Page 1

SMILEY PETE

PUBLISHING

MAY 10, 2013

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 10

Need for honey bees grows more obvious amid colony loss

www.bizlex.com

Addressing immigration reform

PAGE 9

$2.25

A PA R T N E R I N P R O G R E S S

Focus: Human Resources

Rest, refreshment, renewal

Design Slam invites public to experience design PAGE 10

Job sabbaticals are coveted but rare, especially in central Kentucky By Dan Dickson CONTRIBUTING WRITER

T

he word “sabbatical,” with origins in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, derived from the root word “sabbath,” means a rest from work or a hiatus, often lasting a month or two but sometimes up to a year . The concept has been seen in higher education circles for decades, although in the recent economy, sabbaticals have been fewer and farther between. They still appear in corporate America as a sign-on incentive or a reward in both trendy tech companies (Intel and Adobe, for example) and a few old standards (such as General Mills and American Express). But sometimes sabbaticals are of fered in grassroots organizations. SEE SABBATICALS PAGE 13 4

Brewery build-up Alltech’s Lexington Brewing Co. in process of major expansion Erik A. Carlson

Proposed legislation would allow some undocumented immigrants to adjust their status Beginning with this installment, the Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, LLP immigration team, the largest immigration practice in the r egion, will offer readers of Business Lexington a thr ee-part series outlining and discussing the proposed bipartisan legislation surrounding immigration reform that a group of eight senators, led by Senators John McCain and Charles Schumer, introduced into the Senate April 16: the “Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act.” In Part 1, Jessica B. Oswald, a paralegal in the fir m’s Louisville office, provides an analysis of the pr oposed steps to legalize the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the United States.

By Jessica B. Oswald

T

GUEST WRITER

he immigration debate has taken a front seat in President Barack Obama’s second term, with the big question of how to handle the nearly 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the country and fix an outdated immigration system. A bipartisan group of eight senators has teamed up to provide a comprehensive immigration reform package that provides commonsense solutions to problems within the current system, while shoringup the nation’s borders from another wave of illegal immigrants. SEE IMMIGRATION PAGE 114

BUSINESS LEXINGTON

W

hen Alltech purchased the Lexington Brewing Company in 1999, the Kentucky Ale it produced was used mostly as a promotional item to be handed out at corporate events, according to Hal Gervis, global operations manager for Alltech’s Lexington Brewing and Distilling Co. That’s changed. Their beer is now available in 13 states; Alberta, Canada; Ireland; and in Beijing and Shanghai, and the company is in the process of shifting much of its production from its cramped brewery on Maxwell and Cross streets to the former Kentucky Eagle distribution facility on Angliana Avenue. On May 11, they’ll release their newest beer, an India Pale Ale (IP A), as a part of the inaugural Lexington Craft Beer W eek. The week culminates with Alltech’s seventh annual home brewers competition, with the winner getting a commercial batch of their beer produced and distributed in Lexington as well as being entered in the Pro/Am category at the Great American SEE ALLTECH PAGE 7 4

INSIDE

POINTS OF INTEREST: IMMIGRATION PAGE 3 • BRIEFS PAGE 4 • WHO’S WHO IN LEXINGTON PAGE 6 • NEW UK PROVOST PAGE 8 EDUCATING HR PROFESSIONALS PAGE 15 • BIZLIST: LOCAL TOP LOCAL EMPLOYERS (NON-MANUFACTURING) PAGE 16 • MENTORING PAGE 17 RJ CORMAN’S HEALTHY SPIRIT OF GIVING PAGE 18 • UK HONOR’S APPLICANT POOL PAGE 19 • PARTING THOUGHTS PAGES 20 • LEADS PAGE 22

H1-B visa quota gone in five days PAGE 12

Rules of termination: Contemplate before you terminate PAGE 14


We proudly support

Central Kentucky ´6OHHS2XWÀWWHUVKDVEHHQSURXGWREHDQLQWHJUDOSDUWRIWKH&HQWUDO .HQWXFN\FRPPXQLW\HYHUVLQFHZHRSHQHGRXUÀUVWVWRUHLQ/H[LQJWRQ RYHUWHQ\HDUVDJR6LQFHWKHQZH·YHJURZQWRRYHUORFDWLRQVLQ FHQWUDO.HQWXFN\DQGPRUHWKDQORFDWLRQVVWDWHZLGH:HFRXOGQ·W KDYHGRQHLWZLWKRXW\RXUVXSSRUW :H·YHDOVREHOLHYHLQSD\LQJLWIRUZDUG$QGLW·VEHHQRXUSULYLOHJHWR VXSSRUWPDQ\FKDULWDEOHRUJDQL]DWLRQVWKURXJKRXWWKH\HDUVµ

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Immigration: Looking at the second generation The U.S.-born children of immigrants, referred to as “second-generation Americans,” are growing up to do much better than their foreign-born parents, based on socioeconomic factors analyzed by the Pew Research Center. According to the 2012 data, adult second-generation Americans have higher incomes, are more likely to own homes and graduate from college, and are less likely to live in poverty than their immigrant parents. In terms of socioeconomic attainment, the statistics for U.S.-born children of immigrants closely resemble those of the general U.S. adult population.

Comparing Immigrants, the Second Generation and All U.S. Adults (1st generation refers to immigrants) Median annual household income (in $)

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Six out of ten Hispanic and Asian-American adults who are the U.S. born children of immigrants consider themselves to be “typical Americans,” compared to three out of ten foreignborn American immigrants.

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Speaking the Language Nine in ten second-generation Americans of Hispanic and Asian descent are proficient English speakers.

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Eight in ten second-generation Hispanics report that they can speak Spanish at least pretty well. Four in ten second-generation Asian-Americans say they can speak their parent’s native tongue pretty well.

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Hispanics in Kentucky, by the numbers of Hispanics in Kentucky Hispanic population in Kentucky 130,000 Total who are native-born 56% Pct. (3 percent of overall state population) Hispanic population in Fayette Median age of Kentucky’s County, (7 percent of county population) 14 20,474 Total native-born Hispanics age of Kentucky’s Percent change in Fayette County’s 139% Hispanic population from 2000 to 2010 31 Median foreign-born Hispanics annual personal earnings of of foreign-born $18,000 Median Hispanics of age 16 or older 63% Percentage without health insurance of Hispanics ages 18-64 of native-born in Kentucky who are living in poverty 28% Percentage 17% Percentage without health insurance

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SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER, 2013.

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

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Hospice of the Bluegrass announced Friday morning that it will reduce staff by 2.5 percent, a total of 16 positions.

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A release from the organization that provides end-of-life care states hospice programs nationally have faced significant cuts in reimbursements. The 2 percent rate cut from sequestration, which began April 1, is the third reduction for hospice programs enacted by the federal government since 2009. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Affordable Care Act also have imposed permanent reductions in hospice reimbursement rates. Also, in the past 15 months Hospice of the Bluegrass has been admitting higher numbers of patients, but they are coming to Hospice later in their disease progression. In fact, Hospice has seen a 30 percent decline in the length of time a patient is in the program.

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“The care to the nearly 900 patients and families receiving services each day from Hospice of the Bluegrass will not be disrupted,” Gretchen Brown, Hospice of the Bluegrass president and CEO said in a release. Hospice of the Bluegrass continues to be committed to compassionate quality care for the terminally ill, their families and the grieving in the 32 central, southeastern and northern Kentucky county service area. “This decision was not made lightly and we regret having to take this action,” she said. “We care about the employees who are losing their positions and will do what we can to make a difficult situation more bearable.”

www.lexingtonangler.com

Hospice of the Bluegrass has offices in Lexington, Frankfort, Cynthiana, Florence, Hazard, Corbin, Harlan and Pikeville. The staff reduction only affects clinical and administrative staff in central Kentucky. Employees affected by the change have been offered a severance package and given at least 30 days’ notice.

“Business Lexington has allowed us a way to communicate to the business community in a very targeted manner with a message that is made just for business clients. We’ve found that there is no other way to reach the Lexington marketplace without these publications.” Michael Sadofsky, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Republic Bank

BusinessLexington A PARTNER IN PROGRESS

F O R A D V E R T I S I N G I N F O C A L L 8 5 9 . 2 6 6 . 6 5 3 7 O R V I S I T W W W. B I Z L E X . C O M

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Craft Beer Week kicks off May 13 A week honoring craft beer at locations worldwide and here in Lexington will start on Monday, May 13. Put together by LexBeerScene.com with sponsors tadoo.com, West Sixth Brewing Company, Drake’s and Kentucky Ale, Lexington Craft Beer Week will be held at numerous venues around town. There will be at least one event each night “to maximize and flaunt the exploding beer scene in Lexington,” according to LexBeerScene’s Chris Vandergrift, who also started the successful Fest of Ale , which has been held on Labor Day weekend since 2009 at the Fifth Third Pavilion at downtown’s Cheapside Park.

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

Venues for the week include the Beer Trappe, Country Boy Brewing, multiple Liquor Barn locations, the Village Idiot, Pazzo’s Pizza Pub, Drake’s, Arcadium, Lexington Beerworks, Whole Foods, the Alltech Kentucky Ale Brewery, West Sixth and more. To celebrate the occasion, two of Lexington’s newer breweries, West Sixth and Country Boy, have teamed up to produce a beer called Country Western. The beer’s name, a hat-tip to the collaboration between the breweries, will be a hoppy pale ale and will be released to start the week of the event at participating bars and restaurants. It will only be available during Craft Beer Week and can also be found at both the Country Boy taproom on Chair Ave. and the West Sixth taproom on the corner of 6th St. and Jefferson. “Brewing a beer together is not only a great way to show just how tight-knit the craft beer community is here in Lexington, but also to celebrate a great event like craft beer week,” said West Sixth co-founder Brady Barlow. Entry to most events will be free; the only exceptions will be events where meals are served. For more information on the event, visit http://www.lexbeerscene.com.

April announcements and ribbon cutting brought jobs The last few weeks of April proved strong for economic development initiatives in central Kentucky. Well more than 1,000 new jobs were either announced or begun in office openings. Two-hundred and fifty jobs are getting underway at Boston-based law firm Bingham McCutchen’s Global Operations Center; another 750 announced at Toyota as its Georgetown facility adds an assembly line to build the Lexus ES 350; 75 announced at Tiffany and Co.’s Lexington production facility; 15 at the new downtown Lexington office of Transposagen, a biotech company that relocated from Philadelphia; and another 30 to 50 full-time jobs at Birtley, Ky.’s first Chinese-owned manufacturer, which celebrated a ribbon cutting at the end of April.

State CIO named Governor Steve Beshear named the deputy commissioner for information technology and telecommunications for the City of New York as Kentucky’s new chief information officer. James M. Fowler will start his duties as CIO June 1 when he’ll be taking over the role from Finance and Administration Cabinet Secretary Lori Flanery, who has served as interim CIO for most of the governor’s administration. Fowler, who will oversee the Commonwealth Office of Technology and its more than 650


employees, will also be a member of the Governor’s Executive Cabinet.

Bike Lexington events beginning in May This year’s Bike Lexington Commuter Challenge is underway. The event is a competition to see who can log the most bike commutes and which businesses can encourage the most bicycle commuting during the month of May. Any business, nonprofit, organization or individual in Fayette County can participate. Large companies and organizations are encouraged to register by division or department to encourage friendly competition within the organization. Businesses can compete in the following categories: small (1-10 employees), medium (11–25 employees), large (26–100 employees) and extra-large (101+ employees). The 10th anniversary of the premiere event of Bike Lexington, the Family Fun Ride, will take place on Saturday, May 18. Starting at the Robert F. Stephens Courthouse Plaza in downtown Lexington, the Family Fun Ride route caters to all cycling levels and skills. This year organizers are providing a safe shortcut for children on tricycles and training wheels to a special car-free kid zone. Registration for the event begins at 8 a.m. and the ride leaves promptly at 10 a.m. All participants must register on-site. Activities associated with the Family Fun Ride on May 18 include: Sprout Spring, Safe Kids Bike Rodeo, helmet and bike giveaways and bike polo. For dates, times, other details, and to register for the Commuter Challenge, visit www.bikelexington.com.

BHG executive passes Restaurants of the Bluegrass Hospitality Group stayed dark until 5 p.m. on May 2 in honor of the company’s chief operating officer, Ron Rager, who died April 28. Rager had been with the company that owns Malone’s, Sal’s Chophouse, Drake’s and Harry’s since 2007 after coming over from restaurant Thomas and King, according to an email sent to patrons by BHG. “Ron Rager brought out the best in everyone that he knew,” BHG co-founder Bruce Drake said in the email. Rager served as chairman of the Kentucky Restaurant Association in 2012. A native of Chicago, he also served in the Air Force and was later employed as a civilian by the military before coming to Lexington.

THE GRAMMAR GOURMET What’s the difference? BY NEIL CHETHIK

What’s the difference between a bedroom suite and a bedroom suit? The former usually includes a bed, dressers, nightstands and perhaps a vanity with a mirror. The latter is your pjs. The noun suite (pronounced sweet) means a set of items that forms a unit. So you can buy a suite of bedroom furniture, computer programs, or pots and pans. You can even buy a suite of clothes that match, but it’s probably better to drop the e and use suit (pronounced sute)when garments are involved: a swimming suit, running suit, business suit.

HIGH HOPE DAY at the Kentucky Horse Park SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 • POST TIME 1:00 pm Beginning at Noon Activities include Terrier Races, Silent Auction, Arts & Crafts Fair, Face Painting, Obstacle Course, Bounce Castles, Pony Rides, Pirate Ship Rides, Stick Horse Races, and much more.O

For Information call (859) 967-9444 or visit www.highhopesteeplechase.com ONLY $25 per car for general tailgating on the rail of the course, includes event program!

What’s the difference between rein and reign? The former is a leather strap used to control a horse. The latter refers to the period in which someone is in power. You can merge the two for fun: "The reigning Kentucky Derby-winning jockey gathered up the reins of his mount." What’s the difference between levy and levee? A levy is a tax when used as a noun. As a verb, levy means to impose or collect taxes. Levee, meanwhile, is a noun referring to a wall or embankment designed to prevent a body of water from overflowing. You can play these two together: "The government levied a fee to pay for the levee." What’s the difference between quash and squash? Quash means to suppress forcibly and completely. Squash means to beat, squeeze, press or crush something into flatness. You quash a rumor; you squash a cockroach.

