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EW G N TIN S I L

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710 Central Ave.

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200 Woodspoint Rd.

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348 Colony Blvd.

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353 N. Limestone St.

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102 Venice Park

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©MMIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. The Yellow House by Josephine Trotter, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

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SHAKER STEPS MUSIC VIDEOS

IN UNIQUE LOCATIONS, A LOCAL VIDEO COMPANY MAKES FILMS SHOWING OFF LEXINGTON’S TALENT PAGE 15

J U LY 2013 PUBLISHERS Chris Eddie chris@smileypete.com Chuck Creacy chuck@smileypete.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Robbie Clark robbie@smileypete.com

A lifetime of smiles to share.

MANAGING EDITOR Saraya Brewer saraya@smileypete.com ART DIRECTOR Drew Purcell drew@smileypete.com DIRECTOR OF EVENTS AND SPONSORSHIPS Robbie Morgan rmorgan@smileypete.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Linda Hinchcliffe linda@smileypete.com Steve O’Bryan steve@smileypete.com Ann Staton ann@smileypete.com Amy Eddie amy@smileypete.com ADMINISTRATIVE Sheli Mays sheli@smileypete.com

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INTERN Ryan Filchak

MAKING MOVIES, ON LOCATION

AFTER A SOLD-OUT PREMIERE, LOCALLY PRODUCED “RED RIVER MOON” GETS ENCORE PRESENTATION

PAGE 8

CONTRIBUTORS Ann Bowe Biff Shanks Harriett Rose Esther Marr

AT HOME, OFF THE COURT

FOR HOST FAMILIES, THE FIFTH THIRD TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP IS ALL ABOUT “LOVE”

PAGE 10

LOCAL CHARACTERS

INTRUIGING AND AMUSING, THESE PERSONS OF INTEREST ARE ANYTHING BUT BLAND

PAGE 17

A PERMANENT PLACE TO PARK

MANY LOCAL MOBILE FOOD OPERATORS ARE FINDING HOMES IN BRICK AND MORTAR RESTAURANTS

PAGE 26

News & Notes Council Report Dining Guide Table for Two Fitness Landscaping Community Calendar Properties

page 5 page 7 page 28 page 29 page 31 page 32 page 43 page 50

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LexArts and Alltech present bourbon barrel public art project Building on the success of HorseMania, the painted horse art project that graced local businesses and the streets of Lexington in 2000 and 2010, LexArts will unroll a similar public art project this fall, this time using bourbon barrels as a medium.

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“Crafting Our Future From Our Past: The Bourbon Barrel Project on Town Branch� is presented in conjunction with Alltech’s Lexington Brewing and Distilling Company, and aims to accomplish three objectives: highlight Lexington’s rich bourbon heritage and the role Town Branch played in its development; emphasize the potential for the transformation of downtown Lexington; and generate more interest in, and support for, public art. Artists from Kentucky will be juried in a twostep process to paint and embellish authentic bourbon barrels, which will be exhibited in downtown Lexington along the path of Town Branch, which flows under Vine Street and Midland Avenue. Businesses and individuals are invited to sponsor the barrels, choosing from the portfolio of designs. Barrels not chosen by sponsors will be auctioned at a gala in November. For barrel sponsorship inquiries, please contact Maury Sparrow, LexArts Communications Director, at maury@bourbonbarrels.org. Additional underwriting and in-kind sponsorship opportunities are available; interested parties should contact Jim Clark, President & CEO of LexArts, at jim@bourbonbarrels.org.

Old Vine Street shops see new faces, growing spaces The Shops at 400 Old Vine Street is undergoing a considerable metamorphosis, at least on its interior, as new businesses have recently opened and an existing business begins to expand.

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Wines on Vine, a restaurant, wine bar and boutique spirits store, is in the process of increasing the size of its corner space to accommodate an accompanying “tavern,� said owner Burk Kessinger. The Tavern at Wines on Vine will seat around 50 to 60 people and will have an emphasis on craft beer. Kessinger said it will also offer a specialized menu of smaller plates,

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

and he would like to have the new space open by the end of July in time for the Beyond Grits: Lexington Restaurant Week. On the opposite side of the commercial structure, St. John & Myers, a boutique jewelry store, celebrated their grand re-opening on June 20. The jewelry store moved into the shopping district after considerable renovation to the corner space, in what is the former location of Surgener Jewelers. Next to St. John & Myers, upscale men’s clothing store Howard & Miller opened their new store front, in the former location of Olde World Interiors, after relocating from Victorian Square. The store recently opened in early June.

Sav’s Grill bottles the “hot sauce� Chef Mamadou “Sav� Savane, after frequent and numerous requests from dedicated customers at his South Limestone restaurant, Sav’s Grill & West African Cuisine,� is presenting his first bottled product from his culinary creations. Sav’s Piment, better known to customers as the “hot sauce,� is a habanero sauce Savane recommends with savory dishes. Sav’s Piment is available at the restaurant for $5 a bottle, and the chef is looking to expand the av ailability of the sauce in other stores in the area and beyond. Savane, who came to Lexington in the early ‘90s from his home country of Guinea, opened Sav’s Grill in 2008, after being encouraged by family and friends who had tasted a few of his grilled specialities, such as cornish hen and baby back ribs.


Lexington wildlife photographer Tom Myers image of emperor penguins is currently being exhibited at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. PHOTO FURNISHED

Lexington photographer’s work exhibited at Smithsonian Lexington wildlife photographer Tom Myers’ image of emperor penguins is currently being exhibited at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Myers took the photo while traveling on a Russian icebreaker in 2006. The exhibit includes 40 nature images from Myers and other accomplished international photographers and will be on display at the Washington D.C. museum until early 2014. The panel that selected the photos included in the exhibit looked at over 20,000 images shot by photographers from 46 countries. “It is always an honor to be recognized by your peers,” Myers said in a press release. “I am grateful that I am able to share the beauty and wonder of nature with others.” Along with penguins, Myers, a certified entomologist, has photographed endangered creatures and insects from the Amazon to the African rain forest, as well as polar bears in the Arctic. His photos have appeared on local and national TV, national newspapers and magazines including National Geographic publications, and in a number of textbooks and scientific guides.

Photos sought for 2014 Ashland calendar Color photos taken on the grounds of Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate in all seasons are being accepted to be included in the 2014 Ashland Calendar. The photo entry deadline is July 13. Those chosen will receive a one-year Friends of Ashland membership, gift certificate to the museum store and a copy of the 2014 calendar.

Go to www.henryclay.org for an entry form and rules. Contact cbell@henryclay.org for questions or more information. Entries may be mailed or delivered to Ashland at 120 Sycamore Rd., Lexington, KY 40502.

First Tooth. First Birthd ay. First De nta l Visit. Daniel J. Steckler DMD Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

Plein Air artists needed for downtown paint-out competition Artists’ Attic and the Plein Aire Painters of the Bluegrass are seeking artists, volunteers and sponsors as they join forces to continue a downtown Lexington tradition by hosting the upcoming Third Annual “Lexington Cityscapes” Paint-Out on Aug. 3.

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Artists are invited to showcase downtown Lexington, with its wide range of subjects from historic streetscapes and gardens to the color and charm of the outdoor Farmers’ Market. Participating plein air artists will be composing pieces, all within a six-block radius of Artists’ Attic from 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Aug. 3. Artists must check in between 8 - 9 a.m. at Artists’ Attic the day of the paint-out to have their blank canv as officially stamped. Artwork must be completed, framed and returned to Artists’ Attic no later than 2:30 p.m. to be considered for judging. This will be the third year artists take to the streets for an outside extravaganza to paint "Lexington Cityscapes" - en plein air. Artists and volunteers can pre-register at www.papb.home.insightbb.com or in person at Artists’ Attic (located on the 4th floor in Victorian Square, 401 W. Main St.). There will be an opening reception from 6 - 9 p.m. following the Paint-Out, with awards for “Best in Show” and the second and third place overall, as well as a “People’s Choice Award.” Paintings included in the exhibit will be on sale through Aug. 31. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/artistattic or call (859) 254-5501. chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


C O U N C I L M E M B E R ’ S

R E P O R T

Roadblocks on Tates Creek Sidewalks Project BY BILL FARMER, JR. 5TH DISTRICT COUNCIL

state. The project has been scaled from a six-foot sidewalk on each side of Tates Creek Road to five feet. This was ou could hear the frustration in for both cost reasons and width realities Vice Mayor Gorton’s voice at one along both sides of the corridor. Several recent meeting: “It’s been four months were spent as the state realized years and we need to get this done,” in the opportunity to replace the entire reference to the T ates Creek Road signal system at Lansdowne Drive. Sidewalk Project. I more than share her While this upgrade is at their expense, it sentiment. still took time. The outcome is that the Having recently written to you about intersection will be safer and more ef fithe progress to get this project both under cient but more importantly the signal way and complete, I now have downright box will be relocated away from the discouraging news. The original bids to new sidewalk. do this project came in above what the The new bid specifications have state’s grant and our match add up to. The made several changes to save money. original 80-20 match grant between the The work times have been expanded so Department of T ransportation and more can be done in a day’s time. The Lexington totals $1.2 million. The bids for bid also provides for two cost saving the project came back at $2 million each. changes: One is to use the sidewalks The next step, which is underway now, is already in place by Centenary United to rebid the project with some new Methodist Church rather than replacing parameters that will hopefully lower the them as part of the project. The other is overall price. to leave out the new sidewalk from the Previous to this we have waited for fire station and through the shopping several changes and go-aheads from the center parking lot.

Y

I do not believe the new numbers will match our budget, but they will let us know how much the dif ference is. That could be useful and timely information as the Council takes up our fund balance discussion once the new budget year begins. As popular as I know this project is, the opportunity exists to ask the Council to in essence pay the dif ference immediately. That would facilitate action and negate the need to start over with the state. Pedestrian safety along the corridor is still paramount for so many of us. More leadership and patience are required. I am glad to help with both.

Area projects in upcoming budget The Council included funds in the

upcoming budget to do three things in our area. First, $100,000 was included to draw the plans and specs to move Fire Station No. 2 from Meadow Lane and New Circle Road to a spot near the Chase Bank in Eastland Shopping Center along Eastland Drive. Second, $120,000 will be part of the bond package to replace the tennis courts in Lansdowne-Merrick Park. This will completely replace the current courts with two brand new courts from the ground up. Third, $150,000 was included from our Mineral Severance income to pay for as much of the Euclid and High intersection rehabilitation as possible. The islands will go away and a more pedestrian-friendly crosswalk arrangement will take its place. All worthy projects, and the Council agreed.

Bill Farmer, Jr.

Bill Farmer, Jr. Is the 5th District council representative. He can be reached at (859) 258-3213, by e-mail at bfarmer@lexingtonky.gov, or by fax at (859) 259-3838. Letters may be addressed to: Councilmember Bill Farmer, Urban County Council, 200 E. Main St., Lexington, KY 40507.

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MAKING MOVIES, ON LOCATION

AFTER A SOLD-OUT PREMIER, LOCALLY PRODUCED “RED RIVER MOON” GETS ENCORE PRESENTATION BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

W

“Red River Moon” is about a group of children who get lost in the Red River Gorge. PHOTO FURNISHED

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013

hen it comes to making movies, someone once told local filmmaker and middle school teacher Bruce Bar nett not to work with children, water or animals, unless it can’t be avoided. When making “Red River Moon,” which will have an encore presentation on July 9 after a sold-out world premiere earlier in June at the Kentucky Theater , Barnett had to work with all three, although the cast and crew never planned on having to deal with animals. Filming in the Red River Gorge area was temporarily disrupted in the summer of 2010 after a bear attacked a hiker. “It wasn’t on the trail we were on,” Barnett said. “It was a couple of ridges away. We had to close down production for a week.”


