the milling tends to be toward the edges only and not so much or at all at the centerline. Part of that has been more common practice lately so the street has a slight crown and drains water better. My point to the Division of Engineering and in an upcoming meeting with the paving managers is that I would like to have the gutter portions of the streets “double milled� as much as possible to return to the original cement curb and gutter base. I find that approach more appealing visually, and I think that it adds depth back to the curb for greater capacity during drainage. That is a treatment we previously used successfully on South Hanover Avenue. I don’t remember the last time I wrote a whole column on just one topic but with the mobilization under way and the funds in place, great things have already begun to happen.

Last fall the Planning and Public Works Committee – and then the full First, the Numbers council – embraced and enacted a Old Opportunities The 2013 paving allocation per the heretofore underutilized financing As I drove the newly milled streets I adopted budget was $3,080,000. Pursuant method. Based on continuing income noticed how at the beginning and ending to a council-adopted formula, it is allocat- from the state, we know the minimum points, the milling was deep and even. ed in each district based on the total amount we as a community will receive paving need of the district as a percentage will be no less than $3 million per year in of the whole. Because of the expanded our share of the gas tax income in the size of our district after the census and form of Municipal Aid Program (MAP) redistricting, we received $376,540. That funding. The plan is to commit half of isn’t much against our total inspected that as a bond payment. That income need, but it is second highest among all produces a net bonding of $13 million, Bill Farmer, Jr. Is the 5th District council representative. He can be reached at 12 districts. roughly half the inspected repaving need (859) 258-3213, by e-mail at bfarmer@lexingtonky.gov, or by fax at (859) 259-3838. When you see new paving going on across the city. The bond documents, in Letters may be addressed to: Councilmember Bill Farmer, Urban County Council, about town and in our area, it will be in final form, are currently on the council’s 200 E. Main St., Lexington, KY 40507.

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Whitman raised Cloud and Cecile, two White Plymouth Rock heritage breed chickens, since they were chicks. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

CLUCK! Lexington Tour de Coops 2013

ALL COOPED UP THIS BACKYARD CHICKEN COOP, FEATURED ON THIS YEAR’S CLUCK! TOUR, IS AT THE TOP OF THE PECKING ORDER IN THE SOUTHLAND NEIGHBORHOOD

BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

raising, and Whitman was smitten. “It was so compelling, and for whatever reason, she went for it. So I did,” eing raised on the easter n she said. seaboard in places between New Whitman also thought the endeavor York City and W ashington, D.C., would be a good project for her and her livestock is not something with which son, Frank. Penny Whitman was familiar growing up. Jeremy Porter, a chicken expert with But looking at her interact with the Seedleaf, a local food and sustainability fine flock of five heritage breed chickens organization, and organizer with CLUCK! she keeps in her backyard in the (Cooperative of Lexington Urban Southland neighborhood, you might Chicken Keepers) says this notion of think she was raised on a far m. families raising chickens together is what Whitman represents an ever -increas- drives many people to put up coops in ing trend among city dwellers, young and their backyards. old, who are exhibiting more and more “I think for most it’s enjoyable to see rustic and agrarian sensibilities. She said an animal flourish under their care and she first became interested in organic gar- given the proper nurturing and attention,” dening, and it just seemed like a “natural he said. “Plus, there’s food involved, and progression to have chickens.” it can be beneficial for children to see that But it was a fellow North Easter ner eggs can come from their chickens and who really convinced her to fly the coop. not the grocery store.” Susan Orlean, a celebrated author and Whitman started, in 2009, with two staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, light Brahma chickens, Colette (who is published an article a few years ago (titled still in Whitman’s brood) and Cookie, “The It Bird,” it’s still a very popular read) which she purchased from a Cynthiana about her foray into backyard chicken farmer she found online. The farmer gave

B

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

Whitman’s hens and coop, along with eight others throughout Lexington, will be open to the public during the third annual chicken coop tour presented by CLUCK! (Cooperative of Lexington Urban Chicken Keepers). Along with showcasing local chicken keepers’ setups, the purpose of the tour, and the organization, is to promote responsible chicken keeping. The coops chosen on this tour represent a variety of coops, from mail-order coops to DIY structures, and nearly two dozen different breeds of chickens. The tour will take place from 1 - 4 p.m. May 26. Tickets cost $7 and are available at Alfalfa, Good Foods Coop and online at www.seedleaf.org. There will be a Q & A at Alfalfa at 4:30 p.m., and dinner at 5:30 p.m. ($10). Workshops on baby chicks, wing clipping, medicating chickens, and capturing chickens will also be presented. Proceeds from the tour help facilitate the mission of CLUCK!, including free consultations through Seedleaf for those interested in starting a backyard coop. Visit www.clucklex.org for more information, including a workshop schedule and map of coops on the tour.

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Whitman a few suggestions: don’t start with chicks the first time; get a heritage breed on the verge of laying (the term to describe a hen almost to the point of being able to produce eggs). Since then she has brought other heritage breeds into the fold: Marguerite, a Black Marans; Sabine, a Cochin; and Cloud and Cecile, two White Plymouth Rocks Whitman has raised since chicks. Cecile and Cloud are the most comfortable with Whitman, a characteristic she says that probably has to do with them being raised since chicks, and will eat out of her hand, though the other birds aren’t very skittish either. Among the many things Whitman enjoys about raising her chickens, one of the things she finds most interesting is their behavior, especially regarding the “pecking order.” “When Cecile laid her first egg, she immediately rose to the top and just took that spot. She’s the last one into the coop at night,” Whitman said. “She walks the whole backyard to make sure everything is cool and then she gets in. Then she’s the first one out in the mor ning. “They are amazing. They are so smart and systematic,” she added. “There’s a lot more going on in their heads than you would think.” And, of course, she finds the egg production interesting, and delicious. Whitman says that between the five hens, she usually collects three to four eggs daily. Whitman moved into her current home about two years ago, bringing her flock and coop to the new neighborhood. Instead of causing a ruckus with neighbors – some people assume chickens are noisy or unsanitary – Whitman says her hens quickly endeared her to nearby residents, especially the curious ones. “It’s really connected me with all these neighbors,” she said, “introduced me to neighbors.”

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OUT OF THE ASHES AFTER A FIRE DESTROYED HER KENWICK HOUSE, TOMI ROSS HAS MOVED INTO HER NEW HOME, AND FORGED AN EVEN STRONGER BOND WITH NEIGHBORS

BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

for 27 years with her partner , Catherine, has to search diligently for a photo of the home, because the fire destroyed most of omi Ross has to search diligently to her photographs, along with the majority try to find a photo of her old home, of her other belongings. What wasn’t destroyed, friends and a striking teal V ictorian house that stood on Bassett A venue in the Kenwick neighbors helped pull from the wreckage. “The day after the fire, I was standing neighborhood. Last summer, lightning struck one of in the backyard, in a daze,” Ross said. “People all around me were carrying out the home’s three chimneys, which was used as a vent for the hot water heater , my possessions.” But the outpouring of help from and traveled through the pipes, igniting neighbors didn’t stop there. the second story of the house. When the Some children in the neighborhood fire reached an upstairs bathroom, a clawdrew Ross pictures of her old home to foot tub fell through the ceiling into the downstairs kitchen as the floor gave way, help cheer her up, and she said whenever she got a new refrigerator , their bringing the flames with it. Fortunately, Ross was in Louisville at illustrations would go up on it. Ross says she remembers seeing the horror the time and wasn’t injured in the fire. “I got a call at 1:07 in the mor ning on the children’s faces when they realfrom a friend who said, ‘Tomi, your house ized that she no longer had a refrigerais on fire,’” Ross remembers. “So I rushed tor, let alone a kitchen, after the fire. back here, I got back in like 45 minutes - Wanting to assist their neighbor , the kids hosted a lemonade stand to help that’s a speed record from Louisville.” Ross, who had lived in the old house raise money for Ross.

T

A plaque on Tomi Ross’ front porch pays tribute to friends and neighbors who supported Ross this past year. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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Another neighbor suggested Ross rent a home he owned just down the street; other neighbors lent her fur niture to use. The location of the rented house was very convenient for Ross, a senior facilities manager at UK Healthcare. She could watch the construction of her new home, which had to be built from the ground up since the former structure had to be demolished. After talking to a number of contractors for the design and build of her new home, Ross chose Angela Forsee and Greystone Restoration. “I knew it was the per fect fit for the project,” Ross said. Although Greystone doesn’t specialize in new builds, Forsee understood the period housing that Ross wanted to recreate. Even though Ross knew that they couldn’t rebuild the old house, she knew that she wanted her new home to look and feel like a Victorian. Also, she wanted the new home to have the same presence on the lot. Because she was aware of how fond the neighbors were of the old Victorian surrounded by bungalows, she wanted to do right by the neighborhood, partly as a show of appreciation for how gracious others were in coming to her assistance. “When I pulled up that night (the house was on fire), the street was just lined with people, and some were crying. As compassionate as my neighbors are, they weren’t crying because I was losing my house; they were crying because they were losing their Victorian,” Ross remembers. “One woman said she ran out of her house when she heard the sirens and said to another neighbor who was coming out, ‘Tell me it’s not the blue house. It’s not the blue house is it?’ They were devastated.” Ross was able to move into her new home in early March. Though it has a Victorian-style appearance on the outside, inside Ross wanted an open floor

14

While the new home may have a Victorian-style exterior, inside the home has an open floor plan with lots of windows. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

chevy chaser magazine may 2013


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plan with lots of windows for natural light – building features not associated with older homes. “Victorians were very dark usually, and the rooms were all cut up. Y ou had tons of doors into every room,” she said. “I wanted to do the V ictorian look outside, but I wanted more light. So when I built this house, I put in so many windows, I almost don’t have room to put in any furniture.” Incidentally, the new home is about 700 square feet smaller than the old house, but still has a master bedroom downstairs and three upstairs bedrooms. Currently, Ross is working on finding some last pieces of furniture to round out the home and finding ways to incorporate some pieces salvaged from the burned house. Even though Ross had spent nearly 30 years making her old house a home – replacing the roof, windows and air con-