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Rager was 50 years old.

CORRECTION Due to an error, the types of townhomes being built by the Andover Management Group were misreported in the April 26 edition of Business Lexington. Prices for their townhomes start in the $250,000 range and go up to the low to mid $300,000 range before upgrades are added. The square footage of these townhomes range from 1,964 square feet to 2,749 square feet.

What’s the difference between using these words correctly or not? Credibility. Neil Chethik, aka the Grammar Gourmet, is executive director at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning (www.carnegieliteracy.org) and author of FatherLoss and VoiceMale. The Carnegie Center offers writing classes and seminars for businesses and individuals. Contact Neil at neil@carnegiecenterlex.org or (859) 254-4175. Find something tadoo.

We regret the error.

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

5


BusinessLexington CHUCK CREACY

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CHRIS EDDIE

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SUSAN BANIAK Features Editor susan@bizlex.com

WHOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SWHO EMPLOYMENT AND AWARDS IN OUR COMMUNITY

ERIK A. CARLSON

Reporter/Editor â&#x20AC;˘ Weekly Wire erik@bizlex.com

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ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

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AMY EDDIE

sales and service. He will work primarily in the Louisville and Lexington markets.

New Hires & Promotions Green Chesnut & Hughes PLLC (formerly Green & Chesnut PLLC) has announced that Elizabeth Snow Hughes has joined the firm. Hughesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; practice focuses on criminal defense, employment law and litigation (including advising employers with respect to policies, drafting handbooks and handling unemployment claims), and business litigation.

Audio Authority, manufacturer of AV switching, distribution, conversion and intercom products, announced Tony Ferrero is joining the company as sales manager. PNC Wealth Management team announced that Marnie Daniels has been appointed as assistant vice president and relationship manager based out of its Lexington location.

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For licensing and reprints of content, contact Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reprints at (877) 652-5295.

Jill Stowe has been named director of University of Kentucky Ag Equine Programs and Dickson Professor of Equine Science and Management beginning May 1. Stowe is an associate professor within the College of Agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Agricultural Economics.

Board Announcements The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Airport Boar has welcomed new members Rear Admiral William V. Alford, Jr. USN (retired) and James D. Coles. Alford and Coles will serve four-year terms and will replace outgoing Airport Board members Les Kimbrough and Porter G. Peeples.

Wyatt has announced the addition of two attorneys to its Lexington office â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Robert S. Ryan and Suzan J. Hixon. Forcht Bank has named Jonathan Payne as director of retail

Council for Burley Tobacco has

elected new members to represent the growers-at-large for the organization: David Chappell, Todd Clark, Greg Harris, Hampton Henton, Rod Kuegel and Al Pedigo. Scott Travis and Shane Wiseman were the growers elected to represent the Kentucky Farm Bureau on the board. Bob James and Eddie Warren were the growers elected to represent The Burley Growers Cooperative Growers Association on the board. Kenneth Reynolds was the grower elected to represent The Burley Stabilization Corporation on the board. The Board elected the following officers to serve a two-year term for the organization: president, Rod Kuegel; vice president, Scott Travis; secretary, Hampton Henton; and treasurer, Eddie Warren.

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RYAN

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PAYNE

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Kudos Scott Smith, dean of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, was honored with the William E. Lyons Award for Outstanding Service from UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Martin School of Public Policy and Administration and the Department of Political Science.

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Alltech CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Beer Fest in Denver this October. The IPA will be Alltechâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first canned beer, to be followed closely by a rebranded Kentucky KĂślsch, currently called Kentucky Light. The IPA will be sold in four -packs of 16-ounce cans, as well as limited bottles. The KĂślsch will also be sold in the pintsized aluminum cans. The IPA will join the Light/KĂślsch, Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale, Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout and the original, Kentucky Ale, in the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full-time lineup of products. Since starting of f with Kentucky Ale, Gervis and N athan Canavera, beer and spirits brand manager, said the tastes of the public have evolved from â&#x20AC;&#x153;the yellow fizzy water.â&#x20AC;? And, that is one of the reasons the company is rebranding the KĂślsch, a crisp German-style beer that is popular among beer enthusiasts. It is made by many craft breweries that must follow stringent brewing standards similar to the laws that declare what can be called bourbon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The consumer is smart enough to know what a KĂślsch is, shame on us for calling it a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; so long,â&#x20AC;? Canavera said. The IPA and KĂślsch will be available thanks to the addition of a canning line that has recently been installed at the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facility on Angliana, part of a $20 million investment. In addition to cans, soon the beer will be placed in kegs on Angliana as beer is trucked from the Cross St. brewery, and in increasing amounts, brewed on site. By this time next year , Gervis said the

company will have a new bottling line operating on Angliana, too, as the vintage bottler on Cross Street will be decommissioned. That brewery will be scaled back to small amounts to demonstrate the brewing process for those on tours of the adjacent T own Branch Distillery. To get to this point, Gervis said it took a lot of pounding the pavement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way we got traction was making sure we were intrinsically a part of all the local events and out there banging the drum. Everything from the Humane Society to when Thursday N ight Live was three men and a lawn chair , we were there and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still there,â&#x20AC;? Gervis said of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local approach. And in doing that, they produced what he called â&#x20AC;&#x153;gatewayâ&#x20AC;? beers that would be palatable to most beer drinkers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to get people to go from Bud Light to [Bellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] Two Hearted IPA. So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happened is guys who are making beer have made gateway beers, beers that are accessible, and [itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made] a great amount of beer accessible,â&#x20AC;? Gervis said. Gervis said Alltech took a similar approach with the IPA, which he said might not score high on beer criticsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reviews but will with consumers who wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find it too harsh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beer aficionados are going to say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You need to hop the hell out of me.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to do it,â&#x20AC;? Gervis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The IPAs I like are the ones I can have one, and I can have another . So if I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get 2,000 points on a hops score, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really mind.â&#x20AC;? While the production continues to expand, as do its distribution territories, Canavera said the Lexington Brewing and Distilling Co. is not a major player on the

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Lexington Brewery Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest offering, India Pale Ale (IPA) PHOTO FURNISHED

national beer market. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The best-known craft breweries in the country you can think of off the top of your head, N ew Belgium who makes Fat Tire or Sierra Nevada, those guys are over a million barrels [of beer produced per year], and last year we did 30,000,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We feel big here in our hometown, but when I step foot in the Great American Beer Fest, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a small fish.â&#x20AC;?

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But Gervis said while the Angliana expansion phases in, the company is soon to lose one aspect of being a small fish as an improvement will be made to its existing bottling line on Cross Street in advance of the new one being in place on Angliana. N ew labelers will be added, which will keep the paper labels from peeling of f bottles, or at least make them harder to peel off on their own.

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The One Parent Scholar House makes it possible for single parents with small children to earn their college or post-secondary degree, empowering them to sustain their families and pass the love of education to their own children. One Parent Scholar House resident Lauren is pursuing a degree in Nursing from University of Kentucky; pictured here with her daughter Iris.

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Business Lexington â&#x20AC;˘ May 10, 2013

Join John Calipari as we welcome Jeannette Walls, best-selling author of The Glass Castle, which is being made into a movie by Lionsgate. Critics have called Jeannetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story â&#x20AC;&#x153;spectacular,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;extraordinary,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;incredible,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;riveting.â&#x20AC;? Jeannette Walls

Kentucky Employersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mutual Wabuck Development Company Keeneland Association Justin & Molly Yandell Forcht Bank Erin & Bill Rouse Central Bank Judy & Cecil Dunn

Ruth & Robert Straus Lexington Diagnostic Center & Open MRI Jean & Gene Cravens Ken Kerns US Bank Tops In Lex The Carrick House

Visit oneparentscholarhouse.org or call (859) 225-4673 to purchase tickets or a table. Cost is $1000/full table, $500/half table or $50/ticket. All proceeds beneďŹ t the One Parent Scholar House, a Hope Center agency.

7


University of Denver dean named UK provost

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hristine Riordan, dean of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, has accepted an offer to become the University of Kentucky’s next Provost. According to a release from the university, Rior dan’s appointment as the school’s chief academic officer is contingent upon apRIORDAN proval by the Board of Trustees at their May 15th meeting. “Dr. Riordan’s candidacy stood out for so many people I talked with for a number of reasons,” UK President Eli Capilouto said in the school’s announcement. "Her compelling communications skills, her deep understanding of higher education’s future and how she has led a college to prominence, and the sense of excitement her candidacy generated as she discussed her commitment to working collaboratively as we build upon our missions of education, research and service,” were all contributing factors to her appointment. Riordan replaces Kumble Subbaswamy, who left last year to assume the position of chancellor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. “The energy, strength and commitment

of the UK community are clear . It will be a privilege to serve the distinguished UK faculty, staff, students and alumni, and become part of this outstanding institution and community,” Riordan stated in a release. Riordan comes from the eighth oldest business school in the country with a global network of over 33,000 faculty, alumni, students and staff, and is internationally ranked as one of the top business schools. Riordan has her MBA and Ph.D. from Georgia State University and earned her degree in textile engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. According to her biography from the University of Denver, Riordan serves on the executive committee of the board of trustees for the Mile High United Way and is also on the board of directors for Junior Achievement-Rocky Mountain, the Colorado Society of CPAs and the international business honor society, Beta Gamma Sigma. She also chaired a major committee of the Colorado Olympic Exploratory Committee. She was also recently elected to the board of AACSB, the international accrediting association for business schools. For the job, Riordan beat two other finalists: N ancy W . Brickhouse, interim provost at the University of Delaware; and Jose Luis Bermudez, dean of the College of Liberal Arts at T exas A&M University. All three finalists visted UK during the week of April 22 for interviews.

Richmond Downtown Association follows Thursday Night Live trend By Erica Childress CONTRIBUTING WRITER - MADISON COUNTY

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he Richmond Downtown Association has partnered with local businesses on and around Main Street to create a weekly Thursday Night Live event. Aimed at promoting businesses and drawing customers out for a night on the town, Richmond’s first Thursday Night Live was held April 25. Local restaurants and retail stores were included, such as DSP The Studio, Currier Music, Purdy’s Cof fee Co., Babylon Café, Mike’s Bike Shop, Madison Gardens, the Copper Still and the Paddy W agon. These businesses offered discounts, dinner and drink specials, as well as live music. The Downtown Richmond Association sponsors Thursday Night Live created this event with the help of a committee to promote economic growth in downtown Richmond. Research was done on other weekly events, such as Lexington’s popular Thursday Night Live. The difference between Lexington and Richmond’s Thursday Night Live event is that Richmond emphasizes individual business promotion. “I don’t want this to tur n into a bar hopping scene,” Rex said. To avoid this, she encourages the businesses to offer discounts only from 4-7 p.m. The goal of Richmond’s Thursday Night Live is to draw customers into businesses. The Downtown Richmond Association hopes Thursday Night Live will help promote all businesses downtown. “W e

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

want to expand the event,” Rex said. There have been suggestions submitted to the events subcommittee to have a band on the lawn of the courthouse. There have also been suggestions to dedicate one Thursday each month as “kids night” to encourage families to come out to Thursday Night Live. Other suggestions will be submitted to the subcommittee and then go before the Downtown Richmond Association for approval. The businesses that have gotten involved in Thursday Night Live so far are mostly the newer businesses in downtown Richmond. Rex said that not every downtown business is participating because they are waiting to get a feel of what Thursday N ight Live will become. She hopes that eventually all businesses will come on board, and the more businesses that get involved, the more successful it will be. Each business is featuring a dif ferent special each week. Those will be publicized on the Downtown Richmond Association’s Facebook page. Rex said she has a passion for downtown Richmond and wants to focus on the positive and upbeat things that Richmond has to offer. Thursday Night Live has a lot of potential. Rex believes that great success isn’t going to happen overnight but with the continued support from the businesses, the residents of Richmond, and the partner ships, Thursday N ight Live will be successful.