“Red River Moon” is about a group of children who get lost in the Red River Gorge. Barnett began writing the script for the movie in 2007. Because of his fondness for the region, he knew he wanted to set his first feature film in the Red River Gor ge. His decision to feature children was both practical from an audience’s perspective and he could also pull from his experience as a teacher – then the framework for the plot became obvious. “I thought of having the story be about children for two reasons: Having been a middle school teacher for 20 years, I know that I spoke that language; also, people are a little less hesitant to go see a film with unknown actors that are kids versus adults,” he said. “So I thought, what do you do with kids in the wilder ness? You get them together and they get lost. I started writing and a week or two later I had the first draft, which looked very dif ferent than what we ended up with.” Local SCAPA students V irginia Newsome and Maizie Barrett play two of the lead roles in the film. Along with featuring the Red River Gorge area, Bar nett wanted to showcase what he considers another unique characteristic of Kentucky, her music. Many

local and regional musicians’ work is used in “Red River Moon,” such as Carla Gover, Tripp Bratton and John Rose. “When I wrote the script, I heard (Gover’s) voice and T ripp Bratton drumming in my head,” Bar nett said. “I thought, ‘They are the best in this region, if I can get them and other people like them involved, it could elevate the project higher than a typical local, low-budget film.” Barnett majored in film at the University of Kentucky in 1983 and lived in southern California for a number of years before returning to Kentucky. Along with teaching a variety of subjects at Bryan Station Middle School, he has been involved with a number of local film projects, but it wasn’t until the proliferation of affordable high-definition technology a few years ago that producing his own feature film became a possibility. An average studio movie costs $139 million to make, Bar nett said; he produced “Red River Moon” on a $50,000 budget. “They call anything $50,000 and under a ‘no-budget’ movie,” he said, as opposed to low-budget films, “but when it’s $50,000 of your own money, that doesn’t seem like no budget to me. But for a no-budget indie film, I’m very proud

of what it is.” After the film’s premiere and encore presentation, Barnett said he plans on doing other regional showings and submitting the production to some film festivals, though he is all too aware that the chances of his film being picked up for distribution are slim. “I have an open dialogue with my students, and they think I’m just insane that I would spend $50,000 on something that I have openly admitted I don’t expect to get any retur n on,” he said. “I understand the numbers, less than 1 percent of 1 percent of low-budget films get picked up. That’s reality, I understand that.” As an artist, Barnett said he wanted to make “Red River Moon,” not for the chance at a lucrative Hollywood payout, but because he’s “compelled to make films.” Creating a movie at the Red River Gorge was a dream of his, and premiering that movie at the Kentucky Theatre was just as big of a dream. “That’s really where I became a filmmaker, sitting in that theater,” Barnett said. “That’s where I saw films, like “Harold and Maude” and “Clockwork Orange” and all the movies they were showing in the late ‘70s. It was those experiences sitting in that grand theater that led me to make movies.”

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

Red River Moon at the Kentucky Theater The encore presentation of “Red River Moon” is at 8 p.m. July 9 in the Kentucky Theater. Special musical performances are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5, and those wishing to attend should consider purchasing tickets in advance at www.kentuckytheater.com.

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Brother and sister Sarah (left) and Alex (right) Horn with tennis professional Jacqueline Cako. The Horn family has hosted traveling tennis players for several years.

AT HOME OFF THE COURT FOR HOST FAMILIES, THE FIFTH THIRD TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS IS ALL ABOUT “LOVE”

W

BY RENA BAER | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

hen Joanne Wallen played on the professional tennis tour, the British native travelled all over the United States. She had been on the go from the time she was a young teenager, moving to Florida with her parents so she could train at a tennis academy and play tour naments. In all those years, one place had really made an impression on her: Lexington. She had played in the Fifth Third Tennis Championships several times and had been overwhelmed by the warmth of the community, those involved with the tournament and, especially, the host families. Each year families throughout the Bluegrass open their homes to players who are trying to make it on the professional tennis circuit. The Fifth Third T ennis Championships, to be held this year July 20 – 28 at the University of Kentucky’s Boone Tennis Center, attracts players from all around the world. Were it not for people opening up their doors, the cost would be prohibitive to many of them. “It meant I could travel and, even more, it meant I had a home away from home during those 30 weeks on the road each year ,” said Wallen, who has since made Lexington her home. “It was invaluable.” Tournament housing coordinator Diane Atchison said last year she and co-coordinator Susannah Harris found housing for 110 players and officials. The two women spend countless hours making sure they find the right fit for families and players. Atchsion’s home has become the Lexington satellite for Israeli players and coaches, starting with the first year she and her family hosted two players nearly 17 years ago. Having volunteered at the last minute, she had no idea who she was getting and prepared a ham salad to welcome her guests, who it tur ned out were Jewish. Word of her hospitality and kindness quickly spread among players and coaches, who make it a point to seek her out, even when they aren’t staying with her . Atchison also seeks them out, traveling every so often to watch them play other tournaments, which have included the U.S. Open. “This has become my ministry,” Atchison said. “I just love these kids. People think it’s a glamorous life, but it is a grueling life. They go from tour nament to tournament, interacting mainly with just players and coaches. This gives them time with a real family. And, since they can’t take their pets on the road, they love my dogs. The pictures they always want are with my mutts.”

10

chevy chaser magazine july 2013


Much like Atchison, many families enjoy hosting so much that they offer to share their homes every year during the tour nament. One Lexington resident, who is from Taiwan, keeps a standing of fer to house any players from his homeland. For the housing coordinators, his generosity has been invaluable, especially one year when a player from T aiwan spoke no English at all, said Dorothy Clark V an Meter, a former Fifth Third housing coordinator who still keeps players in her home. “He and his wife welcome these players into their home,� she said. “He speaks their language, and they provide native food and meals for them. How wonder ful is that?� Van Meter said over the years she and her family have become close to Paul Hanley, a doubles specialist from Australia who has stayed with them so many times that he calls her “Mom� and holes up at their house when he has a break between tour naments in the United States. “W e managed to find the only introvert from Australia,� Van Meter joked. And though hosts do become close with their players, others pass through with minimal disruption and inter ference, which is great for families that can provide a bedroom and breakfast but don’t have time for too much more. “The Fifth Third takes care of all the transportation, and we provided a place to stay and food for our player to snack on,� said Jenni Scutchfield, a long-time volunteer who hosted Australian player John Peers last year . “We were not put out at all.� Housing Peers gave Scutchfield, who is a competitive recreational tennis player and a huge fan of the Fifth Third, and her Lisa Zumstein (right) husband, Alex, a rooting interest and traveling tennis in the tour nament that lasted all professional Michael the way to the finals, where Peers Venus at last year’s and his partner Austin Krajicek Fifth Third Tennis won the doubles. Championships. Sheila Horn, whose children PHOTO FURNISHED both play competitive youth tennis, has housed players for a few years, including a young woman, Alison Riske, who has been a repeat visitor. Host a Player “It’s a nice exchange,� she If you are interested in housing a player for this said. “The players get to feel like year’s Fifth Third Tennis Championships or would part of a family, and my kids get like more information, please contact Atchison at a chance to grow by learning how dharta@aol.com or (859) 621-9379, or Harris at to make them feel comfortable. (859) 312-6189 or susannahharris@aol.com. They also get to see what it’s really like to be a professional athlete. How often do they get that opportunity? “It’s also a chance to show Souther n hospitality. Players love coming here because of the hospitality.� For Dorothy Ross, whose job and two boys keep her on the run, housing an official the past three years has been ideal. “They are self-sufficient and fit into our life,� she said. “I lay the ground rules – don’t let the cat out – and that’s about it. We have an open-door policy in our house, and people are welcome to visit if they can stand the chaos. It’s the least I can do to give back to my community.� Both officials and players are grateful to these Lexington families, Atchison said. “I’d love to see more people get involved. Maybe they’d like to host someone from their alma mater or practice a specific language or just open their home,� she said. “It’s such a positive experience.� And when Wallen, who now manages Lexington T ennis Club, looks back, she said, “I kept in touch with a lot of these people. These are the memories I made; it was not the matches that I played.�

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Your health is a tall order. Lexington’s first official Juice Bar, cold pressing fruit and vegetable juice daily. Look for our super-cool juice bike around town beginning next week. Grab a cold pressed juice right off the bike. We’ll be visiting several locations around town including a downtown lunchtime route. Check our bike schedule on Facebook beginning Monday, July 8th.

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013

436 OLD VINE ST. 859.368.8000 M-F 7:30AM - 5:30PM SAT 8AM - 3PM


NEW BOOK RECOUNTS INTOXICATING HISTORY OF NOTORIOUS CHEVY CHASE INN BY ESTHER MARR CONTRIBUTING WRITER

“It was so apparent to me that the businesses district along Euclid is really the heart of Chevy Chase,” said Razor, 30, n August 2011, as the early mor ning herself a patron of CCI for nearly a hours crept upon the Chevy Chase Inn decade. “In particular, Lexingtonians have on Euclid Avenue, Sarah Razor had an such deep loyalty and af finity for CCI. I epiphany for her first book. Standing in thought this book would be a great way the doorway of the “CCI,” she observed to document why people love this bar, as the scene as people casually milled well as pay tribute to the neighbor hood around the musty bar and relished the live and the people who have been a part of music that continued into the wee hours. that throughout the bar’s 80-year history.”

I

Smiley Pete Publishing is the publisher of the cof fee table-style book, entitled “Chevy Chase Inn: T all Tales and Cold Ales from Lexington’s Oldest Bar.” (Smiley Pete Publishing is also the parent company for this magazine.) With a release date of July 19, Razor has realized her dream less than two years after her initial idea was bor n. Originally from W inchester, Razor now resides in Lexington with her hus-

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

band, Sam, and their two daughters. Throughout her book, Razor documents the humble history of the CCI through more than 300 photographs, as well as color ful commentary from the patrons, bar owners, bartenders and musicians that frequented the establishment over the years. The bar, which opened in 1933 following Prohibition and was first named the Blue Goose, was one of the initial busi-

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


Author Sarah Razor conducted over 30 hours of interviews while researching her book. PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

nesses in the neighborhood and is one of the only ones to stand the test of time. It took Razor about nine months to do the research, write and gather photos for her book, and four months to edit the project. The finished product reflects more than 30 hours of interviews with dozens of people with dif ferent affiliations with the bar. “The book would not have even been possible without Roger Bondurant and Ronn Crowder, who are the regular musicians who play at the bar ,” said Razor, who also collected historical information about the Chevy Chase neighborhood from old newspaper articles and library archives. “And there were many patrons who put down their drinks to humor me with an interview. All of the surrounding business owners and the children of previous owners of CCI were very supportive and helpful.” Razor said one of her best interviews came from CCI veteran Clark Cramer , who paid his first visit to the bar in 1936

when he was about 17 years old. “He has seen a lot from his barstool over the past 75 or so years,” Razor explained. “The book is dedicated to him and the first chapter includes many of his musings on the bar.” When Razor asked Cramer how the bar had evolved over the years, she received an interesting response: “W ith a cigar clenched between his teeth, Clark confirmed what many of the other regulars also noted: The beauty of the bar is that not much has changed,” she wrote in the book. Razor noted how on the sur face, it’s easy to dismiss CCI as any other neighborhood “dive” bar with its unassuming entrance and small, dark interior . “But there is something about it – the folks that hang out there have a refreshing sincerity that is quite charming,” she said. When people start frequenting the CCI, Razor observed, they simply never stop. During her research period, she encountered at least eight dif ferent men

between ages 50 and 70 that told her they had their first legal drink at the bar . “And at least four of them took their sons and daughters to CCI to buy them their own first legal beer ,” she said. “It has a great ‘come as you are’ acceptance that is multi-generational – that’s really tough to pull off.” Through her book, Razor hopes she has captured what’s special about the CCI, as well as the Chevy Chase business area as a whole. “CCI serves as a social hub for Chevy Chase neighborhood and also the community at lar ge,” she explained. “The clientele is a nice mix of Lexington, providing a watering hole for the refined and the inelegant, the lawful and the lawless.” In Razor’s opinion, local businesses like CCI are the backbone of Lexington. “We all benefit from their economic impact, and they are what make Lexington great,” she said. “It is important to celebrate and support them, and I hope this book does that.”

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

Book Launch Party A launch party for the book is scheduled for 8 p.m. July 19 at Chevy Chase Inn. Following the party, the book will be available for purchase online at www.chevychaser.com, as well as at Morris Bookshop and Joseph Beth Booksellers for $24.95.