Kenwick Bungalow Tour 2013 Tomi Ross’ new home will be on the 2013 Kenwick Bungalow Tour, presented by the Kenwick Neighborhood Association from 1 - 5 p.m. June 2. Seven to 10 homes or gardens will be open on the day of tour and will be within w alking or short driving distance from each other. The tour is an illustration of this near-downtown neighborhood that blends traditional and modernized homes and gardens, and the diverse blend of Lexingtonians who call it home. While every house may not be a bungalow, each one will show a different aspect of Kenwick’s unique personality.

ditioning, and painting the house numerous times through the years – she’s optimistic about the opportunities and possibilities her “new” Victorian offers. “It’s a wonder ful house, but I still mourn the old house. I loved that old house,” she said. “I’m more of an oldhouse kind of person, but (this house) has great bones and it really works, so I love it. The flow is wonderful.” Visitors to Ross’ new home are greeted at the front door with a plaque paying tribute to the neighbor hood and friends and neighbors who have shown Ross so much support through the last year. At the bottom, a quote from Confucius reads, “Of neighbor hoods, benevolence is the most beautiful.” And Ross may not have many photos of her old house, but the pictures the neighborhood kids drew of the old blue Victorian did finally find a home on Ross’ new refrigerator.

Free homemade refreshments will be served on the lawn of the oldest home in Kenwick, located at 116 Lincoln Ave. The new Kenwick Victory Community Garden will also be open on the day of the tour, and there will be a raffle to raise funds to keep the community garden going. Victory Christian Church will also be open and they will be holding a silent auction to r aise funds to make needed repairs to the church. Funds raised from ticket sales for the tour will be used to support Kenwick Neighborhood Association projects and programming at the Kenwick Community Center. Tickets for the tour are $5 and will be available on the day of the tour in the Victory Christian Church parking lot at the corner of Owsley and Cr amer avenues. To volunteer on the day of the tour, please e-mail kenwickneighbors@gmail.com.

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Neighborhood children drew pictures of Ross’ old home for her. Ross said she would put them on her refrigerator once she got a new one (shown her e).

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

C & C Home Improvements gave this kitchen on Richmond Road a makeover, complete with new cabinets and appliances, as well as lots of mor e space.

ROOM TO ROOM

THIS KITCHEN, INCLUDED ON THE UPCOMING 2013 KITCHENS OF THE BLUEGRASS TOUR, GAVE THE HOMEOWNERS EVERYTHING THEY WERE LOOKING FOR, EVEN A SECOND KITCHEN

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

T

he old kitchen in Tim and Beverly Walden’s Richmond Road home wasn’t anywhere near lar ge enough as one would expect out of the size of the house. It was small and cramped, “with a big island in the middle, so when you opened the refrigerator door , it hit the island,” Beverly said. Whenever the couple was entertaining, there was always a bottleneck at one of the entrances. When the couple decided they would completely rework their kitchen last year, they used the services of Chris and Cindy Hopkins of C & C Home Improvements, a husband-and-wife design and construction company based in Nicholasville. To open up the kitchen to flow into a casual dining room, a bearing wall was removed and a countertop sitting area was installed while the entryway was widened. The kitchen island was taken out, which exposed missing portions of the hardwood floor. Instead of replacing the flooring, which the Waldens liked, with its rustic, hand peg nails, Chris Hopkins patched in the gaps to give a unifor m appearance.

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Custom-made cabinets, extending to the ceiling, gave the family much-needed storage space. Interestingly, pieces of a laundry room and coat closet were morphed into a “prep kitchen,” complete with the for mer kitchen’s cabinets and recut pieces of its granite countertops. Being close to the grilling station outside, the prep kitchen serves as a space where work can be done without messing up the for mal kitchen. The Waldens also use the prep kitchen for their dayto-day countertop appliances, so the main kitchen isn’t cluttered. “I use it all the time, making cof fee, juicing,” Tim said. “W e have all of that back here so we don’t mess up the kitchen.” The new kitchen also utilizes some efficient space-saving features, such as corner cabinet apparatuses and appliances installed in the space under neath the stairway. “It’s changed the whole experience,” Tim said. “It used to be when we had family over, or friends, we’d try to get them out of the kitchen because it was so cramped. Now, we encourage people to be in here. W e put the food out and let them hang out in here. We rarely use the other rooms as much now.”

2013 Kitchens of the Bluegrass Tour The Waldens’ home will be one of several homes open for viewing during the 2013 Kitchens of the Bluegrass Tour, presented by Child Development Centers of the Bluegrass (CDCB). The tour, which will be self-guided and features 14 kitchens in homes throughout the Lexington area, will raise funds for programs and therapy services for CDCB’s preschool which helps children with and without special needs achieve their maximum potential. The kitchens were selected based on criteria, including location, “wow” appeal and style. New this year, Jimmy Nash Homes and Kitchen Concepts are sponsoring a cooking demonstration and hospitality station in one of the homes on the tour. In addition, all ticket holders can enter a free drawing for prizes, including a variety of kitchen-related items and gift certificates.

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Pieces of a laundry room and coat closet were used to make a “prep kitchen,” where the homeowners use day-to-day appliances to maintain an uncluttered appearance in the main kitchen.

Every step of the way.

The tour will run from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. May 18 and 1 - 5 p.m. May 19. Tickets for the tour are $20 in adv ance and $25 on the day of the tour. Tickets are available at many local businesses, call (859) 218-2322 for a list or visit www.cdcbg.org to purchase online. Tickets will also be available at each featured kitchen on the day of the tour.

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Giving heart patients an encore. That’s why we’re here. Only UK HealthCare offers the most comprehensive heart care in the region. No one appreciates this more than Deb Lander, who suffered sudden cardiac death on a Lexington sidewalk. To give her the best chance at a full recovery, our cardiac team induced therapeutic hypothermia – a treatment few heart centers are able to do. And we didn’t stop there. We implanted a wireless defibrillator to jumpstart Deb’s heart should it ever stop again. This was all done with one goal in mind: to allow Deb to continue pursuing her passion of teaching viola at the UK College of Fine Arts.

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ROOMS FOR THEIR GARDEN TO GROW PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Many areas of Shelby Reynolds’ and David Bartley’s backyard garden pay homage to different cultures from around the world. Here the Asian emphasis is evident.

WITH A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT FEATURES, THIS AURORA AVENUE GARDEN IS A GROWING SHOWCASE OF CULTURAL INFLUENCES BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

S

helby Reynolds’ and David Bartley’s backyard garden on Aurora A venue probably has more “rooms” than there are in the couple’s home. And as with most rooms in a home, each one of their garden rooms has a theme or motif, all loosely tied together by an overriding concept. For Reynolds and Bartley, that idea is a celebration of different cultures. Some of the most prominent features and nooks in their highly stylized backyard are heavily influenced by the tastes and fashions of people from around the globe. “It’s our around the world tour ,” Reynolds said.

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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The first thing that will catch a visitor’s attention is the or nate water fountain sprouting out in the middle of the yard. Reynolds says the feature is reminiscent of an European, especially Italian, couryard. Encircled by the only patch of grass in the whole backyard (and front yard, for that matter), Reynolds says they don’t have to do much mowing. “That was part of the original plan,” he said, “to get rid of the grass. So I just have one of those little spiral push mowers.” Reynolds has lived in the house since 1987, and for the first 15 years, Reynolds says the couple had a typical backyard – a flat, rectangular plot of grass with some trees and some simple landscaping. But after the space was decimated after the 2003 ice storm, they decided they would give their yard a considerable facelift after a very considerable cleanup effort. The garden was assembled on a “room by room” basis, as time and ef fort would permit. As the seasons progressed, a number of plants began to make appearances, such as climbing hydrangea, a weeping Norway spruce, rhubarb, pom pom junipers, arundo grass, rosebush, boxwood and bonsai. Some of the more durable bonsai are planted in the ground during the colder months of the year , pot and all, and unearthed when the weather begins to warm. Other plants require regular upkeep, but Reynolds and Bartley have tried to select varieties that don’t require so much attention as to take away from their fondness of working outside. “When we first redid the garden, it was extremely high maintenance,” Reynolds said, “but we’ve gotten rid of a few things trying to make it less so. But

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Reynolds drew up the designs for the deck that holds the couple’ s hot tub. The deck was constructed with the durable ipe wood.

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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chevy chaser magazine may 2013


Open Gates to Bluegrass Living Garden Tour

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Reynolds and Bartley constructed the kitchen and sun room on the back of their Aurora Avenue home. Both rooms offer nice vistas of their backyard.

Shelby Reynolds’ and David Bartley’s garden will be open to the public as part of the biennial Lexington Council Garden Clubs’ “Open Gates to Bluegrass Living Garden Tour,” held 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. June 1 and 1 - 5 p .m. June 2, which will celebrate 10 diverse gardens throughout Lexington.

it’s still a daily thing. Especially with the fish.” The koi pond, at the foot of the “pagoda” and ipe wood deck holding the hot tub, contains a number of impressive specimens, including a few koi well over 10 years old, and, along with the pagoda, is one of many features in the garden with an Asian emphasis. Another is the cafe-style sitting area, marked with two lar ge orange circles and covered with a long arbor . As one of the co-owners of Morningside Woodcrafters, a custom furniture and restoration company located just a block away on National

Avenue, Reynolds constructed a number of the wooden features, including the arbors, in the backyard. (A feature on the business begins on page 29.) Along with objects in the garden, Reynolds and Bartley built the adjacent sunroom and kitchen in the back of their home, both of fering as many views of the backyard as possible. But not everything in the backyard is of Reynolds’ device, such as the wooden porch swing under the pagoda – the most recent addition to the space. “Sometimes I just have to order it to get it, because if I were to make it, who knows when we would get it,” Reynolds laughed.