PHOTO FURNISHED

Need for honey bees grows more obvious amid colony losses By Tim Thornberry

fall, the populations were already light going into the winter season. oney bees are one of nature’s most All this will ultimately affect consumers. important assets, as pollinators of Burgess said, first, there will be less honey many flowers, fruits and vegetables, on the market and there will be fewer pollias well as honey producers. Keeping the in- nators around for agricultural crops. sects around is a big deal to both those in the “Beekeepers right now are busy splitbee business and those who just like to eat. ting their hives, trying to get their numbers But massive losses in honey bee popu- back up to where they were, but that’s going lations are making many in and out of the to mean not as strong colonies to take adindustry nervous. A phenomenon known as vantage of the nectar flow,” he said. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is grabbing And that could mean big dollar losses, most of the bee headlines and has since as the value of bee pollination in the United 2006, when the condition was given a name States is about $19 billion, said Burgess, who and people outside of the beekeeping arena is also a beekeeper himself with a 600-hive became aware of just what losing so many commercial operation in South Mississippi. bees could mean. He said while he can’t speak as to Kentucky state apiarist Sean Bur gess whether other states are seeing the same said the state suffered high winter losses this losses as Kentucky, he did incur similar year, something beekeepers did not need. losses to his operation as temperature swings “A lot of beekeepers have lost up to 50 were present in that area, too. percent of their colonies, with an average of Burgess also said that beekeepers could 35 to 40 percent losses this year,” he said. conceivably build back up their hive numbers While some winter losses are expected, this year, but the newer colonies won’t have those experienced this year were likely the the field force an unaffected hive would have. result of early spring temperature swings While natural occurrences in the from warm back to cold. weather definitely have the ability to af fect “The weather would war m up during honey bee populations, many feel there are the day, and bees would go out and forage, other factors contributing, like the use of along with a lot of activity inside the hive. pesticides. Modern agriculture is dependent When the temperature dropped at night, the on the use of pesticides to produce lar ger bees were forming loose clusters and freez- crops for ever -increasing world demands, ing and dying,” Burgess said. but just what effects those chemicals are havNormally, despite the winter tempera- ing on honey bees is now being debated on tures outside, a tight cluster within the hive a very public stage. keeps inside temperatures in the low 90s. Studies across the country and in other However, the swings in temperatures parts of the world have shown a class of inthis spring, coupled with last year’s extremely secticides known as neonicotinoids may be hot, dry weather, delivered a one-two punch harming many species, including the honey to the bees and beekeepers. Burgess said un- bee. The European Food Safety Authority less bees were being fed supplementally last (EFSA) issued a statement last month that CONTRIBUTING WRITER: AGRICULTURE

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noted agency scientists have identified a number of risks posed to bees by three neonicotinoid insecticides. “The [EFSA] was asked by the European Commission to assess the risks associated with the use of clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam as seed treatment or as granules, with particular regard to their acute and chronic effects on bee-colony survival and development; their effects on bee larvae and bee behavior; and the risks posed by sub-lethal doses of the three substances,” the statement read. Of those three, imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. One of the conclusions of the study suggested the use of these chemicals should only be considered acceptable around crops not attractive to honey bees. In the United States, a group of beekeepers and five different environmental and consumer groups have sued the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for “failing to protect pollinators from dangerous pesticides.” In a release from the Center for Food Safety (CFS), one of those five groups, the agency pointed out that the EP A was formally petitioned a year ago and asked to suspend the use of clothianidin, one of the two pesticides listed in the suit. “Beekeepers and environmental and consumer groups have demonstrated time and time again over the last several years that EPA needs to protect bees. The agency has refused, so we’ve been compelled to sue,” said CFS attor ney Peter T . Jenkins. “EPA’s unlawful actions should convince the court to suspend the approvals for clothianidin and thiamethoxam products until those violations are resolved.” Bayer Crop Science, the maker of cloth-

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

ianidin, sees things differently and in a document posted on its website notes that there has been no demonstrated ef fect on bee health associated with use of clothianidin or other neonicotinoid-based insecticides. Randy Ison, president of the Kentuck y State Beekeepers Association, said while CCD has brought most of the attention to the loss of honey bees, he feels like it is a pest known as the Varroa mite that is most dangerous to bees. The tick-like parasite first showed up in this country in the 1980s and was responsible for destroying most feral bee colonies along with devastation to managed colonies. Ison said the problem with finding a chemical that can rid a colony of the Varroa mite is the fact that the bees are making a food that humans consume, which is something the EPA has to take into account when issuing permission to use such chemicals. “That really changed things in the 1980s and made the domestic honey bee more important as pollinators,” he said. “In the last 20 years, we’ve gotten a lot better at controlling the Varroa mite, but that was probably the most devastating thing for hone y bees in the last 20 to 30 years. CCD is not as threatening to the bee population; however, it has brought a lot of attention to the needs of the bees.” Regardless of what is killing hone y bees, most will argue it is something that will ultimately affect all consumers. In addition, the matter will likely remain a “he said, she said” issue, with environmental and food safety groups arguing for discontinuing the use of many chemicals while pesticide companies support studies showing no connection between their products and the loss o f honey bees.

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will help us partner with 1 6 families in 2013 so they may achieve affordable homeownership.” Daniel O. Ware, AIA EKC president, saw his first Design Slam during the AIA Regional Convention in Lexington last fall. “It was incredible to witness the energy as teams from Kentucky and Indiana generated designs,” he said. “The Design Slam is exciting because it’s such an accelerated process. It can take months to design a building. We’re challenging teams to do that in an hour. I realized this was an opportunity for AIA EKC to show the public what architecture is about in an entertaining and energetic competition.” With approximately 255 members, the AIA EKC represents 60 easter n Kentucky counties, serving as the voice of the architectural profession and a resource for members. “Our chapter is focused on promoting the profession of architecture, advancing the standards of architectural education, advancing the living standards of people through their improved environment and increasing our service to society,” Ware said. “For this event, AIA EKC expanded our reach by partnering with Fayette Alliance, an organization with an active membership also interested in the design of redevelopment,” The Design Slam said Ben Simmons, AIA EKC director of comparticipants will offer munity outreach. their creative ideas for Though not identical, the AIA EKC and development of the Fayette Alliance share common interests. A space at 137 Main St., across from the proposed coalition of citizens dedicated to achieving CentrePointe site. sustainable growth in Lexington-Fayette County through land-use advocacy, educaPHOTO FURNISHED tion and promotion, Fayette Alliance serves as a voice for sustainable growth. There are more than 12,000 acres of underused and blighted land inside the city for potential redevelopment. “When we were approached by AI A EKC, we felt the Design Slam was a chance to highlight sustainable growth,” said Knox van Nagell, Fayette Alliance executive director. “The focus of this particular event is redevelopment, which is part of Lexington’s ongoing renaissance.” West 6th Brewing is a successful example of that renaissance. The for mer Rainbo Bread bakery is now a thriving business devoted to helping the community. “West 6th emulates what the Design Slam is all about,” said van Nagell. “It’s an incredible urban space brought to life with investment and design.” “I’m looking forward to seeing how the public views architecture, the spectacle o f design,” said Ware. “What attracts people to design and what do people find exciting about design?” People are inspired by design and creativity in Lexington, said van Nagell. At the Design Slam, Lexington’s design talent and creativity will be represented b y Matthew Brooks from Alt 32 with Michael program, including the type of building and Meter from Kentucky for Kentucky will N eureither and Greg Hosfield from Ross the purpose it will serve, will be announced serve as emcee. Tarrant Architects; Michael Gillette, Beth The event begins at 5 p.m. and is free, to the teams and the audience when the DeHunter and Brandon Spencer from Ross Taralthough a $5 donation is suggested. The sign Slam begins. rant Architects; Chiharu Kono and Shylo Over the next hour, projection screens first 200 guests will receive a Design Slam in the West 6th Brewing beer garden will dis- pint glass. All guests will receive an AIA EKC Shepherd from Sherman Carter Barnhardt, PSC; Jon Cheatham and Maria Gillette from play each step of the creative process, allow- 50/50 sketchbook and a ticket to vote for Murphy + Graves Architects; and Josh Duding the audience to witness the formation of their favorite design. Additional tickets can dey, Ian McHone and Magda W ala from be purchased for $1. design from start to finish. Audience memProceeds benefit Lexington Habitat for EOP Architects. bers will see cutting-edge technology as “Everyone experiences architecture on Humanity — celebrating the 25th Anniverteams use the latest in three-dimensional some level,” Simmons said. “We live and work modeling and rendering software to develop sary of its first home dedication, AIA EKC in buildings, we walk through and around and Fayette Alliance. According to Megan their ideas. Meserve, Lexington Habitat for Humanity’s them. But very few people understand the Each team will have six minutes to present its work. The designs are hypothet- resource development coordinator , “The process of design. At this event, the audience ical, with no plans to construct the winning Design Slam will help draw attention to the will hear the back and forth of design negotineed for affordable housing in our commu- ation. The Design Slam is about allowing the design. West 6th beer will be on tap and public to experience that conversation.” food trucks will be on location. Griffin Van- nity. Monetary donations from this event

Design Slam invites public to experience creative process

By Heather Russell-Simmons CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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here is a void in downtown Lexington, and on Saturday, June 1, the public will have an opportunity to witness local designers competing in real time to fill that void. The Design Slam, sponsored by the American Institute of Architects East Kentucky Chapter (AIA EKC) and Fayette Alliance, will feature teams from five architecture firms navigating through the process of designing a downtown Lexington space in one hour. The goal is to win the most audience votes. The Design Slam will start on a level playing field, with the teams only knowing that the location is 137 Main St., across from the proposed CentrePointe site. The building

THE DESIGN SLAM IS EXCITING BECAUSE IT’S SUCH AN ACCELERATED PROCESS. IT CAN TAKE MONTHS TO DESIGN A BUILDING. WE’RE CHALLENGING TEAMS TO DO THAT IN AN HOUR. I REALIZED THIS WAS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR AIA EKC TO SHOW THE PUBLIC WHAT ARCHITECTURE IS ABOUT IN AN ENTERTAINING AND ENERGETIC COMPETITION.” – DANIEL O. WARE, PRESIDENT, AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS EAST KENTUCKY CHAPTER AND FAYETTE ALLIANCE

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013


Immigration CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Undocumented individuals in the United States may have entered the United States illegally, without inspection at the border, or may have overstayed a valid visa. Regardless, they find themselves in an unlawful status, without work authorization or the ability to leave and reenter the country. One component of the proposed legislation would give these individuals these freedoms, while establishing a record of who is here in the United States. In the proposed legislation, individuals in an unlawful status may adjust to the legal status of Registered Provisional Immigrant, or RPI. There are eligibility requirements to obtain RPI status, and it does not immediately lead to per manent residency or citizenship. The provisions for RPI status use existing immigrant-processing procedures to provide a thorough examination of the applicant, like requiring biometrics processing, or criminal background checks, and possible interview before approval of the application. It also requires that those obtaining RPI status go to the back of the line and wait their tur n to obtain a green card, just like other immigrants currently in another legal status. Eligibility for application to RPI status requires that the applicant be present in the United States at the time the application for RPI status is filed; that the person resided in the United States on or before Dec. 31, 2011; has maintained continuous physical presence since that date and until the application is granted; and has not been convicted of (i) an aggravated felony, (ii) a felony, (iii) three or more misdemeanors, (iv) an of fense under foreign law, (v) unlawfully voted, or (vi) is inadmissible for criminal, national security, public health or other morality grounds. Eligible applicants must complete and file their applications within the filing period (an initial period of one year from the date of publication of the final rule with extension of 18 months possible); pay all assessed federal income taxes; pay the first of two $500 penalty fee installments; and pay an application processing fee. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) eligible applicants are not assessed the penalty fee. Dependent spouses and children may apply for RPI status as a derivative of the principal applicant, but they must be in the United States at the time. While the application for RPI status is pending, the applicant may obtain an Advance Parole document, which will allow the applicant to re-enter the United States if ur gent humanitarian conditions require travel outside the United States. Also, the applicant is considered in legal status and cannot be detained or removed unless the individual has been deter mined ineligible for RPI status. Immigrants granted RPI status will be provided documentary evidence to establish their status. This will likely be a card similar to the current green card or employment authorization card that the immigrant will carry with them at all times. This document will allow the immigrant to work and travel — again, much like the current green card. The initial period of RPI status granted will last six years and can be extended an additional six years, assuming the applicant continues to meet eligibility requirements, meets the employment requirements, and the status was not otherwise revoked.

An employment or education requirement demands that individuals seeking extension of RPI status, unless in a derivative status, maintain regular employment (allowing for lapses of no more than 60 days) or be enrolled in an education program; not become a public charge; and maintain an average income or resources to meet the established federal poverty level. They must also demonstrate that all taxes have been paid. RPI holders are not eligible for welfare or other federal benefits. Deported individuals who were

previously in the United States before Dec. 31, 2011, may apply to re-enter the United States in RPI status if they were deported for non-criminal reasons and are the spouse of a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident (or the parent of a child who meets those requirements); or is a childhood arrival eligible under DACA. Individuals with removal orders or currently in removal proceedings will also be eligible to file for RPI status. Immigrants in RPI status may adjust to a permanent resident status after maintaining RPI status and the requirements

thereof for 10 years. They are also required to demonstrate knowledge of U.S. civics and English and pay another $1,000 penalty fee. RPI holders will not be eligible to adjust status unless all others currently waiting for a family or employment-based green card at the time the new rule is enacted have had their priority date become current. After holding a green card for three years, the immigrant may naturalize to full legal rights as a United States citizen. Up next in the three-part immigration series will be a discussion of changes to the current immigration system.

IN THE PROPOSED LEGISLATION, INDIVIDUALS IN AN UNLAWFUL STATUS MAY ADJUST TO THE LEGAL STATUS OF REGISTERED PROVISIONAL IMMIGRANT, OR RPI. THERE ARE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN RPI STATUS, AND IT DOES NOT IMMEDIATELY LEAD TO PERMANENT RESIDENCY OR CITIZENSHIP.

See the world in a new way. Why settle for local when you can go global? The Cabinet for Economic Development, along with its Kentucky Export Initiative partners, wants to help your company achieve its full potential in the international marketplace. That’s why we’re now accepting applications for grants made possible by the U.S. Small Business Administration’s State Trade and Export Promotion program. Qualifying companies can use the STEP grant to assist with market research, identifying international customers, participating in trade

shows, and even translating websites and marketing materials. Plus, our team of experts will guide you every step of the way. Exporting has already proven its value in helping Kentucky companies grow their capacity, increase productivity and diversify their customer base. Kentucky exports surged to $22 billion in 2012, up more than 100 percent in a decade. Let us help you become part of this success. Find out more about the STEP program under the “assistance” section at www.kyexports.com.