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nteresting people, you see them all the time – walking down the street, at the grocery store, up on stage, driving by in traffic – doing whatever it is that makes them interesting, and if you’re a curious person, you may want to know more. That’s the underlying theme for the group of people you’ll meet on the following pages. They don’t have much, if anything, in common, save for their ability to catch people’s attention, for what ever reason. They are the local characters in your neighborhood or in your community that somehow enrich others’ lives just through their personalities, antics and talents. A professional axiom I’ve always tried to maintain is that everybody has a story to tell, and it’s our job, writers’ and reporters’, to make them sound good, or at least sound entertaining. That was not a dif ficult task after talking to the people you’re about to meet, or have already met. And I hope you enjoy meeting them as much as we did. – ROBBIE CLARK

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


Known in the Kenwick neighborhood for her well-stocked tool shed, Barb Call’s favorite mode of transportation has been a moped for more than 30 years.

LOCAL

CHARACTERS

PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

THE MATRIARCH OF THE ‘HOOD BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

homes were on septic tanks. She says through the years, people have started taking much more pride in the neighboritting out on her nicely shaded front hood, and the relationship between the porch in the Kenwick neighborneighbors is more enriched. hood, Barb Call can point at the Because of her long-standing tenure houses on her street and tell you which in the home, some neighbors have taken of her tools are at each residence. A ladto calling her “the matriarch of the der here, two pry bars there. She says that ‘hood,” she says. being in the same place for so long, she’s Call moved to Kentucky from been able to accumulate a lot of things, Wisconsin to teach at the University of especially tools. Kentucky. It was supposed to be a three“I’ve just been around long enough, year stint; she retired 25 years later and and I have enough stuff that nobody else stayed put in Lexington. has to buy anything. They just come Before retiring in 1995, she taught down and find something. It’s nice to be physical education. “Now they call it ... I able to do things when people need it,” can’t even remember what they call it,” she said, adding that she was going to go she laughed. “They gave it a highfalutin help tear down some curbside debris name, and I couldn’t spell it, so I quit.” later that afternoon so it could fit nicely in Along with running the community the trash receptacle. toolbox out of her garage, Call has made As she tur ns 80 this July, her vigor a reputation for herself has she zips about and laugh betray her age by decades. town on a moped, a mode of transportaLooking back down the street, she says tion she has been fond of for more than that there is nobody left who was in the 30 years when she first got a Rabbit neighborhood when she moved into her moped. house in Kenwick 42 years ago. She “Teaching at UK, it was per fect, bought the house because she liked the especially when school starts, all that traffire place, which, she says, now has gas fic and stuff,” she said. “Man, you could logs. “I just got too old to split the wood just motor right in with your moped. You and carry it in,” she said. can go any place with it. Parking is just She remembers when the street didwonderful.” n’t have street lights or curbs, and all the A knee surgery last year has curtailed Call’s two-wheeled, freewheeling spirit as of late and she hasn’t pursued getting back on her latest scooter . But she slaps her recuperating knee and says it won’t be long before she can get back on the road. “It’s getting better. It’s coming along pretty fast,” she said. “I’m pretty close.” Asked what sort of reaction she’s gotten from others when they’ve seen her shoot by on her scooter , Call shrugs and tries to envision what others have seen. “I was really dorky, I had a basket on the back. I rode to the grocery or down to Home Depot, most anywhere,” she said. “My neighbors have gotten on me for not wearing my helmet.”

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Man, you could just motor right in with your moped. You can go any place with it. Parking is just wonderful.”

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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LOCAL

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THE ROSE LADY OF RABBIT RUN

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BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

eeing Helena Taulbee hunched over working on her rose garden, which sports over 100 plants, has been a familiar sight for neighbors and passersby in the Rabbit Run neighbor hood for two decades. Twenty years ago, she and her husband, Roy, built their house in the thennew Lexington community. When the couple was designing the home, Helena went ahead and made the designs for the garden, which was on a smaller scale then, with only about 25 plants.

One of more than 100 rose plants in Helena Taulbee's Rabbit Run garden.

She was ready to get to work even before they moved in. “My rose garden was in the ground before we were in the house,” Taulbee said. As a fixture in the neighbor hood working on her roses, through the years many people have started stopping by regularly for advice with their own gardens. Or they just stop by to walk through her garden; T aulbee said it is a common occurrence for her to look out her window and see people walking through her rose bushes in the front yard

Taulbee’s garden yields enough blooms to give away a couple of bouquets a week. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

(a practice she might encourage by labeling each plant with a plate indicating its variety). Taulbee retired from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School as a physics and physical sciences teacher in 2000, after which time she ran a small landscaping business taking care of clients’ rose gardens for eight years. At one time she says she was the steward of over 2,000 rose bushes, at residences and prominent horse farms. But after a couple of back sur geries to relieve arthritic symptoms, she can only focus on her garden now, which still takes up a considerable amount of time every day. “Now I’m just trying to maintain mine. I work about an hour at a time, then I walk around like a hunchback and look pretty stupid,” she said. “Then I go inside and I complain and I sweat and I go back out. “I can’t do anything about it anymore, so what can I do? I can dig it all out, or you can say that you are going to work your way through it, and I love being outside.” Taulbee says getting out and working in her garden every day (at least during the warmer seasons; in the winter and fall she nurtures her accomplished painting and sewing skills) is cathartic, no matter what the chore happens to be that day in the garden. “I enjoy going out and weeding. T o somebody else, that might be a big, horrible job, but if you don’t love it, you don’t do it,” she said. “But I enjoy going out there and kind of getting lost. I like working in good earth, to me it’s fun.” Having over a hundred rose plants at her disposal means she has a lot of blooms to deal with, which she makes good use of. Taulbee says right now she gives away about two or three bouquet of roses a week, to friends, acquaintances or whomever needs a stunning aromatic show of support. “Sometimes you just know someone is having a bad day,” she said. “If you give them a bouquet of flowers, it’s a very little thing, but it can cheer somebody up for that day, and it says, ‘Somebody is thinking about you.’ Sometimes that’s more important than anything.” chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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Enrique Gonzalez’s bright artwork features musicians and instruments, race horses and race tracks, and birds. PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

LOCAL

CHARACTERS

ENRIQUE GONZALEZ: AN ARTISTIC DOUBLE THREAT BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

S

itting in the hallway of the front atrium entrance of Lexington Green, Enrique Gonzalez greets people from behind his easel as they walk by. Today, he’s painting a bright hummingbird with color ful strokes. Some know the Venezuelan-born painter, and stop to catch up. Others, who may linger for a moment to watch Gonzalez working with his canvas, get swept up into an informal conversation with the jovial artist – even

though Gonzalez’s English can be dif ficult to understand, decipherable words pop out, and smiles and hand gestures make up for anything that may have been lost in translation. To Gonzalez’s right is the entrance to his new gallery space, Artique’s Painting with Enrique Gonzalez, which has been open for a little over two months. It is stacked with examples of Gonzalez’s whimsical subjects: birds, race horses at Keeneland or Churchill Downs, musicians. Although Gonzalez’s artwork is

nearly ubiquitous in Lexington homes and businesses, this is the first gallery solely dedicated to exhibiting and selling his work. The bright colors and vibrant brushstrokes the artist employs are a reflection of the tiny village where Gonzalez grew up along the Amazon River in Venezuela near the Brazilian border . As a child, Gonzalez would hunt and fish for his food, and there wasn’t much time for creative pursuits, but it was there in the jungle where, he remembers, he crafted his first pieces of art: tiny toy canoes he carved out of wood for kids in the village. “The little children wouldn’t get presents in the jungle, there is no Santa Claus,” he laughed. Art brought Gonzalez out of the jungle and into urban V enezuela, then to Miami, and ultimately to Lexington, where he has lived for nearly 20 years. When he isn’t painting at the Lexington Green gallery, he’s working in his studio in his Kenwick home, or at The Lyric Theatre, where once a month he instructs an open painting class for inter-

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

ested artists of all levels (next is scheduled for 6 p.m. July 25). Along with being an accomplished working artist in Lexington, Gonzalez may be just as well recognized in town for his other creative endeavor: fronting Big Maracas, a lively local band playing a variety of Latin- and Caribbean-inspired styles – salsa, mambo, rumba, tango, calypso and more (be sure to catch their Aug. 29 Thursday Night Live performance downtown, which is always a crowd favorite). Last year Gonzalez recorded his first studio album, “Love & The Amazon,” a collection of his own original music – a project he had always wanted to see through to completion. Much like his accessible artwork, Gonzalez hopes his music transcends audiences’ tastes and pleases any ear it may reach. “Music for me should make people happy – all the people,” he said. For more infor mation on Gonzalez, visit his website, www.gonzalez-art.com. Visit us online to hear a song from “Love & The Amazon.”

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


LOCAL

CHARACTERS

SCOTT COLLINS AND THE BALLAD OF THE “BILLMOBILE” BY RIANNA ROBINSON CONTRIBUTING WRITER

W

hen Scott Collins of Nicholasville drives around in his 1977 Cadillac El Dorado, he feels a connection to the car , not just because it is a classic, but because it is a piece of history from a musical genre dear to him. The car was owned by bluegrass legends Bill Monroe and Ralph Stanley, and their music has had a huge influence on Collins’ life. “We were steeped in country music and all of those old songs, but it was probably ‘Hee-Haw,’ you know, with Buck and Roy picking and grinning, that really made me want to play the banjo,” he said. At the age of 12, Collins got his first banjo and began taking lessons, a move which didn’t ear n him any popularity with his peers. “I was bluegrass before bluegrass was cool.” As a young man, Collins met Dean Osborne, a cousin of the Osbour ne Brothers, and the two for med a band called Eastbound. The group toured and played venues all over the world, and Collins still per forms in venues in the central Kentucky area. It was a stroke of serendipity which brought Collins and his El Dorado, which he has dubbed “The Billmobile,” together, when he and his father traveled to visit relatives in the mountains near Clinchco, Va. “On a lark, we stopped in to see a cousin of my father’s, W ayne McCown, who is a car collector. He started showing us around the bar ns where he had all these cars, and then we came to this one barn, and the car was there under an old tarp. As he started pulling the tarp back, he said, ‘This car was owned by Bill Monroe, and he sold it to Ralph Stanley, so this car has been owned by two bluegrass legends,” Collins said. “When I found out the history of the car, I thought, ‘This needs to be preserved, it’s just going to rot here.’” The first time Collins sat in the car , he turned on the radio and received what he considers a sign that he should purchase the car. “I turned on the radio, and this blugrass music just blared out of the system,” he said. On a retur n trip to finalize the sale, Collins said he checked to see what 8-track tape was in the

radio, but there wasn’t one, and he said the radio in the car has never worked again since that day. Collins brought the car home and began researching the pedigree of the vehicle. The car was originally purchased in 1976 by James Monroe, Bill’s son, at Bob Frensley Ford in Nashville. He owned the car for several years before selling it to his father , who later sold the car to fellow musician Ralph Stanley. Collins said Stanley used the car as his personal vehicle for a number of years before selling it to his driver , who traded the Cadillac to a dealership in Haysi, Va., where McCown purchased it then owning it for four years before selling it to Collins. “It’s been a labor of love, learning the history of this car ,” Collins said. While the car was obviously wellmaintained and cared for , Collins has had to do some work to restore it. “It still needs a lot of work, but it’s way, way beyond

Visit us online to see a recorded video of Collins performing a song he wrote about “The Billmobile.” PHOTOS BY RIANNA ROBINSON

what it was before. It’s amazing the condition it was in, to be a ’77,” he said. Collins says he has been in contact with the car’s original owner , James Monroe, and the two are working to exhibit it in the Bill Monroe Museum in Rosine, Ky.

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

“It’s just like a bow that tied it all together, my love of music and growing up with that music, and then having the chance to rescue this car from obscurity and keep this piece of history alive. The stars aligned and it just worked,” Collins said.

