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Playing the Ponies W

BY ROBBIE CLARK | EDITOR

hat is it about April – when days are warmer and the birds are chirping in the trees and everything is budding up ready to gush forth with the season’s beauty – that makes me so excited to go throw away my hardearned money? Other people call it gambling, but these people must have actually won money at some point to be so positive. I’m terrible at gambling (unless you count Bingo; I’m really good at Bingo), so the practice is always akin to throwing money away, at least when we’re talking about my wallet, and especially when we’re talking about horse racing. Still, I love playing the ponies, and I look forward to Keeneland’s spring meet in April like a bookie eagerly waiting March Madness. But it’s gotten to the point where I don’t even bother saying I’m betting when I go to the track. I say I’m helping to buy the oats for the horses. And through the years, I’ve footed the bill for an oats smorgasbord. We all have friends who do well out at Keeneland, be it through their own devise or destiny – the ones with daily programs and chicken scratches on each page, the ones with children who can pick a winner because they like the horse’s name. We all have friends who accidentally stumbled into a lucrative trifecta ticket because they told the person at the window the wrong horse or got a hot tip on a long shot from some dude with a funny hat. And we all have friends who have actually left Keeneland with money in their pockets. Believe me, I am not this friend. I’m the friend trying to bum two bucks off of you for the last race (yes, I know there are cash machines out there, but that’s a road I don’t want to go down just yet). Even though I’m not from Lexington, I’ve been coming to Keeneland for a long time. When I was a kid, I remember being terrified as I sat in the classroom as the school secretary would come over the intercom and say I needed to come to the of fice, and then relieved when I saw my grandpa waiting in the hallway ready to take me the two hours to the track. We’d meet up with some of his friends, and we’d all hang out toward the finish line, away from the crowd, to watch the races. Even now when I go to Keeneland, I’ll check out a race or two by the finish-line post to see if any of these old characters are around. Sometimes they are, and I know I can always mooch a few bucks of f of them if I’m in a pinch. Later, when I was a student at UK, I remember my grandpa talking me out of going to class and meeting him at the track. He didn’t have to try too hard, it was an easy sell, especially since he gave me some seed money to bet with; whenever we left, he’d float me a $50 bill after I told him I lost all the money he gave me. So, I guess there have been a few times when I’ve left Keeneland with some money in my pocket, but it had nothing to do with my ability to pick a winner , and it’s been a long time. Still, I wouldn’t miss my seasonal obligation to buy some oats for the ponies for anything.

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STICKING AROUND

AS LACROSSE GROWS IN POPULARITY, MORE KIDS ARE GETTING INTO THE FASTEST SPORT ON TWO FEET PAGE 19

APRIL 2013 PUBLISHERS Chris Eddie chris@smileypete.com Chuck Creacy chuck@smileypete.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Robbie Clark robbie@smileypete.com MANAGING EDITOR Saraya Brewer saraya@smileypete.com ART DIRECTOR Drew Purcell drew@smileypete.com DIRECTOR OF EVENTS AND SPONSORSHIPS Robbie Morgan rmorgan@smileypete.com

UNDER THE SEA CHANGE OF RICHMOND ROAD COBA COCINA IS THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT ON AN EVOLVING ROADWAY

PAGE 12

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GROWING COMMUNITY

Another fine publication from

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News & Notes Council Report Landscapes Table for Two Books Community Calendar Observations Properties

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The National History Bee provides tournaments that are fair, educational and lots of fun for all. The substance and style of questions reward students who can make connections across eras, places and themes in history, and they learn that history is one key to understanding every human endeavor – from the battlefield to the baseball field, from sacred places to the science lab.

Last year’s winners were: Bullhorn Marketing (small group, 0 - 10 employees), UK Department of Statistics (medium group, 11 - 25 employees), The Hive from UK (large group, 26 - 100 employees) and Good Foods Market and Cafe (extra large group, 101 and more employees).

Visit www.bikelexington.com to register for the Commuter Challenge and to see other scheduled Bike Lexington events.

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Registration for this year’s Bike Lexington Commuter Challenge, presented by Pedal Power, will open April 8, and the challenge runs from May 1 through 31.

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March 23. He bested nine other high school finalists from across Kentucky and qualified for the national contest April 28 in Arlington, Va.

The Commuter Challenge serves to help cyclists feel more comfortable on the road while creating awareness of biking in Lexington and encouraging an alternative method of transportation. In 2012, nearly 30 businesses competed in the event, totaling 3,527 trips and 11,729 miles traveled by bicycle in the month of May.

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St. Ann Drive intersection one of the most prone for collisions in the city According to the 2012 Traffic Analysis Summary and Comparison, which the Lexington Division of Police released in March, the intersection of St. Ann Drive and Fontaine Road at Richmond Road was second on the list of “top intersection collision locations” in the city for the year.

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The intersection saw 28 collision incidents. The roundabout on West Reynolds Road topped the list, with 36 incidents last year.

Henry Clay student wins statewide history bee MEMBER

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Michael Kamer, a junior at Henry Clay High School, placed first in the varsity division of the National History Bee’s state championship chevy chaser magazine april 2013

Downtown trash cleanup scheduled for April The Downtown Lexington Corporation will be hosting its Downtown Trash Bash, an annual spring cleaning effort, to help keep downtown Lexington clean and green. The event will be held April 19, and volunteers can register anytime between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. at the Fifth Third Bank Pavilion, where they will be armed with trash bags, recycling bags, gloves and hand sanitizer (the first 200 volunteers will receive a free t-shirt and refreshments). In case of rain, the clean-up effort will be April 26. Litter and debris collected from downtown streets, sidewalks, and parks will be properly disposed of by the Division of Waste Maganement and saved from being washed down the storm drains and into our local rivers. The first five businesses to register 10 or more volunteers will receive a free pressure-washing of the sidewalk in front of their entrances. Only businesses within the daily trash pick-up zone in the central business district will be eligible. Email tamara@downtownlex.com or call 4252592 to register.

LexArts announces a Call for Artists for East End Mural Project In association with Tweens Nutrition, Fitness Coalition and the Lexington East End Equity Partnership, LexArts is seeking local muralists to create an outdoor mural on the side of the East Third Street building that houses Pak-N-Save (503 E. Third St.). The mural, which has been allotted a $12,000 budget, is part of a corner store tr ansformation project incentivizing corner stores to carry more nutritious food, improve store appearance and


enhance community relations. More information on the project can be found at www.lexarts.org/participate/artists

Student environmental group keeping thousands of water bottles from landfill The Bluegrass Youth Sustainability Council (BYSC), an environmental advocacy group comprised of 30 public and private high school students in Fayette County, with funding from Kentucky American Water and the FCPS Child Nutrition Department, has installed bottle refilling stations in all area high schools. Bottle refilling stations installed on two water fountains per high school encourage students to bring reusable containers and thereby cut down on plastic in landfills. In the first week, more than 3,600 containers were filled in the five public high schools, and usage has increased since early February. The BYSC is an environmental advocacy group made up of 30 students from public and priv ate high schools in Lexington. Among their various initiatives are leading energy audits in the main office building of Fayette County Public Schools, working with elementaries to promote rain gardens and hosting an Earth Day celebration. “By just bringing a reusable water bottle, every single student can impact sustainability,� said Marie Armbruster, a junior at Lafayette High School. “This is just a start, but it empowers students to make the small changes that collectively will result in a major impact on our local solid waste.�

Keeneland race is named for Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate, and Clay was a major force in making Lexington the “Horse Capital of the World� with his Thoroughbred breeding operation. The race is sponsored by Central Bank. After a day at Keeneland, enjoy an Ashland Steak special at Dudley’s (120 West Short). Clay, a farmer, brought the first Hereford cattle to the United States.

We look

Great Brunch the morning after.

Happy Birthday Henry, April 8. Celebrate Henry Clay’s birthday (born April 12, 1777) at Nick Ryan’s (157 Jefferson St.). Special menu items will be available, such as the “Clay Cocktail,� as well as the regular menu for lunch and dinner. Part of proceeds from the day go to Ashland. Arbor Celebration, April 21. From 1 − 4 p.m. at Ashland. Some of the over 400 trees at Ashland date back to Clay’s time in the 1800s, including two of the original Ash trees. Join arborist Dave Leonard for a free tree talk and tour, as well as music from University of Kentucky Wind Symphony, and kids’ activities. Visitors will also have the opportunity to adopt one of Ashland’s 400 trees – $50, $100, $250 or $500 helps maintain a tree for a year. Tree and Bourbon Trail, April 28. From 5 − 7 p.m. Learn about Ashland’s trees while sampling some of Kentucky’s best bourbons on this fun and casual tree and bourbon walk around the estate’s grounds in all its spring beauty. The event is $10. For more information on any of these events, visit www.henryclay.org or call (859) 266-8581.

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Armbruster researched the possibilities of bottle refilling stations and led the council subcommittee that secured a $6,400 donation from Kentucky American Water Company.

Clay Family Reunion coming to Ashland In honor of the 400th anniversary of the Clay family coming to America when John Claye arrived in Jamestown in 1613, Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate will be hosting a series of events in April called Clay Roots. If your name is Clay, you might likely be related to the “Great Compromiser,� Henry Clay. There are thousands of Clay descendants across the country, and many here in Kentucky. There will be a large Clay Family Roots Day from 2 − 4 p.m. on April 20, but you don’t have to be a Clay to attend the activities, which include tours of the historic home, genealogy talks, family portraits and an ice cream social. Other Clay Roots events include: Ashland Stakes, April 6. This annual

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Get Chevy Chaser news first with our newsletters Many of the news items on this page, and much more, appeared previously in our weekly Chevy Chaser e-newsletters. If your monthly dose of the Chevy Chaser isn’t enough, be sure to visit our website, www.chevychaser.com, to sign up for the newsletter. (There’s a button at the top next to the banner.) The intent of the newsletter is to be a community service. If you have an announcement, such as a neighborhood association meeting or a school function, or want to see an individual or group recognized for their efforts, please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@smileypete.com.

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The new permanent housing facility is undergoing construction and scheduled to open in June.

          

PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

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Shepherd’s House opening permanent housing facility on Fontaine Road

T

BY ROBBIE CLARK | CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

he Shepherd’s House, a local transitional residential treatment program for adult men recovering from substance abuse, is planning on opening its first per manent housing facility at the cor ner of Dinsmore Drive and Fontaine Drive. The organization, which has worked with individuals since 1989, purchased the apartment building at 2117 Fontaine Dr. in November of 2012 for $340,000, according to Fayette County PVA records. Since the organization started in 1989, The Shepherd’s House has assisted more than 1,300 individuals, said executive director Jason Thomas. The non-profit currently operates three other facilities in Lexington for clients in the 12- to 18-month transitional living program, where they must obtain employment, become involved in a sobriety program (such as Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous), undergo counseling, avoid legal troubles and maintain sobriety to graduate. During the transitional living program, Shepherd’s House clients are instructed in an array of life skills, such as budgeting finances, setting goals and lear ning valuable employment information. The permanent housing facility is tentatively scheduled to open in June of this year, and will be able to accommodate nine clients who have already graduated from the transitional living program, meaning, among other things, that they have been clean and sober for at least one year . “It will be our clients who are much more stable,� Thomas said, “And if they continue to do what they are supposed to, they are welcome to stay there. This just provides them with a safe and af fordable place for housing.� As with the transitional living houses, clients in the per manent housing facility will have to maintain sobriety and employment to pay rent. A Shepherd’s House staff person will also be onsite to “monitor� the clients. Thomas said Shepherd’s House was interested in this property mainly because of its availability and location. “It’s right on the bus route,� he said, “and it’s close to a lot of different potential resources for our clients.� To help with the cost of reconstructing the new permanent housing facility, and to assist with purchasing dishes and furniture for the units, Shepherd’s House is holding a “Walkway to Recovery� fundraiser, where friends of the organization can donate $125 for a uniquely engraved brick with names or memorable sayings that will pave the front walkway to the new property, being the first thing clients see as they enter their new homes. For more information on Shepherd’s House, or to make a donation to the “Walkway to Recovery� program, visit www.shepherdshouseinc.com.