For more information visit ThinkKentucky.com or call 800-626-2930. Facebook.com/ThinkKentucky

Twitter.com/ThinkKentucky

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

Cabinet for Economic Development

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Focus: Human Resources

Focus: Human Resources

H-1B visa quota gone in five days

PHOTO FURNISHED

By Doug Martin and Martha Alexander CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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he arrival of April marks the start of a new fiscal year when U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) begins accepting H-1B nonimmigrant visa applications. Each year, USCIS approves 65,000 “regular cap” H-1B applications and 20,000 “advanced degree exception” H-1B applications. USCIS also processes an unlimited number of applications that are classified as “cap-exempt.” The H-1B visa program is important to

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U.S. companies, research fir ms and universities that employ foreign workers in specialty occupations. These require theoretical or technical expertise in specialized fields, and include scientists, engineers and computer programmers. Individuals in specialty occupations must have at least a bachelor’s degree or equivalent or have duties that are so specialized and complex that the knowledge required for the job is comparable to having a bachelor’s degree or higher . Individuals approved under the H-1B advanceddegree exception cap must have at least a

master’s degree from a U.S. institution of higher education. The speed at which the USCIS’s annual H-1B quota is met is considered one indicator of whether U.S. companies are confident about hiring new employees for the coming year. During a down economy, the cap season can stay open as late as December or January. In fiscal year 2011, USCIS did not reach its H-1B quota until November. This year, USCIS received 124,000 H-1B visa applications by April 5, 2013, and some analysts hope this is evidence of improved

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

employer confidence. Because only 85,000 cap-subject applications could be approved for fiscal year 2014, more than 39,000 H-1B applications were rejected. USCIS used a computer-generated lottery system to select which petitions would be reviewed and which petitions would be rejected. While this is good news for the U.S. economy, it is bad news for the many companies that were denied petitions for new H-1B workers. Fortunately, some types of employers and some existing H-1B workers are exempt from the H-1B cap, and USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions received from these employers and individuals. Certain amended applications for cur rent H-1B workers will not be counted toward the annual H-1B cap, including applications (1) to extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States, (2) to change the terms of employment for a current H-1B worker, (3) to allow a current H-1B worker to change employers, and (4) to allow a current H-1B worker to work concurrently in a second H1B position. The annual H-1B cap also does not apply to certain institutions of higher education, nonprofit research or ganizations and government research organizations. These institutions and organizations are exempt from the H-1B cap and can submit an H-1B visa petition any time during the year. To qualify as an “institution of higher education,” an organization must be a public or nonprofit institution, award a bachelor’s degree or educational credits that count towards a bachelor’s degree, be accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association, and require that students be graduates of a state authorized school that provides secondary education or its equivalent. USCIS will also recognize as cap-exempt any nonprofit entity that is connected or associated with an institution of higher education. To qualify, the nonprofit must have shared ownership or control with the same board or federation operated by the institution of higher education, or be attached to an institution of higher education as a member, branch, cooperative or subsidiary. Finally, some contractors and vendors can file cap-exempt H-1B petitions on behalf of foreign workers who will work “at” a qualifying institution of higher education, nonprofit research organization, or government research or ganization. Thus, even though the worker is not directly employed by the qualifying institution, the worker can still be treated as cap-exempt when the employment “directly and predominately” fur thers the essential purposes of the qualifying institution. While the fiscal year 2014 quota was met in a brisk five days, some employers and existing H-1B workers can continue to file their H-1B cap-exempt applications with USCIS. For these employers and individuals, the H-1B visa process is a continuous, yearround process. If you’re not one of these lucky ones, it’s never too early to start thinking about next year’s fiscal year 2015 cap season. Preparing an H-1B application packet can be a lengthy process, and just like tax season, waiting until March to start is never a good idea. Early preparation and prompt filing will give your H-1B petition the best chance it has to be accepted in the USCIS lottery. Doug Martin and Martha Alexander are attorneys with the Lexington law firm of Sturgill, Turner, Barker & Moloney, PLLC (www.SturgillTurner.com).

Sabbaticals CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“I’ll be taking a month for a sabbatical leave,” said Mike Ward, pastor of Lexington’s Walnut Hill Church, which has an ecumenical relationship with the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches. “For me, personally, it’s the opportunity to take time away from ordinary duties and responsibilities to pursue refreshment or renewal or development of my personal, spiritual and professional self.” The vestry of his church congregation, which is the elected gover ning board, told Ward he is free to use the paid time of f in whatever way he sees fit. Ward will use it as more than vacation time. “I’m choosing to use the time to explore an area of the ministry I have never had experience with,” he said. “I’ll present a report to the vestry about my experience and what I learned.” In 2012, Fortune Magazine devoted an issue to the “Best 100 Companies to W ork For” and also focused on some of the best benefits around. The article claimed that nearly a quarter of the companies on the list offered fully paid sabbaticals. The top five in that category were: Boston Consulting Group, Recreational Equipment (REI), DPR Construction, DreamWorks Animation and Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. No Kentucky companies made the list. In fact, sabbaticals seem to be a rare employee benefit throughout the business world in central Kentucky. The Bluegrass Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management (BGSHRM) comprises about 300 human resource professionals in the Lexington-Bluegrass area. Amanda Huddleston, vice president at People Plus in Lexington and president-elect for BGSHRM, said, “Unfortunately, none of our BGSHRM board has any infor mation or knowledge of local companies that offer sabbaticals. One of our board members is in the tech industry, too, and he was not aware of that being offered here.” Linda Haft, director of human capital services for Lexington-based Hanna Resource group, which uses strategic business and human-resource solutions to help make companies profitable, also agrees sabbaticals are not a common benefit here. “I cannot personally tell you of any local company that offers it,” said Haft. “I would say a few large companies might offer it, because small companies cannot af ford to be without their employees for that period of time. Historically, it was high-tech companies that might offer it as a benefit.” Haft recalled dealing with a particular client in her past professional life — Netscape — a major computer services company best known for N etscape N avigator , its web browser. A dozen years ago, N etscape worked some of its employees so hard and for so many hours they couldn’t squeeze in their vacation time. So Netscape gave them extended paid time off to recuperate. “It wasn’t forced vacation; they were able to take sabbaticals at their discretion. They could take six weeks of paid time, in addition to their normal vacation time,” said Haft. “It was because people were working around the clock, and N etscape realized these people were getting burned out.” In a 2010 study of sabbaticals, Forbes Magazine reported that in today’s fast-paced, always-plugged-in business world, taking just a week off throws some workers “into a taskdelegating, calendar-clearing frenzy. Taking

IT WASN’T FORCED VACATION; THEY WERE ABLE TO TAKE SABBATICALS AT THEIR DISCRETION. THEY COULD TAKE SIX WEEKS OF PAID TIME, IN ADDITION TO THEIR NORMAL VACATION TIME,” SAID HAFT. “IT WAS BECAUSE PEOPLE WERE WORKING AROUND THE CLOCK, AND NETSCAPE REALIZED THESE PEOPLE WERE GETTING BURNED OUT.” – LINDA HAFT, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN CAPITAL SERVICES FOR LEXINGTON-BASED HANNA RESOURCE GROUP

PHOTO FURNISHED

a prolonged break, by quitting a job, or taking a paid or unpaid leave, can seem downright insane,” said the article. One reason may be job insecurity in this reduced economy. But Elizabeth Pagano, cofounder of YourSabbatical.com, disagrees. “The concept of working for 40 years and then retiring is outdated,” Pagano said. “People should be able to inject bursts of time off into their career paths.”

Joe Reynolds, who has an event-production business called Red Frog Events, gives his employees, along with a guest of their choosing, a fully paid, one-month trip to the destination of their choice — every five years. He told Inc. Magazine, “Sabbaticals make sense. A month away allows enough time to come back hungry to tackle the next big project … people who love their job, perform better.” Meanwhile, Pastor Ward, who counsels

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

many individuals and couples feeling the strain of work on their personal lives, ur ges proportion: take your allotted vacation time. If you earned it, he counsels, you should take it “My message to anyone would be that it’s important to strike a balance between work and rest. Rest might mean physical rest or refreshment and renewal,” Ward said. “I’m certainly aware not everyone’s vocational situation allows for four weeks or two months off, but I think people need a rhythm.”

13


Focus: Human Resources

Focus: Human Resources

H-1B visa quota gone in five days

PHOTO FURNISHED

By Doug Martin and Martha Alexander CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

T

he arrival of April marks the start of a new fiscal year when U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) begins accepting H-1B nonimmigrant visa applications. Each year, USCIS approves 65,000 “regular cap” H-1B applications and 20,000 “advanced degree exception” H-1B applications. USCIS also processes an unlimited number of applications that are classified as “cap-exempt.” The H-1B visa program is important to

12

U.S. companies, research fir ms and universities that employ foreign workers in specialty occupations. These require theoretical or technical expertise in specialized fields, and include scientists, engineers and computer programmers. Individuals in specialty occupations must have at least a bachelor’s degree or equivalent or have duties that are so specialized and complex that the knowledge required for the job is comparable to having a bachelor’s degree or higher . Individuals approved under the H-1B advanceddegree exception cap must have at least a

master’s degree from a U.S. institution of higher education. The speed at which the USCIS’s annual H-1B quota is met is considered one indicator of whether U.S. companies are confident about hiring new employees for the coming year. During a down economy, the cap season can stay open as late as December or January. In fiscal year 2011, USCIS did not reach its H-1B quota until November. This year, USCIS received 124,000 H-1B visa applications by April 5, 2013, and some analysts hope this is evidence of improved

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

employer confidence. Because only 85,000 cap-subject applications could be approved for fiscal year 2014, more than 39,000 H-1B applications were rejected. USCIS used a computer-generated lottery system to select which petitions would be reviewed and which petitions would be rejected. While this is good news for the U.S. economy, it is bad news for the many companies that were denied petitions for new H-1B workers. Fortunately, some types of employers and some existing H-1B workers are exempt from the H-1B cap, and USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions received from these employers and individuals. Certain amended applications for cur rent H-1B workers will not be counted toward the annual H-1B cap, including applications (1) to extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States, (2) to change the terms of employment for a current H-1B worker, (3) to allow a current H-1B worker to change employers, and (4) to allow a current H-1B worker to work concurrently in a second H1B position. The annual H-1B cap also does not apply to certain institutions of higher education, nonprofit research or ganizations and government research organizations. These institutions and organizations are exempt from the H-1B cap and can submit an H-1B visa petition any time during the year. To qualify as an “institution of higher education,” an organization must be a public or nonprofit institution, award a bachelor’s degree or educational credits that count towards a bachelor’s degree, be accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association, and require that students be graduates of a state authorized school that provides secondary education or its equivalent. USCIS will also recognize as cap-exempt any nonprofit entity that is connected or associated with an institution of higher education. To qualify, the nonprofit must have shared ownership or control with the same board or federation operated by the institution of higher education, or be attached to an institution of higher education as a member, branch, cooperative or subsidiary. Finally, some contractors and vendors can file cap-exempt H-1B petitions on behalf of foreign workers who will work “at” a qualifying institution of higher education, nonprofit research organization, or government research or ganization. Thus, even though the worker is not directly employed by the qualifying institution, the worker can still be treated as cap-exempt when the employment “directly and predominately” fur thers the essential purposes of the qualifying institution. While the fiscal year 2014 quota was met in a brisk five days, some employers and existing H-1B workers can continue to file their H-1B cap-exempt applications with USCIS. For these employers and individuals, the H-1B visa process is a continuous, yearround process. If you’re not one of these lucky ones, it’s never too early to start thinking about next year’s fiscal year 2015 cap season. Preparing an H-1B application packet can be a lengthy process, and just like tax season, waiting until March to start is never a good idea. Early preparation and prompt filing will give your H-1B petition the best chance it has to be accepted in the USCIS lottery. Doug Martin and Martha Alexander are attorneys with the Lexington law firm of Sturgill, Turner, Barker & Moloney, PLLC (www.SturgillTurner.com).

Sabbaticals CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“I’ll be taking a month for a sabbatical leave,” said Mike Ward, pastor of Lexington’s Walnut Hill Church, which has an ecumenical relationship with the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches. “For me, personally, it’s the opportunity to take time away from ordinary duties and responsibilities to pursue refreshment or renewal or development of my personal, spiritual and professional self.” The vestry of his church congregation, which is the elected gover ning board, told Ward he is free to use the paid time of f in whatever way he sees fit. Ward will use it as more than vacation time. “I’m choosing to use the time to explore an area of the ministry I have never had experience with,” he said. “I’ll present a report to the vestry about my experience and what I learned.” In 2012, Fortune Magazine devoted an issue to the “Best 100 Companies to W ork For” and also focused on some of the best benefits around. The article claimed that nearly a quarter of the companies on the list offered fully paid sabbaticals. The top five in that category were: Boston Consulting Group, Recreational Equipment (REI), DPR Construction, DreamWorks Animation and Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. No Kentucky companies made the list. In fact, sabbaticals seem to be a rare employee benefit throughout the business world in central Kentucky. The Bluegrass Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management (BGSHRM) comprises about 300 human resource professionals in the Lexington-Bluegrass area. Amanda Huddleston, vice president at People Plus in Lexington and president-elect for BGSHRM, said, “Unfortunately, none of our BGSHRM board has any infor mation or knowledge of local companies that offer sabbaticals. One of our board members is in the tech industry, too, and he was not aware of that being offered here.” Linda Haft, director of human capital services for Lexington-based Hanna Resource group, which uses strategic business and human-resource solutions to help make companies profitable, also agrees sabbaticals are not a common benefit here. “I cannot personally tell you of any local company that offers it,” said Haft. “I would say a few large companies might offer it, because small companies cannot af ford to be without their employees for that period of time. Historically, it was high-tech companies that might offer it as a benefit.” Haft recalled dealing with a particular client in her past professional life — Netscape — a major computer services company best known for N etscape N avigator , its web browser. A dozen years ago, N etscape worked some of its employees so hard and for so many hours they couldn’t squeeze in their vacation time. So Netscape gave them extended paid time off to recuperate. “It wasn’t forced vacation; they were able to take sabbaticals at their discretion. They could take six weeks of paid time, in addition to their normal vacation time,” said Haft. “It was because people were working around the clock, and N etscape realized these people were getting burned out.” In a 2010 study of sabbaticals, Forbes Magazine reported that in today’s fast-paced, always-plugged-in business world, taking just a week off throws some workers “into a taskdelegating, calendar-clearing frenzy. Taking

IT WASN’T FORCED VACATION; THEY WERE ABLE TO TAKE SABBATICALS AT THEIR DISCRETION. THEY COULD TAKE SIX WEEKS OF PAID TIME, IN ADDITION TO THEIR NORMAL VACATION TIME,” SAID HAFT. “IT WAS BECAUSE PEOPLE WERE WORKING AROUND THE CLOCK, AND NETSCAPE REALIZED THESE PEOPLE WERE GETTING BURNED OUT.” – LINDA HAFT, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN CAPITAL SERVICES FOR LEXINGTON-BASED HANNA RESOURCE GROUP

PHOTO FURNISHED

a prolonged break, by quitting a job, or taking a paid or unpaid leave, can seem downright insane,” said the article. One reason may be job insecurity in this reduced economy. But Elizabeth Pagano, cofounder of YourSabbatical.com, disagrees. “The concept of working for 40 years and then retiring is outdated,” Pagano said. “People should be able to inject bursts of time off into their career paths.”