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A PERMANENT PLACE TO PARK

MANY LOCAL MOBILE FOOD OPERATORS ARE FINDING HOMES IN BRICK AND MORTAR RESTAURANTS BY DAN DICKSON CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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Shannon Arnold (left) and Linda Chambers opened a La Petite Creperie restaurant after the success of their mobile food endeavor. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

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hile Lexington officials finalize the details of its food truck pilot program, some of these gastronomical entrepreneurs are also taking their delicious food of ferings into their own brick and mortar establishments. La Petite Creperie first showed up at the downtown Lexington Farmers’ Market in 2010 and at special events. From under a tent, the “crepe ladies” serve simple, traditional crepes. They’re either sweet, like with banana, chocolate or cinnamon, or stuffed full of ham, eggs, cheese or vegetables. “It’s unbelievable. We just have long lines all the time,” said Shannon Ar nold, who operates the mobile business. In late June, Ar nold and business partner Linda Chambers opened a La Petite Creperie restaurant on Kentucky A venue across from Woodland Park, in what was most recently Six Friends Cafe. Arnold and Chambers taught French at The Lexington School or Sayre and spent time in Paris. “In France, I ate a lot of (crepes) because they’re ‘student, budget friendly.’ You could get a pretty nice meal fast for a few bucks,” Ar nold said. “They’d cook right in front of you and you’d walk away with them. Easy, quick and cheap.” “I’m French and came here 10 years ago with a family restaurant background,” added Chambers, who admits to needing time to get comfortable with American food and culture before opening a restaurant. “I wanted to introduce the French casual experience to Lexington. French food is often thought of as sophisticated, expensive and slow, but there’s also a French culture of casual eating. I drove around Lexington for years to find a patio that reminded me of patios in France. We found this house, bought it and tur ned it into a restaurant,” Chambers said. The crepe ladies plan to continue the mobile portion of their business.

(Above) Toa Green, owner of the Thai Orchid Cafe restaurant, started a mobile food enterprise to serve her artisan ice cream streetside. (Left) Tim and Tracy Latham opened a Tnt BBQ restaurant in a space they share with fellow food truck operator Lincoln Ogata, of Ogata’s Hawaiian Grill.

Another outdoor cook who’s coming indoors is Ilias Pappas, who’s operated the Athenian Grill food truck at various sites since last fall. His restaurant is scheduled to open in late August in the former location of Belle’s Bakery on South Ashland Avenue.

Food Truck Pilot Program Gets a Green Light On June 20, the Urban County Council unanimously approved the Food Truck Pilot Program, a six-month initiative that will allow food truck operators to use public parking spaces in designated zones downtown. The city’s Food Truck Work Group first started discussing the proposed ordinance over six months ago. Under the program, food truck operators may use public parking spaces within six downtown zones to set up shop for two hours at a time between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. After that window, as well as on weekends from 7 a.m. - 3 a.m., trucks could use any metered parking space that isn’t within 100 feet of an open business or residential area.

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

“Operating a food truck business out of a tent has menu limitation. W e’re constantly getting requests for dishes that aren’t possible on a food truck,” explained Pappas, who said he hadn’t been looking for a restaurant site but saw the vacancy at Belle’s, thought it could work, and struck a deal that night. Pappas, a native of Greece, could have taken the property as is, slapped some paint on it and opened, or gut it and make it his own. He chose the latter. He’ll offer a few tables for eating in, encourage takeout orders and try to enhance his catering business. His most popular dishes: the lamb gyros and the spanakopita, a spinach pie. “With the quality of food, the uniqueness of our menu, the desserts and a market we’ll have on the second floor , we’ll attract people. They’ll find us,” he said. Fans of T akeria El habanero Loko won’t have any trouble finding finding the popular food truck’s new restaurant, which opened in late June. Sitting at the corner of V ine Street and Limestone downtown, in the spot most recently occupied by J. Morse Bistro, the casual Mexican restaurant has a very visible and prominent location. In an inventive and resourceful solu-

tion to opening a restaurant, two other mobile food businesses have teamed up to operate out of one fixed location. Tim Latham, owner of Tnt BBQ & Grill, and Lincoln Ogata, of Ogata’s Hawaiian Grill, are serving customers in a space adjacent to a Shell gas station along US 27 between Nicholasville and Lexington. Both hope steady vehicle and foot traffic from the busy highway will attract customers. “We share a commercial kitchen and a dining room. It’s a good location with a good lease rate with little start-up costs,” said Latham, who’ll continue the mobile portion of his business and, apparently, his day job. He’s a product line manager at Valvoline. Latham is from Tennessee and hopes to hook people here on his Memphis-style barbeque. Ogata’s menu is described as “working man’s food” and comes from the Ogata family’s Hawaiian-style recipes. Latham noted one big dif ference between operating a mobile food business and a stationary one: time commitment. “With the food truck, you’re at just one event location and plan everything for one day, but when you have to do it every day in a restaurant, it’s a whole different story.” In a reverse scenario, another local

restaurant has taken the sweetest item on its menu outdoors to serve customers under a tent. Thai Orchid Café, based of f South Broadway near V irginia Avenue, now sells its popular ice cream flavors from a freezer on wheels at events and at the Lexington Farmers’ Market. It’s described as artisan ice cream, handmade in small batches. “There is a craft to it. It’s just not throwing ingredients into a machine and having it spit out ice cream,” said owner T oa Green. The ice cream flavors vary by season and by the whim of the chef. Green began with making coconut ice cream. Coconut is a common ingredient in Thai food. “I wanted to replicate ice cream made on the streets in Thailand and have for dessert in the restaurant. We experimented with other flavors and got great customer response.” Last fall Green started an ice cream side business. On the city’s experiment with downtown mobile food vendors, Green thinks it’s great. “The city is moving toward a more open environment for food trucks and mobile food vendors. It creates a great atmosphere, brings people out of their offices and homes, and creates a cool vibe which every city needs,” she said.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voted Best New Restaurant in Kentucky for 2007 by The Lane Report.â&#x20AC;?

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Contemporary ambience in historic Midway. Cuisine with French foundations and a California accent. Every Wednesday night half price wine by the bottle with purchase of entree. Lunch: Tues. - Sat. 11:30-2 â&#x20AC;˘ Dinner: Tues. - Sat. at 5:30pm 125 E. Main St. Midway, KY â&#x20AC;˘ 846-5565 heirloommidway.com

130 West Tiverton Way Open 3-10 p.m. Mon-Thurs, 3-11 p.m. Fri-Sat. (859) 523-5500

Wood grilled seafood, steaks, chicken & ribs.

Seafood Grill

PATIO DINING SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-2 2012 Regency Rd. Lexington, KY 40503 (859) 277-5919 www.ketchseafoodgrill.com

Lexingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only Prime Beef Steakhouse featuring Chicago style steaks, fresh seafood, pastas and other house favorites in a casual yet upscale environment. Open daily 11:15 am - 11:15 pm. Three locations. Lansdowne Hamburg Palomar 335-6500 264-8023 977-2620 Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smiling Teeth offers an array of innovative pizzas, pastas, calzones, sandwiches, Italian chicken dinners & salads prepared fresh every single day. Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s features homemade dough, slow-simmered sauces & delicious homemade dressings. The atmosphere is casual & stylish. Families, dates and seniors feel equally comfortable. Open all week for dine in, carryout, delivery & catering. &KHY\&KDVH3ODFHRQ+LJK6WÂ&#x2021; %HDXPRQW&HQWUH&LUFOHRII+DUURGVEXUJ5GÂ&#x2021; %RVWRQ5RDGDW0DQ2Âś:DUÂ&#x2021;

An eclectic sit-down pizza restaurant featuring gourmet pizzas baked in stone ovens, delicious calzones, hoagies and salads. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re vegetarian-friendly and offer a full bar, televisions and a selection of over 50 beers! Dine in, take out, bulk delivery. Open 7 days a week. 503 S. Upper Street (One block behind Two Keys Tavern.) 281-6111 â&#x20AC;˘ www.mellowmushroom.com.

2 FOR 1 MARGARITAS! Tuesday Thursday Sunday 5-10 p.m. Serving Lexington since 1992. Catering services available. Two Locations: 818 Euclid Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ 859-268-8160 and 3901 Harrodsburg Rd. Suite 180 â&#x20AC;˘ 859-219-0181 www.rinconmexicanorestaurantky.com

Lexington 152 W Tiverton Way | 254-MELT(6358) www.meltingpot.com Savâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill is the finest authentic west African Cuisine in the bluegrass region. Healthy, delicious and reasonably priced dishes that combine the flavors of Africa with traditional southern favorites. Come visit and share the African food experience with us and our patrons. Dine in, take out, catering. 304 S. Limestone St. 859-368.SAVS (7287) â&#x20AC;˘ Mon-Thur 11a-9p, Fri & Sat 11a-10p. Closed Sunday â&#x20AC;˘ www.savsgrill.com

TWO LEXINGTON LOCATIONS! 4750 Hartland Pkwy 859-245-9504

French and Japanese Cuisine featuring Lexingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only Kaiten Conveyor Sushi and Culinary Cocktail Lounge Complimentary Event Planning - Private & Corporate Modern Party Room with Digital Karaoke 162 Old Todds Road â&#x20AC;˘ Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 269-0677

lunch â&#x20AC;˘ dinner â&#x20AC;˘ full bar

154 Patchen Drive 859-269-7621 Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-7 (food and alcohol) Daily Lunch Specials Trivia Tuesday (Hartland), Trivia Thursday (Patchen) NFL Sunday Ticket - all the games Beer Specials for all College & Pro Football games

live music wireless internet located at 147 n. limestone across from courthouse www.sidebar.com â&#x20AC;˘ 859.225.8883 open: mon-fri 11am - close â&#x20AC;˘ sat 5pm - close

Monday-Thursday: Lunch: 11a-2p Dinner: 5:30-10p Tomo serves fresh sushi specials, amazing appetizers, and tantalizing entrees. 848 East High Street Lexington, KY 40502 Phone: (859) 269-9291 www.tomolex.com

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Fine Wine, Beer & Spirits.

Friday: Lunch: 11a-2p Dinner: 5:30-10:30p

The Bistro at Wines on Vine

Saturday: Lunch: closed Dinner: 5:30-10:30p

Pizza, Burgers, Salad Bar Open 7 Days a Week, Lunch and Dinner Delivery Available

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Sunday closed

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YOUR restaurant should be here. With a 12-month commitment, you will be able to purchase display advertising in any issue at the discounted 12x rate. SOUND YUMMY? Contact our sales department at 266-6537 for all the dining guide details!


T A B L E

F O R

T W O

Glenn’s Creek Beer Exchange The owners of Glenn’s Creek – its name taken from a vital waterway to early bourbon production just lenn’s Creek Brewery opened less than a year outside of Versailles – have given the restaurant a bit ago in the highly visible location at the corner of of a rustic feel, with reclaimed barn wood fashioned as Euclid Avenue and High Street, the for mer spot tabletops at some booths and pieces of bourbon for Buddy’s Grille, and, to avoid any confusion, has since barrels working their way into the decor . The restauhad to rebrand itself as Glenn’s Creek Beer Exchange, rant’s open layout helps serve the casual atmosphere since there isn’t an actual brewery on the premises. At and can allow for restaurant-wide programming, which the moment, the owners are in the process of installing my guest and I encountered on a recent Monday a microbrewery in W oodford County, which will ultievening as we sat down for dinner amid a relaxed mately supply this Chevy Chase restaurant with a line of round of bar trivia. original craft beers. The menu also reflects the tone of Glenn’s Creek, Now, that doesn’t mean there isn’t any beer at with the food decidedly skewing in the direction of Glenn’s Creek Beer Exchange, there’s plenty of it: good American pub fare. There are a number of appetizers, beer, imported beer, domestic beer, beer that doesn’t such as Buffalo wings, fried dill pickle spears, fried calaeven taste like beer (such as the Belgian lambic ales) mari and shrimp, and a few dips, as well as a handful of – available in bottles and on a line of rotating taps. specialty pizzas. They have quite a few burger and sandAlong with the restaurant’s food menu, they provide a wich selections (including an interesting sounding W est drink menu, where their hefty selection of brews are 6th IPA beer battered pork loin sandwich) and a few traarranged by state domestically and by country inter na- ditional entree selections. tionally. Along with beers, they also have a number of For starters we ordered some buf falo chicken unique martini and cocktail concoctions (such as the wings ($8; other sauces are available) and some crispy “New” Old Fashioned, which used cherry-infused fried calamari and shrimp (which were very crispy Woodford Reserve and peach slices). indeed; $9). For our dinner selections, my guest honed

BY BIFF SHANKS | TABLE FOR TWO

G

in on the All Saints Pasta (a cajun pasta dish; $13) and I went with a half-rack of smoked ribs ($10). The food was what you might expect from an establishment that puts a great emphasis on their bar and beer selections: how good you think the food is Glenn’s Creek is probably a factor of Beer Exchange how many high-per854 E. High St. centage brews you’ve (859) 317-9219 thrown back. www.gcbbeer.com Our bill, prior to 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Mon. - Sun. 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. tipping, came to $70, Brunch Sat. - Sun. and included two cocktails, two craft beers, two appetizers and two entrees, which I thought was a little pricey, but then, adult beverages have a way of doing that to my bill. Glenn’s Creek hosts a weekly brunch from 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, complete with a “build your own” Bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas.