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C O U N C I L M E M B E R ’ S

R E P O R T

Pension, Paving and Parks BY BILL FARMER, JR. 5TH DISTRICT COUNCIL

arrange a more af fordable answer. That measure, which the gover nor recently signed, mandates that this government will s spring has officially begun, so has put $20 million per year into the pension the budget season at City Hall. This system for 30 years. So, relief has a price. will be yet another challenging task Depending on the conversation and the that will have a midpoint of sorts when the progress being made at the time, the estimayor delivers his Budget Address on mated difference between what we have April 9. Divisions of gover nment were budgeted yearly and will need to budget asked to submit flat budgets along with has fluctuated between about $3 million documents for both a 5- and 10-percent more. (My estimations calculate about $9 reduction, as well as “new idea” budgets. million more.)

A

Infrastructure

Last Year

At the budget retreat last year , the council, through a collaborative goal-setting session, ranked our priorities. The three that topped the list were, in order, the pension, infrastructure and better investments in our parks. At that time and place those three encompassed what this current year’s priorities would be.

Pension

The pension consensus was reached because of Mayor Jim Gray’s skill set and leadership to bring parties together to

The council has worked on funding a method to help pave $13 million of the $26 million paving needs in all of our neighborhoods. Right now district paving lists are being or have been submitted, and the asphalt season has of ficially opened – a date now more special to me than the Reds opening day. This effort includes only street work and not the sewer work that will also follow shortly. Work in our area will initially focus on Ecton Park and the back corner of Idle Hour, eventually to include a large sanitary sewer tank and pumps from Richmond

Road for offline storage in the back of Idle Hour Park. What will start in our area will be repeated across the city in the next decade.

Individual leagues bear the fundraising and improvement brunt for our children.

This Year

After the mayor delivers his proposed budget, the council will split into five While I have described good starts on teams of three to make suggestions and the first two priorities, I hope that this possible changes to the spending plan. I budget address and subsequent council will lead the “link” on Environmental retreat will also begin to help our Parks and Quality and Public W orks. Last year the Recreation system. While we own about mayor asked us for the potential to 4,000 acres of parkland, we only actively increase franchise fee income by 1 percent program about one fourth of that, and over to help fund street lighting, which we are the last four years the parks budget is now behind on. This year during the legislative 25 percent less. Buildings have been closed session in Frankfort, the government asked and programs discontinued. In Lexington for and almost received the okay to change we value all things green. W e purchase our “tourism tax” from 6 to 7 percent. development rights. We protect trees and Let’s see what the mayor unveils, and then view sheds, but largely we just mow parks. we can talk again here.

The Parks

Bill Farmer, Jr.

Bill Farmer, Jr. Is the 5th District council representative. He can be reached at (859) 258-3213, by e-mail at bfarmer@lexingtonky.gov, or by fax at (859) 259-3838. Letters may be addressed to: Councilmember Bill Farmer, Urban County Council, 200 E. Main St., Lexington, KY 40507.

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Under the Sea Change of Richmond Road COBA COCINA IS THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT ON AN EVOLVING ROADWAY

PHOTO BY EMILY MOSELEY

Lee Greer, president of Greer Companies, opened Coba Cocina in March.

S

tanding next to his 3,000-gallon jellyfish aquarium at Coba Cocina, the new restaurant that opened on Richmond Road in March, Lee Greer recalls one of his first forays into aquatic ornamentation. Greer – the president of Greer Companies, a local hospitality and real estate development company whose portfolio includes, along with Coba Cocina, 35 Cheddar’s restaurants in Kentucky and several contiguous states – was opening one of his first Cheddar’s restaurants, in Johnson City, T enn. Aquariums, usually behind the bar , are popular features in most Cheddar’s restaurants, but this one, for some reason, had a hairline fracture in the glass, which decided to give way and spill forth its contents – 15 minutes before opening. “That was almost the beginning of the end of the fish tank experiment,” Greer said with a chuckle. Obviously undeterred, this new aquarium is the piece de resistance of Coba Cocina, which Greer opened in the Idle Hour Shopping Center with his father, Phil, the founder of Greer Companies. Extending nearly 20 feet into the air, the tank is visible from nearly every nook and cranny in the 12,000square-foot restaurant. Greer says it’s the

The 3,000-gallon jellyfish aquarium is the focal point of Coba Cocina and home to hundreds of moon jellies. PHOTO BY EMILY MOSELEY

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BY ROBBIE CLARK CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

chevy chaser magazine april 2013


largest private jellyfish aquarium in the world, and is home to hundreds of moon jellies. Aquarium aside, from the food to the architecture to the unique concept, Coba Cocina is certainly a distinct Lexington restaurant. The restaurant is actually three separate, but complementary, concepts: Cocoh! Confectioner, a bakery, cafe and gelateria; Cobar Cantina, an upstairs lounge with a specific small pate (tapas) menu; and Coba Cocina, the intricately decorated downstairs restaurant with seating for nearly 230 people (the entire building can sit upwards of 400). The cuisine, managed by chef Alejandro Velasquez, is “pan-American,” according to Greer , and is inspired by dishes from Mexico, South America and Latin America, the Baja, and Texas. Coba menu specialities include ceviche, brisket tacos, a Cubano sandwich, agave-BBQ glazed ribs, chicken monterey and “pescado de Y ucatan.” Coba offers lunch and dinner, as well as a variety of breakfast items in Cocoh!, which is managed by Velasquez’s wife, Shanyn – a seasoned pâtissière. The restaurant is named after the city of Coba, on the easter n Gulf Coast of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, which is a well-known destination because of its Mayan ruins. Its interior was inspired by “cenotes” – sea caves characteristic of Yucatan which were important sources of water and other aspects of the Mayan civilization. The moon jellies and many other features feed into this nautical and cenotecave theme, from the 38-foot-wide dome perched on top of the building, to the sparkling blue ceiling panels and the wavy, scale-like, “fish panel” walls. Other pieces and installations play into the Mayan theme, with a row of panels of “glyphs” lining the exterior and or nate, hand-hammered front door pulls at the front entrance. Dozens of local and central Kentucky craftspeople and professionals contributed to specific components of the building’s full rendering, such as Mike Angelucci, whose company, Angelucci Acoustical, constructed the the restaurant’s large domes, and Bryan Uittenbogaard from Garrard W ood Products, who fashioned the interior’s distinctive walls. Greer said he is excited finally to be able to show off all the work that went into the building, which was designed by architect Todd Ott. “When this thing was under construction, it was a hodgepodge of all kinds of crazy stuf f,” Greer said. “Y ou had a bunch of people thinking we’d just dumped a bunch of leftover building material on to a job site and started throw

PHOTOS BY EMILY MOSELEY

Coba Cocina's interior decorations, from its 38-foot-wide dome to the sparkling blue ceiling panels and wavy, scale-like, "fish panels," are intended to be reminiscent of "cenotes" sea-caves common to the Yucatan Peninsula. Other features focus on the restaurant’s Mayan themes.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


ing it together. But now, with the outside really coming together and done, you can get a full appreciation. It is an amazing work of art by the architects and all the craftspeople we had working on it.” Greer wouldn’t provide the exact amount invested for the multi-milliondollar restaurant, which he said will employ about 200 people, but he did acknowledge that opening more Coba Cocina locations (or per haps one of the three different concepts) could be a possibility after gauging the success of the initial restaurant’s performance, from the food to the service to the design. “Frankly, this one could never make money; there’s just too much in it,” Greer said. “This is for Lexington, and we want to get it right. … If you’re ever looking for a return on investment, you’ll never get it in just one. It’ll take several of these.”

Richmond Road Sea Change Annette Castle is the president of the Idle Hour Neighbors Alliance, an or ganization which represents the community just north of Richmond Road behind the Idle Hour Shopping Center . She and her husband, Derriel, have lived on St. Ann Drive for 45 years, and during that time they’ve watched the ebb and flow of development along the stretch of Richmond Road between Idle Hour Country Club and N ew Circle Road, but Castle says nothing really compares to the sea change currently taking place along that busy thoroughfare. “It’s been fun to watch things change,” she said. Along with the installation of Coba Cocina, at the cor ner of Richmond Road and St. Margaret Drive, which dramatically altered the look and feel of one of the main entrances into her neighbor hood, Castle has witnessed the highly anticipated and discussed multi-million-dollar metamorphosis of the for mer Lexington Mall into the newest campus for Southland Christian Church not too far from her home. “I think anything that’s adjacent to us that improves the look of the area is always good for us,” she said. While the conspicuous design for each of these structures is unorthodox, Castle says the two properties are interesting buildings and bookends to her neighborhood, especially Coba Cocina, which has some unintended roadside benefits. “It’s a great way to direct somebody to your home,” she said. Last year, Castle also saw 90 tons of honeysuckle removed from the creek bed which runs parallel to Richmond Road along its south side as part of a $20,000 initiative through the Lowe’s / Keep America Beautiful Community

(above) Husband-and-wife chefs Alejandro (right) and Shanyn Velasquez. Alejandro handles the Coba Cocina restaurant, while Shanyn, a seasoned pâtissière, makes the sweets in Cocoh! (below) Along with specialty menu items, the restaurant also has a number of specialty cocktails. PHOTOS BY EMILY MOSELEY

Improvement Grant, which greatly improved the roadside visibility for two apartment complexes behind the plants. These two complexes, Kenwick Place and Canterbury Place, were purchased by Resource Real Estate in March for $6.8 million. The national real estate firm, which specializes in acquiring apartments that are being underutilized, according to executive vice president Kevin Finkel, plans to renovate the 244 units associated with the two properties. Finkel said his company will make an initial $3-million investment to improve the two properties, which is almost $12,500 per unit, and that the new activity along Richmond Road was one of the factors they considered when purchasing the properties. “This particular part of Lexington was appealing to us because it is becoming more vital, we see that there’s a lot of activity,” Finkel said. “This particular property benefits from excellent visibility on Richmond Road, which has just under chevy chaser magazine april 2013

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The new campus for Southland Christian Church on Richmond Road drastically transformed the former Lexington Mall.

The glass facades of Coba Cocina, embellished by multiple lighting features and facing Richmond Road, easily catch the attention of passersby on the busy road.

PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

30,000 vehicles passing by every day. As Richmond Road gets more active because of all this development going on, that’s only going to become more important to our property, as visibility is really critical in terms of marketing an apartment community.” Bill Farmer, Jr. the Fifth District Councilmember who represents this section of Richmond Road, says this groundswell of activity – organic, and not orchestrated under one entity – is in response to the commercial shift from Richmond Road to the Hamburg area. “Richmond Road kind of got mined

out as everything moved to Hambur g,” he said. “This is kind of a different sort of infill than we’ve seen before, it’s infill in terms of businesses and or ganizations rather than housing.” Farmer says, given this section of Richmond Road’s proximity to downtown and other amenities, it was only a matter of time before the area started to attract attention. “What Richmond Road had when Henry Clay built that home for his son out there, that’s still hidden from the trees, is what it still has now: location,” Farmer said, referring to Mansfield (the

Thomas Hart Clay House), at the cor ner of Richmond Road and Shriners Lane. In regards to design, Farmer said that these additions to Richmond Road, Coba Cocina and Southland Christian Church, have “new and dynamic architecture” – the presence of which is becoming more prevalent in Lexington. “Since one of Lexington’s central planning tenets is infill and redevelopment, the city becomes denser , but the farmland remains green and pastoral,” he said. “If we’re going to make Lexington a little denser , let’s make it look a little better.”