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

The tour is a fundraising event to provide grants to the community and scholarships to University of Kentucky students who are majoring in horticulture and allied fields. Grant recipients from the 2011 tour included a butterfly garden, a rain garden, a memorial art garden, a community vegetable garden and watershed improvement. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 the day of the tour. Tickets may be purchased at a number of local businesses, as well as at garden sites on the days of the tour. This is a rain or shine event. For more information e-mail lcgcgardentour@gmail.com or visit www.lexgardenclubs.org.

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NEW, OR GOOD AS NEW, FURNITURE

THE TWO OWNERS AT MORNINGSIDE WOODCRAFTERS HAVE BEEN BUILDING AND RESTORING PIECES FOR OVER 20 YEARS BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

B Morningside Woodcrafters co-owners Willy Brown and Shelby Reynolds (at right). The two have been in business for 23 years on National Avenue. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

rand new fur niture has been coming out of Mor ningside Woodcrafters for over 23 years. Or furniture that’s as good as new – it depends on what service the customer wants. The two-person team that makes up the business, W illy Brown and Shelby Reynolds, specialize in dif ferent aspects of wooden fur niture. Brown restores or repairs old pieces; Reynolds custom builds new pieces. Brown and Reynolds have been in business together since they opened their workshop on National A venue (Morningside Addition is the old name of the area), and they’ve been in the same location ever since.

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Brown and Reynolds admit that their profession, or the materials or tools they use, hasn't changed much through the years. (At right, bottom) Eclipse Awards awaiting their custom bases Reynolds constructs every year. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Brown grew up around his father’s woodworking shop in Lancaster , where he started working after school and in the summers when he was 10 years old. Skilled cabinet makers and other artisans worked in the shop too, and Brown learned about fur niture repair watching and learning from them. An interest blossomed, and he hasn’t done anything else since. As Brown grew older and more accomplished, he eventually took over his father’s business, and ultimately decided to move it to Lexington, where a number of his clients were already located. At that time, Reynolds was working for another Lexington woodworking company. An acquaintance of Brown’s, Reynolds suggested the two open a shop together when Brown was relocating to Lexington. “I said, ‘Let’s do this together ,’ because I was wanting to get out on my own as well,” Reynolds said. “But it’s kind of a scary proposition to get out there and do it by yourself.” Reynolds (whose backyard garden is featured on page 23) first recognized his talents for furniture making while taking woodworking classes in junior high school and high school. He attended Centre College as a theatre major , and after graduating stayed at the school for two years helping to build sets for school productions. Then he decided he was more interested in finer woodworking and enrolled in an apprentice fur nituremaking program in Massachusetts. Through the years, Reynolds says that the way he builds custom fur niture from chairs and tables to grandfather

clocks and beds – hasn’t changed, but new technology has changed the way he works with clients, especially when it comes to e-mailing and texting pictures. “For a long time, I didn’t want to get a cell phone when they were new,” he said. “With texting, customers can send me pictures, and we can talk back and forth with just a text. It’s so convenient, especially for sending pictures. I can look at something and say, ‘This is going to cost this much.’” And newer technology is also having an influence on the pieces he’s asked to construct. “With the new flat screen TVs, a lot of people are having to convert their old cabinetry from the old, real deep TVs to the new ones,” Reynolds said, “and I have to figure out how that is going to work.” Never a fan of mass producing, Reynolds says he finds the variety in the work the most rewarding aspect of the job. Still, for nearly the past 15 years, every year Reynolds is contracted to build the wooden base for each trophy presented at the annual Eclipse A wards, which honors people and horses in the Thoroughbred industry. Brown jokes that if he and Reynolds stay in business much longer together, he will probably start seeing some of Reynolds’ custom furniture come through the door in need of restoration. While he does fix newer fur niture, Brown says that the majority of the pieces he works on is fur niture dating from 1780 to 1880. Most clients bringing pieces in for repair or restoration are familiar with the items’ ages, and maybe

even value, but sometimes a person will bring in an object and want Brown to investigate its age and origin. He looks at the style, the type of wood and the hardware used to construct the piece to inform his answer. From time to time, he’s also had to break a customer’s heart when he finds that the piece they have brought in is actually a reproduction, and not as old as they had initially thought. “I can tell if it’s a reproduction because I know a lot of the tricks, too, to make these things look old,” Brown said, “so I know some of the tricks someone else may have used.” Brown says his favorite fur niture to work on, and he’s worked on pieces from all over the world, using the same tools craftspeople used up to 90 years ago, are Kentucky items from the early 19th century. He likes seeing the building science cabinet makers employed over 200 years ago. “Most people just see the outside of the furniture, and I’ve taken apart so many and put them together ,” he said. “So I’ve seen the backs and the insides and the bottoms – the whole construction method of how they’ve been made. It’s very interesting to see what other cabinet makers did, and even the little mistakes they’ve made sometimes.” And when it comes to covering up their mistakes, Brown says that is something modern furniture makers have in common with their predecessors. “That’s what cabinet makers do now and that’s what they did 200 years ago,” he said. “Everything wasn’t per fect like people think.”

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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prouting weeds are one of the first signs of spring, but unlike other buds and blooms, we tend not to welcome these plants. There are three weedy plants that clients invariably ask me about. Here is the most common question I get: “There is this little weed with tiny white flowers, it’s everywhere, and it pops seeds when I try to pull it out. What the heck is this?” I’ll bet you know exactly what I’m talking about, and I’m sure I could find some in most any backyard in Lexington. It is Cardamine hirsuta, better known as hairy bittercress. Hairy bittercress is an annual with a pretty little basal rosette of leaves. Flowering stems, just a few inches long, grow out of the center of the rosette. Look very closely and you may see scattered hairs on the leaves, especially around their bases. Tubular seed pods project nearly straight upwards, each containing many tiny seeds. If you try to pull the plant after the seed pods ripen, you will experience their carpet bombing attributes. Seeds everywhere, projected as far as 10 feet. This plant produces flowers and seeds vigorously before most other plants have reached the reproductive stage. It can complete its life cycle in three to four weeks to disperse thousands of seeds, all of which can germinate to release their own seeds in quick succession, so it can dominate yards and gardens if not caught in the early stages. They grow best in damp, recently disturbed soil, which pretty much defines garden beds in the spring. Hairy bittercress is a member of the mustard family. While we do have beautiful native mustards, this is not one of them – it is native to Europe and Asia. Apparently

chevy chaser magazine may 2013


the young, tender leaves add a peppery bite to a salad and can be added to soups. Another common weed is from the genus Lamium. Actually, there are two similar plants: purple deadnettle ( Lamium purpureum) and henbit ( Lamium amplexicaule). Both are in the mint family and have that characteristic square stem but no minty odor. Pinkish or purplish tiny tubular flowers grow in whorls around the stem. These plants grow in moist, disturbed areas and look very much alike. If you’re interesting in telling them apart, here’s how: purple deadnettle’s leaves have a stem (petiole), a pointed tip and a triangular shape; henbit’s upper leaves have no stems and are circular or heart shaped, with big, scalloped edges. These are winter annuals, meaning that they start their life cycles in the fall with seed germination and flower and set seed in the spring. They are invasive and nonnative. Where these plants are common, they are important nectar and pollen sources for bees, especially the non-native honeybees. And these plants are edible, too. For some spicy flavor, use raw in salads or add to soups and stews. Nutritious, high in iron, vitamins and fiber . There is a species of deadnettle, Lamium maculatum, that is sold as a groundcover. I never use this because it is extremely aggressive and hard to get rid of once it starts to take over. Which it will. And, for the third weed I’m most likely to hear about, I’ll go with ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea.) Another nonnative, it shares similarities with purple deadnettle and henbit: tubular flowers and the square stem of the mint family. However, ground ivy is perennial with creeping stems that root at the nodes, and when you handle it you can’t miss the mint-like odor. It will form dense mats which can take over areas of your lawn. I am all for pulling weeds rather than spraying chemicals, if at all possible. In most garden areas this will be enough to get things under control. And Groud Ivy, maybe leave the henbit and purple resembling purple deadnettle while it’s in flower , to deadnettle, give sustenance to the bees, then forms dense pull it before it sets seed. mats that can And, of course, you might take over just go for tastier salads. your lawn. PHOTO FURNISHED

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Are You Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise BY SHEILA KALAS | FITNESS COLUMNIST

T

he Wall Street Jour nal published an interesting article earlier in the year investigating if some of us are genetically wired to hate exercise. The article looked at both physiological and psychological factors that af fect our feelings about exercise. This article reminded me of a New York Times article, titled “The Fat Trap.” Both of these articles concluded that there are genetic factors that make both exercising and being of nor mal weight more difficult. People read these articles and quickly jump to the conclusion that they don’t have to exercise or watch what they eat because it’s no use, their genetics are never going to allow them to be successful. This is wrong. The fact that some of us are wired to dislike exercise is not permission to abandon all efforts. It is a reminder that some of us, due to uncontrollable factors, have to work harder to keep up with a regular exercise routine. So, why do some people naturally hate exercise? Let’s take a look: First let’s talk about genetics. A study done at Iowa State shows that how people interpret their body sensations during and after exercise plays a large role in whether they enjoy it or not. Some people are “wired” to enjoy the feeling of muscle soreness, sweating and being physically challenged, while some brains interpret these same sensations as terrible, even dangerous. Y our body naturally tries to get you to avoid things it thinks are dangerous or bring you pain, therefore you are not motivated to produce those body sensations again. Also, everyone has a genetic level relating to how much stress their body can take. There are many genetic factors that make this up, such as lung capacity, your oxygen transport system and your ventilatory or anaerobic threshold. It’s best to think of your maximum ability in these areas as your “genetic box.” What this means is that not all of us, no matter how much exercise or training, can ascend to be an Olympic champion. W e have limits, but that doesn’t mean we should not challenge them. What happens in the body when you reach your physiological limits for doing exercise is that you will start to build up acid in your muscles and feel discomfort. This feeling is what drives people to stop exercising. For some people who are very de-conditioned, this may come with doing the dishes, for others, it may come with running a seven-minute mile. Since the overwhelming majority of people do not like the feeling of discomfort that comes with overexerting themselves, it is important to make sure you exercise at a pace just below the level that starts producing muscular pain and discomfort. An important fact to know is that people who continually push themselves to the point of discomfort lose motivation faster . If you want to bring consistent exercise into your life, then working out at the proper intensity and building up slowly is key. There are also cognitive “tricks” that can help you overcome hating exercise. Research showed that people who viewed scenes of green trees while cycling were happier with their workout than those who viewed black-and-white images. The environment in which we exercise can both change our attitude about our workout and help us do more than we nor mally would.So, you may have some genetic pre-disposition to hate exercise, but you still have to find a way to do it. Use science, both physiological and psychological, to help you develop a successful program in spite of your genetic limits.