Joe Reynolds, who has an event-production business called Red Frog Events, gives his employees, along with a guest of their choosing, a fully paid, one-month trip to the destination of their choice — every five years. He told Inc. Magazine, “Sabbaticals make sense. A month away allows enough time to come back hungry to tackle the next big project … people who love their job, perform better.” Meanwhile, Pastor Ward, who counsels

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

many individuals and couples feeling the strain of work on their personal lives, ur ges proportion: take your allotted vacation time. If you earned it, he counsels, you should take it “My message to anyone would be that it’s important to strike a balance between work and rest. Rest might mean physical rest or refreshment and renewal,” Ward said. “I’m certainly aware not everyone’s vocational situation allows for four weeks or two months off, but I think people need a rhythm.”

13


Focus: Human Resources By Cynthia L. Effinger GUEST WRITER

W

ith a simple statement (“Y ou’re fired!”), the employee gets up and exits the boardroom. And like that, the underachiever is nixed from the show, ushered into a limo and never seen again (at least, until the “All-Star” season). If only the real world was that easy. The decision to terminate an employee can give any employer anxiety, even if it is undoubtedly for the betterment of the business. This sense of dread is not without warrant; termination can be a legal landmine. Even terminating “at-will” employees requires cautious consideration. You can cover your bases, though, by carefully drafting policies, adhering to procedures, and relying on some common sense. Before any action is taken, review these simple rules that can protect you from a lawsuit.

Determine the employee’s status

If someone is an “at-will” employee, he or she can be ter minated any time, for any reason. Yes, you can fire someone simply because you do not like them. Review any existing employment agreements or contracts that could be deemed to negate the atwill status. If an employee is not at will, then they usually have a set period for employment and a ter mination is governed by an employment contract that likely includes a provision requiring termination “for cause.” In such an instance, you must remember to review the contract and follow its terms before terminating that employee. It should be noted that even if all of your employees are at-will, you are still not out of the proverbial woods. At-will employees can file post-employment lawsuits for a variety of reasons. Any employee, no matter the status, can claim that he was terminated, at least in part, because of a legally protected category (such as gender, religion, disability or age). An employee can also always allege he was ter minated for exercising a legal right, such as taking a leave as per mitted under the Family and Medical Leave Act, or for refusing to engage in illegal activity. The term “at-will” is not an insulator for liability but there are steps an employer can take to protect itself against claims of wrongful discharge.

Documentation

The key to avoiding ter mination lawsuits is documentation. All instances of substandard performance or misconduct should be documented (even for at-will employees). The recording of these things can provide support for the ter mination. Check records to see if an employee has received a previous warning or has been written up — evidence of past problems can go a long way in justifying a ter mination decision that negates against wrongful termination. On the other hand, if an employee recently received a raise or ear ned a stellar performance review, then a sudden discharge may raise suspicion if other factors are present. A positive paper trail can indicate termination was predicated upon illegitimate (and perhaps unlawful) reasons.

RULES OF TERMINATION CONTEMPLATE BEFORE YOU TERMINATE

If the employee manual is silent, consider whether treatment of this employee is consistent with the treatment of others similarly situated. Consistency is crucial. An experienced HR employee can help you determine if uniformity in management decisions is present.

Calm down and investigate

N ever explode on an employee and end the outburst by telling him he is fired. Acting out of anger or frustration can just Take time to review the company policause more problems. An employee whose cies and procedures to make sure the puntermination is preceded with yelling or other ishment fits the crime. For example, if you are emotion-driven acts is much more likely to considering firing an employee who violated become disgruntled. There may be times the company dress code, but the employee when a sudden discharge seems warranted, manual says that such an offense first requires however, best practices dictate that you a warning, you may be left to explain why should suspend an employee first and conyou did not abide by your own rules. duct an investigation. This will give you time

Review company policies and procedures

14

to cool of f and collect evidence of the wrongful act. More often, though, a decision to terminate may not be so clearly defensible. If an investigation is required, act promptly. Document your findings, and remain neutral in your treatment of the suspect employee (and the accuser employee, if there is one) until the facts are uncovered.

Cut the cord face to face When it is time to let the person go, do not take the easy way out by writing an email or letter. Not only is this impersonal, but things in writing can be misinterpreted. Likely, if you do put something in writing, the employee will read it, think it over, and then confront you about the decision. It is better for all involved to handle the issue head-on and with a witness present.

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

If you are nervous about how the employee will handle the news, then take time to “script” how you would like it to go. B y planning the encounter , you will be less likely to deviate from the objective or make the meeting more excruciating than it has to be. Termination is like pulling off a Band-Aid — it hurts less if you do it in one sweeping motion. Before the meeting, remember to: • Arm yourself with any documentation you may need to back up your reason fo r the decision. • Decide who else you would like to be present in the room; it is always a good idea to have an unbiased party privy to the meeting. • Be stern in what company items or information must be handed over before departure and review with the employee an y non-compete or confidentiality clauses that have been signed. • State exactly how long the employee has to remove his belongings and self from the premises. If you do not want it to disrup the office environment, consider letting the employee gather his things during off-hours with the accompaniment of security or personnel. • If there is any chance of violent retaliation, have a procedure in place beforehand for removing the employee from the premises and consider having company securit y personnel on-hand. Before you sit down with the employee, you should contemplate the issue of sever ance pay. Any time an employee is fired, there is possibility that legal action will follow. To avoid this, a severance agreement can be negotiated with the employee. The employee will sign a release foregoing their right to sue in exchange for something o f value. Keep in mind that the exchange does not have to be money, but can be something intangible, such as an agreement to provide positive job references or to not contest unemployment benefits. To ensure that your agreement will hold up if challenged in court, make sure an y agreement is in writing, signed by the employee, and states that the waiver of right to sue is knowing and voluntary. You will also want to allow the employee some time to consider signing it, and in certain circumstances, the law sometimes requires a 21-day consideration period. Also, always allow the employee to review the document with an attorney if he so chooses.

The wrap-up

Once the employee is out the door, you can breathe a sigh of relief. But know there is still work to be done. A ter minated employee may be legally entitled to benefits, such as COBRA or vested 401(k) or pension benefits. You will want to check with you r HR staff or an attorney about the necessary procedures for compliance with these. Y ou will also have to issue the employee’s final paycheck, which may have to include payment for accrued or unused vacation days. Letting go of an employee is rarely as easy as Mr. Trump makes it look, but with some planning and forethought, you can traverse the legal landmine safely. Cynthia L. Effinger is an associate of McBrayer, McGinnis, Leslie & Kirkland, PLLC. Effinger is located in the firm’s Louisville office and can be reached at ceffinger@mmlk.com or at (502) 327-5400, ext. 316. This article is intended as a summary of newly enacted federal law and does not constitute legal advice.


Focus: Human Resources

EDUCATING HR PROFESSIONALS

Business Lexington PRESENT THE BUSINESS LEXINGTON LEARNING SERIES

By Kathie Stamps

demic conferences in Europe, China and CONTRIBUTING WRITER other countries, and each has written for nuhat was once called the personnel merous scholarly publications in recent years. department, dealing with people In Lexington, Louisville, and Fort Knox and paperwork, is now known as in Kentucky, Sullivan University offers bachhuman resources, a term coined by Leonard elor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in Nadler in his 1970 book “Developing Human human resource leadership, through an eResources.” The field of human resources, or learning program that began in 2008. HR, has evolved to include working in an “The future is online; that’s where peooperational capacity and implementing a ple are lear ning,” said T eresa A. Daniel, company’s strategies. Aside from on-the-job Ph.D., dean of the program. “W e cater to a training and years of general workplace ex- working student.” perience, where do professionals lear n HR The HR leadership department has close skills? Area universities are providing educa- to 300 students, with the lar gest concentrational opportunities. tion enrolled in the doctoral program. Since the late 1990s, the Executive Edu- Daniel’s courses involve weekly reading ascation Center at the University of Kentucky’s signments, videos and discussions via WebEx Gatton College of Business and Economics or Skype, plus occasional one-on-one phone has offered an HR management certification. conversations. The continuing education credit program has “The technology is so good now you helped more than 400 people at the Univer- can virtually be anywhere,” she said. sity of Kentucky prepare for the exam to beA lawyer by trade, Daniel worked for come certified as a professional in human Ashland Inc. for 15 years when the comresources (PHR) or a senior professional in pany’s headquarters was still in Ashland, Ky. human resources (SPHR). Those exams are She was transferred as a divisional vice presadministered by the HR Certification Instiident to the HR department because that tute, based outside of Washington, D.C. field was becoming so regulated. Then she Within the College of Business and went back to school for a doctorate in Technology at Eastern Kentucky University human and organizational systems and has (EKU), the bachelor’s degree in business ad- led the Sullivan HR program since 2010. ministration has an option in human reShe has seen a couple of changes in the source management. Created by Mike field of human resources, from the need to Roberson, Ph.D., the program began in 1994. possess strong business skills to being able In the early years, EKU had a hard time get- to interpret data. ting students placed in anything other than entry-level positions, because HR positions were traditionally staffed by senior members of corporations. “A lot of organizations didn’t think they needed to hire people with specialized trainA LOT OF ORGANIZATIONS ing in human resources,” Roberson said. DIDN’T THINK THEY NEEDED “That has changed. W e see our alumni proudly serving in all kinds of organizations TO HIRE PEOPLE WITH SPECIALIZED TRAINING throughout the Bluegrass and beyond.” In addition to an introductory HR man- IN HUMAN RESOURCES. agement course, students take four advanced THAT HAS CHANGED. WE SEE OUR ALUMNI PROUDLY SERVING courses in labor relations, compensation management, employee recruitment and se- ALL KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS lection, and human resource development. THROUGHOUT THE BLUEGRASS “If you’re looking for three cheap hours AND BEYOND.” in advanced management, you’ve come to MIKE ROBERSON, EKU COLLEGE OF BUSINESS the wrong class,” Allen Engle, Ph.D., tells his – AND TECHNOLOGY students. “It is labor-intensive work.” Roberson added, “They leave here and know they’ve been through one of the most “Sullivan is one of the first programs in rigorous programs they can imagine.” the nation to have a course devoted entirely Engle and Roberson, professors of man- to analytics,” she said. In the master’s and agement, are the primary faculty members in doctoral programs, the course centers around the HR program. Of the 111 graduates in the data-driven, evidence-based management. HR option’s history, 34 have graduated in the “In some organizations, it’s still very adlast four years. Many of the 407 management ministrative and transactional,” Daniel said of majors in the same time period took adhuman resources — hiring people and provanced HR courses. cessing benefit claims, for example. There are “This is an indication of where we are other companies that really understand and today and what we expect the next few embrace what an HR professional can do: years to be like,” Roberson said. “Projecting needs, getting the right people in, The EKU professors combine theory doing things that keep the organization flourand application in each course. They update ishing, continuing to update people skills and content on a regular basis. creating a culture that makes people want to “We constantly ask ourselves, ‘What is be there and be more productive,” she said. relevant for today’s students?’” Roberson said. Sullivan’s courses under go constant For many years, a human resources review, and each one is redesigned intenmanager was “a smart person who got along tionally. well with others,” according to Roberson. As “We take it apart every three years, to the field grew in complexity, so did the need deliver content that keeps students up to for formal training. date,” Daniel said. “We’re delivering people “The international aspect is becoming who can hit the ground running when they bigger and bigger ,” Engle added. He and get hired and know what they’re talking Roberson have made presentations at acaabout.”

W

ROMANCE OR RUIN? MUSINGS ON THE FOOD BUSINESS

JUNE 27 - OPENING A FRANCHISE The allure of being self-employed with the security of a known brand is often the driver behind becoming a franchise owner. However, doing good research and due diligence is crucial to having a successful operation. Learn from experts in the field from franchise owners and operators and those in the know. AUGUST 22 - OPENING A BAR KEYNOTE SPEAKER: ALAN STEIN OF STEIN GROUP

You love talking to people, never fit in the 9 to 5 and know how to infuse some mean bitters. However, the business of opening a bar is more complex than a perfect Bloody Mary. Running a bar can be a profitable business but an extremely risky one. Join the discussion and find out from bar owners and investors how to be in the bar business. OCTOBER 24 - TAKING YOUR FOOD TO MARKET KEYNOTE SPEAKER: LESME ROMERO AND REINALDO GONZALEZ OF LEXINGTON PASTA

Turn your hobby into a successful niche product and a big business. Learn from the best of the best how to package, price, brand and promote your product and get it on the shelves.

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

15


BizList Top Local Employers For questions please contact: Sharon Lee Metz sharon@bizlex.com

Current Rank

1

Non-Manufacturing

Ranked by Total Number of Local Employees

Business Name Address Phone Website

Total Number of Local Employees

Services / Type of Business

Top Local Official/ Year Established Locally

University of Kentucky 410 Administration Dr. Lexington, KY 40506 859-257-9000 www.uky.edu

14,000

The University of Kentucky, also known as UK, is a public co-educational university and is one of the state’s two land-grant universities, located in Lexington, Kentucky. Founded in 1865 by John Bowman as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky, the university is the largest in the Commonwealth of Kentucky by enrollment, with 28,094 students as of Fall 2011, and is also the highest ranked research university in the state.

Eli Capilouto (President)/ 1865

2

Fayette County Public Schools 701 E. Main St. Lexington, KY 40502 859-381-4000 www.fcps.net

5,374

Fayette County Public Schools serves about 40,000 students in pre-K through 12th grade. We have 34 elementary, 12 middle and five high schools, two technical centers and five other academic programs. All of our schools are committed to providing the best possible education and well-rounded growth experience. Through Comprehensive Improvement Planning, we determine how to ensure that students reach proficiency and beyond.

Tom Shelton (Superintendent)/ 1890

3

Kentucky Cabinet for Health & Family Services 275 E. Main St. Frankfort, KY 40621 800-372-2973 www.chfs.ky.gov

3,610

The Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) is home to most of the state’s human services and health care programs, including Medicaid, the Department for Community Based Services and the Department for Public Health.