As for Castle with the Idle Hour N eighbors Alliance, she’s planning on orchestrating a few changes to make her neighborhood look a little better too. The neighborhood association has plans to install a native plant garden in the traf fic island on St. Ann Drive between Fazoli’s and Walgreens, as well as a community garden in Idle Hour Park. What do you think of the new Coba Cocina restaurant and the other developments on Richmond Road? Visit us online at www.chevychaser.com and let us and other readers know.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


Lacrosse players must utilize the skills required in baseball, basketball and hockey to excel in the sport. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

STICKING AROUND

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

AS LOCAL INTEREST IN LACROSSE CONTINUES TO GROW, MORE PLAYERS ARE GETTING CAUGHT UP IN THE FASTEST SPORT ON TWO FEET

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n a war m, March after noon, Henry Clay High School’s lacrosse team competed valiantly against Northern Kentucky and ran away with an impressive 10-1 victory. As the young players engaged in the fast-paced sport under clear, sunny skies, one thing was apparent: the sheer enjoyment and determination on their faces. Lacrosse is not a school-sponsored sport in Lexington, but rather a team activity made possible by the Lexington Youth Lacrosse Association. Currently offered at all of the city’s high schools and nine middle schools, as well as at Transylvania University as a N CAA Division III sport and at the University of Kentucky as a club sport, the LYLA board consists of coaches, officials, parents, and advocates of lacrosse and the sport’s development in the Lexington area.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013

PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK LYLA president Linda Borkosky, whose son plays for T ates Creek High School, caught her first glimpse of the sport’s positive impact on youth when she helped get a team started at T ates Creek Middle School five years ago. “I witnessed several boys that were not that vested in school suddenly have a reason to attend school regularly, keep their behavior in check, their grades at least at a 2.0 and have a connection to their school,” she said. “Anytime you can give students a reason to be connected to their school, good things usually happen.” As enthusiasm for the sport started to spread around the city, L YLA grew rapidly, with the or ganization adding around nine teams to public schools in the last few years. This year , LYLA plans to launch the first girls’ middle and high school teams.


All Lexington high schools, including Henry Clay (shown here), as well as nine middle schools, have lacrosse teams through LYLA.

“It’s a lot of work but when you see the rewards of players on the field enjoying a great sport, it’s suddenly all worth it,” Borkosky said. LYLA also sponsors youth and middle school lacrosse conglomerate teams called the Lexington Lizards for players in the Lexington area that do not have a school team. “Lacrosse has exploded in popularity as more kids see the game played on ESPN and on the high school field,” said Candace Clay, a local parent that helped get the Lexington Lizards off the ground. Kim Eldridge, who serves as the LYLA field committee chair, feels lacrosse has gained quick popularity because of the ability of most individuals to pick up the sport, become proficient and hone their skills in a fairly quick manner . Youth also develop an af finity for lacrosse because of the fast-paced, exciting nature of the game. “There’s also room (in the sport) for people that aren’t experienced,” Eldridge said. “As soon as my son, Grayson, picked up a stick he was hooked. When your kid hasn’t liked any other team sport, and they find something they love, you find a way for them to play.” Grayson and Clay’s son, Sam, were able to play lacrosse with Sayre’s youth team in fourth grade. Even though they didn’t attend Sayre, the school let them join since it didn’t have enough members to field a team. N ow teenagers and still going strong in the sport, Grayson and Sam currently play for Henry Clay High School. Julie McDonald, the coordinator for the newly launched girls’ lacrosse teams, has a son that plays for Morton Middle School. She noted that lacrosse is known as “the fastest sport on two feet.” “Players and parents quickly become addicted to lacrosse because it combines all the most exciting features of other

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sports into one game,” she said. “Lacrosse also has a very strong national governing body, U.S. Lacrosse, and a strong local or ganization, LYLA, that have ensured the game grows with a continuing emphasis on safety and sportsmanship.” “(Lacrosse) offense is similar to basketball – pick and rolls, backdoor cuts, and give-and-go passing,” added veteran lacrosse expert Terry Justice, who is currently the head coach at T ransylvania University. “The contact is similar to both football and hockey. The hand-eye coordination needed to catch and throw the ball with a lacrosse stick is similar to baseball skills.” Justice’s experience in the sport began when he helped for m the University of Kentucky lacrosse club in 1979. Over the years, he has coached many of Lexington’s current middle school and high school coaches, as well as officials. Even though lacrosse is ever -popular and relatively safe, Eldridge said one of the challenges L YLA faces with the growth of lacrosse in Lexington is finding safe field space on which teams can practice and play. “Open city parks space is first come, first serve, and often leagues are competing with each other for field space,” she explained.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


While Lexington Parks & Recreation has helped L YLA obtain field per mits, there are no fields that can be dedicated to lacrosse since it is a new sport. Space exists at Shillito Park to develop four multi-use fields, but so far there hasn’t been support for funding to move the project forward. Ben Schaefer, who recently founded a local summer travel lacrosse program with four age divisions, has the distinction of being a high school All American while playing lacrosse at Tates Creek. He went on to play the sport at three dif ferent colleges, including Jacksonville University, a Division I program. “It’s the best game in the world,” said Schaefer, who returned to Lexington last year after finishing graduate school. Schaefer is now an associate head coach at Tates Creek High School. “Lacrosse is interesting in that it does not necessarily require you to be the best athlete like a lot of other sports,” he added. “Instead, you will see success if you work hard, develop solid stick work, and find a role to fill on the field. I feel that it’s very unique in that manner. Also, the game is special in that if you commit yourself to it, you will be amazed at the number of opportunities it can provide. I have always been grateful for that. Now it’s important that I stay involved, give back, and hopefully provide others with the same opportunities I had.” Schaefer and Logan Otto, a for mer standout lacrosse attackman and current coach at Lexington Catholic, decided to form the summer travel program in the spring of 2011. The two men had observed several lacrosse programs in other states and took note of how beneficial travel programs were in those “hotbed” regions. “Kids taking part in these programs were improving at a rate far quicker than those on the outside because at every practice they were receiving excellent coaching and they were playing top teams from around the country,” Schaefer said. “We knew we had to start a program to help Lexington catch up with the development other lacrosse communities are seeing around us.” During the program’s first summer , Schaefer and Otto showcased their inaugural team and enjoyed traveling with the players and families. In summer 2013 they expanded to of fer the opportunity to all age levels and the program subsequently grew to four teams. This summer, Schaefer anticipates participation from nearly 115 players that and will travel to four dif ferent states for seven tournaments. For more information about LYLA, including summer and fall leagues, visit www.lexkylacrosse.com.

IN BRIEF:

LACROSSE RULES • There are 10 players on each team: three attackers, three midfielders, three defenders and a goalie. • Each team must keep four players, including the goalie, in its defensive half of the field and three in its offensive half. The midfielders may use the entire field. • Points are scored by slinging the ball into the opponent's goal. • Players can advance the ball by carrying it in their stick (crosse) or passing to another player. Only goalies can pick the ball up with their hands. • A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's stick with a stick check, which includes poking and slapping the stick and gloved hands of the player in control of the ball. • Body checking is permitted if the opponent has the ball. All contact must occur from the front or side, above the waist and below the shoulders. • An attacking player cannot enter the space designated for the goalie, but may reach into this area with the stick.

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ho knows what sparks our desire to redo a room? It could be something obvious, like a child moving out and you finally have the chance to get that guest bedroom you’ve always wanted. It could be something subtle, like wanting to incorporate a new piece of fur niture into a room. Or it could be that you’re just plain being tired of looking at the same thing day after day and only a new coat of paint can break the monotony. Sometimes redoing a room can be so daunting, it takes all the fun out of creating a new space in your home. There are many things that need to be considered: color , material, textures, furniture, accessories, functionality, and, of course, a budget. Whether it is a complete over haul of your living room or a few tweaks to the color scheme in your kitchen, redoing one, or more, of your rooms requires just as much forethought as it does creativity. We asked a couple of local designers – Heather Reilly, from adele; Dwayne Anderson, from house by jsd; and Megan Green, from For Friends – to give us some pointers and other aspects to consider when redoing certain rooms of the house, using some of their recent projects as examples.

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PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

When decorating for a nursery, try to go with colors and accessories that can be alter ed without too much effort as the child ages. Repurposed items from around the house make great additions.

redid:

nursery BY HEATHER REILLY

A

nursery should retain a sense of practicality and youthfulness. Using these guidelines to plan ahead the first time will prevent you from having to do major updates every few years. When it comes to paint colors, think outside the box of your typical pink and blue. Calming neutrals can easily be accented with bold fabrics and accessories. Neutral paint will also allow you to change the accent colors over time. Look for vintage pieces that have already withstood the test of time. These can easily be updated with a fresh coat of non-toxic paint. T ry a glossy finish for a more modern look. Choosing durable fabrics is essential when designing for children. There are a plethora of designer fabrics available with an indoor -outdoor finish that can be wiped down ef fortlessly. Find prints that will reflect your child’s personality. For instance, a bright colored geometric pattern would be well suited for a fun-loving little girl, while a classic blanket plaid in

blues, reds and tans would work well for a boy and be something that will never go out of style. Look for art work around the house that has meaning. Old paint by numbers, a movie poster of your favorite movie, vintage silhouettes and family photographs from past generations are all unique and thoughtful ways to add a bit of history to a child’s room. Create a gallery wall by reframing these in sleek white frames and hanging them in a grouping. If you must introduce a theme, do so through accessories. For instance, if your child loves baseball, try restricting the baseball theme to framed baseball cards rather than wallpapering the room with pennants. Eventually the cuteness of the juvenile theme will fade and you’ll be redecorating in a few years. Heather Reilly is the owner of adelé (445 S. Ashland Ave.). For more information, call (859) 266-9930 or visit www.adelelexington.com.

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DREAMS DO COME TRUE!


PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

If you think colored cabinets might be too bold for your kitchen, try adding color to your island. Simple trays on the island can be functional, and attractive, design elements to keep clutter in check.

redid:

kitchen BY DWAYNE ANDERSON

W

hether you’re doing a facelift or starting over in your kitchen, color on your cabinets can be a scary thought. But the lowly kitchen island is a safe place to add color without going overboard. A soft mossy green was chosen for this kitchen. The color is applied in a matte finish and then slightly distressed. The ef fect is soft, subtle and chic, and it’s a big green island. Lets keep working on that island. Recently while in a kitchen cabinet shop, I over heard a saleperson guide someone to granite counters as if were the only option in the world.

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

I could not disagree more – yes, granite is a very good answer and pricing has become more competitive – but is not the only answer. In good design, texture can make a room. Granite is always an option for counters, and pricing has become more competitive over the years, but it’s not the only option. Instead of going with granite, the island top in our design project is a butcher block, stained a rich English walnut. Kitchen islands have become the new workhorse of the house, being the platfor m for casual dinners, homework and other school projects, and yes, even cooking, but they are also big dumping grounds for mail, phones, keys and anything else. So how do we fix the clutter problem and add good design? A large tray functioning as a collection bin can be a helpful tool to add design flair and functionality. I’m not sure why random stuf f on a tray looks more organized to me, but it does. And the tray, with all its trinkets, can be moved quickly for a fast tidyup. I’ve found success with lar ge willow trays. Dwayne Anderson is a designer with house by jsd. For more information, call (859) 523-3933 or visit www.housebyjsd.com.

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PRESENT THE BUSINESS LEXINGTON LEARNING SERIES

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BY DWAYNE ANDERSON

R

edoing your living room starts with a little pillow talk. Tired of your sofa, but not ready for a new one? Pillows are the easy answer . The first step is to find a few toss pillows already pre-made at a local design shop. I think of these pillows as the Milli V anilli of the design world – pretty to look at, but they really don’t sing. Find a fabric that make those basic pillows earn their money. Look for ikat, chevron or tribal patter ns – timeless in themselves, yet very new again. The scale of these prints have become larger and new bolder colors have been introduced to really capture the spirit of today’s design focus. The next step for refreshing this room is working with the windows. When choosing window treatments, the humble drapery panel is a classic option. The linen, Euro pleat style is hard to beat and versatile. Like the “little black dress,” linen can be dressed up or down, yet is always timeless and goes with virtually anything. The last, easy step to a room makeover is the humble can of paint. Everyone needs a few fans, and I say the paint fan deck should be in everyone’s life. I think of a humble neutral as a bowl vegetable soup. The soup can be hearty and filling but a little bland. The right spice changes everything. Neutral does not have to be bland. The classic Lexington paint color Newport Tint is a great color, but other options do exist. I recently used a Sherwin Williams color called Garden Urn. It is a dark grey with muddy undertones and a slight green cast in certain lights. The name really does describe this color beautifully.