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Artisan Dishes

Local Inspiration

Lexington-born Executive Chef Cole Arimes Make reservations from your mobile phone at www.Coles735Main.com. Serving Dinner M-Th 5pm-10pm; F-Sat 5pm-11pm; Bar/Gazebo open at 4pm. Closed for lunch; Closed Sundays.

735 East Main St., Lexington, KY • 859.266.9000

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


F I T N E S S

Fighting Repetitive Motion Disorder BY SHEILA KALAS | FITNESS COLUMNIST

O

ne of the most popular questions I get as a personal trainer is: What kind of exercise should I do? My answer is always the same: There isn’t one exercise that is better than another; any exercise is better than nothing. This is true, however, there are differences with each type of exercise, and one might be better for you than another . What makes an exercise a better choice for you might be something as simple as the fact that you like it. Or it can be more convenient for you (using the gym close to your house), include other people (playing tennis with friends), need little equipment (walking), or double as a job that has to be done anyway (mowing the grass). All of these are wonderful, valid exercise choices. None of them include everything a perfect fitness route would, but considering that most Americans just need to move and work their body in any way, all of these are good choices. If you are a competitive athlete or a very fit person that is looking to take it up a notch, it would be necessary to pinpoint the weaknesses in your current fitness routine. For example, someone who is in great running shape may have incredibly weak core muscles, making them very unstable, as well as weak glute and hip muscles that should be developed for better posture and reduction of injury. Or , an accomplished weight lifter who has been dedicated to building muscle with various body building exercises for decades may have poor cardiovascular fitness, as well as terrible balance and instability. For these competitive athletes, it would be best for them to seek out specific exercises and fitness routines that can further improve their competitive edge, reduce the chance of injury, and keep them competing in the sports they love. For the other people concer ned about their fitness, the choice of exercise that you participate in is less important. The first and most important goal is to get out there and do something on a regular basis. As you build a foundation of fitness, through walking, tennis, golf, swimming, gardening, mowing the grass, whatever , then you can start honing in on specific exercise routines that can benefit you and your specific biomechanical needs. Make no mistake, every singular activity, if done on a regular basis, will create some type of “repetitive motion disorder.” Your body will not be perfect doing a lot of any singular activity. If you only run all the time, you will be quad dominant; you will have weak glutes and hips; and you will have tight or weak hip flexors. But you also will be in great cardiovascular shape and probably maintain your weight better than most. I could make the same list for any sport or activity. Even classes that say they get every muscle and give you a full body workout all will produce biomechanical weaknesses over time. This does not mean that any activity is bad, just that not one of them is per fect. Here is what the scientific and medical community knows: Any exercise is good and necessary for your body to function at its best. Exercising on a regular basis is great for your health, but without proper guidance, will not guarantee a per fect body that functions without pain and gives you beautiful posture and no injuries. If you are interested in getting fit and trying to maximize posture and muscle balance, reduce injury, and function better , then you should hire an educated trainer that can put a workout routine together for you that addresses all these issues. However, if you just want to get started and can’t think about all of those lofty goals, then just pick something and start doing it. It doesn’t matter what it is or what the pros and cons are of that particular activity; if you are not exercising, start.

Sheila Kalas

owns Fitness Plus in Lexington. She can be reached at 269-9280 or by e-mail at skalas@fitplusinc.com.

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L A N D S C A P E S

LEARN CHINESE

The Carolina Silverbell, though not a native species, flourish here in Kentucky. PHOTO FURNISHED

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Two Unusual Spring Flowering Trees

M

BY ANN BOWE | LANDSCAPES COLUMNIST

any of us are adding to our landscaping this time of year , making plant choices to increase the beauty of our homes in years to come. Flowering trees are often at the top of the list. Even though their bloom time is past, let us consider two less than usual spring flowering trees that I know you would enjoy in your gardens. When we think of spring flowering trees, the dogwood (Cornus florida) and the redbud (Cercis canadensis) tend to come to mind first. These are our best known native flowering trees. We love them dearly for their great beauty and, at a deeper level, because they belong here. These trees are part of Kentucky, our home. Dogwoods typically grow to 15 to 30 feet tall, with a bloom time that overlaps with the redbuds. The true dogwood flowers are actually tiny, yellowish green, button-shaped clusters. What we call the bloom is the four showy, petal-like bracts which open flat and give the appearance of a lar ge flower. In the fall, the leaves tur n red. The bright red fruits, poisonous to humans but loved by the birds, mature in the fall. Unfortunately, especially when stressed, dogwoods can have disease issues. The most serious is dogwood anthracnose, but they are also susceptible to other diseases, and when stressed, they become vulnerable to borers. Water them well during times of drought to avoid stressing them unduly. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop planting dogwoods, but in the interests of increasing biodiversity, here are two other lovely spring-flowering trees that you might like to consider adding to your garden. While there are other species of each of these trees, I will stick to those that are most likely to be found at a garden center . Carolina silverbell (you may see two scientific names for this tree, Halesia carolina or Halesia tetraptera) grows as an understory tree, 30 to 40 feet tall, along streams in the southeastern states. While not native to Kentucky, they will grow here just fine. These trees thrive in the same habitat as our native dogwood, preferring evenly moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soil, in full sun to part shade. While they will not do well in difficult sites, the silverbell should be fine in a normal garden setting. They can be grown with multiple stems or trained as a single-trunk tree.

chevy chaser magazine july 2013


The silverbell blooms in the spring, just before or just as the leaves start to emerge, with small, bell-shaped, white flowers in drooping clusters. These blooms have a dainty, delicate beauty. Four-winged, brownish fruits appear in the fall. They are quite interesting looking and often persist well into the winter. Fall color isn’t a big selling point, being a rather muted yellow-green. The bark is lovely, though, a light gray with darker striations. In the same family as the Carolina silverbell is the Japanese snowbell (Styrax japonicus), which has been called a “tree of singular grace and beauty.” It has the same preferred growing conditions as the silverbell and similar drooping clusters of white, bellshaped flowers in the spring. These flowers are easily visible The Japanese snowbell has been called a because of the upward-growing “tree of singular positioning of the leaves. Flowers grace and beauty.” give way to greenish olive-shaped fruits in the fall. Again, fall color PHOTO FURNISHED tends to be insignificant but the gray bark produces fissures that reveal inner orange bark, which can be attractive. Japanese snowbell is native to China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines. It is a compact, 20 to 30 foot tall tree with horizontal branching, a rounded crown and glossy green leaves. Both of these trees have no serious insect of disease problems. The silverbell is susceptible to chlorosis in high pH (that is, alkaline) soils. I have seen a number of beautiful specimens in Lexington, none of which appears to be having this issue. The styrax doesn’t tolerate drought well, so watering well during periods of heat and lack of sufficient rainfall will help to avoid stressing the tree. This will be especially important during the first two years after planting to establish a strong root system. Spring is already a gorgeous season in the Bluegrass. Carolina silverbell and Japanese styrax, with their beautiful blooms and attractive form, are worthy to join in the celebration.

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F I N E

L I N E S

Sewn in History I

BY LINDA HINCHCLIFFE | FINE LINES COLUMNIST

n Jennifer Chiaverini’s richly drawn historical fiction novel, “Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker,” we meet Elizabeth “Lizzie” Keckley, a talented black seamstress whose skills with a sewing needle enable her to buy her status as a freewoman. Her reputation, sewing for the elite such as Mrs. Jef ferson Davis and Mrs. Robert E. Lee, among others, lead her to Washington, D.C. and the chambers of Mary Todd Lincoln – where she finds herself outfitting the first lady in exquisite gowns as well as the clothes that suited her everyday life. An extraordinary friendship for ms between the first lady – and President Abraham Lincoln – and Lizzie becomes privy to the lives, secrets and scandals of two of history’s most notable characters. The discussions of the Civil War and its most discreet underlyings become her everyday environment. The recollections of numerous situations and conversations become of keen interest to her . When her only son, Geor ge, enlists in the service of the Union, and is soon killed in action, Lizzie finds herself drawn to his ef forts and those of the Union. She raises funds for the freed slaves who are conver ging upon the Washington area and teaches them the skills necessary to survive. Her efforts for the Contraband Belief Association become of interest to Mrs. Lincoln as well, and its needs become a distraction to the First Lady’s grief over the the death of her own son, Willie. Declares Chiaverini’s Mrs. Lincoln: “I shall do as you suggest, Elizabeth, and distract myself with the needs of others. Even if it does not ease my pain, it will at least accomplish some good for the soldiers.” “I hope it does both,” is Lizzie’s impassioned reply. They combine their efforts to raise the funds for this cause. Lizzie saved the scraps from the numerous gowns and frocks she had sewn for Mrs. Lincoln over the years and fashioned a quilt with them – later referred to as the Mary Todd Lincoln Quilt. When made aware of the project, Mrs. Lincoln comments: “What a lovely idea...A memory album made of fabric. It is just the thing.” But it was Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker the notes and and memories that Lizzie also saved that severed her fond relationship with the first lady. By Jennifer Chiaverini Penguin Group, 2013 Publishing a book in 1868 of her recollections, “Behind the Scenes: Thirty Years as a Slave and Four Years in the White House,” she created a scandal that the cherished friendship could not survive. To Lizzie’s dismay a number of Mrs. Lincoln’s private letters had been published within her manuscript without her knowledge. When she challenged her publisher , he commented: “The letters reveal her thinking, the motives behind her actions. You always said that if people understand her good intentions, they would be more for giving of her ... outbursts and mishaps, as it were. I fail to see how this should embarrass her .” But Lizzie knew the publication of the first lady’s private correspondence was the worst sort of betrayal. The longtime confidants were now estranged, and Lizzie spent the remainder of her long years trying to reclaim her reputation through a moral life of teaching and reflection. Explains Chiaverini: “If Mrs. Lincoln’s example had taught her nothing else, it had shown her that the only way to redeem oneself from scandal was to live an exemplary life every day thereafter. And that was what Elizabeth intended to do.” “Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker” is Jennifer Chiaverini’s first stand alone historical novel and reflects impeccable research of key Civil W ar figures and the years that wrap around it.