Audrey Tayse Haynes (Secretary)/ NA

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet 200 Mero Street Frankfort, KY 40601 502-564-4890 www.transportation.ky.gov

3,017

This is the state agency charged with overseeing the highway, rail, and aviation infrastructure. Includes information on highway planning, traffic laws

Mike Hancock (Secretary)/ 1912

Baptist Health Lexington* 1740 Nicholasville Rd. Lexington, KY 40503 (859) 260-6100 www.centralbap.com

3,000

Healthcare Services at Central Baptist Hospital Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, KY is known throughout the Bluegrass for advanced healthcare of heart disease, cancer and our specialized services for women and children, but we offer even more.

William G. Sisson/ 1954

Xerox Company 101 Yorkshire Blvd. Lexington, KY 40509 859-389-4000 www.xerox.com

3,000

Through ACS, A Xerox Company, which Xerox acquired in February 2010, Xerox also offers extensive business process outsourcing and IT outsourcing services, including data processing, HR benefits management, finance support, and customer relationship management services for commercial and government organizations worldwide.

Chris Gillian (Corporate Communications)/ 2010

Kentucky State Government - Franklin County 229 W. Main St. Frankfort, KY 40601 502-875-3733 www.ky.gov

2,863

State Government - State Agencies, Bureaus and Departments

Alison L. Grimes (Secretary of State)/ NA

Lexmark International Inc. 740 W. New Circle Rd. Lexington, KY 40550 859-232-2000 www.lexmark.com

2,800

Development, marketing and sales of printers and related supplies and software. Also, corporate headquarters.

Paul Rooke (CEO)/ 1991

Lexington-Fayette Urban County 200 E. Main St. Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 425-2255 or LexCall 311 www.lexingtonky.gov

2,699

City Government Services

Jim Gray (Mayor)/ 1974

St. Joseph Health Systems, Inc - Kentucky One Health 424 Lewis Hargett Circle Lexington, KY 40503 859-313-3465 www.sjhlex.org

2,500

Saint Joseph Hospital, Lexington’s first hospital, remains the first choice for health care today. Founded in 1877, it has grown into a 433-bed medical center, with a full range of services, including the national award-winning Heart Institute and leading edge da Vinci robotic surgery. Also known as Lexington’s “heart hospital,” Saint Joseph has pioneered many firsts in the health care community.

Ruth W. Brinkley (CEO of Kentucky One Health)/ 1877

11

Walmart 500 W. New Circle Rd. Lexington, KY 405011 859-381-9370 www.walmart.com

2,027

American multinational retailer corporation that runs chains of large discount department stores and warehouse stores.

Mike Duke (President & CEO)/ 1962

12

The Kroger Company - Lexington Area 1600 Ormsby Station Court Louisville, KY 40223-4039 502-423-4900 www.kroger.com

1,665

Retail food chain corporate history, news, store locator, operations profile, employment details, and overview of food, pharmacy, gifts, and savings available.

Penny Goddin; David Dillon (CEO & Chairman)/ 1883

Lexington Veterans Affairs Medical Center 1101 Veterans Dr. Lexington, KY 40502 859-233-4511 www.lexington.va.gov

1,500

Is a fully accredited, two-division, tertiary care medical center with an operating bed complement of 199 hospital beds. Acute medical, neurological, surgical and psychiatric inpatient services are provided at the Cooper Division, located adjacent to the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Other available services include: emergency care, medical-surgical units, acute psychiatry, ICU, progressive care unit, (includes Cardiac Cath Lab) ambulatory surgery, OR/PACU, hemodialysis, medicine specialty clinics, surgery specialty clinics, and outpatient primary and specialty care.

Fernando O. Rivera (Director)/ 1931

Lexington Clinic, PSC 1221 S. Broadway Lexington, KY 40504 859-258-4000 www.lexingtonclinic.com

1,300

As Central Kentucky’s oldest and largest multi-specialty medical group, we have been here to serve you since 1920. From establishing the first radiology department in Lexington to implementing one of the first electronic medical records systems, Lexington Clinic has a rich history of medical innovation and superior care for our patients.

Andrew H. Henderson, M.D. (CEO)/ 1920

Amazon.com 1850 Mercer Rd. Lexington, KY 40511 859-381-2100 www.amazon.com

1,200

Customer discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavors to offer its customers the lowest possible prices. Amazon.com and other sellers offer millions of unique new, refurbished and used items in categories such as Books; Movies, Music & Games; Digital Downloads; Electronics & Computers; Home & Garden; Toys, Kids & Baby; Grocery; Apparel, Shoes & Jewelry; Health & Beauty; Sports & Outdoors; and Tools, Auto & Industrial.

Brian Owens (General Manager)/ NA

KY Department of Workforce Investment 500 Mero St., 3rd Floor Frankfort, KY 40602 800-648-6056 www.workforce.ky.gov

1,067

Cabinet for Workforce Development provides high-quality education, training and employment opportunities for individuals and the business community.

Joseph U. Meyer (Secretary)/ 1982

Meijer 351 W. Reynolds Road Lexington, KY 40503 859-219-3701 www.meijer.com

675

Offers a complete one-stop shopping experience, from Grocery and Health and Beauty Care to over 40 other departments including Fashion, Automotive, Home Decor, Pharmacy, Electronics, Pets.

Hank Meijer (CEO, Co-Chair), Doug Meijer (Co-Chair)/ 1934

Ashland Consumer Markets 3499 Blazer Parkway Lexington, KY 40515 859-357-7777 www.valvoline.com

658

Provides specialty chemical products, services and solutions for many of the world£s most essential industries

Daryl K. Love (Manager of Community Relations)/ NA

Galls 1300 Russell Cave Road Lexington, KY 40505 859-266-7227 www.galls.com

596

For your police gear, police equipment & tactical gear needs

NA/NA

Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital 2050 Versailles Rd. Lexington, KY 40504 859-254-5701 www.cardinalhill.org

560

A non-profit, private facility providing services in stroke, orthopedic, amputee, MS, brain and spinal cord injury rehabilitation, developmental stimulation.

Gary Payne (President & CEO)/ 1958

4 5

TIE

5

TIE

7 8 9 10

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Source: Commerce Lexington, Fast Facts, Company web sites, Manta, Wikipedia. Note: * Central Baptist Hospital was changed to Baptict Healthcare. Key: WND=Would Not Disclose, NA=Not Available To add your company’s information to the Top Local Employers Bizlist that will appear on our website in the near future, please visit the following link, https://secure.datajoe.com/url/?1y1g4Tifg.

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013


Focus: Human Resources

Mentoring: Bridging generations in the workplace

By Hannah LeGris

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

n our two previous articles on the multigenerational workforce, we examined the backgrounds, values and work styles of baby boomers, born between the years 1946 and 1964; Generation Xers, bor n between 1965 and 1976; and Millennials, bor n between the years of 1977 and 1998. W e also discussed ways to build upon generational differences, because although there may be marked distinctions among the generations, strong leaders can facilitate effective partnerships across these generations. In this final article on multigenerational workplaces, we will focus on mentoring and examine various ways that leaders can facilitate productive mentoring relationships among employees of different generations. There are various forms that mentorship may take. The traditional mentoring model involves pairing younger workers with older workers so that the more experienced employee may instill institutional knowledge and skills to the less experienced employee, thereby helping that younger worker move up the organizational ladder. However, another form that a mentorship can take may involve a reciprocal arrangement, where younger workers also share their skills with their more established colleagues. A “reverse mentorship” relationship, therefore, may give an unconventional twist to building connections between boomers and younger workers. A 2012 article in Human Resource Management Jour nal ar-

gues that there can be a considerable amount of value in having a younger, junior employee share his/her expertise, technological and otherwise, with a more senior colleague. In this relationship, younger workers are able to reap the benefits of traditional mentorship while simultaneously passing on technical savvy and multitasking skills to older workers. Developing dynamic mentorship programs can encourage co-workers to connect both personally and professionally. The healthiest workplaces are those that treat their employees as multi-dimensional individuals who wish to be engaged on many levels, and reverse mentorship helps accomplish this goal. For supervisors, the key to fostering these reverse mentorship relationships may lie in reinforcing the idea that all workers have valuable skills, and that sharing them will only increase their worth and stability in the workplace. Although some employees are reluctant to teach their strengths to others for fear that they give up some expertise and thus their power in the or ganization, coworkers helping each other ultimately strengthens bonds, opens communication and is good for not only the organization but also for the employees themselves. To encourage these relationships, leaders should consider tapping into employees’ existing interests and affinities. For example, a 2009 Harvard Business Review article revealed a number of similarities between baby boomers and Millennial workers. Many members of both groups were drawn to opportunities that allowed time to ex-

plore their passions, hobbies and volunteering. Both groups felt that temporarily taking time away from work was an opportunity for fulfillment. According to Boston College’s Center for Work and Family, Millennial workers are likely to reject hierarchical leadership, desiring to lead by team motivation, collegiality and accountability. Even though younger workers may initially question the boomer top-down leadership style, their shared value systems may be a way to connect the two generations. This is especially important as older workers begin to retire and Millennials follow the path into their leadership roles. Innovative leaders will facilitate such unions and encourage older and younger workers to see the similarities they share and, conversely, the ways that their differences are productive. There are various forms that mentorship relationships can take, and each generation may benefit from different forms of partnerships. Though some studies ar gue that Millennial generation workers tend to pursue boomers for professional advice, there are also partnerships to be forged between Generation Xers and baby boomers, as Gen Xers will soon be filling the positions left open by the boomers upon their retirements. They will need to work closely to make those transitions as seamless as possible. Younger workers should also be encouraged to for m partnerships with each other. Gen Xers and Millennials are likely to share an interest in creating more flexible work environments and using technology in order to diversify communication. These

generations also have the tendency to reject and rewrite the standard rules for doing business and performing work tasks. Inspiring collaboration between several younger, innovative workers can help businesses rethink the way they structure projects, use communication and marketing skills, and generate new strategies for connecting with a younger client base. Established Generation X workers are likely to hold the institur tional knowledge that their younge colleagues lack and are able to communicate their own industry experiences, therefore modeling potential career-advancement trajectories. Though some of the aforementioned cross-generational mentorship ideas may be perceived as unconventional, creating a collaborative, innovative workplace often requires facilitation by those in leadership positions. Creating a sense of meaning fo r all workers by emphasizing the importance of various skill sets demonstrates that diversity is valued rather than problematic. Engaged workers are more likely to build upon their existing competencies, especially when socialization with colleagues is part of this process. Producing situations where workers can help each other grow, succeed and navigate various changes is an impor tant part in the process of building a healthy organization. Hannah LeGris is an intern at the Institute for Workplace Innovation and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in English at the University of Kentucky.

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

17


A healthy spirit of giving Businessman RJ Corman’s philanthropic gift funds new mammography suite in Jessamine County By Kathie Stamps CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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s the largest philanthropic supporter in the history of St. Joseph Hospital, RJ Corman Railroad Group provided funds to establish the St. Joseph Jessamine RJ Corman Ambulatory Center , which opened in January 2009 in RJ “Rick” Cor man’s hometown of Nicholasville, Ky. Cor man’s most recent contribution has funded the new Sandra J. Adams Digital Mammography Suite at the medical center . The first screening on the Hologic digital mammography unit was performed April 4. “This gift will save lives,” said Barry Stumbo, president of the St. Joseph Hospital Foundation. “Our broad oncology program goal is very simple: to detect cancer at an earlier stage and grow life expectancy.” “Our patients will also benefit by having their images reviewed and dictated by one of our highly qualified board-certified radiologists at the St. Joseph Breast Center, who have many years of experience in breast health,” said Adam Gossom, director of ambulatory imaging operations. Corman named the mammography suite after his sister, Sandra “Sandy” Adams. “You look around at the competition, to try to come into a St. Joseph Jessamine place versus all the other options that they have,” Corman said. “Anything we can do

to enhance our hospital, if I can, I’ll try to help them.” Adams didn’t even know about the gesture until a friend texted her. “My brother likes to have the shock effect,” Adams said. She added, “I am truly, truly, truly honored and very humbled by such a kind gesture.” Adams has had friends and family who have been affected by breast cancer. “People will be so blessed to have this in Jessamine County,” she said, “not because it is named in my honor, but because of the lives I see it saving.” Hospital administrators know that some women will put of f scheduling a mammogram if traveling to get one is not convenient. For Jessamine County residents, driving to Lexington is no longer an excuse. “In the interest of wellness and early detection, patients can get scheduled quickly at our facility and can get in and out with low wait times,” said Greg Giles, director of ambulatory operations and development for KentuckyOne Health. The eight facilities of Saint Joseph Health System — in Bardstown, Berea, London, Martin, Mount Sterling and two hospitals in Lexington — merged with hospitals in Louisville in January 2012 to become KentuckyOne Health. The Jessamine center has a 24-hour emergency room and of fers

CT scans and other diagnostic imaging services. Prior to the mer ger, Gene Woods was the system’s CEO from 2005 to 2011. He is currently the executive vice president and COO for Christus Health, based in Irving, Texas. Woods met Corman at a chamber dinner and a few months later approached him about donating to the ambulatory center , which had already broken ground in Nicholasville, Ky. “Someone mentioned that he had multiple myeloma, the same disease my father died from, and we for med an instant connection,” Woods said. “He told me that if my dad had access to the latest technology and science, he might have lived longer.” It didn’t take much convincing from Woods for Corman to contribute to the medical project for Jessamine County. Cor man once counted 26 traf fic lights from Nicholasville to St. Joseph Hospital in Lexington. “The guy who pushed me over the edge,” Corman said, “was Gene Woods.” Woods recalled that when Cor man made the donation, it was not just because the ambulatory center was needed, “but because of the discussions we had about my father,” Woods said. “It was one of the most heartfelt and personally moving things anyone has ever said to me.” Corman is one of W oods’ all-time fa-

vorite people, Woods said. “For one, he has an iron will the likes of which I have never seen,” W oods said. “There are only one or two people in a hundred that could build such a tremendously successful company from scratch, and also fight his disease as valiantly as he has.” Corman formed the RJ Corman Railroad Group in 1973. His sister went to work for the company after working in the banking industry and taking of f eight years to be a stay-at-home mom. “It was only for a couple of weeks, helping the CPA during tax season,” she said. “I left 18 years later.” Today Adams owns the Zaxby’s restaurants in Nicholasville, Danville, Frankfort and Richmond. She and her brother are very close, and the siblings have never forgotten their humble beginnings. “We have a very strong work ethic,” she said. “That’s the way our parents raised us. Work hard and you can accomplish anything you can set your mind to, with the Lord’s help.” “The Jessamine County community is very blessed to have folks like RJ Cor man,” St. Joseph’s Giles said. “He gives to local causes that support health and well-being of all residents, regardless of status or means. We’re grateful for his gift and our continued partnership in this community.”