APRIL 24 -STARTING A FOOD TRUCK KEYNOTE SPEAKER: JESSE AND LIZ HUOT OF GRIND FOOD TRUCK The food truck craze has hit cities from Lexington to Las Vegas. Like all small businesses the food truck industry has its upsides and challenges. Join our panel of experts who will help you understand the steps to help you mitigate the challenges and improve your chances of success. Tickets for “Starting a Food Truck” on sale now at www.bizlex.com/romanceorruin. Early Bird Discounts available till April 12.

Dwayne Anderson is a designer with house by jsd. For more information, call (859) 523-3933 or visit www.housebyjsd.com.

JUNE 27 - OPENING A FRANCHISE The allure of being self-employed with the security of a known brand is often the driver behind becoming a franchise owner. However, doing good research and due diligence is crucial to having a successful operation. Learn from experts in the field from franchise owners and operators and those in the know.

AUGUST 22 - OPENING A BAR You love talking to people, never fit in the 9 to 5 and know how to infuse some mean bitters. However, the business of opening a bar is more complex than a perfect Bloody Mary. Running a bar can be a profitable business but an extremely risky one. Join the discussion and find out from bar owners and investors how to be in the bar business.

OCTOBER 24 - TAKING YOUR FOOD TO MARKET Turn your hobby into a successful niche product and a big business. Learn from the best of the best how to package, price, brand and promote your product and get it on the shelves.

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group fitness • cycling • personal training

Redoing your pillows is a quick, but effective, method for refreshing your living room if you don’t want to purchase new furniture.

342 Romany Rd. • 858.309.3131 • Get a schedule and register for classes at www.FitLexington.com

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redid:

dining room BY MEGAN GREEN

A

t For Friends, when we begin a dining room project, our first objective is to determine the size, shape and formality of the dining table. The table selection sets the tone for how the remaining finishes will be specified. In this case we were able to place a beautiful sterling silver filled breakfront on the north wall and a Schumacher custom made buffet on the east wall, both of which are functional as well as instrumental design elements. Lighting is then taken into consideration. The shape and scale of our scalloped drum shade allows for a bit of a light hearted flair while being right at home with our traditional approach. The sconces are strong enough to flank either side of our focal point, without over powering our main chandelier as the primary light source. A

dimmer on all switches is always suggested to create your best lighting ambiance. Our grass-cloth textured walls, in a rich coffee tone, create a war m and cozy backdrop for the art and wall hangings. The floor covering in a horizontal, tone on tone, wool carpet presents a distinctive frame around our dining table, as well as sets and defines our seating space. As designer Jill McCarty likes to say, “the most important part of any dining room is the people who gather there, even more than the room itself.� Cheers to lots of fun and memorable meals together with friends and family.

The table needs to set the tone for the dining room. Dimmers on all the light switches are also a good way to achieve the ambiance you are looking for with any engagement. PHOTOS BY ROBBIE CLARK

Megan Green is a designer with For Friends (869 E. High St.). For mor e information, call (859) 268-2576 or visit www.forfriends.com.

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GROWING COMMUNITY

FRESH

(AND SOME TOMATOES, TOO)

SUSHI

KENWICK NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY GARDEN INCHES TOWARD FRUITION

SPECIALS AMAZING

BY SARAYA BREWER CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

APPETIZERS TANTALIZING

said he identified Kenwick as a good location for a community project like this for a number of reasons, including the lmost a year after the initial seeds potential to engage with the Kenwick for the idea were planted, a com- community center, which is operated by munity garden in the Kenwick the Lexington Parks & Rec department, neighborhood is starting to take root. and also the opportunity to engage a Spearheaded by the Kenwick N eighbor - variety of neighborhood volunteers from hood Association (KN A), with seed a wide range of economic backgrounds. money provided by the 5th District “What you get is a whole lot of peooffice, an initial planning meeting has ple with ownership now – it’s a chance to been set for April 2 to map out a plan for bring the people from the community centhe garden, which will be located in the ter more into the community,” Farmer said. green space behind V ictory Christian “Kenwick a very neighborly group,” Church (facing Owsley Avenue). he added. “Now you can thread the neighAccording to Kenwick N eighbor - borhood with the church and the commuhood Association board member Sara nity center, with one fairly vibrant spot.” Constantine, the hope is to have the garSeveral details of the garden still den installed before the neighbor hood’s need to be sorted out at the initial April semi-annual Bungalow T our, which is meeting, but Constantine says the biggest scheduled for June 2. hurdles – securing a space and funding “I don’t know if we’ll necessarily – have already been crossed. have early spring plantings, but we’ll be Currently, Constantine said she enviready for tomatoes,” Constantine said, sions it will be a primarily edible garden adding that she has heard from more utilizing raised beds, with the harvest than 40 volunteers interested in helping split between neighbor hood volunteers bring the garden to fruition. and residents, and also those in need. “The response has been fantastic,” Ryan Koch, the executive director she said. “[The neighborhood association] for Seedleaf, a non-profit or ganization has put together so many events in the that has built several community gardens past that require volunteers, and I would around Lexington, recommends focusing say this has been the most ef fortless out- on small varieties of vegetables that peopouring of volunteers.” ple recognize, such as greens and cherry Fifth District councilmember Bill or grape tomatoes. Seedleaf operates sevFarmer, Jr. approached the KNA last sum- eral “You Pick” gardens that encourage mer with the funding opportunity. He passersby to collect the bounty.

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THE INNOVATION THAT STARTED A REVOLUTION IN HAIR CARE.

The greenspace behind Victory Christian Church, at the corner of Cramer and Owsley avenues, is the future home of the community garden.

“It’s good garden maintenance to harvest,” Koch said. “It’s better to get the (fruit) of f the plant than to have it all over the ground. So even if people just come with their self interest, the garden is blessed because they took the time to harvest a little bit.” Koch noted that Seedleaf has had a handful of positive partnerships with local churches in the past, and said he hopes this partnership is a “win” for the church, which had initially expressed some misgivings about hosting the garden on their property. “They wanted to make sure their property was respected and that it would look nice, and since they’re a small congregation, they wanted to make sure we had enough people to manage it,” Constantine explained. “And that’s reasonable, because these things can fall apart.” Jim Mahoney, the interim pastor for V ictory Christian Church, said that providing space for an endeavor that is potentially contributing to people in need of assistance could impart a sense of pride within the congregation. “If people take advantage of it, this could provide real assistance,” Mahoney said. “That’s what I would personally like to see.” “The primary goal is to raise a sense of community, and however it gives back to the community is great, but really the idea of working together and bringing everyone together is the foremost goal in my mind,” Constantine said. “The garden and working together, it helps people bond, to have a common goal, to do service together,” Koch said. “It’s a real privilege to get to host something like that.” Anyone interested in helping with the Kenwick community garden should contact Constantine at kenwickneighbors@gmail.com.

M

MOROCCANOIL

Lexington Community Gardens Lexington is home to a handful of community gardens, many of which are billed as “you pick” (i.e., community members are welcome to harvest the bounty) and that offer regular volunteer hours each week. Most of these are edible gardens, and many are managed by Seedleaf (contact seedleafinfo@gmail.com for more information on those). This is by no means a comprehensive list; if you know of a garden we’ve left off, find this article online at www.chevychaser.com and leave a comment, or e-mail saraya@smileypete.com. Ashland Terrace Garden Public Cutting Gardens (flowers and herbs) 475 S. Ashland Ave.

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London-Ferrill Community Garden 235 E. 3rd St. Gainesway Community Garden 3400 Milano Rd. Goodloe Street Community Garden 525 Goodloe St. Hill ‘n Dale Park 2351 Maplewood Dr. North Pole Community Garden 902 N. Limestone New Beginnings Community Church 845 Bryan Ave. Peacemeal Gardens BCTC Leestown Campus, Opportunity Way Withrow Way Community Garden 114 Withrow Way

Community Garden Resources Seedleaf Seedleaf offers a variety of community garden services, including free consultation. www.seedleaf.org, seedleafinfo@gmail.com Fayette County Extension Office The Fayette County Cooperative Extension has a wealth of gardening resources, including informational brochures and booklets and gardening classes. 1140 Red Mile Pl. (859) 257-5582. fayette.ca.uky.edu.

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

35


Take home heirloom and hybrid tomato plants from the Fayette County Extension Office April 23 for participating in their Growing Heirloom Tomatoes workshop. PHOTO FURNISHED

Central Kentucky Home, Garden and Flower Show. Apr. 4 - 7. The largest and longest running show of its kind in Kentucky, the Central Kentucky Home, Garden and Flower Show features state of the art products at show-special prices. 5 - 9:30 p.m. Thurs. - Fri.; 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat.; 12 - 6 p.m. Sun. Heritage Hall, 430 W. Vine St. www.ckyhomeshow.com. Bluegrass Junior Woman’s Club: Pinwheels for Prevention Garden. Apr. 7. BJWC is planting a pinwheel garden at Wellington Park and inviting the community to participate. The garden is committed to fostering environments where children may grow and prosper. 4 p.m. Wellington Park, 565 Wellington Way. www.bluegrassjuniors.org. 7 Keys to Organic Gardening. Apr. 10. Jerome Lange has refined his organic farming techniques on his Casey County farm for over 30 years; he will lead a session on how to create a successful organic garden. 7 p.m. Good Foods Co-Op, 455 Southland Dr. www.goodfoods.coop. Strawberries in Small Spaces. April 11. Strawberries are very adaptable to small-space production. They can be grown in towers, barrels, raised beds, hanging baskets and even in the ground. This workshop covers the basics of strawberry culture. Take home ideas for planting and 25-day neutr al, everbearing, Mara des Bois strawberry plants for your backyard patch. Class size is limited. 6:30 p.m. Fayette County Extension Office, 1140 Red Mile Place. (859) 257-5582. The Kentucky Christmas Tree Association’s Plant Auction. Apr. 13. A variety of annuals, perennials, balled, and burlapped landscape trees and shrubs

36

HOME+GARDEN SPRING EVENTS will be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to provide one or more scholarships for students majoring in Forestry or related sciences in the College of Agriculture at the University of Kentucky. 10 a.m. Fayette County Extension Office front parking lot, 1140 Red Mile Place. (859) 223-1140. Gardening for the Birds. Apr. 13. Presented by Mary Carol Cooper, this free workshop will focus on what to plant to attract the best variety of birds to your backyard. 11 a.m. Wild Birds Unlimited, 152 Locust Hill Dr. (859) 268-0114 www.lexingtonky.wbu.com. Composting at Home. Apr. 16. Esther Moberly, from LFUCG Waste Management, will present a workshop on how to manage a home composting system including: how to build or install one, how to maintain it, how they work, the items that can and can’t be placed in a compost pile, and ways to use the end product. Those who pre-register will get a free kitchen compost bin. The Arboretum Visitor Center, 500 Alumni Dr. (859) 2576955. www.ca.uky.edu/arboretum. Disease Resistant Apples. April 16. Tree fruits generally require multiple chemical sprays to produce quality fruit. Participants will be introduced to varieties of apples that have been selected for resistance to common diseases. Each attendee will receive two varieties of disease

resistant apple that will cross pollinate. Please register in advance. 6:30 p.m. Fayette County Extension Office, 1140 Red Mile Place. (859) 257-5582. Vegetable Gardening for Beginners. April 16. Ideal introductory class for those new to vegetable gar dening. This class will cover warm season crops like tomatoes, peppers, beans and squash, as well as simple approaches to having a small garden. A vegetable growing guide will also be provided. Class will be led by Fayette County Horticulture agent Delia Scott. Call to pre-register. 6:30 p.m. Gainesway Community Center, 1201 Centre Parkway (859) 257-5582. Spring Plant Sale. Apr. 20. A sale featuring special perennials, native plants, shrubs and peonies. Great plants, good prices and advice will be av ailable. All plants have been donated, divided or selected for the local growing area. 9 - 11 a.m. The Arboretum Visitor Center, 500 Alumni Dr. (859) 257-6955. www.ca.uky.edu/arboretum. Growing Heirloom Tomatoes. April 23. Most people agree that heirloom tomatoes offer unique culinary features and flavors, but they can be downright challenging to grow. Participants will take home heirloom and hybrid plants to use in their own trials . Decide for yourself if all the hype is substantiated. Please register in

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

advance. 6:30 p.m. Fayette County Extension Office, 1140 Red Mile Place. (859) 257-5582. Arbor Day at The Arboretum. The Arboretum’s Arbor Day celebration is the best-attended Arbor Day event in Kentucky. The 22nd annual Arbor Day celebration will begin with a reading of the Arbor Day Proclamation by Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, followed by the planting of the Arbor Day tree. Over 40 exhibitors and demonstrators will be on hand to offer expertise on planting and nurturing the trees and the environment, and various children’s activities will be available as well. Free tree seedlings will be available for attendees to take home. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. The Arboretum, 500 Alumni Dr. (859) 257-6955. www.ca.uky.edu/arboretum.