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T A B L E

F O R

T W O

Palmers Fresh Grill other creative cocktails as well, including four options that are only $5 during happy hour . ituated in the Lexington Green venue that for merly As for food, the menu may fit neatly on one page, housed Regatta Seafood Grill, Palmers Fresh Grill but it has a wide enough variety to make for some difimparts a new twist to a shopping area that is prificult decisions. For appetizers, we ordered the Thai marily known for more casual chain and franchise Mussels (served in a bowl of red curry coconut cream restaurants. Locally owned and featuring an innovative sauce flavored with lemongrass, lime and white sesame, fine-dining menu ripe with Caribbean and Mediterranean $10.70) and the Latin Egg Rolls (stuf fed with chipotle influences, Palmers seems to take pride in fresh ingredi- braised chicken and served with avocado cream, pico de ents, fine wines and variety. gallo and pickled radish, $8.70). The egg rolls were The interior space has seen a significant makeover absolutely dynamite; while the mussels weren’t the highsince Regatta shut its doors in November, with rustic hard- light of the meal for me (and they typically aren’t, unless wood floors, modern and sophisticated equine-themed art ordered somewhere more coastal), they were flavor ful work and ambient lighting. The patio, which overlooks and the portion was more than ample. the pond at Lexington Green, was still undergoing its final Off the bat, I knew I would have a dif ficult time touches during a mid-April visit, but our server – who was deciding on an entree. Options that glittered on the page quite friendly and knowledgeable – assured us that the to me included the Hanger Steak Chimichurri (with restaurant had plans to open it before May 1. Yukon gold mashed potatoes, pico de gallo, fresh lime First things first; my guest and I started with an and cilantro, $21.90), the Macadamia and Coconut Austin Mule (a spin on the Moscow Mule, only with Crusted Mahi (with Cuban-style black beans and grilled Tito’s vodka, ginger beer, lime juice) and the Benton’s 46 pineapple salsa, $21.90) and the Shrimp and Scallop Manhattan, made with Maker’s 46 bourbon infused inGnocchi (with basil pesto cream, $16.90). My guest house with Benton’s bacon. In an interesting (and actu- ordered the hanger steak and I ended up going for the ally quite delicious) twist, the Manhattan was gar nished grilled ahi tuna steak, with wasabi mashed potatoes, with candied bacon. The drink menu featured several Vietnamese slaw and a ginger soy glaze ($25.90). It was

BY BOO VIVANT | TABLE FOR TWO

S

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

a wonderful melding of flavors and textures, with the wasabi potatoes being the real standout – not too spicy, but enough kick to bring the meal together . My guest’s steak was also quite good, perfectly cooked to the chef’s recommended medium rare. For dessert, we ordered the vanilla bean panna cotta, served with a fresh berry compote ($6.20) – a refreshing end to a delicious meal. Other dessert options include Palmers Fresh Grill a bourbon and salted 161 Lexington Green Cir. caramel bread pudding (859) 273-0103 and a chocolate www.plateopie.com/palmers mousse cheescake 4 - 10:30 p.m. Sun. – Thurs. 4 - 11:30 p.m. Fri. – Sat. (which our server had enough forethought to give us the heads up that the texture was more like a mousse and less like a cheesecake than we might expect). Our total, which included a couple of drinks and three courses, came to $103.70 before tax and tip. Perhaps a bit pricey for a mall-area dining experience, but the menu, quality and ambience were on par with downtown’s finer restaurants. I look forward to returning during patio season.

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SPREAD IT ON OUT IN GARDEN SPRINGS, DAD’S DELI’S POPULARITY CONTINUES TO GROW, DESPITE BEING OFF THE EATEN PATH

PHOTOS BY EMILY MOSELEY

The friendly crew at Dad’s Deli is almost as big of a dr aw as the food. James Caudill, “Dad,” (at right) says customer appreciation and interaction is just as important.

BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

loyalty program. If a customer buys 10 sandwiches, and keeps track of their card, the 11th is on the house. At first, the ames Caudill is sometimes accused of used cards would be displayed on the making it hard for people to come eat walls, but wall space filled up quickly. To at his restaurant, Dad’s Deli, which conserve space, they said for those loyal showcases the handful of cheese customers who filled up three cards, they spreads, called Dad’s Favorites, Caudill would get their framed photo, with has created in the past few years. Caudill, mounted on the wall. Now, after The soup and sandwich shop is virall the walls have been festooned with tually hidden in the back of the Garden used cards and photos, a digital photo Springs Shopping Center’s arcade shops, screen displays slideshows of the most and their small window of business is recent faithful eaters. only 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Caudill, who employees his two Friday. sons, Jayson and Jef f, in the deli and in “A lot of people say, ‘Well, I’ve got a the cheese spread operations of the busireal job and I can’t get over there,’” ness, says that customer interaction, and Caudill said. “And I say, ‘Well, I’m sorry.” definitely appreciation, is just as imporBut for those that can make it out to tant as the food. Dad’s for lunch, and there are many, they “That’s one thing I tried to instill in don’t mind. The lines are already long my boys – you want to treat people the enough. way you would want to be treated. They On a busy day in early April, as the want to know you, you want to know line to the counter started to backup them,” Caudill said. “The ones that don’t down the arcade’s hallway, Caudill, in an want to know us, they aren’t going to be ever-present flat cap, was taking the time our customers anyway.” to speak with people waiting to order , The deli opened in October of 2010. check on some tables, and even get his To keep up with the growing demand for picture taken with some customers who Caudill’s cheese spreads, Caudill fitted a had reached the upper level in the deli’s commercial kitchen in Garden Springs

J

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chevy chaser magazine may 2013


Shopping Center earlier that year . The space had a small front, which Caudill intended to paper over since they were making the spreads in the back, but Joe Singleton, who owns and works at Garden Springs Barber Shop across the hallway, said that he had four barbers who eat out every day. The owners of next-door Alterations & Sew Much More echoed the same notion. At minimum, Caudill figured that serving simple sandwiches might be a good way to market the handful of spreads they were producing in the back. They would put a table out in the hallway in case a customer wanted to hang out and eat. “If we can make a $100 a month to pay the electric bill, we’ll be happy,” Caudill remembers saying about the idea. “Next thing you know, one table tur ned into 10. ... It’s one of those things where we had no idea that it was going to take off like this. But we figured, if we put the love in it, if we try to make food that we like, let’s see if other people like it.” The quick and robust popularity of Dad’s Deli runs parallel to the cheese spreads, which Caudill started producing, commercially at least, in 2008. Prior to that, always fond of cooking, he would prepare the spreads for parties or other social gatherings. He remembers one tailgate where someone first gave him the idea to make the spreads for retail. “Somebody stood up and said, ‘Who made this?’ I kind of cringed,” Caudill recalls. “I thought somebody had gotten sick or something.” Instead, the person implored Caudill to get the items on the market. At the time, Caudill had been in the insurance business for over 20 years, and as the economy began to slow in 2007 and customers were slashing their coverage, Caudill, prodded by his partner , Susan Bratton, to do something he was passionate about, entertained the idea of a career realignment. He was also taxed, mentally, as his oldest son, Jayson, was stationed as an MP in Iraq. Hours and hours in the kitchen would be a welcome distraction. “He was ‘outside the wire’ for 14 hours a day,” Caudill says, referring to Jayson being outside the confines of a military base while on duty, “and I tried to do something to keep my mind of f of it, so I started making it.” Later, on a whim, Caudill took a plain container of his spread (it didn’t even have a label at that time) to Liquor Barn to see if the deli manager would be interested. Serendipitously, the buyer was there; she wanted to know if it was somebody trying to sell another beer cheese. “I said, ‘No, I’d rather have a fresh beer in my hand than a flat one in my cheese,” Caudill said. The buyer laughed

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Jayson Caudill (at top) lets unfamiliar customer s sample the deli’s cheese spreads while they are ordering.