Spend the day at Lexington’s Premier Car Show at Keeneland

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Linda Hinchcliffe

loves a good book at any hour. She particularly likes to support up-and-coming authors. She can be contacted by e-mail at linda@smileypete .com.

ss Tickets for all events www.keenelandconcours.com chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013


PORTRAIT OF MUSIC VIDEO PRODUCERS

Music video producers Mark Rush (left) and Derek Feldman filmed a perfomance from local act Bear Medicine in the UK Chandler Hospital atrium. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

SHAKER STEPS: DEREK FELDMAN & MARK RUSH BY SARAYA BREWER CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

songwriter who per forms under the moniker Doc Feldman, Feldman has an intimate knowledge of the challenges y day, Community Action Council often faced by working musicians, from financial fitness coordinator Derek building a following to paying the bills. It Feldman counsels low-income, was with these factors in mind that he working class families; Mark Rush, a high approached his friend Mark Rush, a felschool science teacher , coaches his stu- low musician and hobby photographer , dents through the often confounding with the idea of creating a series of world of physics. And as producers of the unique music videos that could serve to online music video series Shaker Steps – both bolster the regional music scene and which will soon become a television help promote individual artists and bands. series on the local network KET – the duo Rush received the idea war mly, and last dedicates much of their free time to help- fall the duo began filming and publishing ing uplift another sector of the population videos under the umbrella of Shaker that often struggles to make ends meet: Steps, named in honor of a series of independent musicians. Shaker “spirit” drawings discovered on “In the age of digital downloads, the steps of Rush’s historic Garrard people don’t actually think about paying County house. artists, or the money that it takes to sup“The beginning thought was just to port an artist,” explained Feldman. A interact with artists and do these intimate

B

sessions that show the artists’ humanity – this sort of behind-the-scenes footage,” said Feldman, who said he was inspired by a similar video project based in his hometown, St. Louis, called “Show Me Shows.” Shaker Steps videos, which typically range from three to six minutes in length, each feature a song performed by the artist in an unusual setting – be it a local boutique, a historic site, a park or an abandoned building. The videos often feature additional footage of the artist interacting with the filmmakers as well, highlighting raw and personal qualities that fans might not typically have the chance to witness in a typical concert setting. The primary goal of the videos, which the duo began filming and publishing in the fall of 2012, was to give

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

artists a tool they can use to promote their music, while at the same time encouraging fans to “spend money, to buy the album, to see them live, to buy a t-shirt – to go support the artist that you love,” Feldman said. During the early process of creating the videos, however, Feldman and Rush soon noticed another important layer to the project: its ability to showcase venues and locations that are unique to Lexington and the surrounding area. “I lived here, but I didn’t really know all the great places – the cool local businesses and the really neat old buildings,” said Feldman, who moved to Lexington around six years ago after living in Nashville; Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Austin and St. Louis. “We’re always looking for unique places to film,” he added

37


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The locations utilized for the 50 or so videos the duo has produced so far are a mixture of pre-meditated, or ganized-in-advanced local businesses (local vintage shops Street Scene and Fox House, Manchester Street distillery Barrel House and Longwood Antique Woodshop, to name a few) and more spontaneous “found” locations such as the catwalk of downtown’s “big blue” 5/3 building, or an abandoned warehouse beside some train tracks near downtown Lexington. W ith a laugh, Feldman recalls an anecdote about the time they filmed a video of up-and-coming Alabama band St. Paul & The Broken Bones in the back of Rupp Arena. “Right as we were ending, the security guard came up to us, and we were like ‘Oh, here we go, we’re about to get kicked out,’” Feldman said. “Instead, the security guard was like ‘Hey, there’s this great room back here behind this locked door, do you want me to open it up for you?’ He opened it up, turned on the lights, and it was an even better view of downtown. ... It was one of those meant-to-be moments.” While most of the artists featured in Shaker Steps videos are based in Lexington (Paul K., W illie Eames, Coralee and the T ownies, Wooden Wand, Warren Byrom and others), Feldman and Rush have taken the opportunity to feature various touring artists as they stop through Lexington, including Browan Lollar (a member of Jason Isbell’s band the 400 Unit), Nashville guitarist William Tyler, and regional acts such as The Seedy Seeds and Elephant Micah. Feldman says he hopes to increase the range and variety of artists and invite some more of his favorites to come to town with the purpose of recording with them, as the KET deal will exponentially increase the exposure offered to featured artists. (The promo videos are free for the artists to use at their disposal, and Feldman and Rush hope to be able to eventually be able to compensate them, if the KET show brings in enough income from underwriters.) “Obviously we have to do a little bit of quality control, but just because some music might not be my personal favorite kind of music, that doesn’t mean I don’t respect it,” he said. “I have respect for all musicians who put themselves out there, who do something creative – we want to showcase that as best we can. If there’s an artists who’s playing gigs, recording, doing their craft in a professional manner, we’d love to highlight them.”

Music On the Air “Music Anywhere,” a Shaker Steps Production, will air on KET starting this fall. KET is slated to begin airing “Music Anywhere,” a television series filmed, directed and produced by Shaker Steps crew Derek Feldman and Mark Rush, in September 2013. Each 30-minute episode will feature several shorter segments of local, regional and touring musicians performing their material in a unique setting in or around Lexington. The producers are currently seeking underwriters for the show , and are always looking for interesting and unique locations in which to film. For a link to more information on Shaker Steps, including contact information and a link to an archive of all their videos to date , visit this story on chevychaser.com.

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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Pete’s List

Arts, Music, Fundraisers, Announcements, Kids, Classes, Workshops

July Events Calendar

Live Music Picks Tee Dee’s Blues & Jazz Club. Mondays. Weekly live music and blues jam session at the best juk e joint in Kentucky. 9 p.m. Tee Dee’s Blues & Jazz Club, Elm Tree and 2nd St.

Summer Classic Film Series July 3, 10, 17, 24. The Kentucky Theater presents a different classic film each Wednesday throughout the summer. July’s schedule includes “Two for the Road” (July 3); “Young Frankenstein” (July 10); “To Kill a Mockingbird” (July 17); and “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (July 24). 1:15 and 7:30 p.m. screenings. Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main St. www.kentuckytheater.com.

Blair Crimmins & the Hookers. July 16. Before a 2007 concussion from a skateboarding accident, Crimmins’ music was in the eclectic college rock vein. Today, he produces swinging and tawdry prohibition-era jazz, aided by a rotating cast of char acters. 9 p.m. Natasha’s Bistro, 112 Esplanade. www.beetnik.com. Glenn Jones. July 17. This finger-picking guitarist, known for his work with the experimental rock group Cul de Sac, is a staple in the American Primitivism genre and has collaborated with a diverse range of acclaimed musicians, from free jazz percussionist Chris Corsano, to late steel-string guitarist John Fahey, to Damo Suzuki, singer of the German kraut rock act CAN. 9 p.m. Natasha’s Bistro, 112 Esplanade. www.beetnik.com. Over the Rhine

PHOTO FURNISHED

ART & EXHIBITS New Work by Eric Johnson. On display through July 31. Eric Johnson paints in oil and w atercolor and will feature landscapes and figure work. In conjunction with his show, Johnson will conduct a Watercolor Workshop July 27 - 28. Gallery open 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mon. - Sat. Artist's Attic, 401 W. Main St. (859) 2547118. www.artists-attic.org. Youth Arts Council: 2013 Visual Art Exhibition. On display through Aug. 2. The fourth annual Youth Arts Council Exhibition features the inspiring efforts and creativity of local high school students. This collaborative exhibition between Lexington’s Youth Arts Council, the Living Arts and Science Center (LASC), and the Central Kentucky

Youth Orchestras (CKYO) is based on the “Enigma Variation” by 19th century composer Edward Elgar. Inspired by one of three movements from the Elgar composition and juried by acclaimed artist Lennon Michalski. Gallery open 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mon. Fri.; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sat. Living Arts and Science Center, 362 N. Martin Luther King Blvd. (859) 2525222. www.lasclex.org.

York St. (510) 387-5340. www.facebook.com/theblacklodgelexingtonky.

The Human Console. On display through Aug. 9. A two-person mixed media collaboration and concept show by Lexington local Marco Longsdon and Renee Shaw, aka VJ Poppins, of Washington D.C., which plays with the idea of the body as a unit or housing for complex inner workings as seen in everyday electronic devices. Gallery hours are determined by events and appointments. The Black Lodge, 110

History of Aezous: Abandon Poles. On display through Aug. 24. History of Aezous: Abandon Poles is an exhibition of new paintings, collages and sculptural work by the Lexington-based artist R. Clint Colburn, who uses acrylic paint, marker, ink and ballpoint pen to build layered, richly textured compositions on paper and poster board. Occasionally, he cannibalizes his notebooks and older drawings, incorporating them into his colorful new work. This process of collage and accumulation pushes many pieces beyond their original dimensions – compositions spill over onto other surfaces that then become part of the work as a whole . Gallery hours 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Wed. - Sat. Institute 193, 193 N. Limestone. (859) 749-9765. www.institute193.org.

Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour: Over the Rhine. July 22. The husband-and-wife Americana duo return to WoodSongs in support of their new double album, “Meet Me at the Edge of the World,” which was recorded live and inspired by the couple’s move to a preCivil War farm in southern Ohio eight years ago. 6:30 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 300 E. Third St. www.woodsongs.com. Delicate Steve. July 30. The upbeat, instrumental visions from the up-and-coming New Jersey slide guitarist Steve Marion bear influences of world beats, math rock, indie pop and classic rock. Presented by local college radio station WRFL, The Nativity Singers and New Wave Rebellion will open. 10 p.m. Cosmic Charlie’s, 388 Woodland Ave. www.cosmic-charlies.com.

About Pete’s List

How do I get my events on the list?

Pete’s List is a monthly listing of local arts , performance, workshops and other community events published each month. Due to time and space constraints, we can only publish a portion of the events featured on our online community calendar each month. Please visit www.chevychaser.com for more community events, including a weekly update of live music listings .

To submit an event to our online community calendar, visit this magazine online; click on the ‘Calendar’ tab and then ‘Submit an Event.’ Once the event is approved, it will appear on the websites of all three Smiley P ete publications: Business Lexington and Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines. Be sure to submit your event no later than the 18th of each month for possible inclusion in the following month’ s print editions of Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines .

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

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The Teen Howl Poetry Series takes place July 11 at Morris Book Shop. PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

African Art: A Teachable Moment. On display through Aug. 24. This exhibit is an introduction and celebration of sculptural art created on the continent of Africa. Displayed are large and also true-to-scale creations representing a broad range of West African artistic creativity, including fantastical bronze statues of heroes and kings. Also present are sculptures of older heirlooms by contemporary artists – who are trained in ancestral traditions which then give us a window into the aesthetics and the religious beliefs of several cultures. Gallery hours 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tues. Fri.; 1 - 5 p.m. Sat. The Lyric Theater, 300 E. Third St. (859) 280-2201. www.lexingtonlyric.com. Land Sake Alive. On display through Aug. 30. Land Sake Alive reveals a multitude of various techniques, media and compositions by fifteen artists that include or refer to the land as a significant component of their artworks. Included are works by Steve Armstrong, Ron Isaacs, Daniel Ludwig, Bonnie Sklarski and Lawrence Tarpey among other well-known and accomplished artists. The title refers to the old-fashion exclamation of astonishment, surprise and discovery. Gallery open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mon. - Fri. Heike Pickett Gallery Lexington, 400 East Vine St. (859) 233-1263. www.heikepickettgallery.com. Lina Tharsing: Making a New Forest. On display through Aug. 30. Tharsing’s most recent works are painted from archival images taken at the American Museum of Natural History. Installed like a filmstrip, the paintings revisit the creation of the iconic dioramas using only two colors: ivory black and titanium white. Gallery hours: 24 hours a day, seven days a week. UK Albert B. Chandler Hospital, 1000 S. Limestone, East Gallery. Not Just a Hunting Ground: Native Americans in Kentucky. On display through Aug. 31. Organized by the Lexington History Museum, this display covers the history of Native Americans in Kentucky, from the first people to enter the state to present day . Gallery open 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tues. - Fri.; 1 - 5 p.m. Sat. The Lyric Theater, 300 E. Third St. (859) 280-2201. www.lexingtonlyric.com. Evolving Revolving 12. On display through Sept. 8. The Ann Tower Gallery presents Evolving Revolving 12, an annual summer group exhibition featuring a variety of new work from artists represented by the gallery, including paintings, sculpture, photography, drawings, ceramics and folk art. The exhibition will change throughout the summer. Gallery hours 12 - 5 p.m. Tues. - Sat.; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sun. Ann Tower Gallery, 141 E. Main St. (859) 425-1188. www.anntowergallery.com.

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chevy chaser magazine july 2013

LITERATURE & FILM Fountain Films on Fridays. July 12, 26. Every other Friday, the Downtown Lexington Corporation presents a free outdoor movie at Triangle Park. This month’s line-up includes “Jumanji” (July 12) and “Legally Blonde” (July 26). Films will be rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. 8:30 p.m. Triangle Park, 430 W. Vine St. www.downtownlex.com. Jonathan Miller & John Y Brown III book signing. July 9. In “The Recovering Politician's Twelve Step Program to Survive Crisis,” more than a dozen "recovering politicians" share their 12-step program on how to survive crises - from highly publicized and politicized scandals, to smaller, more intimate interpersonal struggles. 7 p.m. Joseph-Beth, 161 Lexington Green Cir. www.josephbeth.com. Neil Gaiman book signing. July 11. Joseph Beth Booksellers will host a signing and discussion by Neil Gaiman for his new book “The Ocean at the End of the Lane.” 7 p.m. Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 161 Lexington Green Cir. www.josephbeth.com. Teen Howl Poetry Series. July 11. Serving the youth of central Kentucky, the Teen Howl Poetry Series showcases an adult “celebrity” reader as well as a teen feature and open mic for original poetry. Open mic sign up starts at 5:45 p.m. Morris Book Shop, 882 E. High St. (859) 276-0494. www.morrisbookshop.com.