UPCOMING GARDEN TOURS Open Gates to Bluegrass Living Garden Tour. June 1 - 2. The Lexington Council Garden Club’s 2013 Open Gates to Bluegrass Living Garden Tour will showcase 10 diverse gardens, from Lexington’s early suburbs to rural Fayette County. Highlights include Jon Carloftis’ on-going restoration work in the gardens at Botherum, vegetable gardens incorporated into the home landscape, Asian-style gardens and shade gardens. www.lexgardenclubs.org. Woodford County Woman’s Club Spring Garden Tour and Plant Sale. May 11. The tour, with a “Backyards of Woodford County” theme, will feature intimate gardens in Versailles, Midway and the surrounds. Gardens will be located in both historic and suburban homes. Visitors will view rain gardens, koi ponds, perennial and annual gardens, herb gardens, and a unique train garden. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Visit www.woodfordcounty womansclub.org for more information.


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YOUR

L A N D S C A P E S

AFTER THE RACES

Thatch Watch

BEST BET FOR

O Lexington-born Executive Executivve Chef Cole Arimes Need a place to re-energize after a day at Keeneland? Want to start your night on the town with a great meal? Heart-warming, eclectic uptown dining and plenty of on-site parking make Coles 735 Main the perfect complement to your Lexington Plans. Also, Coles is just steps from the Trolley Route.

Open Mon-Thurs 5 pm-10 pm • Fri-Sat 5 pm-11 pm • Bar/Gazebo opens at 4 pm Make M ake rreservations eser vations oonline nlinne aatt w www.Coles735Main.com. ww.CColes735Main.ccom.

735 East Main St., Lexington, KY 40502 • 859.266.9000 LLike ike us us on FFacebook! acebbookk!

-Dr. Robinette and Cate

38

BY ANN BOWE | LANDSCAPES COLUMNIST

kay, all you lawn nerds out there, this one’s for you – an entire article devoted to the mysteries of thatch. What, exactly, is thatch? Is it always a problem? Do grass clippings cause thatch? Thatch is a distinct layer of spongy brown organic matter consisting of living and dead roots, leaves and stems that accumulates between the actively growing grass and the soil surface beneath. A certain amount of thatch is quite nor mal and even beneficial. Like mulch, it shades the surface, reducing summer soil temperature and evaporation. It competes with crabgrass. Thatch provides food for beneficial microbes and supplies or ganic matter to the soil. And it filters stor mwater to reduce groundwater contamination. While excessive thatch is unlikely to kill the grass directly, it can lead to tur f health issues that surely can kill your lawn. More than one inch of thatch will block the movement of air, water and nutrients into the soil. This impervious layer causes the grass to root into the thatch layer to get nourishment, which reduces the drought resistance of the turf. Thatch can harbor disease-causing fungi and insects. Thatch production is all about balance. When the production of new grass shoots is equal to the microbial decomposition of old roots, leaves and shoots, excessive thatch build up won’t be a problem. But, if grass is growing too quickly or the microbes aren’t functioning properly, this balance is lost. Excessive nitrogen fertilizer makes the grass greener, but it makes the lawn grow faster, too. Also, chemical fertilizers, fungicides and insecticides are detrimental to the beneficial organisms in turf. The result can be too much grass growth combined with reduced microbial action which will allow thatch to build up. Consider an or ganic lawn care program. Or ganic fertilizers do not push growth. Rather , they are slow Feed Your Lawn release and nourish the soil in order to proFall is the ideal time to fertilize. Your vide a healthy growing medium for the grass will be greener over the winter, grass roots. you will have less spring mowing and Watering should be infrequent and fewer weeds in the summer. If you add deep. Frequent watering (which is the way nitrogen in the spring, the weeds will irrigation systems are often set) keeps the love it. surface moist, which is where thatch accumulates. Grass roots and shoots will begin to grow in this moist thatch layer instead of in the soil. Grass growing in the nutrient-poor thatch layer is more prone to die when the thatch does dry out. This then adds more dead plant material which accumulates in the thatch layer. Over-irrigating also creates waterlogged soil which damages the aerobic microorganisms. Many new homes have the topsoil stripped of f and subsoil layers exposed. Subsoil is lacking in organic matter, microbes and earthworms. Sod is laid directly on this subsoil, which sets the grass up for thatch issues since the new growth may remain in the sod layer instead of the subsoil. If this is your situation, hollow-core aeration, which removes soil plugs from the turf, will help prevent or correct this shallow rooting. If you are about to lay sod, incorporate or ganic matter, topsoil and fertilizer into the subsoil beforehand. Earthworms are important for soil aeration and thatch reduction. Certain insecti-

chevy chaser magazine april 2013


Thatch is a tightly interwoven layer of both living and dead and decaying tissue existing between the green vegetation and sub soil surface. It is composed primarily of products from stems, leaf sheaths, and roots that are fairly resistant to decay. PHOTO FURNISHED

cides and fungicides are highly toxic to earthwor ms. Avoid these products or use them rarely. Everyone has heard that grass clippings are a primary cause of thatch but that’s really not the case. Short clippings will break down quickly and retur n balanced nutrients back to the tur f. Note: short clippings. Infrequent mowing of tall grass will contribute to thatch accumulation. Mow at a height and frequency so that no more than one third of the grass height is removed in a single mowing. Of course, if you already have excessive thatch, then clippings will make it worse. How do you know if your lawn has a thatch problem? Cut out a small, triangular-shaped plug of turf several inches deep and take a look. If the spongy layer above the soil is more than three-fourths to one inch thick when you compress it, you should consider having your lawn dethatched. Mechanical dethatching should be done in late summer or fall, when the weather is cooler. Do not dethatch when the soil is wet and do not try to remove the entire thatch layer in one treatment. Aeration will also help to stimulate bacterial decomposition by improving the availability or air, water and nutrients. After dethatching, it can be useful to lay down some grass seed. Grasses that produce a large amount of side shoots, like Kentucky bluegrass, also tend to produce thatch readily. What is the best seed for our area? To quote Gregg Munshaw from the UK College of Agriculture, “Kentucky is in a transition zone between warm and cool season grasses; we can grow all types of grasses equally poorly.� He recommends turf type tall fescue for our area.

A R T M AT T E R S T O U S A L L And so does your support. Donate now at lexarts.org

Ann Bowe

offers creative landscape design and installation, with a deep interest in beautiful native plants. She can be reached at (859) 278-0069, or by email at annbowe@annbowedesigns.com.

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39


SMILEY PETE’S

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Seafood Grill

Wood grilled seafood, steaks, chicken & ribs.

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Puccini’s Smiling Teeth offers an array of innovative pizzas, pastas, calzones, sandwiches, Italian chicken dinners & salads prepared fresh every single day. Puccini’s features homemade dough, slow-simmered sauces & delicious homemade dressings. The atmosphere is casual & stylish. Families, dates and seniors feel equally comfortable. Open all week for dine in, carryout, delivery & catering.

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Contemporary ambience in historic Midway. Cuisine with French foundations and a California accent. Every Wednesday night half price wine by the bottle with purchase of entree. Lunch: Tues. - Sat. 11:30-2 • Dinner: Tues. - Sat. at 5:30pm 125 E. Main St. Midway, KY • 846-5565 heirloommidway.com

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2 FOR 1 MARGARITAS! Tuesday Thursday Sunday 5-10 p.m. Serving Lexington since 1992. Catering services available. Two Locations: 818 Euclid Ave. • 859-268-8160 and 3901 Harrodsburg Rd. Suite 180 • 859-219-0181 www.rinconmexicanorestaurantky.com

TWO LEXINGTON LOCATIONS! 4750 Hartland Pkwy 859-245-9504

French and Japanese Cuisine featuring Lexington’s only Kaiten Conveyor Sushi and Culinary Cocktail Lounge Complimentary Event Planning - Private & Corporate Modern Party Room with Digital Karaoke 162 Old Todds Road • Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 269-0677

lunch • dinner • full bar

154 Patchen Drive 859-269-7621 Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-7 (food and alcohol) Daily Lunch Specials Trivia Tuesday (Hartland), Trivia Thursday (Patchen) NFL Sunday Ticket - all the games Beer Specials for all College & Pro Football games

live music wireless internet located at 147 n. limestone across from courthouse www.sidebar.com • 859.225.8883 open: mon-fri 11am - close • sat 5pm - close

YAMAMOTO

Monday-Thursday: Lunch: 11a-2p Dinner: 5:30-10p Tomo serves fresh sushi specials, amazing appetizers, and tantalizing entrees. 848 East High Street Lexington, KY 40502 Phone: (859) 269-9291 www.tomolex.com

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T A B L E

F O R

T W O

Jefferson Davis Inn multitude of television screens and cheer on the UK women’s basketball team advance to the Sweet 16 had ne of Lexington’s newest places to eat and, something to do with this. especially in this case, belly up, the Jef ferson The menu is a quick assortment of appetizers, with Davis Inn is one of the first restaurants to items such as chicken wings, beer cheese nachos and emerge from the rubble on South Broadway amid the fried pickles (priced between $6 and $9); a few salads, new housing and apartment complex developments on including a wedge and salmon; a variety of bur gers that busy thoroughfare. (priced between $9 and $11) and sandwiches, including Jefferson Davis Inn, or JDI Grille and T avern (or chicken, fish, a rueben and a club (priced between $8 just JDI) as it is being referred to, is not the reopening and $10); and entrees, which include fish and chips, a of the former bar that sat at the corner of West High and pulled pork dinner, steaks, pork chops, and chicken and Limestone streets until closing in 1996. Instead, JDI is a waffles (priced between $11 and $19). tribute to that popular, bygone nightspot. We started out with beer cheese nachos, which is My guest and I, being too young to have experian interesting regional spin on regular bar nachos, enced the original location, weren’t sure how faithful of before ordering our entrees; my guest ordered the a homage the new incarnation was; on its own, howev- chicken and waffles, and I had a cajun pasta (andouille er, the new JDI, especially the building with its appeal- sausage and chicken in a heavy cream sauce). The food ing and ample wood and brickwork throughout its three is on par with your standard pub grub, but we weren’t levels, will likely become an attractive haunt for people expecting a fine-dining, gourmet meal. in the South Hill Neighborhood, most certainly for those I thought the beer cheese nachos were the most from the college community. W e went on a recent interesting dish to hit our table, but maybe that’s Tuesday evening, and the restaurant was full and boisbecause it was the first up, and I was hungry (I defiterous, though I think the crowds gathering to watch the nitely didn’t leave hungry; the portions at JDI are very

BY BIFF SHANKS | TABLE FOR TWO

O

When

large). I do wish we had taken the opportunity to try the chicken wings, which can come with a number of “signature sauces” (like Thai sweet chili, mango habanero and even bourbon). Jefferson Davis Inn The bar has a 319 Cedar St. number of quality, and (859) 246-0202 affordable, beers on www.jeffersondavisinn.com draft and a large selec11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Daily tion of bourbon varieties (hopefully they’ll have a list available soon for the tables). Our bill, prior to tipping came to just a hair under $60, and included an appetizer, two entrees, a dessert (bananas foster) and a few beers, a very reasonable price. If JDI can get a few of its new-restaurant kinks worked out (such as long wait times to be seated and see a server , and loud television volumes), it could be a nice spot for nibbling and socializing, especially on the patio, when the war mer weather rolls around.