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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and took a taste. She asked everybody to try it. She said she had to have it in all six locations before Derby, and it was early April. “I’ve been in sales all my life. Y ou never say no,” Caudill said. “I was like a dog chasing a car that caught it – now what was I going to do with it.” A lot happened in the coming weeks – forms and inspections and fees from various state and local departments, labels and logos for the dif ferent spread varieties – but Caudill got his spreads (now called Dad’s Favorites, as Caudill was always known to feed his kids’ friends after sports practice) into the Liquor Barn locations. Then Dad’s picked up a small contract for some local Kroger grocery stores. By that time, Jayson was back from Iraq and unemployed, and his other son, Jeff, who had recently graduated from UK, was also without a job. Caudill thought he may have enough work for the three of them. “I said, ‘Guys, I’ve got a Kroger account, I think it will support us,’” he said. “It’ll be a little lean at first, but let’s see what we can do.” Dad’s Favorites started out being available in about eight to 10 locations, now Caudill says his products are in around 60 spots, including Liquor Bar n and Kroger locations in Kentucky and Ohio, as well as regional farmers markets. Along with being available in a growing number of outlets, the spreads have also begun to amass a number of local awards and accolades, such as the people’s choice award at the Incredible Food Show two years in a row and “Best KY Proud Food” at T aste of the Bluegrass. One contest even dubbed Dad’s as “best beer cheese,” even though they weren’t producing a beer cheese – a deliberate business decision since “in Kentucky, everything is beer cheese,” Caudill says. “I had a recipe for a beer cheese, but I didn’t want to make it because every-

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body from Aunt Betty to Uncle Bill in Kentucky makes a beer cheese, and theirs is always the best,” he said. “So, I said I didn’t want to get in that business.” However, as a recent gesture to Country Boy Brewing for their one-year anniversary, Caudill and his family whipped up a batch of beer cheese using Country Boy’s Stampin’ Ground Nitro Porter beer. It was such a hit that Caudill, after years of saying he wouldn’t, has decided Dad’s will begin producing its first beer cheese. And for those who have given Caudill a hard time about his hours, he’s scouting out locations for a second Dad’s Deli, possibly even with longer hours, so maybe it will be easier for others to stop in for a bite.

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During a moment of downtime, Caudill takes a brief moment to r elax outside his deli.

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F I N E

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How Do You “Cue”? BY LINDA HINCHCLIFFE | FINE LINES COLUMNIST

W

es Berry, author and an associate professor of English at Western Kentucky University, hits the Kentucky backroads in search of the best regional treasure: barbecue. In a class with fried chicken and the amber spirits that define other traditions, Kentucky barbecue has a rich history of its own. The author writes, “Although that noted Kentucky institution, the barbecue, is not by any means confined to the Bluegrass, yet it is only there that it reaches its happiest development.” Berry’s intention is for “The Kentucky Barbecue Book” to be an introduction to the regional culinary traditions, as well as serve as a travel guide to seek out the best “mom-and-pop smoked-meat destinations in the Commonwealth.” He provides a map of Kentucky barbecue regions designating as areas preferring brisket and beef ribs, pork shoulder and vinegar dip, hickory smoked mutton and burgoo, pork shoulder with vinegar -cayenne table sauce – county by county – and while by no means exclusive, it does offer an interesting guide to the variety the region of fers. Providing information on the cuts of meat, varieties of meat, and varieties of wood for the fire, Berry sets up a veritable roadmap for the lovers of all things barbecued – complete with descriptions of authentic and tastebud-worthy side dishes and recipes for the sauces that offer the distinct flavors. Homemade ice cream, butter milk pie, fried Amish pie, grilled cabbage, cheese grits, various potato salad recipes, and green bean recipes are sprinkled throughout the book. Baked beans, sweet and sour slaw, and signature sauces adorn the pages, and it is with this that Berry admits that a good part of the enjoyment of each meal comes from the folks doing the mixing, firing and cooking. A section of photographs clearly shows the hard The Kentucky work involved – hauling the wood and meat and laboring Barbecue Book over the intense heat and smoke of the fire pits – but it By Wes Berry more clearly shows the grins and good times the processUniversity Press es provide. of Kentucky, 2013 Pig in a Poke BBQ in Prestonbur g is a prime example of a local “haunt.” Berry explains: “It seems to me that if you want family dining, eat downstairs; if you want a lively bar atmosphere, go upstairs. And if you’re opposed to a rowdy bar atmosphere, then go at lunch. People were on good behavior then.” Admits owner Brian Cramer when asked what prompted him to give up his job and open his “joint”: “I love to smoke, I love to smell it. I love to sit and drink a beer and just stare at it ... The beauty of barbecue is that everybody does do things their own different way. Barbecue is a way of life.” Which place is the best? Berry admits he has given up on a rating system with the hopes that his enthusiasm for the places he writes about will spur readers to venture to them, and come to their own conclusions. But one thing he makes very clear, before filling your tank with gas and traveling the often windy and deserted roads that bring you to some of these restaurants – call ahead. The nature of the beast leads many of these establishments to close up on a moment’s notice. Berry notes: “I wish all these mom-and-pop shops would survive through several generations. Patronize them and they’ll have a better chance. Give fast food the finger . Eat some love.” With a sense of humor, a deep respect for the traditions reflected, and an honest love of the process – and its result – Berry provides a practical guide to all that is Kentucky barbecue and the mouthwatering meals its practitioners provide.

Linda Hinchcliffe

loves a good book at any hour. She particularly likes to support up-and-coming authors. She can be contacted by e-mail at linda@smileypete .com.

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PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST

GETTING THE WORD OUT

POET, PUBLISHER AND LITERARY ACTIVIST KATERINA STOYKOVA-KLEMER BY SARAYA BREWER CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

A

Master of all word trades Katerina Stoykova-Klemer reads in her home office. PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

n accomplished poet, teacher and translator; founder of the longstanding creative writing group Poezia; founder and host of a literarythemed radio show; and founder and senior editor of her own press (whew) – it’s no wonder Katerina Stoykova-Klemer has become a household name among the Lexington literary scene. Given her extensive accomplishments, it might surprise folks to lear n that the local literary scene is not something she dove into headfirst upon moving to Lexington from her native Bulgaria in the mid 1990s. A writer from an early age, Klemer came to the states to marry her American fiance (now husband), whom she initially met through the pen pal or ganization International Pen Friends, but between raising her son, living in a new country, and working full-time as a project manager and software engineer for Lexmark, she experienced a distance from writing for more than a decade. “I wrote a lot before I came, then when I came to the United States, something happened and I didn’t write for 11 years,” she said. “Then all of a sudden, I started writing again – in English.” Klemer said the experience of being reacquainted with writing – in a new language, no less – was challenging, but liberating as well. “For the first time, I lear ned to tell the truth to myself,” she said. “Accents” (she speaks with a lovely Easter nEuropean one) has become a major theme in Klemer’s life – and the title of her radio show, an annual literary reading she organizes, and the publishing company she founded in 2010, which is currently her primary job. While it maintains a strong focus on local and regional poets, Accents Publishing occasionally publishes prose (something Klemer says she would like to do more of in the future) and also highlights national and inter national authors. Expanding the press’ focus is a distinct part of Klemer’s strategy for the press – something she hopes will ultimately help put local authors on a larger literary map. “It’s wonderful to have a local press that highlights the local community, the local art and local talent,” she said, “but unless (we include authors from) outside this area, then our press is not relevant outside this area.” Like many other major projects she has embarked on, Klemer had some initial hesitations about starting her own publishing company. “Ideas appear in my head, and the first thing I do is I say, ‘No, no, I can’t do that.’ For whatever

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One Should Exercise Caution When kissing a daffodil. Somebody could get hurt. It helps to have dabbled in botany. To reach the Sweet of Hearts without splitting apart her innermost petals is a high art. While the kiss lasts, you’ll share her crown. You’ll shimmer in the sun for days after you drift apart.

Katerina Stoykova-Klemer, in her home office, says she has to make time for writing, “otherwise I wouldn’t be able to do anything else.”

LEXINGTON POETRY MONTH

PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

National poetry month might take place in April, but local literary enthusiasts Katerina Stoykova-Klemer and Hap Houlihan have initiated a new local movement encouraging Lexington to produce more poetry. This June marks the inaugural Lexington Poetry Month, a monthlong writing marathon that asks participants to write a poem every day and submit it online. Submissions will be posted daily on the Accents Publishing blog. Acknowledging the fact that writing something for public consumption every single day is a tall order, participants may elect for a certain percentage of their poems to go unpublished.

The Most Welcome Last Resort We meet at last Plan Z I’ve heard a lot about you Worst Case Scenario

Registration is open through May 31. For more information, and to register to participate, visit www.accents-publishing/blog/lexington-poetry-month or email lex.poetry.month@gmail.com

I look forward to Working with you When-all-else-fails It’s going to be you and I now Do you feel lucky to end up with me?

Accents Publishing Klemer’s grassroots press has published around 30 books, which can be found at Morris Book Shop, sQecial MEdia, Joseph-Beth and online at www.accents-publishing.com.

Hey, it’s okay After the initial shock Wears off You too Will try to make The most of me

Accents Radio Hour

POEMS BY KATERINA STOYKOVA-KLEMER

reason,” she said. But the idea for the press wouldn’t leave her alone. “I have this test that I do, and it’s ‘will I regret not doing this?’” she explained. “If the answer is ‘yes, I will regret not doing it,’ I go ahead and do it. I can always fail, but at least I know I have tried.” The concept for the press emer ged following Klemer’s experience with getting two of her own books published; during that time, she says, she lear ned a lot of things – including that she has very strong opinions about how things should be done. With Accents Publishing, there were two major facets she hoped to distinguish

from other literary presses: publish the books quickly and make them affordable. “I have been through the process of trying to sell my own book, and I have been through the process of buying other people’s books. T o me that was very important,” she said. “It’s very hard to char ge for something that people can get for free unless they want to support you,” she added. “And they want to support you if they feel that you are doing what you can to meet them halfway.” With around 30 books published over the past three years at an average price of $5, one could easily check of f both of these aspects as successes for

Accents Publishing. Many of the books are hand-bound by Klemer and her husband, Dan, at their home of fice. She relies heavily on the assistance of four interns, who help with tasks ranging from project management to scheduling book signings to maintaining the blog, making it possible for Klemer to focus on other focuses of her life – such as writing, which she says is a priority to make time for. “It’s super important to me to continue writing regularly, or to think about writing or to do something writing-wise, so I have to make time,” she said. “I have to make time for it, otherwise I wouldn’t be able to do anything else.”