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS eBooks: Publish, Promote, Prosper. July 13. Participants will learn the ins and outs of eBooks and discover how easy it can be to publish one in this workshop led by Peggy DeKay, author of "Self Publishing For Virgins." 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning, 251 W. Second St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Our Voices Matter: Writing As Activism. July 20. Writers of all levels will practice writing as a form of empowerment, social change, and community building. Led by Marianne Worthington in conjunction with Kentuckians for the Commonwealth. 10 a.m. - noon. Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning, 251 W. Second St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. LGBT Writing Workshop. Tuesdays, July 23 - Aug. 27. In this weekly group, participants will explore the wealth of LGBT literature and take time for their own writing. Participants will contribute suggestions to build a reading list of classical and contemporary writers from the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.


5:30 p.m. Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning, 251 W. Second St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Getting Published. Wednesdays, July 24 - Aug. 14. Learn the process of publishing with Penguin-Berkley author Cynthia Ellingsen. This four-week course will help participants learn to write a query letter to stand out from the crowd, create a one-sentence pitch for their project, polish the piece they plan to put in front of an agent or publisher, and develop a get-noticed submissions packet. 6 p.m. Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 161 Lexington Green Cir. www.josephbeth.com. Poetry, from Prompts to Edits. July 27. This seminar, led by Lisa Parker, will help participants move through their poetry shopping list, from discovering great prompts to navigating feedback. 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning, 251 W. Second St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org.

THEATRE & PERFORMANCE

Woodsongs presents: Amy Grant. July 8. Amy Grant has won six Grammy Awards in multiple categories. Her career spans over 25 years and stretches , from her roots in gospel to her experience as an iconic pop star, songwriter, television personality and philanthropist. 6:45 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 300 E. Third St. www.lexingtonlyric.com. Studio Players: “Always... Patsy Cline.” July 11 - 14, 18 - 21, Aug. 1 - 4. This production is more than a tribute to the legendary country singer. The show is based on a true story about the friendship between Patsy and her devoted fan, Louise Seger. The show is complete with down-home humor, true emotions and the story of a relationship that any fan would dream of having with their idol. 8 p.m. opening night, Fri. - Sat.; 2:30 p.m. Sun. The Carriage House, 154 W. Bell Ct. www.studioplayers.org. Shaker Music Days at Shaker Village. July 13. Featuring performances by The Pleasant Hill Singers and other Kentucky choral groups. 10 a.m. Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill. (859) 734-1545. www.shakervillageky.org.

Big Band & Jazz Series at Ecton Park. Tuesdays. One of Lexington’s longest running and most beloved concert series features great jazz and big band music weekly on Tuesday evenings. 7 p.m. Ecton Park. www.lexingtonky.gov.

Lexington Children’s Theatre: “Shrek the Musical.” July 20 - 21. LCT’s production of the beloved DreamWorks motion picture. 2 p.m. Lexington Children’s Theater, 416 W. www.lctonstage.org.

Southland Jamboree. Tuesdays. The Southland Jamboree takes place each Tuesday evening at the stage to the side of Collins Bowling Alley on Southland Drive. Attendees are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or a blanket to enjoy an evening of free bluegr ass music. 7 p.m. Collins Bowling Center, 205 Southland Dr. www.southlandjamboree.org.

Summerfest: “A Chorus Line.” July 25 - 7, 28 31. Each summer the Kentucky Conservatory Theatre presents a theatre festival in the tradition of Lexington’s longstanding Shakespeare in the Park event. This year, the event presents some changes in formatting, featuring two productions running for two weekends instead of one. 7 p.m. UK Arboretum, 500 Alumni Dr. www.mykct.org/summerfest.html.

Thursday Night Live. Thursdays. Every Thursday evening, Downtown Lexington features Central Bank Thursday Night Live, a free event featuring beverages, live music, and food from local booths. 4:30 p.m. Fifth Third Pavilion at Cheapside Park. www.downtownlex.com. Summerfest: “Peter Pan.” July 5 - 7, 12 - 14. Each summer the Kentucky Conservatory Theatre presents an outdoor theatre festival in the Arboretum in the tradition of Lexington’s longstanding Shakespeare in the Park event. This year, the event presents some changes in formatting, featuring two productions each running for two weekends instead of one. 7 p.m. UK Arboretum, 500 Alumni Dr. www.mykct.org/summerfest.html.

Multple Grammy Award-winning artist Amy Grant will perform during the Woodsongs taping on July 8. PHOTO FURNISHED

Shaker Village Summer Picnic Concert Series. July 29. Live music and picnic fare on the lawn for this new monthly event. July’s event features The Zoom Band. Tickets include live music, picnic fare and one glass of wine. 6:30 p.m. Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill, 3501 Lexington Rd. www.shakervillageky.org.

AN EVENT TO BENEFIT KENTUCKY’S HUNGRY One in five children does not know from where their next meal will come.

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Stargazing. July 6. Planets, stars, nebulae, constellations and the Milky Way are just a few of the things you will discover in the night sky. Co-sponsored by the Bluegrass Amateur Astronomy Club, this program provides viewing of the night sky through telescopes provided by members of the club. 9:30 p.m. Raven Run, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 272-6105. Creatures of the Night. July 26. This free program will focus on the habits and folklore of insects active at dusk throughout the night. There will be a few flashlights available but please bring your own if you have them. 8:30 p.m. Raven Run, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 272-6105. Weekend Workout. July 27. McConnell Springs needs volunteers to help with garden upkeep, trail maintenance and more. Please dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes and work gloves. Come to the Education Center at 10 a.m. and stay as long as your schedule permits. McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Ln. (859) 225-4073.

EVENTS Bleu Plate Food Tour. Saturdays and Sundays through October. A guided, walking food tour that traverses through historic downtown Lexington while stopping at the city’s best eateries. Sample the fare that made each place an iconic staple in Lexington restaurants. 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m. Sun. (859) 8931011. www.bleuplatetours.com. Lexington Fourth of July Festival. July 2 - 6. Events include the Great American Pie Contest and Ice

Cream Social (July 2), a patriotic concert (July 3), the Bluegrass 10K foot race, downtown street festival and parade, fireworks presented by RJ Corman, and a weekly favorite, Central Bank Thursday Night Live (July 4). www.downtownlex.com. Bluegrass 10k. July 4. More than 3,500 men, women and youth participate in this annual Fourth of July tradition. Featuring a wheelchair division, a race and a fun run leading up to the downtown entertainment, arts, crafts and food vendors, parade, fireworks and more. 7:25 a.m. (859) 288-2900. www.lexingtonky.gov. Red White and Boom. July 5. A family-friendly outdoor live music tradition, this year’s line-up includes country artists Rodney Atkins, Craig Morgan, Will Hoge and Rachel Farley. The night concludes with a fireworks display. 6 p.m. Whitaker Bank Ballpark, 207 Legends Ln. www.wbul.com.

Bleu Plate Food Tour guide Laura Mize leads participants through some of Lexington’s best eateries on Saturdays and Sundays. PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

Summer Arts & Craft Fair. July 6. An all day fair, featuring local arts and crafts, free entertainment and crafts supplies for kids. Free concert by All the Little Pieces. Coffee shop and gift shop will be open as well. 9 a.m. Third Street Stuff, 257 N. Limestone. (859) 255-5301. Junior League Charity Horse Show. July 8 - 13. Created in 1937 to help fund the Junior League’ s community works project, the horse show has grown to be the world’s largest outdoor American Saddlebred show and the first leg of the Saddlebred “Triple Crown.” Sessions at 9 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Red Mile, 1200 Red Mile Rd. www.lexjrleague.com. The Whippoorwill Festival: Skills for Earth

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Friendly Living. July 12 - 15. 75 workshops on traditional and Appalachian living skills. Bluegrass, folk and mountain music and dancing in the evenings. Tent camping and all meals provided. Kids 16 and under free. Homegrown Hideaways, 500 Floyd Branch Rd., Berea. (941) 323-0565.

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Lexington Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Bluegrass Fair. July 11 21. Presented by the Lexington Lions Club, this fair features rides, games, pageants, agriculture-related events, food and other entertainment. Masterson Station Park. www.lionsclubbluegrassfair.com. Breyerfest. July 19 - 21. Break out your rhinestone cowboy hats and cowgirl boots for a party dripping in Nashville glitz and glamour. Reining superstar and 2010 World Equestrian Games Team Bronze medalist Smart and Shiney (owned by Lyle Lovett and presented by Tim McQuay) bring true Nashville star power to the arena. Kentucky Horse Park, 4089 Iron Works. www.breyehorses.com. Keeneland Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance. July 19 - 21. On the third weekend of July, the annual Keeneland Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance will again be held at K eeneland Race Course in Lexington, showcasing over 130 of the finest collector vehicles in the country, from antiques to future classics. 11 a.m. Keeneland, 4201 Versailles Rd. www.keenelandconcours.com. UK Art Museum White Elephant Rummage Sale. July 20. Featuring gently used items, including but not limited to art, books, bric-a-brac, DVDs, household goods, jewelry, small furniture, tools and vintage accessories. Proceeds benefit the UK Art Museum. 9 a.m. Art Museum at the University of Kentucky, 405 Rose St.

Super Sunday Dirt Bowl basketball game, July 21 at Douglass Park. PHOTO FURNISHED

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the Morris book shop.

South Hill Gallery/ Photo Therapy

everything for the book lover Ĺ&#x20AC;RYHUnewERRNWLWOHVĹ&#x20AC; featuring thousands of local interest and kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; books Ĺ&#x20AC; ZH can special order DQ\ ERRN LQ SULQW Ĺ&#x20AC; IULHQGO\ DQG knowledgeableVWDIIĹ&#x20AC;FKHFNRXUZHEVLWHIRUXSFRPLQJevents Ĺ&#x20AC; FDUGV magazines,  JLIW LWHPV Ĺ&#x20AC; IRXQGLQJ PHPEHU Local First Lexington Ĺ&#x20AC; ORFDWHG LQ Chevy Chase next to Rite-Aid

Super Sunday. July 21. This annual event highlights teams that play in the Lexington Parks & Recreation Dirt Bowl League, and attracts thousands of people to experience basketball action at its best. Also featuring special entertainment, live music, concessions and vendors. 2 p.m. Douglass Park. (859) 288-2955. Beyond Grits: Lexington Restaurant Week. July 25 - Aug. 3. More than 20 participating restaurants will offer special $25 prix-fixe menus during the week, in addition to their regular menus. (859) 233-7299. www.beyondgrits.com.

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Gifts & Accessories The perfect gift for any occasion! 112 Clay Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Lexington 859.255.3188 â&#x20AC;˘ www.peggysgifts.com Hours: Mon-Fri 10-5:30 and Sat 10-5

Custom picture framing & imaging Mike & Letha Drury, Owners 1401 Versailles Road Lexington, KY 40504 859-253-3885 www.southhillgallery.com

YOUR business should be here. Offering Hands-On Cooking Classes for All Ages, Couples Date Nights, Demonstrations, Team Building & Private Events, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthday Parties, Party Platters & Kitchen Retail Boutique

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Call us today & sign up! 859.523.COOK â&#x20AC;˘ www.wildthymecooking.com 1060 Chinoe Road, Suite 108 â&#x20AC;˘ Lexington KY 40502

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

With a 12-month commitment, you will be able to purchase display advertising in any issue at the discounted 12x rate. SOUND GOOD? Contact our sales department at 266-6537 for all the reail guide details!