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F I N E

L I N E S

Tune in to watch stories of hope and determination on the 42nd Annual

It’s Creek to Me L

BY LINDA HINCHCLIFFE | FINE LINES COLUMNIST

exington resident, author and educator, Gurney Norman is a readily recognized advocate of the culture and beauty of the Appalachian region. He grew up in the mountains there and his written works ardently express his love and respect for the area. After working as a reporter for his hometown paper, the Hazard Herald, he joined the UK faculty in 1979 and now serves as Director of the English Department’s Creative Writing Program. He received the much respected title of Poet Laureate for the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 2009, a few short years after receiving the Helen M. Lewis Community Service A ward – an award that recognized his significant contributions to the Appalachian region through his involvement with and service to its people and their communities. It is with this passion that he provides us “Ancient Creek.” In a presentation that is no subtle throwback to the folktales told to us and by us in our lifetimes, N or man places the reader down in Holiday Land, located not far from what was once the beautiful and naturalized Appalachian region. King Condominium now rules the area and, as Norman provides: “...wasn’t satisfied with just half. He wanted it all. He’d heard that this Hill Domain had a lot of beautiful rivers and valleys and meadows and great herds and flocks of wild game … So he sent his army down to dispossess the natives and put them to work as laborers for his empire.” Resistance comes in the for m of an elusive hero named Jack. He and a band of natives, and the ancient Aunt Haze from the remote Creek area of the Hill Domain, defy the edicts of King Condominium and break Ancient Creek the law with their forbidden telling of stories in their By Gurney Norman regional dialect, “sitting around an outdoor fire on a hillOld Cove Press, 2012 side, laughing and talking in illegal accents … whittling strange images from blocks of cedar … making an unauthorized wooden chair by hand.” When caught, many endured the unbearable punishment of “life at hard labor as public relations workers for various imperial enterprises,” the author writes. The King’s resolve to capture and eliminate these heathens is absolute. When the administrator of Holiday W orld, Black Duke, hears that the King is venturing to his facility for a respite, he has his staf f arrange for a theatrical event, “Haw Haw,” in an attempt to entertain and distract him. His head staf f member has arranged the event with a slight twist in the entertainment, the brothers of Jack held hostage in a plot to capture Jack when he attempts to rescue them. But as with all good folktales, all is not what it appears and the evening’s show does not go as Black Duke had anticipated. In satire that drips as heavily as torrents from the leaves of a richly wooded area in a rainstorm, Norman serves Appalachia again with his telling of “Ancient Creek.” And his writing, as delightfully exaggerated as Alexander Pope’s in “Rape of the Lock,” sheds a spotlight on the exploitation that has plagued the Appalachian region for decades, and continues to this day. Originally recorded as a spoken word piece in 1975, it is now in book for m for the first time. With much the same stream of thought as “Ancient Creek,” Nor man is also the author of the novel “Divine Right’s T rip” and “Kinfolk,” a collection of stories.

CARDINAL HILL TELETHON Sunday, April 21 WKYT TV-27 & WYMT TV-57 11:30am-6:00pm Proceeds to benefit Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital www.cardinalhill.org

CARDINAL HILLHOSPITAL

REHABILITATION

Linda Hinchcliffe

loves a good book at any hour. She particularly likes to support up-and-coming authors. She can be contacted by e-mail at linda@smileypete .com.

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

43


EXPERIENCE A SCHOOL THAT TRULY KNOWS YOU “Choosing Sayre has been a wonderful experience for my son and our family. He is excited for school every day, and he values all of his teachers because they know his interests and support his love of learning.” (859) 254-1361 • 194 North Limestone Street, Lexington, KY 40507 • www.sayreschool.org

Reclaiming a piece of America's environmental legacy with hand-made photo frames created from urban salvaged wood.

South Hill Gallery & Photo Therapy 1401 Versailles Road Lexington, KY 40504 859/253-3885 Hours: M-F 10-6; Sat. 10-2 www.SouthHillGallery.com

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


This wearable piece, entitled “Dressed to the ICD-9s” (2013) was created out of an old surgical drape that Chinn, who also works for a surgeon's office, sewed and screenprinted with ICD-9 codes (a.k.a. medical classification codes). PHOTO BY ROBBIE CLARK

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST

CHINN UP MULTI-MEDIA ARTIST STACEY CHINN USES A VARIETY OF MATERIAL TO COMPOSE ART ON AN EVEN WIDER VARIETY OF TOPICS

S

BY SARAYA BREWER CHEVY CHASER MAGAZINE

tacey Chinn got an initial whif f of her future vocation when her first grade teacher told her she was going to be an artist. “I guess I was fairly impressionable at the age of 6,” said the multi-media artist, who served as the head of Geor getown College’s sculpture department for three years, and has served as adjunct faculty in the University of Kentucky and Easter n Kentucky art departments. Chinn is one of over 30 regional female artists who will be presenting work at the upcoming “Femme-A-N est” group art show, a Gallery Hop event and benefit for The Nest Center for W omen, Children and Families, with a general “nesting” theme. Chinn will feature several photographs; an installation representing a dozen “nests” or egg-like forms hanging from clothespins; and A knitted piece that incorporates man-made yar n as well as rubber bands, metal wire, grocery bags and other materials. Known for incorporating a variety of unusual materials into her pieces – synthetic hair , fibers, found objects, metal, wool, wood – Chinn says her attention span is much like that of her 5-year -old daughter. “I’ll be working on something and I’ll literally stumble upon something else,” she said. This was the case with the photographs that she’s including in the Gallery Hop show – she had been traipsing around in a field, looking for a large stick to incorporate into another piece, when she came across a large pile of scrap metal resembling a nest. She took some photos, thinking the images could inspire a “nesting” piece for the show, and then it occurred to her that the photographs themselves were nest-themed works of art. “When I think about nesting, you take what’s around your environment and make it into something,” she said. Chinn took some time away from nesting to answer some questions about her art and other interests. For more images and infor mation about Chinn’s art – including a link to her newest line of wearable art, “alter -knit-ive,” visit her website, www.staceyrchinn.com.

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

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W h e n A R T M A T T E R S, communities F L O U R I S H .

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SmART Grants to Schools

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General Operating Support

Community Arts Grants

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013

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What’s currently on your iPod/ CD player/ record table? Adele, Billie Holiday, Dolly Parton, Mamas and the Papas, Missy Higgins, Pink, Robert Plant & Alison Krauss, Rufus W ainwright, Vanessa Carlton, Y ann Tiersen, and everything in between. Favorite TV show? “Project Runway” – hands down. What are some of your favorite local haunts?

I think downtown, with its assortment of hot spots, has an eclectic vibe. On any given Friday night, however, you’re most likely to find me curled up on my couch, knitting. You have used lots of dif ferent media in your art: sculpture, photography, paintings, textiles. Do you have a favorite medium? Is there one you’d like to pursue but haven’t yet?

I tend to approach making each work by having the thought first, then applying whatever processes or materials best suit the idea. I guess that makes me more of a “Jill of all trades...” The exploratory nature of my work and my interest in experimentation, problem solving, and lear ning with each new piece leaves little room for mastery, I suppose. I’d say I am more drawn to three-dimensional

works and often try to mingle various media in a singular piece (for example, paintings that have wooden legs, paper that is woven or sewn, or sculptures made completely from knitting). I have yet to create a large-scale fiber-textile installation, which interests me greatly. Ideas for that are currently gathering force. Talk a bit about the materials you use – wher e do you find them? How do you decide which materials to use?

I admit that I have hoarding tendencies, but favor calling myself a “collector.” I will pick up anything that I think may have the potential to be incorporated into a piece. On more than one occasion, I have made a work directly in response to what I have found lying on the sidewalk or that I have climbed over or quite literally stumbled upon in the woods (I also have a thing for nature). I enjoy using found items and aged things, and choose objects and materials that resonate with me, both man-made and not – things that have a past or connotations of a history, be they prescribed or otherwise. I also use materials and processes that reference tradition and personal narratives – both mine and others’ – and those that engender a more quiet response, as in “It’s What’s for Dinner” (2010), where knitted sausage links protrude from an old meat

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

grinder given to me by my grandmother . Are there specific themes you tend to explor e with your art?

Identity, domesticity, industry, memory, regeneration, relationships, the collective conscience, the human condition, familiarity, repetition, challenging and reassigning traditional materials and methods of production. Do you employ any sort of rituals or routines to get your creative juices flowing?

Many people have addictions; mine is making art. I think about creating things all the time. I am forever on the lookout for inspiration and consider just about everything around me as fodder for my craving – a good find, a particular conversation, or something I see in a magazine. I especially like it when a revelation about making a work comes from out of the blue, as it often does.

Femme-A-Nest Art Show 6 - 8 p.m., April 19 (Gallery Hop) Bread Box Studios, 501 W. Sixth St. Featuring poetry, music and an art exhibit with more than 30 regional female artists (including Stacey Chinn). A portion of the proceeds from all art sales will benefit The Nest Center for Women, Children and Families.

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Jeannette Walls

The Carrick House

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

Central Bank Judy & Cecil Dunn Ruth & Robert Straus Lexington Diagnostic Center & Open MRI

Join John Calipari as we welcome Jeannette Walls, best-selling authorof The Glass Castle, which is being made into a movie by Lionsgate. Critics have called Jeannette’s story “spectacular,” “extraordinary,” “incredible,” and “riveting.”

Jean & Gene Cravens Ken Kerns US Bank Tops In Lex The Carrick House

Visit oneparentscholarhouse.org or call (859) 225-4673 to purchase tickets or a table. Cost is $1000/full table, $500/half table or $50/ticket. All proceeds benefit the One Parent Scholar House, a Hope Center agency.


Pete’s List

Arts, Music, Fundraisers, Announcements, Kids, Classes, Workshops

April Events Calendar

Live Music Picks Meat Puppets. April 10. This alternative rock band has been pushing out records (more than 14) since the 1980s, and are touring in support of the April 16 release of “Rat Farm.” The group is often cited for the influence they had on Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain. The Cringe and Fanged Robot will open. 10 p.m. Cosmic Charlie’s, 388 Woodland Ave. David Mayfield Parade. April 10. A former member of Cadillac Sky and brother (and collabor ator) of songwriter Jessica Lea Mayfield, award-winning guitarist and mandolin player David Mayfield brings a powerful mix of roots, indie and bluegrass music. Local outfit Tula will open. 7 p.m. Willie’s Locally Known, 805 N. Broadway. www.willieslex.com. Moser performs Shostakovich. April 12. Lexington Philharmonic explores Dvorak’s Eighth Symphony and welcomes guest artist Johannes Moser to perform Shostakovich’s “Cello Concerto No. 1.” “Rusty Air in Carolina,” a composition combining traditional orchestral sounds with electronica by American composer Mason Bates, will provide intriguing contrast. 7:30 p.m. Singletary Center for the Arts, 405 Rose St. (859) 257-1706.