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

Founded in 2009 and billed as “A Radio Show for Literature, Art and Culture,” Accents Radio Hour features an in-depth conversation with a different writer each week. The show recently celebrated its 200th episode and airs on 88.1, WRFL-FM on Friday afternoons at 2 p.m.

Poezia Writing Groups Founded by Klemer and Colin Watkins in 2007, Poezia Poetry Club meets at Common Grounds on Thursdays at 7 p.m. and Poezia Prose Group meets at Common Grounds at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. More information on the groups can be found at www.katerinaklemer.com.

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Pete’s List

Arts, Music, Fundraisers, Announcements, Kids, Classes, Workshops

May Events Calendar

Live Music Picks Calvin Johnson, Street Gnar, Escape-ism. May 9. The founder of K Records and Dub Narcotic Studio , Olympia, Wash.-based Johnson is a cult favorite among DIY and underground music circles. His own music is sparse, stark and lyrically based. 9 p.m. Griffin’s Modern Motel, 199 E. Loudon Ave. OPETH. May 8. Opeth is a Swedish band formed in 1900, known for their lengthy compositions, consistently incorporating folk, blues, classical and jazz into its decidedly metal sound. With singer, songwriter and guitarist Mikael Åkerfeldt at the helm, they have embarked on various world tours and released 10 albums to date. 7 p.m. Buster’s Billiards & Backroom, 899 Manchester St. www.bustersbb.com. Springtoberfest Block Party. May 11. An indooroutdoor mini-fest featuring local bands Matt Duncan, The Fabled Canelands, Coralee & The Townies, Street Gnar, Englishman and more. Organized by local production crew Lexington Lexington. 7 p.m. Al’s Bar & Sidecar, 601 N. Limestone. Troubadour Concert Series: The Time Jumpers: Western Swing Night. May 14. The Time Jumpers have grown to be one of the biggest acts in Western Swing music. Their first album “Jumpin Time” was nominated for two Grammy Awards. The band is a staple at Nashville's Station Inn. 7:30 p.m. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. www.troubashow.com.

Harry Dean Stanton Fest May 30 - June 2. Since February of 2011, Lexington has proudly hosted a festival in honor of Kentucky-born actor Harry Dean Stanton, powered by the Lexington Film League. This year’s event features special guest Crispin Glover, in conjunction with the screening of “Wild at Heart,” as well as screenings of “Red Dawn,” “Ride the Whilrlwind,” “The Mini-Skirt Mod,” and a new documentary about Stanton called “Partly Fiction.” Also on the docket are live music events and an art show paying homage to Stanton. Various venues. For the full schedule and more information, visit www.facebook.com/HarryDeanStantonFest.

ART & EXHIBITS Tales They Told Us. Through May 12. For centuries myths, legends, epics and moral tales have delighted the imagination with fantastical worlds constructed from both fact and fib. “Tales They Told Us” is an exhibition of artists exploring issues common in tr aditional and contemporary tales including parables, folklore, ghost stories, comic books, urban legends, tall tales, and even news stories. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues. - Fri.; 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat. - Sun. Lexington Art League at the Loudon House, 209 Castlewood Dr. www.lexingtonartleague.org. How Small a Thing Can Be Pleasing. Through May 25. This exhibit title is taken from Kentucky poet Wendell Berry’s poem “Sabbaths 1999, VII,” and like

the poem, this exhibit will celebrate the pleasure and awe that is often inspired when we look deeply into the natural world. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mon. - Fri.; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sat. Living Arts and Science Center, 362 N. Martin Luther King Blvd. www.lasclex.org. Curves from Math, Waves in Glass. Through May 26. Art and geometry merge gracefully in the origami and glass sculptures by father-and-son team Martin and Erik Demaine, engineering and computer scientists at MIT. UK Art Museum, 405 Rose St. www.uky.edu/artmuseum. Fay Moore: Pastels from the Studio. Through May 31. Pastels and oil paintings from equine artist Fay Moore will be on display in Heik e Pickett’s Lexington satellite gallery through the end of May .

PHOTO FURNISHED

CMW Architect Building, 400 E. Vine St. www.heikepickettegallery.com. Burying Monkeys: A Photographic Exhibition by Rhett L. Beck. Through May 31. Strongly influenced by Taoism and drawn to woods and water, Los Angeles-born, Frankfort-based photographer Rhett L. Beck uses his camera to record the effects of nature on our built environment. Beck has spent much of the past decade documenting the ruins of the Old Taylor and Old Crow Distillery sites. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues. Fri.; noon - 3 p.m. Sat., and by appointment. M.S. Rezny Studio/Gallery, 903 Manchester St., Suite 170. www.msrezny.com. Lonnie Holley: Stepping in the Footprint. Through June 1. Holley’s art practice is diverse, but he is

tadoo Lounge featuring Ana Egge. May 16. A combination of fearlessness, confidence and disarming wit, Egge’s acoustic-folk compositions shine with a vibrance and originality that propels her crystal clear voice. 6 - 8 pm. Smiley Pete Publishing, 434 Old Vine St. www.tadoo.com. Troubadour Concert Series: The Wailers. May 21. As the greatest living exports of J amaica’s reggae tradition, the Wailers have completed innumerable other tours, playing to an estimated 24 million people across the globe under the veteran hand of Bob Marley. 7:30 p.m. Lyric Theatre. www.troubashow.com. Night Beds. May 26. Nashville-based Night Beds is driven by the power of Winston Yellen’s pure, unadulterated and wide-ranging voice, which stole the show of many a South by Southwest music showcase . 10 p.m. Cosmic Charlie’s, 388 Woodland Ave. www.cosmic-charlie’s.com. Visit tadoo.com daily for more listing of live music acts and other events.

About Pete’s List

How do I get my events on the list?

Pete’s List is a monthly listing of local arts , performance, workshops and other community events published each month. Due to time and space constraints, we can only publish a portion of the events featured on our online community calendar each month. Please visit www.chevychaser.com for more community events, including a weekly update of live music listings .

To submit an event to our online community calendar, visit this magazine online; click on the ‘Calendar’ tab and then ‘Submit an Event.’ Once the event is approved, it will appear on the websites of all three Smiley P ete publications: Business Lexington and Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines. Be sure to submit your event no later than the 18th of each month for possible inclusion in the following month’ s print editions of Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines .

chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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This photograph, called “Whisky Barrel & Sun Stars,” and others by Frankfortbased Rhett L. Beck, will be on display at M.S. Rezny Gallery throughout the month of May.

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“Back to the Future.” May 26. The Lexington Film League presents the 1985 film, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Crispin Glover. 2 p.m. The Farish Theatre at the Lexington Public Library Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org.

LITERATURE & FILM

“Gas Hole.” May 28. Good Foods Co-Op presents a documentary about the history of oil prices and alternatives to petroleum. 6 p.m. The Farish Theatre at the Lexington Public Library Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org.

Fountain Films on Friday: “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure.” May 17. Come to the newly renovated Triangle Park starting at dusk for a great movie shown on an inflatable screen. There is no admission charge; food and beverages will be available for purchase. 8:45 p.m. Triangle Park. www.downtownlex.com. Kentucky Women Writers Conference Preview Party. May 18. Join the KY Women Writers Conference Board and staff for wine, appetizers, and a preview of writers to be featured at the Sept. 20 - 21 conference. One of them, Louisville poet Kiki Petrosino, makes her Lexington debut, reading poems from her witty and wistful Robert-Redford-anagrammed collection, “Fort Red Border.” 5 - 7 p.m., Morris Book Shop, 882 E. High Street. www.morrisbookshop.com. “River’s Edge.” May 25. The Lexington Film League presents this 1986 film, starring Keanu Reeves and Crispin Glover, who will be making a Lexington appearance on May 30 in conjunction with Harry Dean Stanton Fest screening of “Wild at Heart.” 2 p.m. The Farish Theatre at the Lexington Public Library Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org.

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chevy chaser magazine may 2013

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS Art Book Making 101 with Pat Gerhard. May 4. Artist Pat Gerhard, owner of Third Street Stuff and Coffee, leads participants in the creation of a book that tells a story through imagery, texture, color and architecture more than through words. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Lexington Art League, 209 Castlewood Dr. www.lexingtonartleague.org. Introduction to InDesign. May 6. Adobe InDesign has become the industry standard for print design. Participants will learn the basics of InDesign and pr actice its applications as a graphics editor and arrangement tool. 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. The Carnegie Center, 251 W. 2nd St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Refining Your Work for Publication. May 18. All writers struggle with how to effectively polish, edit and


revise their work. Learn from a professional editor how to apply a range of tips and techniques to improve your writing. 10 a.m. Carnegie Center, 251 W. 2nd St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org.

Kentucky Ballet Theatre: “Peter Pan.” May 11 - 12. The Kentucky Ballet Theatre presents their original adaptation of J.M. Barrie’s “Peter Pan.” 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. www.lexingtonoperahouse.com.

THEATRE & PERFORMANCE

Big Band and Jazz Series at Moondance Amphitheater. May 14, 21, 28. Big Band & Jazz, one of Lexington’s longest running concert series, features jazz and big band music weekly. This year’s May shows take place at Moondance Amphitheater in Beaumont, while the remaining summer concerts take place in Ecton Park. Picnics encouraged. 7 p.m. Moondance Amphitheater, 1152 Monarch St. www.lexingtonky.gov.