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013


UK Honors applicant pool doubles in size

By Jane S. Shropshire

didn’t understand the quantity of applications received, nor did they understand the he Honors Program at the University impact that quickly written essay responses of Kentucky has program staff feeling might have had on the final decision. very excited and, honestly, a little Marquis urges parents to give as much overwhelmed: More than 2,400 students ap- responsibility as possible to students plied for entry this year , as compared to throughout the process, even at the end if 1,200 last year. The program expects to en- questioning an admission decision. roll an entering class of between 400 and Admission to the Honors Program is 450. based on a holistic process in which stuAlthough those not admitted may redents’ essay responses are weighted quite main active on a wait list, the yield on offers heavily. The three essay questions allow stuof admission already looks higher than in dents to demonstrate writing aptitude and previous years. As a result, students on the where they are in ter ms of thinking deeply wait list may be sorely disappointed. about things, being curious and having a Meg Marquis, director of student servmind open to exploration. ices for UK’s Honors Program, attributes the There is no “auto-admit” based on grade applicant pool’s growth to two factors: inpoint average and ACT, although 90 percent creased recruiting efforts to make sure in- of those admitted have an unweighted GPA state students and their school counselors of at least 3.9. The average ACT composite know about opportunities, especially for for those admitted was close to 32, and more high-ability students otherwise inclined to go than a handful had a per fect 36. Marquis out of state; and UK recruiting at more out- noted that a per fect score would not guarof-state schools generally. antee admission in and of itself. A third factor, as well, may have imAll applications are read by faculty repacted the applicant pool: The Honors appli- viewers. In addition to academic excellence, cation was appended to the general extracurricular accomplishments and volunadmissions application, rather than standing teer experience are considered. Faculty want alone as in previous years, making it more “students who are interested in doing,” said convenient for students to apply. Marquis, “students who are curious about the world.” Many denied in competitive Although review of completed applications begins early, no preference is given to review process Marquis and her colleagues in the Hon- early applicants. However, Marquis observed that students who wait until the deadline to ors Program have been hearing from unhappy students not admitted, as well as their apply often approach the application less parents. Many express surprise because they thoughtfully.

COLUMNIST: HIGHER ED MATTERS

T

Program components UK’s Honors Program is more than 50 years old. The curriculum has been molded to fit students’ needs and provide academic rigor, and to help students explore different courses and experiences rather than focus solely on graduate/professional school goals. Honors seminars of fer small classes, capped at 20, with Honors peers and highly experienced professors. Connections with Honors are now spread throughout all four undergraduate years. A flexible curriculum gives students credit for education abroad and undergraduate research; structure and guidance is available to make these opportunities realities for each student. This is “a notoriously friendly program,” said Marquis, with students very friendly toward one another rather than competing against each other. “They’re proud of each others’ successes.” Incoming freshmen should apply for competitive scholarships while applying for admission; there is no automatic award that accompanies Honors entry. Instead, Honors funding supports enrolled students as they pursue education abroad and undergraduate research conferences, as well as other educational experiences.

Honors Living Learning Community As of fall 2013, a new residence hall will have 450 of its 600 beds designated for an Honors LLC. This can accommodate the entire first-year cohort if they choose to live there, but students are not obligated to

choose this housing option. Programming in the LLC is student-driven and includes networking with faculty, guest lectures and social/stress-release opportunities. The new residence hall makes connections between living and lear ning more deliberate, as it includes Honors classrooms and program offices. Perhaps this is a fourth reason for the extraordinary increase in applications this year.

Explore before applying

Students who seek the relative bar gain of in-state tuition and who are up to the rigors of the Honors program overlay would do well to explore UK’s program as they build their college lists. Even students drawn to small liberal arts colleges may find that the hybrid approach of a smaller Honors program within a lar ge public university is worth careful consideration. It is not purel y for those in arts and sciences; the program boasts student enrollment from every major offered at the university. Students are advised to seek information early to develop an understanding of the program, Marquis emphasized. She hopes that they will apply not because they see the Honors Program as a resume-builder, but instead because they see the program as an excellent match for their intellectual interests. Jane S. Shropshire guides students and families through the college search process and is Business Lexington’s Higher Ed Matters columnist. Contact her at Jshrop@att.net.

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

19


PARTINGTHOUGHTS

Chuck Creacy Publisher Chris Eddie Publisher Tom Martin Editor in Chief Susan Baniak Features Editor

Immigration reform is necessary to advance our global competitiveness By Eli Capilouto GUEST OP-ED

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ast year, I had the opportunity to travel to China with a delegation from the University of Kentucky to advance several partnerships growing between UK’s colleges, departments, and universities and industries in a country growing in economic importance. One such partnership is between UK’s Center for Applied Energy Research and the world’s largest power company. During a meeting with industry representatives, we shared our exciting work in the development of clean-coal technology and discussed partnerships, the exchange of students and faculty collaboration as part of the U.S.China Clean Energy Research Center. As we met, they described several multi-billion-dollar research-and-development investments in their country’s ener gy sector. In comparison, the proposed Department of Energy’s FY2014 budget for fossil energy R&D was just over $420 million, reflecting an approximate reduction of $82 million over last year. That stark reality underscores the competitive environment our country’s students face today and in the coming years as our economy continues to be transfor med by global forces. We can’t avoid it, nor should we try.

The changing landscape, in fact, demands more of the United States in educating and preparing a well-educated workforce — one outfitted with the skills necessary to compete and succeed in a global, multinational, multifaceted economy. We can no longer af ford to focus only locally; we must broaden our scope. But we can make changes here at home that will help ensure our competitiveness, particularly in science and technology where advances are occurring rapidly in ways that are shaping our economy profoundly. Last month, I joined the presidents of Cornell University, Arizona State University, and Miami-Dade College in a letter calling on colleges and universities across the country to voice support for a sensible solution for the United States’ broken immigration policy. On April 19, some 75 institutions nationwide joined together on National Immigration Reform Day — we are at the juncture of this important national dialogue. Universities are responsible for educating the workforce that creates jobs and fills employment ranks; and our graduate students, faculty and staff reach transfor mative breakthroughs, write patents and invent new technologies that fuel our economy. In many ways, the existing, outmoded immigration policies — written nearly a halfcentury ago — are hindering us in each of

these endeavors. Consider that a quarter of the Americans who have won a Nobel Prize have been immigrants, and — in 2011 — more than three quarters of the patents received by the top ten U.S. patent-producing universities listed an immigrant inventor . Their innovations yield impressive economic growth for the United States; between 1990 and 2000, these discoveries have contributed to growing U.S. GDP by 2.4 percent, as reported by the Bureau of Economic Research. In an economic context, 40 percent of all Fortune 500 companies were founded by an immigrant or the child of an immigrant. While on our campus, international students bring a cultural richness to the university community, adding global perspectives to classroom discussions and conversations in our residence halls before they graduate. At the same time, international students and families had a net impact on the United States and Kentucky economies of some $21 billion and $137 million, respectively, in 2011-’12, according to the National Association of Foreign Student Advisors. The data tell a compelling story — one that parallels with an American dream that inspired generations of immigrant entrepreneurs who traveled to the United States in pursuit of a better life. Yet, in an increasingly interdependent

world — we are making it dif ficult for immigrants to chart a promising path through education and, ultimately, employment in the United States. Our workforce needs, especially in STEM education, are growing, and at the current rate of production, we will fall short of the necessary tar gets to accelerate and sustain economic growth. Roughly half of post-baccalaureate degrees awarded in STEM disciplines are to foreign-bor n students, but we lack the common-sense immigration policies to keep these graduates in the United States. In short, we are preparing the brightest minds to lead the new global economy, and then we watch as they retur n to another country hungry for their entrepreneurial spirit — we’re competing against the students we educate. As a nation of immigrants, we have an opportunity to seize our heritage and find an alternative method for engaging a vibrant part of our global community in our future. By choosing a path to sensible immigration reform, not only can we help Kentucky become more competitive nationally, but we can contribute to the overall global prosperity of the United States. Eli Capilouto is the 12th president of the University of Kentucky.

A new era of decentralized leadership in Lexington By Todd Willey

stead of following corporate guidelines built elsewhere. Starting with a minimal budget he past couple of years might come and finding a home in whatever repurposed to be known as the Kickstarter era. building is suitable, they tur n their dreams Across the nation, ideas have been into success by connecting with their peers converted from potential into real value. The and winning them as customers. Instead of breakthrough that powers this new era of establishing themselves in a cluster around commerce is the openness that connects in- a larger, established anchor, this new breed novators directly to their market. This is a of leaders consists of cultural ambassadors. shift from having to be vetted by established They are building neighborhoods where you players before gaining access to capital, peer can expect authentic interactions, well-pronetworks and other resources that first-time duced goods and services and otherwise exfounders often have trouble acquiring. perience the tone of what is quickly In the same way that crowdfunding is becoming the heart of Lexington. taking over financing, a merit-based style of Entrepreneurs deserve a lot of the credit leadership is taking over our city. The next for their visible impact in this cultural shift, generation of nonprofit and business lead- but the change we’re seeing isn’t limited to ers are developed by promoting their ideas founders and executives. Less visibly, proand creating real-world progress instead of fessionals working in lar ger businesses in navigating institutional hierarchies and play- non-managerial roles are finding ways to exing political games. Leadership is not bepress themselves and get their peers to enstowed in Lexington by being hired or gage in building a more open community. voted into a position with some amount of Blood drives, fundraisers and volunteer efassumed authority — the potential for lead- forts are being led by employees when there ership exists in anyone willing to work hard is a lack of direction from their managers, or to make change. when the goals of the boardroom don’t This new breed of leadership is already match the desires of the employees. Lexinghaving a huge impact on our city. While a ton’s plethora of young professionals’ organfew big developers are spending capital de- izations deserve the credit for a lot of this veloping Fayette Mall and Hamburg to make rabble-rousing and self-organizing. way for more franchises, the growth of LimeIt is a credit to many businesses that their stone, Jefferson and National avenues is hap- employees are successful with their inter nal pening in a way that reflects our culture. campaigns for local involvement. Business Our local businesses are creating value participation in the traditional ways, such as and experimenting with the local market in- offering paid leave for volunteering and sharGUEST COMMENTARY

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ing underutilized resources such as of fice space, has always been healthy in the region. Recently, there has been a transition to setting company-wide community objectives in a way that includes employees in deter mining the areas of interest and investment. The businesses that encourage employees to build direct connections to community organizations, instead of participating in the regifting schemes of older workplace-giving programs, are promoting happy employees who build a vibrant Lexington and strengthen our culture of openness and accessibility. There are signs the city gover nment understands this shift toward openness and wants to empower each person to make a change in his or her own way. As this article gets ready for press, we are in the final contention for a grant from the Knight News Challenge. Our elected officials want to develop a system for promoting change in which our citizens can become leaders and find pathways to push through or avoid interference by the government and other regulators. The city’s proposal generated some negative feedback when it was proposed to the Bloomberg Mayor’s Challenge. It was considered generic and missing an opportunity to have our elected of ficials create and lead a strong identity and brand for our city. What Lexington needs is not to have an administration claim an identity and try to capture it with their limited time in of fice, but to build an enduring legacy of empower ment and openness. An open community

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

builds more leaders and creates more value than a community that rallies around a few favored industries. Some challenges remain while this model of decentralized leadership continues to become the dominant mode of growth for our city. We’ve always found it easier to boast about the successes of particular companies or industries than to promote the value of openness and community. The identity that Lexington projects to our visitors is based on a few sectors of our economy and heritage that are, for the most part, neither representative of the lives of our residents nor opportunities for continued growth that are available to the entire city. As the conversation changes about the value of being in Lexington, the institutions that interface with visitors and newly relocated residents must tap into the resources that are driving this cultural shift. What hurdles remain, and any backlash from the entrenched or ganizations that are losing relevance, will quickly be swept aside or overcome. The path forward for Lexington is knowing that the path forward is constantly in flux, but anyone can have an ef fect on its trajectory. In an egalitarian city, the future is built by the best ideas with the best leaders, and we’re fortunate to have plenty of both. Todd Willey is a serial startup founder and employee. He is CEO of CirrusMio, where he oversees the CivChoice workplace-giving program.


Think outside the Herbie Lexington could benefit from expanded recycling initiatives

By George Kaufman GUEST WRITER

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teach environmental science at Transylvania University. Each semester , I take my students on a field trip to the LFUCG Recycling Center on Thompson Road. For the past two semesters, I have added a component to the experience: Before we go on our trip, I have collected as much trash as I could carry from the side of the road between my house and Transylvania. The stretch includes North Forbes and West Main, and I fill my bags before I get halfway to campus. Then my students and I classify and weigh what I have found. Although the amount of trash over the one- to two-mile stretch doesn’t seem impressive, the numbers add up quickly when my students extrapolate how much trash is likely to be on all the roadways in Fayette County. Plastic dominates the landscape — wrappers and plastic ware, lids and straws from 32-oz drink containers, plastic bottles and jugs, and hosts of other things that fall out of people’s cars as they drive along.