PHOTO FURNISHED

Beaux Arts Ball April 13. Since 1969, Lexington’s Beaux Arts Ball has brought together thousands of college students , local residents and visitors for a massive costume party celebrating creativity and imagination. Organized by the University of Kentucky College of Design, the ball donates proceeds to local charities. This year’s event features music from Dieselboy, Designer Drugs, Child in Disguise, Ellie Herring and more, with additional entertainment from the Rebel Riot Revue, Lexington Fashion Collaborative, Amalgamation Fire Nation and more. 9 p.m. Pepper Warehouse, 1200 Manchester St. www.beaux-arts-ball.org.

ART & EXHIBITS Tales They Told Us. Through May 12. For centuries myths, legends, epics and moral tales have delighted the imagination with fantastical worlds constructed from both fact and fib. “Tales They Told Us” is an exhibition open to artists exploring issues common in tr aditional and contemporary tales including parables, folklore, ghost stories, comic books, urban legends, tall tales, and even news stories. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues. - Fri.; 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat. - Sun. LAL Loudon House, 209 Castlewood Dr. www.lexingtonartleague.org. 3XD Design. Displace. Daddy Issues. April 4 19. This senior thesis exhibition is the culminating event for students who are completing their bachelors of fine arts degrees at Transylvania University. 12 - 5

p.m. Mon. - Fri. Morlan Gallery, 300 N. Broadway. www.transy.edu/morlan.

Lonnie Holley

Lonnie Holley: Stepping in the Footprint. April 18 – June 1. Holley’s art practice is diverse, but he is best known for richly symbolic assemblages that examine spirituality, African-American history and the interconnectedness of all things. This exhibition includes a variety of work that demonstrates his talent for creating powerful visual narratives with sculptural forms. It also features a new series of many-layered paintings on cloth created with spray-paint. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Wed. - Sat. Institute 193, 193 N. Limestone. www.institute193.org.

PHOTO FURNISHED

How Small a Thing Can Be Pleasing. April 19 May 25. This exhibit title is taken from Kentucky poet

Victor Wooten. April 15. Bass virtuoso Victor Wooten, a former member of Bela Fleck’s band, has been heralded as “the Michael Jordan of the bass” and “one of the most fearless musicians on the planet. ” 8 p.m. Buster’s Billards and Backroom, 899 Manchester Ave. (859) 368-8871. www.bustersbb.com. tadoo Lounge feat. James Friley and Richard Young. April 18. Taking place on the third Thursday of each month, the tadoo lounge sessions are a free , allages “Happy Hour” social event at the Smiley Pete headquarters, featuring art, performance, food trucks and libations, as well as billiards, pinball, a photo booth and surprises. For the April event, James Friley (Idiot Glee) and Richard Young of the Chamber Music Festival will play a live score to accompany the film masterpiece “Dog Star Man” by Stan Brakhage. 6 - 8 p.m. Smiley Pete Publishing, 434 Old Vine St. (859) 266-6537. www.tadoo.com/tadoo-lounge-sessions. Troubadour Concert Series: Richard Thompson Trio. April 9. Regarded for his guitar techniques and strange, darkly funny lyrics, British guitarist Richard Thompson returns to the Kentucky Theatre, for the first time bringing his entire band. 7:30 p.m. Kentucky Theater, 214 E. Main St. (859) 231-7924. www.troubashow.com. Visit tadoo.com daily for more listing of live music acts and other events.

About Pete’s List

How do I get my events on the list?

Pete’s List is a monthly listing of local arts , performance, workshops and other community events published each month. Due to time and space constraints, we can only publish a portion of the events featured on our online community calendar each month. Please visit www.chevychaser.com for more community events, including a weekly update of live music listings .

To submit an event to our online community calendar, visit this magazine online; click on the ‘Calendar’ tab and then ‘Submit an Event.’ Once the event is approved, it will appear on the websites of all three Smiley P ete publications: Business Lexington and Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines. Be sure to submit your event no later than the 18th of each month for possible inclusion in the following month’ s print editions of Chevy Chaser and Southsider Magazines .

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

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SPRING STYLES HAVE ARRIVED!

Wendell Berry’s poem “Sabbaths 1999, VII,” and like the poem, this exhibit will celebrate the pleasure and awe that is often inspired when we look deeply into the natural world. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mon. - Fri.; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sat. Living Arts and Science Center, 362 N. Martin Luther King Blvd. www.lasclex.org. Lexington Gallery Hop. April 19. Featuring more than 30 open venues, this event allows the community an opportunity to tour local galleries and exhibits in a fun, social setting. Many galleries provide refreshments. 5 - 8 p.m. Various locations. www.galleryhoplex.com. Curves from Math, Waves in Glass. April 21 May 26. Art and geometry merge gracefully in the origami and glass sculptures by father-and-son team Martin and Erik Demaine, engineering and computer scientists at MIT. UK Art Museum, 405 Rose St. www.uky.edu/artmuseum.

LITERATURE & FILM

Cove Press. 5:30 p.m. Morris Book Shop, 882 E. High St. (859) 276- 0494. www.morrisbookshop.com. James C. Nicholson: “Never Say Die: A Kentucky Colt, the Epsom Derby and the Rise of the Modern Thoroughbred Industry.” April 7. This book traces the history of the extraordinary colt, Kentucky-born chestnut Never Say Die, who galloped to a two-length triumph at odds of 33-1, winning the 175th Derby Stakes Race at Epsom Downs in Britain and marking an important shift in the world of Thoroughbred racing. The book begins with his foaling in Lexington, when a shot of bourbon whiskey revived him and earned him his name. 2 p.m. Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 161 Lexington Green Cir. (859) 271-5330. www.joseph-beth.com. Steampunk Film Series: “The City of Lost Children.” April 13. French directors Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s 1995 film “The City of Lost Children” tells the fantastical story of a mad scientist who invents a machine to steal the dreams of kidnapped children. 2 p.m. The Farish Theatre at the Lexington Public Library Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org. James Bond Double Feature Drive-In. April 13. The University of Kentucky Student Activities Board will host its second drive-in movie double feature, with “SkyFall” and “From Russia With Love.” Free popcorn and cotton candy. 7:30 p.m. BCTC Parking Lot, 470 Cooper Dr. (859) 257-8868. Author Talk: Erin Morgenstern. April 21. Following the April 20 Night Circus Gala at the Red Mile Round Barn, author Erin Morgerstern will discuss the writing process and inspiration for “The Night Circus.” 2 p.m. Lexington Public Library, Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org/OneBook2013/events.

316 S. Ashland Ave | (859) 266-6420 www.johnsnewclassic.com

Frank X. Walker: “Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers.” April 25. Kentucky poet laureate Frank X. Walker’s new collection of poems are created around the void left by the mur der of civil rights activist Medgar Evers in 1963. 7 p.m. Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 161 Lexington Green Cir. (859) 271-5330 www.joseph-beth.com.

Cynthia Ellingsen PHOTO FURNISHED

Cynthia Ellingsen: “Marriage Matters.” April 4 and April 12. Lexington’s Cynthia Ellingsen will read from and sign her brand-new novel, “Marriage Matters.” Weddings can be complicated… especially when three generations of women – mother, daughter and grandmother – all decide to say “I do” on the same day. 7 p.m. April 4 at Joseph-Beth Booksellers (161 Lexington Green Cir.) and 6 p.m. April 12 at Morris Book Shop (882 E. High St.). Steampunk Film Series: “Wild Wild West.” April 6. Part of the Lexington Public Library's five-week steampunk film series leading up to the Night Circus Gala event on April 20, this 1999 western remake of the 1960s television series “The Wild Wild West” features actors Will Smith, Kevin Kline and Kenneth Branagh. 2 p.m. The Farish Theatre at the Lexington Public Library Central Branch, 140 E. Main St. www.lexpublib.org. Gurney Norman: “Ancient Creek.” April 6. Kentucky literary hero (and former poet laureate) Gurney Norman returns to the Morris Book Shop to read from and sign the new edition of "Ancient Creek" from Old

50

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS Writing Habit. April 1 - 30. Participants in this online class, presented by the Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning, will log on daily for writing prompts and keep track of their writing time, while sharing in ongoing forums about their progress and work. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Intro to Creative Nonfiction. Mondays, April 8 May 13. In this six-week class, creative nonfiction writer Jason Howard will introduce participants to the essential forms of the genre, including memoir, personal essay, literary journalism and the nature essay. 5:30 - 7 p.m. The Carnegie Center, 251 W. 2nd St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Intro to Creative Nonfiction. Tuesdays, April 9 May 28. A lively, diverse group of people will explore nonfiction writing, including personal essays, columns, magazine pieces and autobiography in this class, led by Neil Chethik. Noon - 1:30, The Carnegie Center, 251 W. 2nd St. www.carnegiecenterlex.org. Creative Writing with Tarot. April 10. Jennifer Barricklow will lead a fun-filled, hands-on workshop using tarot cards to generate ideas for all kinds of writ-


The Lexington Ballet presents “Coppèlia,” April 12 - 14 at the Lexington Opera House.

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ing: fiction, poetry, even memoir. Reservations required. 6:30 p.m. Lexington Public Library, Eagle Creek Branch, 101 N. Eagle Creek Dr. Folk Art Rooster. April 13. Participants will create their own folk art rooster with the Lexington Wood Carvers Guild at McConnell Springs. All tools will be provided and registration is required. 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Lane. (859) 225-4073. Basics of Ghost Hunting. April 17. Tom Jones from the Kentucky Area Paranormal Society will talk about theories on ghosts and hauntings. Reservations required. 6:30 p.m. Lexington Public Library, Beaumont Branch, 3080 Fieldstone Way. The Magic Jam Session. April 24. Magicians refer to getting together to show off and talk about magic as a jam session. Watch top-level sleight of hand, learn how to study magic, how to rehearse, how to purchase magic wisely, and more. Reservations required. 6:30 p.m. Lexington Public Library, Village Branch, 2185 Versailles Rd.

THEATRE & PERFORMANCE Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour. Mondays. Woodsongs is a multi-media celebration of grassroots, Americana music, recorded before a live studio audience each week and syndicated on more than 500 outlets around the world. 6:30 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 300 E. Third St. www.woodsongs.com. Red Barn Radio. Wednesdays. Red Barn Radio is a

syndicated weekly radio show celebrating traditional Kentucky music. The show’s live weekly tapings are open to the public and offer the audience a unique opportunity to experience grassroots artists from Kentucky and around the globe. 7 p.m. Artsplace, 161 N. Mill St. www.redbarnradio.com. Pianolust. April 5. The public solo debut of Lexington entertainer Tedrin Blair Lindsay, who is known for his performances at “It’s a Grand Night for Singing” each year. 7:30 p.m. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. Woodford Theatre: “The Odd Couple.” April 5 7, 12 - 14 and 19 - 21. This classic comedy by Neil Simon is about two mismatched friends forced to share an apartment after having trouble with their spouses . 8 p.m. Fri. and Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. Woodford Theatre, 275 Beasley Dr., Versailles. (859) 873-0648.

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Lexington Ballet: “Coppèlia.” April 12 - 14. This lighthearted comedy about mistaken identity, mischief and love features a mysterious toymaker and his life-size doll, Coppélia. Based on a story created by E.T.A. Hoffman. 7:30 p.m. April 12 - 13; 2 p.m. April 13 - 14. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. www.lexingtonballet.org. The Euclid String Quartet. April 14. A dynamic ensemble representing players from four different continents. The Euclid Quartet is dedicated to performing contemporary music and endorsing living composers in the 21st century. 3 p.m. Singletary Center for the Arts, 405 Rose St. Balagula Theatre: “God on Trial.” April 14 - 17, 21 - 24. First published in English in 1979, this Elie

chevy chaser magazine april 2013

51


Wiesel play follows a fictitious trial calling God as the defendant after a devastating pogrom has killed all the Jews of the town of Shamgorod. 8 p.m. Natasha’s Bistro, 112 Esplanade. www.balagula.com.