Bluegrass Youth Ballet: “The Little Mermaid.” May 3 - 4. Hans Christian Anderson’s famous tale comes to life, with a twisted ending that will warm your heart. Featuring bilingual narration and 130 performers on stage. 7 p.m. Fri., 2 p.m. Sat. Lexington Opera House. www.bluegrassyouthballet.org. Actors Guild: “William Shakespeare’s Land of the Dead.” May 9 - 19 (Fri. - Sun.). After the Globe's inaugural performance of “Henry V,” Shakespeare fends off an embittered Will Kemp, furious about Falstaff's removal, and Francis Bacon, who has arrived with an idea to pitch. But when the company's costumer is bitten by a plague-ridden madman and the Queen and her men arrive seeking safety, life in the playhouse takes a turn for the worse. 8 p.m. Fri. - Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. South Elkhorn Theatre, 4383 Old Harrodsburg Rd. www.actors-guild.org. Studio Players: “Funny Money.” May 9 - 12, 17 - 19, 24 - 26. Bob Singleton directs this Ray Cooney throwback farce about mistaken identify. 8 p.m. opening night, Fri. - Sat.; 2:30 p.m. Sun. Carriage House Theater, 154 W. Bell Ct. www.studioplayers.org. Lexington Philharmonic: Ellis Island and Rach 3. May 10. Rising Star Chu Fang Huang joins LexPhil for Rachmaninoff's epic Piano Concerto No. 3. LexPhil closes the season with Peter Boyer's “Ellis Island: The Dream of America,” a compelling multimedia theater and orchestral backdrop featuring Project SEE Theatre, in celebration of the historic American immigrant experience. 7:30 p.m. Singletary Center for the Arts, 405 Rose St. www.lexphil.org.

Rising star piano concertist Chu Fang Huang PHOTO FURNISHED

The Lexington Singer’s Broadway Pop’s Concert. May 19. The Lexington Singers take the stage with the best of Broadway, featuring musical medleys from Kentucky’s 2006 “Artist of the Year” Jay Flippin. 8 p.m. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. www.lexsing.org. The Chamber Music Festival of the Bluegrass. May 25 - 26. Featuring The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, this event boasts chamber concerts in a restored barn, pre-concert lectures and more. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, 3501 Lexington Rd., Harrodsburg. (859)734-5411. www.shakervillageky.org. Contra Dance. May 4, 10, 24. Contra Dance with various callers and bands, presented by the Lexington Traditional DAnce Association. 8 - 11 p.m., with new dancer workshops taking place at 7:30 p.m. Artsplace, 161 N. Mill St.

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NATURE Birding at McConnell Springs. May 4. People of all ages are invited to join the staff of McConnell Springs for this free morning bird walk. 8 a.m. McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Ln. (859) 225-4073.

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Birds of the Bluegrass. May 4. Over 30 species of birds will be viewable on this early morning bird w alk, many of which can only be seen this time of the year as they migrate through Kentucky. Registration is required. 8 a.m. Raven Run, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 272-6105. Growing Community. May 11. Fayette County Extension officers present a series of short talks on everything gardening-related. Attendees have the opportunity to take home goodie bags with vegetable transplants, seeds and more. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. The Learning Center at Linlee, 2420 Spurr Rd. Down to Earth Garden Club Plant Sale. May 11. Annual fundraiser featuring plants for shade or sun, natives, perennials, herbs, vegetables, wildflowers, grasses, hostas and more. 8 a.m. - 2 p.m., Woodland Christian Church, 530 High St. www.downtoearthky.com/plantsale.html.

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Backyards of Woodford County Spring Garden Tour. May 11. A tour of intimate gardens in Versailles, Midway and the surrounding area. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 247 Lexington St., Versailles. Spring Plant Exchange. May 11. Participants are encouraged to bring a plant and leave with something new. Plants to be delivered at 9 a.m.; sale starts at 10 a.m. The Arboretum, 500 Alumni Dr. www.ca.uky.edu/arboretum.

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The Bike Lexington Family Fun Ride is May 18, 10 a.m. at Robert F. Stephens Courthouse. PHOTO FURNISHED

Northside Neighborhood Historic Home & Garden Tour. May 19. The Northside Neighborhood Association presents a historic house and garden tour. Noon - 5 p.m. Transylvania University Old Morrison Chapel, 300 N. Broadway Rd. (859) 233-8120.

EVENTS Bleu Plate Food Tour. Through Oct. 26. A guided, walking food tour that traverses through beautiful, historic downtown Lexington while stopping at the city’s best eateries. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Sat., 1 p.m. Sun. www.bleuplatetours.com. Free Music at Thursday Night Live. Thursdays through October. Every Thursday evening, Downtown Lexington features Central Bank Thursday Night Live, a community event featuring beverages, food from local restaurants and live music. 4:30 - 8 p.m. Fifth Third Pavilion, Cheapside Park. www.downtownlex.com. Bike Lexington Velo Swap. May 5. A Bike Lexington tradition, this event is open to the public. Participants are encouraged to bring their used bike parts, cycling gear and bike-related items to sell or swap with others. 12 - 4 p.m. West Sixth Brewery, 501 W. Sixth St. www.bikelexington.com. Debra’s Social Stimulus. May 10. An evening of stimulating conversation and a screening of the aw ardwinning documentary “Gen Silent,” a documentary on taking care of an aging LGBT population. Pre-show cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and conversation begins at

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chevy chaser magazine may 2013

5:30 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 300 E. Third St. (859) 280-2201. www.debrassocialstimulus.com. Crawfish Festival. May 11. Bourbon n' Toulouse and Bayou Bluegrass Catering will join forces to throw the First Annual Crawfish Festival. More than 1,500 pounds of live crawfish will be boiled and other Cajun fare will be available. 5 - 10 p.m. Red Mile, 1200 Red Mile Rd. www.ilovecajun.com. Mayfest Arts Fair. May 11 - 12. Mayfest is a juried art fair with a focus on a casual, family-friendly atmosphere. More than 100 artist vendors will be featured, along with performances by musicians, dancers, a traditional Maypole Dance, food concession vendors, and children’s activities. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.; 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun. Gratz Park. www.downtownlex.com. Artists Stand Against Poverty. May 11. A night to fight back against the causes and effects of poverty in central Kentucky. Local artists will share their work for an evening of cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, entertainment and an art auction to raise money for the Community Action council’s programs and services. 6:30 - 9 p.m. Artsplace, 161 Mill St. www.endpovertyasap.com. Lexington Craft Beer Week. May 13 - 19. Lexington’s first Craft Beer Week will feature a week’s worth of special tastings, craft beer dinners, cooking lessons, pint nights and more, geared to highlight the city’s and regions’s growing focus on craft beer. Various venues, including Pazzo’s, West Sixth, Arcadium, The Beer Trappe, Liquor Barn, The Pub and more. A complete schedule and details at www.lexbeerscene.com.


Bluegrass Classic Stockdog Trials. May 15 - 19. One of the longest-running and most prestigious collie trials in the country, this competition draws top handlers from across the United States and Canada and hundreds of spectators. Dawn to dusk, Masterson Station Park. (859) 494-6189. www.bluegrassclassidsdt.com. Taste of the Bluegrass. May 17. The Taste of the Bluegrass aims to showcase the best food and drink central Kentucky has to offer. Featuring more than 60 restaurants and beverage distributors, live music and a silent auction. 7 - 11 p.m. Keeneland, 4201 Versailles Rd. www.godspantry.org. Kentucky Wine & Vine Fest. May 18. Featuring a tasting tent with domestic and international wines, food, entertainment, a grape stomp and a light hearted â&#x20AC;&#x153;Run for the Merlotâ&#x20AC;? race. Noon - 7 p.m. Downtown Nicholasville. (859) 881-3820. www.kywineandvine.com. Bike Lexington Family Fun Ride. May 18. Thousands of cyclists are expected to take to the streets of downtown and ride together on a planned route. Registration required. Registration begins at 8 a.m.; ride starts promptly at 10 a.m. Robert F. Stephens Courthouse, 120 N. Limestone. www.bikelexington.com. Kentucky Sheep and Fiber Festival. May 18 19. A natural fiber and local food event, held in conjunction with The Bluegrass Stockdog Trial. Over 70 vendors of natural fiber art, yarn and fleeces will be assembled in one place under tents and pavilions. The Kentucky Proud Bistro will cater to all palettes with locally r aised and produced foods, along with traditional fare. Masterson Station Park. www.kentuckysheepandfiber.com.

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High Hope Steeplechase. May 19. This annual event at the Kentucky Horse Park features a day filled with races, tailgating and shopping. A volunteer-driven event that supports worthy equine charities and nonprofit groups. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Kentucky Horse Park, 4089 Iron Works Pike. www.highhopesteeplechase.com.

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O B S E R V A T I O N S

Another Kind of Bucket List

. . . 1 2 s Turn

BY HARRIETT ROSE | OBSERVATIONS COLUMNIST

T

he term “bucket list” came along too late for me. I had already been to every place I ever wanted to see when that term hit the popular lexicon. It was, however, the motive one of my much travelled friends used for her itchy foot – wanting to travel all the time, even to the most obscure location. Even now, in her 80s and in a wheel chair, the mention of a cruise they haven’t taken lights her eyes and she starts planning. My son forwarded to me an article he thought I’d enjoy, something he rarely does. What I rarely do is share things forwarded to me with others, but this really spoke to me, and I thought it would to other people, so I’m making an exception to my custom. This list was compiled by an Australian nurse who worked in palliative care with patients in the final weeks of their lives. She later compiled their dying epiphanies in a book she called “Inspirations and Chai.” These are the greatest regrets the dying expressed to her. They were so different in tone and mood from a bucket list item such as “ I always wanted to see the Taj Mahal and I never did it” that I wanted to share them with my readers. The single most common regret was, “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” Many people get caught up in what well-meaning parents, children, Nothing is more spouses, mentors or bosses want for them – thereimportant than fore they never follow their own dream. Nothing is more important than finding one’s own path and finding one’s own taking the responsibilities and obligations that path and taking the responsibilities come with it. That takes courage, but the dying remind us that time is shorter than we think, and and obligations that come with it.” health may not last forever. “I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.” The regret is probably that working too much that one loses balance in one’s life. Workaholics often sacrifice too much for too little. “I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.” Keeping the peace is a costly process if it means bottling up opinions and emotions. It means, in a sense, living a lie. Speaking honestly either raises a healthy relationship to a higher level or eliminates an unhealthy one. Either way, you win. “I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.” Old friends are irreplaceable. They are the ones who have known us longer and better – yet choose to hang out with us anyway. “I wish I had let myself be happier.” Happiness is an inside job – an attitude. Right now is the time to be happy. For it is always the present moment. Did you recognize yourself in any of those regrets? I did. In fact I just made some of those phone calls I always plan to do but put off. And I’m not dying, just reflective. Listening to the elderly or dying is an excellent way of getting the wisdom of experience in advance. W ith each passing hour, our future grows shorter. It’s important that our lists not be regrets. No “I wish I had” for me.