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SEPTEMBER 21 & 22 • THE MOONDANCE AMPITHEATER @ BEAUMONT CIRCL E 60 local food vendors • a hi-lo slow dinner • corn roast • Cooking demonstrations sunday breakfast with azur’s jeremy ashby • best home Cook Competition L ive Music for two days featuring: tee dee young • kelly richey • vandaveer Chloe Charles • 23 string band • oh my me and many more! for more information visit www.cravelexington.com phone 859-266-6537 or email us at wecravefood@smileypete.com

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O B S E R V A T I O N S

Generations BY HARRIETT ROSE | OBSERVATIONS COLUMNIST

T

his last week we had the pleasure of a visit from the only great grandchildren in the family. They live in Rockville, Md., and their grandparents have visited them almost monthly, but I saw them last year for the first time, on their first visit here. I have made do with pictures and computer images up to that visit, which was brief and busy. This time, the visit was longer and less structured, so MiMi (that’s me) got some time with them. They are charming children – an 8-year -old girl and two boys, ages 6 and 3. All are smart, active, socially adept and a pleasure to be around. Their parents are attorneys, but their mother took child-rearing seriously and has been at home with them – and out with them in all the schedules that children have these days. They greeted me as if they remembered me from last year . I think the little girl did really; the others are a tribute to their mother’s preparation. I watched her with them. They are lucky children to have such a mother . She really enjoys her role and the results of her loving discipline are visible. I played Monopoly with Lindsey and Sam, the two older children. They were both better than I was. I claim the long layof f – the last time I played was probably 60 years ago and Nothing gets a Monopoly is not like riding a bicycle, it doesn’t come back so easily. nonagenarian When we were at the table, I realized that moving like an there were four generations sitting there – the offer to be taken first time since my mother died in 1993. It felt good, and even at the table they were enjoyable somewhere.” to be around. They had all been to Keeneland and the children’s museum earlier. They showed no sign of tiring – not so their grandparents or their great grandmother. But I had led an hour of study group on a subject I wasn’t so good at earlier and I had an unintended nap afterwards. Sometimes I go by what my horoscope suggests. One said I was full of energy and I should get things done (wrong) and the other one suggested that I take it easy today. It is probably a good thing to read both of them and obey the one which suits you. I get two by computer and one by newspaper . Sometimes all three are wrong. The only time the stars don’t let me down is in the description of the Virgo personality. That fits me to a tee, no matter which one I read. If the description is so accurate, how come the daily suggestion is so wrong? My life is very busy and I like it that way, but it really requires a lot of energy to keep it that way. My friend Lowell who takes me every Saturday to a study group at Temple asked me if I’d like to go to a luncheon lecture on Tuesdays and said he’d call me. I told him that T uesday is the only day I have nothing I must do but it sounds pretty interesting. If it is every T uesday, probably I won’t go – but if it’s just once a month, probably I will. Nothing gets a nonagenarian moving like an of fer to be taken somewhere. And nothing gets this nonagenerian’s interest like a new lear ning experience to keep the brain cells in action. I’m probably fighting off the inevitable, but as long as I’m the oldest generation, I intend to keep fighting. However, my son David said, as he brought me home last night, “I understand why only young people should have children.”

Going Bald? Replace your hair for as little as $599

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is a native Lexingtonian, a retired psychologist, and an avid bridge and Scrabble player. She can be reached by e-mail at harriett77@yahoo .com.

chevy chaser magazine july 2013

Cash & Check Accepted

49


Pete’s Properties Real Estate Transactions in 40502, 40503, 40508

40502

1237 Indian Mound Rd., $775,000 1924 Lakes Edge Dr., $740,000 1741 Lakewood Ln., $687,500 3067 Clair Rd., $625,000 301 Garden Rd., $565,000 2313 The Woods Ln., $550,000 1245 Summit Dr., $545,000 1514 Lakewood Dr., $540,000 1807 St. Ives Cir., $515,000 509 Culpepper Rd., $480,000 1817 St. Ives Cir., $455,800 403 Cochran Rd., $448,600 2063 Norborne Dr., $405,500 2012 Bridgeport Dr., $405,000 1836 Blairmore Ct., $390,000

640 Tally Rd., $385,000 345 Kingsway Dr., $364,702 101 Victory Ave., $326,000 344 Henry Clay Blvd., $321,000 1003 Tates Creek Rd., $320,000 1008 Slashes Rd., $317,000 3417 Heritage Pl., $310,000 377 Henry Clay Blvd., $307,500 2918 Montavesta Rd., $299,900 316 Chinoe Rd., $275,000 3333 Pepperhill Rd., $260,000 365 Henry Clay Blvd., $259,900 3415 Woodstock Cir., $249,400 415 Chinoe Rd., $247,900 681 Providence Rd., $245,000 726 Tremont Ave., $205,000 3419 Woodside Way, $199,900

429 Kentucky Ct., $170,000 325 Park Ave., $156,000 357 Park Ave., $126,000 316 Preston Ave., $120,000 112 Owsley Ave., $115,000 342 Memory Ln., $87,000 264 Lincoln Ave., $72,500 332 Lincoln Ave., $50,000 112 Marne Ave., $40,000

40503

108 Tahoma Rd., $340,000

40508

136 Forest Ave., $350,000 541 Columbia Ave., $190,000

Arm’s length residential sales for this magazine’s distribution area for the month of May 2013. Information compiled by Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. For more information on any of these properties, or others, please visit www.fayette-pva.com.

TOP-SELLING PROPERTY 1237 INDIAN MOUND RD. | $775,000

WaterFest Meet the team that provides clean water to your tap everyday! Tuesday, August 6, 2013 Stop by anytime between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Kentucky American Water 2300 Richmond Road Lexington, KY 40502 Treatment plant tours. Educational demonstrations. Facepainting. Light refreshments and more!

(800) 678-6301 • www.kentuckyamwater.com

50

chevy chaser magazine july 2013


Bluegrass

Sotheby’s INTERNATIONAL REALTY

8 0 0 E . H i g h S t . , S u i t e 2 0 0 • L e x i n g t o n , K Y 4 0 5 0 2 • t 8 5 9 - 2 6 8 - 0 0 9 9 • f 8 5 9 - 2 6 8 - 0 0 9 8 • w w w. b g s i r. c o m EW G N TIN S LI

EW E N RIC P

EW G N TIN S LI

EW G N TIN S LI

EW E N RIC P

1857 Normandy Rd.

2612 Mable Ln.

4424 Lancaster Ct.

913 Seneca Park

1755 Bryan Station

Adorable ranch on quiet street backing to creek. 3BR, 1BA, 1300 sqft, 2 car garage. Beautiful yard, tile in kitchen. Newer windows, roof, house is precious! Paige Good 621-3562 $137,000

Adorable 2 story on quiet cul-de-sac, 3BR, 2.5BA, new stainless appliances, new tile in kitchen and laundry. New light fixtures, gorgeous open floor plan and more. Paige Good 621-3562 $154,900

Adorable story and a half on quiet cul-de-sac. 3BR, 2.5BA, open floor plan. Updated appliances in kitchen, great yard, wonderful home! Paige Good 621-3562 $164,900

Beautiful 2 story in Carolina Place on lovelybcul-de-sac. Vaulted ceilings open floor plan, gorgeous kitchen, all BR on second floor, tile in all BA and entry, huge backyard! Paige Good 621-3562 $224,000

Historical home with charm from the 1800's to date! Beautiful lot and livability with hardwood floors, hearth kitchen, courtyard, covered front porch and much more! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $279,900

EW G N TIN S LI

EW E N RIC P

1219 East Cooper Dr. Quintessential life in Chevy Chase! Hardwood, granite, master suite, beautifully finished basement, 4BR, 4BA, 2 bonus rooms, 2 car attached garage, new privately fenced backyard, side entry and much more! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $549,000

2325 The Woods Ln.

8 Deepwood Dr.

315 Eagle Dr.

Wonderful 5BR, 4.5BA, 2 story w/fin bsmnt on incredible .688 acre lot inside New Circle Road. 9’ ceiling, hardwood on 1st and 2nd screened porch, wet bar, cook’s kitchen, 2 FP, great built-ins and millwork Mary Cherrey 983-6346 $699,900

Remodeled estate on .97 acre with award-winning kitchen, hardwood, mature trees, amazing master suite, 3rd level suite. 3854 sq ft, 5BR, 3.5BA – all transformed beautifully with taste and style! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $735,000

Just completed! Daniel Adkins Designs estate on premier 1 acre golf course lot w/artisan stonework, exotic marble, porcelain tile & spacious rooms. Old World design at its finest. 4BR, 3.5BA, 5380 sq. ft. Whitney Durham 983-9500 $844,000

937 Turkey Foot Rd. Luxurious living in Shadeland in this stunning newly constructed estate with 6100 sq ft, spacious fenced private backyard in exquisite condition. 5BR, 2 Family rooms, playroom, bonus room, 4.5BA and much more! Whitney Durham 983-9500 $945,000

Representing Fine Homes in ALL Price Ranges ©MMIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Dacha Near Moscow, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

Bluegrass

Sotheby’s INTERNATIONAL REALTY

147 Old Georgetown St. | $209,000

514 W. Short St, #102 | $385,000

3724 Hidden Lake Ln. | $895,000

101 S. Hanover Ave. #8M | $199,000

3516 Coltneck Ln. | $409,500

This 1847 Crutcher-Lusby Greek Revival brick cottage was renovated in 1996 and features hardwood floors and tall ceilings. Upgrades include the roof, heating and central air, appliances, plumbing, electric, kitchen, bath, 2-car carport and underground utilities. Located in one of the most diverse and energetic historic districts in Lexington.

Fabulous, condo located in a historic church in the heart of downtown Lexington! Two story home with full finished basement features 13 foot ceilings. Conveniently located within blocks to fantastic restaurants, Rupp Arena, art galleries and shopping! Parking is located in the adjacent garage. Must see, features too numerous to list!

Gorgeous custom home with scenic views of lovely pond and in-ground pool! Situated on 10 acres, this home features a designer kitchen, family room, mahogany hardwood floors, soaring ceilings and extensive moldings. First floor master suite offers a fireplace in the bedroom and Jacuzzi plus walk-inshower in the bath. Additional features to numerous to list.

Nicely remodeled 2 BR, 2 BA located on the 8th floor with views of South Hanover Ave. Features an open floor plan with an expanded living area, new appliances and kitchen countertops, lovely moldings and refinished floors. HVAC and windows have been replaced. Rooftop terrace overlooks downtown and Ashland Park.Walk or catch the trolley to Chevy Chase or downtown!

Stunning renovation in Lans-Merrick subdivision! New living room with new built-in fireplace with rock tile facing, spacious and open kitchen with Kraftmaid cabinetry, granite countertops, double ovens and 2 dishwashers, 5” hickory hardwood floors designer decorated throughout! Features 4 BR, 2.5 BA, family room, private patio area, 2 car attached garage on corner lot!

COMMERCIAL

6021 Damar Ct. | $695,000

201 Chinoe Rd. | $1,220,000

11238 Campton Rd. Stanton, KY | $1,150,000

245 S. Limestone | $725,000

407 N. Broadway Ave. | $875,000

Gorgeous setting, awesome house! Located off Old Richmond Road, this property has it all! Open floor plan with a first floor master suite, soaring ceiling in the living area and abundant light. Second floor has 2 additional BR, 2 full BA and a loft office overlooking living area. Patio off kitchen overlooks the lake and vineyard area.Vineyard annually produces cab/sav grapes.

Beautiful Ashland Park home! Meticulously renovated, this home is perfect for entertaining. 1st floor features include a gorgeous kitchen, expansive family room with large stone fireplace, 1st floor master suite, large living room, dining room, butler’s pantry and office/utility area. 2nd level offers 3 additional BR and 3 full BA. Hardwood floors throughout and extensive built-in cabinetry.

Privately owned 603 +/-acre parcel in the heart of Natural Bridge State Park and Red River Gorge. Outstanding scenic beauty, it is located 2 miles off the Mountain Parkway on the waters of the Middle Fork of Red River.This beautiful wooded property has 8-10 miles of hiking and ATV trails with some cleared areas, natural arches, and springs.

Zoned B-1, the meticulously restored Oldham House features first floor office space with living quarters on the second level. With approximately 3500 square feet, gorgeous hardwood floors and exquisite craftsmanship,The Oldham House is located on S. Limestone between the UK campus and downtown Lexington. On site parking is available behind the building.

Located near downtown Lexington and Transylvania University, the Lilly House is a beautifully renovated luxury professional office building. Featuring hardwood floors, spacious rooms, high ceilings and a gorgeous front stairway Building has 7 private offices, reception area, conference room, lower level storage and on site parking. Professionally decorated and move-in ready!

Becky Reinhold, Principal Broker

cell 859.338.1838 • office 859.268.0099 • www.bgsir.com • becky@bgsir.com chevy chaser magazine july 2013

51


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Try over 20 NEW menu items, including Appetizers, Salads, Entrées, Sushi Rolls and More!

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Chevy Chaser Magazine July 2013  

Chevy Chaser Magazine July 2013

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