Celtic Woman sound. 8 p.m. EKU Center for the Arts, 521 Lancaster Ave. (859) 622-7294.

NATURE Black Jacket Symphony. April 18. The Black Jacket Symphony returns to Lexington to perform The Rolling Stones’ “Some Girls” album live, note for note, sound for sound, exactly as it was on the record. 8 p.m. Lexington Opera House, 401 West Short Street. (859) 233-4567. Broadway LIVE: “Dreamgirls.” April 19 - 21. “Dreamgirls” tells the story of an up-and-coming 1960s girl singing group, and the triumphs and tribulations that come with fame and fortune. 8 p.m. Fri.; 2 and 8 p.m. Sat.; 2 and 7 p.m. Sun. Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short St. www.lexingtonoperahouse.com. The Lexington Singers: Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem. April 19.The Singers present one of the most monumental and important pieces from the 20th century, rarely performed because of its scope and difficulty. A multi-ensemble production and collaboration between The Lexington Singers, UK Chorale, Lexington Singers Children's Choir and UK Symphony Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Singletary Center for the Arts, 405 Rose St. www.lexsing.com. UK Theatre: “Spring Awakening: A New Musical.” April 18 - 20, 25 - 28. This Tony award-winning musical is a racy coming-of-age teen drama set in 19th-century Germany. 7:30 p.m. Thurs. - Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. Guignol Theatre, 465 Rose St. (859) 257-4929. Celtic Women. April 20. This spectacular musical experience features Celtic Woman performing classic Irish tunes such as “The Water Is Wide” and timeless pop anthems such as “Sailing,” all with the signature

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013

Spring Break at Raven Run. April 1, 3 and 5. This program offers an arts and crafts activity as well as a short nature hike. For youth K - 5th grade, a parent or adult guardian must accompany children. 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Raven Run, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 272-6105. Language of Spring Flowers. April 13, 21. A tour of dozens of early spring wildflowers in the forests of Raven Run. 1 p.m. Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 272-6105. Stargazing. April 13. Enjoy an astronomy presentation and view the night sky through a v ariety of telescopes provided by the Bluegrass Amateur Astronomy Club. 8:30 p.m. Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, Jack’s Creek Pike. (859) 271-6072. Junior Naturalist “Celebrating Earth Day.” April 20. Youth ages 5 - 10 are invited to come out to McConnell Springs to celebrate Earth Day 2012. Junior Naturalists will learn about ways to take care of the earth including recycling, composting and planting trees. Call the park to register. 11 a.m. McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Lane. (859) 225-4073.

EVENTS Thursday Night Live. Thursdays, April 4 - October. Presented by the Downtown Lexington Corporation, this free, family-friendly weekly event features a different live band every week, as well as beverages and food from local restaurants and vendors. 4:30 - 8 p.m. Fifth Third Pavilion, Cheapside Park. www.downtownlex.com.


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Kite Fest. April 6. Jacobson Park will celebrate Parks & Recreationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first major outdoor event of the season as well as National Kite Month with this colorful event, which will include face painting, kite making, giant bubbles and special entertainment. Food and beverages available onsite; picnics also encouraged. 12 - 4 p.m. Jacobson Park, 4001 Athens-Boonsboro Rd. (859) 288-2927. Kentucky Music Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. April 13. Steven Curtis Chapman, The Kentucky Headhunters, Exile, Skeeter Davis, The Hilltoppers, Old Joe Clark and Emory & Linda Martin will make up the 2013 class of Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum inductees. 8 p.m. Lexington Center Bluegrass Ballroom, 430 W. Vine St. www.kentuckymusicmuseum.com. I Know Expo. April 14. Presented by the Independent Transportation Network, this free expo will bring together scores of experts on the subject of growing older and lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transitional phases. Noon - 6 p.m. The Lexington Center, 430 W. Vine St. (859) 252-8665.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


THIS YEAR, WE’RE SUPERSIZED!

O B S E R V A T I O N S

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Counting the Years

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BY HARRIETT ROSE | OBSERVATIONS COLUMNIST

ext year the Carnegie Center will observe and celebrate its 21st birthday. I’m sure there will be articles about what it has meant to Lexington and the people it has served through its teaching, tutoring and mentoring programs. I want to talk about what it has meant to me and how grateful I am for its contribution to my life. Back in the ‘90s, my retirement activities had gotten a little old and my husband, who had been my research and writing partner during our years working at the university, suggested that I should try writing unrelated to research. I then wrote an article about life in Lexington as it had been and was no longer. He, that husband who had been the editor of a professional journal, used his editorial skill to make suggestions about my output. I made changes he suggested, but put the article away, assuming it had little merit. A couple of years later he suggested that I might like a class being offered at the Carnegie Center on non-fiction writing. I dug out the laid aside article and enrolled in the class rather dif fidently to see if I really could write. There were about 15 people in the class, taught by Jan Isenhour then. The custom was that the class members read their pieces and the class and Jan gave gentle critiques to the author. I was asked to read anything I had brought, as was customary for new class members. I did. There was a deep silence, during which I thought, “W ell, that teaches me that I am not a writer . I will have to look for another hobby.” Then a man said, “Well, it has to be published.” And the class agreed. I went home on a cloud, hardly able to wait to improve it and retur n to class, where I stayed for the next several years. One day the Chevy Chaser came, a new neighbor hood paper being run by two young men full of promise. I read a notice saying that unsolicited articles would be welcome, I sent in my article. I heard nothing. About two months later it appeared in the Chevy Chaser. I still heard nothing except from my classmates, but I was excited to see it. Then a couple of months later , the editor, Chuck Creacy, called me, saying they had received good comments on it and wondering if I had any more. I said, “No, but I can write you some more like it.” The article came out in June 1999; the next one in August 1999 (I think). I have not missed a month since. I’ve been saying it was 10 years I’ve been writing the column, but it was really 12 years. This will be my 156th column. I’ve been through four or five editors. Each time a new one came, I’ve held my breath, expecting to be told they have had enough of me. That hasn’t happened and my fan mail has only increased over the years, as have the comments I receive from per fect strangers who recognize me from my picture in the Chevy Chaser . I owe it all to the Car negie Center. I embarked on my second career due to them. It was really my final career . Preceding have been teaching public school music, editing army regulations, bookkeeping for WLEX radio station, being my Temple’s secretary and Sunday School principal, and many years as director of the Counseling Center at UK from which I retired. None of those occupations brought me the local recognition that writing for the Chevy Chaser has. Even my 20 years at UK as a psychologist made me known professionally, but this is my own home town. And I may be the bestknown nonagenarian in my home town. Thank you, Car negie Center. Thank you, Chevy Chaser.

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Pete’s Properties Real Estate Transactions in 40502, 40503

40502 890 McMeekin Pl., $710,000 233 Woodspoint Rd., $610,000 725 Beechmont Rd., $582,000 2117 Hunters Wood Ln., $515,000 3047 Clair Rd., $500,000 1209 Oak Knoll $495,000 444 Bristol Rd., $416,000 496 Seeley Dr., $400,000 720 Central Ave., $385,000 705 Edgewater Dr., $370,000 235 Cochran Rd., $370,000 755 Brookhill Dr., $360,000 420 Queensway Dr., $333,000 830 Tremont Ave., $288,000

229 Henry Clay Blvd., $248,000 3241 Raven Cir., $239,000 124 Bassett Ave., $235,000 401 Cochran Rd., $220,000 44 Richmond Ave., $210,000 345 Kingsway Dr., $210,000 232 Sherman Ave., $184,500 330 Oldham Ave., $181,000 815 Melrose Ave., $129,000 341 Owsley Ave., $87,500 925 Aurora Ave., $75,100

40503 425 Greenbriar Rd., $212,000 313 Blueberry Rd., $205,000 240 Barberry Ln., $180,000 205 Albany Rd., $170,000

Arm’s length residential sales for this magazine’s distribution area for the month of February 2013. Information compiled by Fayette County Property Valuation Administer David O’Neill. For more information on any of these properties, or others, please visit www.fayette-pva.com.

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chevy chaser magazine april 2013


Bluegrass

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225 Barrow Rd. | $1,595,000

One BR condominium in Artek Lofts! This mixed-use urban development is located downtown within the Western Suburbs Historic District. Artfully combining innovative architecture with sensitive urban planning the Artek lofts are sophisticated and sleek. Interiors feature open floor plans, contemporary cabinetry, polished concrete floors, and high efficiency heating/cooling.

Fantastic new construction in downtown Lexington! Located off the trendy North Limestone corridor, this low maintenance, highly energy efficient townhouse features 9 ft. ceilings with an open floor plan on the first level and 2 BR with full BA on the second floor. The kitchen includes granite countertops and all stainless appliances. Floors are reclaimed heart pine from Shelby County.

Nicely remodeled 2 BR, 2 BA located on the 8th floor with views of South Hanover Ave Features an open floor plan with an expanded living area, new appliances and kitchen countertops, lovely moldings and refinished floors. HVAC and windows have been replaced. Rooftop terrace overlooks downtown and Ashland Park. Walk or catch the trolley to Chevy Chase or downtown!

Stunning renovation in popular Lans-Merrick subdivision! Living room with new built-in fireplace with rock tile facing, spacious and open kitchen with Kraftmaid cabinetry, granite countertops, double ovens and 2 dishwashers, 5 inch hickory hardwood floors designer decorated throughout! Features 4 BRs, 2.5 BAs, family room, private patio, 2 car attached garage. Large corner lot!

A gorgeous circular stairway greets you in this Ashwood neighborhood home. Over 5,000 sq. ft of living space including a first floor master suite, formal living and dining rooms, an updated kitchen, family room, and private yard. Second level has an additional master suite with large master BA and 2 other spacious BRs and BA. unfinished basement and 2 car garage.

500 S Mill St. | $595,000

515 S. Mill St. | $749,000 The perfect blend of historic with elite scale modern amenities. Built in 1838, the house sports elevated ceilings, some original floors and multiple fireplaces. Lovingly and beautifully renovated. 3 BR and 2 1/2 BA. Master BR has large walk-in closet and juliette balcony. First floor BR with bath. Built in library, house wide sound system and security system. Private, fenced yard.

5320 McCowans Ferry Rd., Versailles $1,950,000

11238 Campton Rd. Stanton, KY | $1,250,000

650 Stonegate Ln. Irvine, KY | $1,700,000

Downtown living at its best. Spacious Padgett built townhome. 1st floor MBR. Recent interior paint and carpet. Hardwood floors, stainless appliances, granite kitchen countertops. Den upstairs could be converted into 4th BR. Upstairs balcony and large deck. 10 foot ceilings on 1st floor. Mud room off garage. Neutral decor. Move right in.

92 acre Woodford County horse farm with a fully renovated and unique home, 4 barns, walking ring, mangager’s residence and gorgeous views of the countryside. Historic home is 4500 s.f., w/ 5 BR, 4 BAs, wide plank floors and a pine contemporary kitchen with cathedral ceiling. Too many features to list.

Privately owned 603 +/-acre parcel in the heart of Natural Bridge State Park and Red River Gorge. Outstanding scenic beauty, it is located 2 miles off the Mountain Parkway on the waters of the Middle Fork of Red River. This beautiful wooded property has 8-10 miles of hiking and ATV trails with some cleared areas, natural arches, and springs.

Awe-inspiring location in Estill County. Main house features 5 BRs, 5.5 BAs w/in-ground pool and gorgeous views. Manager’s house has 5 BRs and 3.5 BAs. The gate-keepers house has 2 BRs, 1 BA. There is a 7-stall horse barn with full BA, 3 ponds and 1 1/2 miles+ frontage on the beautiful Red River and all comes with 210 gorgeous rolling acres! Call to find out all amenities.

Becky Reinhold, Principal Broker

cell 859.338.1838 • office 859.268.0099 • www.bgsir.com • becky@bgsir.com chevy chaser magazine april 2013

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Chevy Chaser April 2013  

Chevy Chaser April 2013