Tickets On Sale Now! N

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chevy chaser magazine may 2013

57


Pete’s Properties Real Estate Transactions in 40502, 40503

40502 1528 Lakewood Dr., $925,000 1324 Prather Rd., $429,500

3114 Lamar Dr., $275,000

783 Robin Rd., $165,000

3366 Pepperhill Rd., $260,000

1220 Kastle Rd., $140,000

321 Chinoe Rd., $255,000

809 Aurora Ave., $100,000

820 Sunset Dr., $246,000

332 Lincoln Ave., $45,000

3328 Bellefonte Dr., $245,000 205 Owsley Ave., $245,000

1984 Shadybrook Ln., $415,000

3216 Lansdowne Dr., $245,000

40503

647 Raintree Rd., $400,000

725 Providence Rd., $235,000

425 Greenbriar Rd., $212,000

617 Beechmont Rd., $365,000

685 Mt. Vernon Dr., $225,000

313 Blueberry Rd., $205,000

342 Hart Rd., $355,000

3442 Brookhaven Dr., $212,000

240 Barberry Ln., $180,000

1105 Slashes Rd., $355,000

805 Cramer Ave., $187,000

205 Albany Rd., $170,000

983 Edgewater Dr., $335,000

425 Park Ave., $181,500

715 Tremont Ave., $315,000

3241 Pepperhill Rd., $180,000

40508

858 Glendover Rd., $288,000

804 Raven Rd., $177,000

563 Columbia Ave., $154,000

Arm’s length residential sales for this magazine’s distribution area for the month of March 2013. Information compiled by Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. For more information on any of these properties, or others, please visit www.fayette-pva.com.

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58

FDIC

chevy chaser magazine may 2013


Bluegrass

Sotheby’s INTERNATIONAL REALTY

8 0 0 E . H i g h S t . , S u i t e 2 0 0 • L e x i n g t o n , K Y 4 0 5 0 2 • t 8 5 9 - 2 6 8 - 0 0 9 9 • f 8 5 9 - 2 6 8 - 0 0 9 8 • w w w. b g s i r. c o m EW G N TIN S LI

348 Colony Blvd.

324 Memory Ln.

4612 Walnut Creek Dr.

Enjoy eclectic Kenwick in this charming stone Cape Cod. Updates include an upstairs master suite, replacement windows and a rehabbed interior. Quite street with no though traffic. 3BR, 2BA, close to everything! MG Turner 229-1251 $179,900

This new townhome offers a spacious screened in porch with a lush park view, $70,000 in upgrades, wet bar, 1st floor master suite w/granite, stone FP and dream décor, 4BR.2.5BA 2940 sq ft. Whitney Durham 983-9500 $448,000

Perfect-with new designer gourmet kitchen, great screened in back porch for living in 3 seasons a year. Gated and landscaped backyard, 2 car garage, rare find in charming Chevy Chase - Move in Condition. Mina Mattone 420-1135 $449,000

1219 E. Cooper Dr.

420 Lawrence St. #103

This 2-story offers the quintessential life in Chevy Chase! Hardwood, granite, master suite, finished basement, 4 BR, 4 BA, 2 bonus rooms, 2-car garage, new privately fenced backyard, side entry Whitney Durham 983-9500 $565,000.

One of downtown Lexington’s finest condominiums, this Cigar Flats condo helps define luxury condo living in Lexington. Carrie Milner 333-6236 $460,000

200 Woodspoint Rd. Classic and elegant Ashland Park home. Overlooking Henry Clay Estate with glassed in family room, 2 small offices, 3BD, 2.5BA, plus finished space in lower levels. Mina Mattone 420-1135 $599,000

201 Legacy Dr.

1364 Strawberry Ln.

4891 Faulkirk Lane

8 Deepwood Dr.

315 Eagle Dr.

Jessamine Co. Beautiful 1.5 story residence, model perfect with hwd flrs, coffered ceilings, covered back porch, granite in spacious eat in kitchen, sitting room in 1st flr master, bonus room on 2nd level and much more! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $645,000

Spacious, lovingly maintained ranch on a full walkout bsmnt, gourmet kitchen, 5BR, 9ft ceilings, remodeled bathrooms, oversize garage, in-ground pool, walk to Romany Rd. shops. Meredith Walker 312-8417 $679,000

Executive style two-story on a park-like cul-de-sac. Over 6400 sq. ft., ext. millwork & built-ins, FR w/FP , office/library, 3-car garage, huge kitchen, master w/sitting room, 4BR, 4.5 BA’s. Mary Cherrey 983-6346 $729,000

Enjoy this remodeled estate on .97 acre with award winning kitchen, unparalleled craftsmanship, hardwood, mature trees, amazing master suite, 3rd level suite – all transformed beautifully with taste and style! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $750,000

Just completed! Daniel Adkins Designs estate onpremier 1 acre golf course lot w/ artisan stonework, exotic marble, porcelain tile & spacious rooms. Old World design at its finest. 4BR, 3.5BA, 5380 sq ft. Whitney Durham 983-9500 $844,000

Representing Fine Homes in ALL Price Ranges ©MMIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Dacha Near Moscow, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

Bluegrass

Sotheby’s INTERNATIONAL REALTY

155 Old Georgetown St. #103 | $139,000

250 S. Martin Luther King #306 Blvd. | $158,00

203 W. Fourth St. | $229,000

101 S Hanover Ave. #8M | $199,000

212 Tahoma Rd. | $325,000

One BR condominium in Artek Lofts! This mixed-use urban development is located downtown within the Western Suburbs Historic District. Artfully combining innovative architecture with sensitive urban planning the Artek lofts are sophisticated and sleek. Interiors feature open floor plans, contemporary cabinetry, polished concrete floors, and high efficiency heating/cooling.

Fantastic penthouse loft in desirable downtown location near University of Kentucky. Walk to work, school, and downtown restaurants and activities. Fabulous view of downtown skyline from this well decorated 1 BR, 1 BA loft with many upgrades including granite countertops, stainless appliances, and extra lighting package. Must see! Furniture negotiable if desired.

Fantastic new construction in downtown Lexington! Located off the trendy North Limestone corridor, this low maintenance, highly energy efficient townhouse features 9 ft. ceilings with an open floor plan on the first level and 2 BR with full BA on the second floor. The kitchen includes granite countertops and all stainless appliances. Floors are reclaimed heart pine from Shelby County.

Nicely remodeled 2 BR, 2 BA located on the 8th floor with views of South Hanover Ave Features an open floor plan with an expanded living area, new appliances and kitchen countertops, lovely moldings and refinished floors. HVAC and windows have been replaced. Rooftop terrace overlooks downtown and Ashland Park. Walk or catch the trolley to Chevy Chase or downtown!

Classic 2-story located in Tahoma Terrace neighborhood with close proximity to The Arboretum! This 3 BR home features a renovated kitchen with granite and stainless appliances, gorgeous reclaimed red oak hardwoods and remodeled full bath. Updates include new heat pump, sunroom remodel, new electrical panel and exterior paint. Unfinished basement, work room and 2-car garage.

5320 McCowans Ferry Rd., Versailles $1,950,000

829 E. Main St. $365,000 Walk to Chevy Chase or downtown from this beautifully renovated and decorated townhouse! Features include hardwood floors on both first and second floors, kitchen with granite countertops, 3 bedrooms and 3.5 baths, finished third floor with skylights and finished basement. The nicely landscaped courtyard provides private outdoor space and connects the townhouse to the 2-car garage. Low association fees cover exterior painting, roofs, landscaping and snow removal.

3516 Coltneck Ln. | $439,500

225 Barrow Rd. | $1,595,000

515 S. Mill St. | $749,000

Stunning renovation in Lans-Merrick subdivision! New living room with new built-in fireplace with rock tile facing, spacious and open kitchen with Kraftmaid cabinetry, granite countertops, double ovens and 2 dishwashers, 5 inch hickory hardwood floors - designer decorated throughout! Features 4 BR, 2.5 BA, family room, private patio area, 2 car attached garage on corner lot!

A gorgeous circular stairway greets you in this Ashwood neighborhood home. Over 5,000 sq. ft of living space including a first floor master suite, formal living and dining rooms, an updated kitchen, family room, and private yard. Second level has an additional master suite with large master BA and 2 other spacious BRs and BA. unfinished basement and 2 car garage.

The perfect blend of historic with elite scale modern amenities. Built in 1838, the house sports elevated ceilings, some original floors and multiple fireplaces. Lovingly and beautifully renovated. 3 BR and 2 1/2 BA. Master BR has large walk-in closet and juliette balcony. First floor BR with bath. Built in library, house wide sound system and security system. Private, fenced yard.

92 acre Woodford County horse farm with a fully renovated and unique home, 4 barns, walking ring, mangager’s residence and gorgeous views of the countryside. Historic home is 4500 s.f., w/ 5 BR, 4 BAs, wide plank floors and a pine contemporary kitchen with cathedral ceiling. Too many features to list.

Becky Reinhold, Principal Broker

cell 859.338.1838 • office 859.268.0099 • www.bgsir.com • becky@bgsir.com chevy chaser magazine may 2013

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Chevy Chaser Magazine May 2013  

Chevy Chaser Magazine May 2013

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