Plenty of paper and Styrofoam are also strewn on the street. The paper itself will degrade into fairly non-toxic stuf f, but the dyes and ink used on them will run off into our streams and eventually into the water supply. The Styrofoam, as with any plastic, photodegrades (gets broken down by light) into smaller bits and simple chemical compounds. These chemicals will run of f and pollute our streams, if they don’t find their way into the bellies of the local wildlife first. Having large quantities of trash on the side of the road is no good in anyone’s books. Much of that roadside garbage could be turned into something far more useful: money. Every pound of material that our recycling center segregates stays out of a landfill and can actually earn some money for the county and several local businesses. They send milk jugs to Somerset, Ky., and colored plastics go to T roy, Ala., to make new items like plastic chairs. Plastic soda bottles go to Florence, Ky., to make plastic strappings, while cardboard and fiberboard are sent to Memphis, Tenn., where they are

reused. Steel goes to a steel mill in T ube City, Ill., aluminum cans go to Berea, Ky. — and the list goes on. Aluminum is the best moneymaker for our recycling center, which would ear n about $700 for the amount of aluminum that is likely littering the streets of Fayette County on any given day. Perhaps that amount of money sounds like a lot, or per haps it doesn’t, but it should definitely make someone think twice before he or she throws a soda can out the car window. Here’s where the economic opportunity lies. My students are amazed to learn that we actually could recycle Styrofoam if it weren’t cost-prohibitive to transport a material that is mostly air. We need local businesses to use recycled materials, such as Styrofoam, plastic wrappers and the myriad plastics beyond the bottles and jugs our recycling center already takes. These materials are unrecyclable because of the economics of segregating and shipping, not because of science and technology. Some cities do recycle these materi-

als, and Lexington could join them. Anyone who has read “Cradle to Cradle” by Michael Braungart and W illiam McDonough will likely agree that we should mine those materials instead of discarding them in a landfill or letting them degrade and contaminate the water we drink. Doing so could help further the image of our wonder ful city by protecting and beautifying the environment. It could also create meaningful jobs for people, boost local economic development and reduce our reliance on foreign oil, because nearly all of these plastics are made from petrochemicals. We recycle quite a lot in this city, and creating these local businesses would help us recycle even more. The amounts of Styrofoam and plastics that litter the roadside pale in comparison to the amounts we throw away in our Herbies each week. I teach my students that our society can be truly sustainable when economic development, social justice and environmental stewardship act in concert. Developing such local businesses would take us a step further in that direction.

If you have views and suggestions on the many issues challenging our regional economy, we’re interested in what you have to say. Email your thoughs to erik@bizlex.com or post comments to any story online at bizlex.com

Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

21


BUSINESSLEADS BIDS

LFUCG is seeking Bids for Hospital PPE Kits. Contact 859-258-3320. Request No. 56-2013, deadline 5/14/13. LFUCG is seeking Bids for Internet Access Provider Service. Contact 859258-3320. Request No. 49-2013, deadline 5/14/13. LFUCG is seeking Bids for Tates Creek Sidewalk Improvements Project. Contact 859-258-3320. Request No. 572013, deadline 5/22/13.

CONVENTIONS May 15 – 20 National Association of Miniature Enthusiasts, 2013 A-3 Regional House Party at the Clarion Hotel. 500 people expected.

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS Masters In Renovation Inc, addition to general business office, 207 West New Circle Road (Lucky’s Autosports), 1,841 sq.ft., $200,000. SC Contracting Inc, remodel, 3735 Palomar Centre Drive, Suite 170, (Family Eye Center), $125,000. Jarobe Construction Inc, remodel general business office, 101 Old LaFayette Avenue (Ross Tarrant Architects), $30,000. Congelton-Hacker Company, remodeling private hospital, 150 North Eagle Creek Drive (St. Joseph East), $350,000. Management Resource Systems, retail sales remodeling, 161 Lexington Green Circle Suite A16 (Chico’s), $211,000. DMK Development Group LLC, nursing home, 1376 Silver Springs Drive (Trilogy Health Campus), 58,000 sq.ft., $5,200,000. Tomas Rogers, remodeling restaurant, 128 North Broadway, $90,000. Lenco Excavation Inc., addition to a warehouse, 767 Winchester Road (JM Smucker Co), 69,762 sq.ft., $10,000,000.

NEW BUSINESS LICENSES

Audio/Video Installation | Rodgers Audio/Video, owned by Donnie Rodgers II, 859-494-3968. Beautician | Owned by Michelle S Newby, 153 Patchen Dr., Ste. 3, Lexington, Ky. Cattle Farm | Owned by Anthony G Witt, 5535 Athen Walnut Hill Pike. Child Care | Owned by Gulley, Cindy L, 859-969-9917. Child Care | Owned by Amy Morris, 308 Derby Drive. Clinical Psychology | Skaggs Consulting PLLC, owned by Emily E Skaggs, 501 Darby Creek Road 16. Commercial Rental | Chick Fil A Inc, owned by Timothy Rj Howe Sr, 404765-8000. Commercial Rental Real Estate | Owned by Edward G Reynolds, 1620 Old Paris Rd., Lex ington, Ky., 859363-1514. Concrete | Vitco Inc, owned by Jack Vittitow, 850 Landis Lane, 502-5386820. Construction | Owned by George M Brock, 100 Clear Springs Drive. Construction | Hare & Associates Inc, owned by Franklin Hare Jr, 704-2015737. Construction | Phoenix Of Tennessee, owned by Kyle Waites, 615-8609712. Construction/Remodeling | CW Remodeling LLC, owned by Chris Watkins, 175 N Locust Hill Drive, 859509-5845. Consultant | Owned by James A White, 147 Treetop Court. Consultant | Owned by Roy H Woods, 2899 Uttinger Lane. Consulting | Bluegrass Hathaway LLC, 748 Montclair Drive, 859-221-2955. Consulting Service | Oneiroi Consulting Service, 1101 Beaumont Centre Lane. Counseling | Owned by Ladonna K Tyler, 169 E Reynolds Rd., C-3, Lexington, Ky. Design Business | Owned by Snyder, Deborah, 859-879-6106. Educational Services | Owned by Lauren A Villemuer-Drenth 321 S Cleveland Road.

Elder Care | Owned by Laura Frazier, 726 Franklin Avenue. Electrical Contractor | Excel Services Inc, owned by Brian Waltrip, 502-4135402. Employment Service | All Source PPS Inc, owned by Janice B Howroyd, 800872-2677. Environmental | Owned by George B Clarke, 105 Teal Lane. Farm | Owned by Wyles, Jeremy, 859421-8860. Farrier Products/Supplies | Stockhoffs Horseshoes, owned by Dory Stockhoff, 4981 Old Versailles Rd., Lexington, Ky., 502-222-3960. Food Service | Campus Cooks LLC, 500 Zenith Drive. Handy Man | Owned by Jimmy Caudill, 1032 Darley Drive. Handyman | Owned by Britton Holman, 174 N Mount Tabor 150. Hauling | Hagewoods Hauling Inc, owned by Anna Hagewood, 931-2164125. Home Inspections | All Homes Inspection, owned by Jeffrey Gibson, 859621-0504. Horses | Owned by Marvin Little Jr, 3949 Lemonsmill Pike. HVAC | Moore Mechanical, owned by Joseph Moore, 128 Eisenhour Court A, 859-887-0717. HVAC | Smitson Indoor Air LLC, owned by Charlie Smitson II, 208 Burbon Street, 859-489-4381. Insurance Premium Tax | Generation Life Ins Co, 931-388-7872. Internet Sales | Metal & Wood LLC, owned by Douglas O'ryan Mccray, 859-494-3773. Investment Broker | Owned by Johnathon T Davis, 941 Revere Run. Investments | 401 West Main LLC, 250 W Main Street 3000, 859-253-0000. Landscape | Ideal Landscapes LLC, owned by Charles Magruder, 859327-4441. Lawn Care | Owned by Jonathan Latimer, 883 Cheryl Lane, 859-2707128. Management Consultant | Alpha Management LLC, owned by Danny Anthony Everett, 2312 Golden Oak Drive, 859-309-9849. Marketing | Owned by Patricia Hall, 2653 Idlewood Drive.

Mary Kay | Owned by Jane E Miller, 3029 Maddie Lane. Massage Therapist | Owned by Keary E Snapp, 1550 Trent Blvd 2408. Medical Consulting | Witt Consulting PLLC, owned by Dr William O Witt, 2050 Versailles Rd., Lexington, Ky., 859-629-6120. Medical Equipment Warehouse | Surgitech LLC, owned by Thomas H Mullins, 1025 Dove Run Rd., Ste. 210, Lexington, Ky., 859-553-5460. Medical Doctor | Taylor Physical Medicene, 131 Lone Oak Drive. Minister | Owned by Martina Y. Ockerman, 835 Glendover Road. Motor Vehicle Salvage | JLC Stuff Ky LLC, owned by James L Combs, 2273 Abbeywood Road. Prepaid Phone Cards | Tek Digicom LLC, owned by Pierre Ngog Jackson, 1612 Konner Woods Drive, 859-2857068. Professional Services | Owned by Timothy Padgett, 2541 Lake Hill Drive. Provisions | Market Plus Wine LLC, owned by Abdel Krim Boughalem, 75 Hampton Court. Real Estate | Ava Properties LLC, owned by Andrew Areaux, 1040 Monarch Street, 110, 859-492-0899. Real Estate | D A M Properties LLC, owned by, 1414 Versailles Road. Real Estate Appraiser | Owned by Debra J Fister, 221 Chenault Road. Remodeling | Gren Tek Contracting LLC, owned by Gregory R Schenuk, 2517 Sir Barton Way, 210, 859-9634104. Rental | Biederman Properties LLC, 1076 Wellington Way. Rental | J&M Bass LLC, owned by Michael Bassetti, 614 Euclid Avenue. Rental Real Estate | Lexington Bluegrass Rental, owned by Waddah Yaacoubagha, 859-913-9900. Rental Real Estate | Megna Properties LLC, owned by Nagris Hasheem, 3669 Winding Wood Ln., Lexington, Ky. Rental Real Estate | Dragonfly Properties LLC, owned by Sylvia Walling, 304 Somersly Place, 859-523-8508. Rental Real Estate | Gravity Wins LLC, owned by William S Cloyd, 4388 Ft. Springs Road, 859-255-3652. Rentals | Owned by C G Patterson III, 1313 Glenview Drive, 859-277-1956. Residential Painting | Owned by

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Business Lexington • May 10, 2013

Michael Cremeans, 3500 Laredo Drive 33, 859-285-4730. Restaurant | Aabha Inc, owned by Ramesh Rimal, 7220 Nicholasville Road, 859-277-0711. Restaurant | Owned by Leland Hollid Jr, 1419 Versailles Road, 859-3682272. Restaurant | Jax LLC, owned by Aimee Lovitz, 101 W. Short Street, 502-3334804. Restaurant | Main Cross Cafe LLC, owned by Tavern Rest Group, 404 W Main St., Lexington, Ky., 513-6054713. Retail | Ex Mr Guns LLC, owned by Nicholas Simon Kelly, 2556 Moray Place, 502-648-7890. Retail | Thirty One Consultant, 1881 Lost Trail Lane. Retail Construction | Singleton Construction, owned by Chris Singleton, 740-756-7331. Retail Sales | Owned by Aaron M Sander, 221 Ransom Trace. Retail/Juicer | Owned by Elizabeth Beal, 436 Old Vine Street. Sales | Owned by Carla G Graybeal, 4197 Heartwood Road. Sales | Owned by James L Hildreth, 5064 Ivybridge Drive, 859-523-6145. Sales/Financial | Mbr Holdings LLC, owned by, 859-421-8683. Sales/Medical | Clinical Dynamics LLC, 3509 Westmont Circle. Salon | Hair And Beyod, 4246 Saron Drive. Security System Services | Owned by Michael J Rigney, 2737 Stillesville Road, 606-423-1950. Service Company | Robinson Pipe, owned by Bill Burchell, 2656 Idlewood Road, 412-921-2100. Signage | 4MC Corporation, owned by Dick Wylie, 217-795-4416. Sports Reporter | Owned by Richard H Gabriel, 377 Northwood Drive. Stone, Landscape | Stone & More LLC, owned by Abel F Bautista, 859-5196586. Taxi Cab Service | Owned by Donald Cheek, 3200 Loch Ness Drive 21. Teacher | Owned by Starla L Welch, 2209 Cascade Way. Tech Support | Owned by Nemecek, Andrew, 616-334-7379. Telecommunications | Star Construction LLC, owned by Robert Allen Stoutt Jr, 740 Phillips Lane. Theater | Luckey, Joshua A, 329 Taylor Drive. Therapy | Allstar Therapies Inc, owned by Dan P Wukich, 1941 Bishop Lane, Ste. 100, Louisville, Ky., 724-3273553. Trucking | Kingston Express Inc, owned by Demyck C Maye, 859-2236361. Tutoring | Owned by Tamela B Craig, 1847 Bellefonte Drive. Various | Owned by Davorka Klaric, 859-967-4875. Video / Photography | Owned by Seth Eckert, 3617 Mossbridge Way. Web Content Manager | Owned by Morris K Duckworth Jr, 2780 Mable Lane, 859-243-9903.

COMMERCIAL LOANS Garry Milton Real Est Inc from First Sec Bank Of Owensboro Inc for $42,476. Gdp Homes LLC from Peoples Exchange Bank for $42,500. Harpe Prop LLC from United Bank & Tr Co for $51,200. Dynamo Prop LLC from Central Bank & Tr Co for $54,750. Yallarhammer LLC from Brown, Jason S for $58,000. Rad & Lime LLC from Traditional Bank for $58,400. Eckman Prop LLC from Central Bank & Tr Co for $58,500. Jamcor Inv Inc from Traditional Bank for $60,400. Anderson Homes for Rent LLC from Banktrust Fin Corp for $63,743.

Triton Holdings LLC from Mischner, S James for $75,000. 1317 West Main LLC from Bank Of Lex for $80,000. Bentley & England LLC from Peoples Exchange Bank for $97,030. Rtf Prop LLC from U S Bank Na for $99,500. Prather Inv LLC from Bank Of The Bluegrass for $100,000. Owen Matthews LLC from Bank Of Lex for $101,560. Yallerhammer LLC from Mischner, S James for $110,000. Lexingtons Real Est Co LLC from Bank Of The Bluegrass for $118,000. Top Ten Realty Inc from Central Bank & Tr Co for $120,000. Jamcor Inv Inc from Traditional Bank for $126,800. Briggs Co from First State Fin for $133,053. Briggs Co from First Sec Bank Of Owensboro Inc for $139,200. Eirecon LLC from Farmers Bank for $160,000. Eirecon LLC from Farmers Bank for $195,000. Emt LLC from Tr12 LLC for $200,000. North Mlk LLC from Sebree Dep Bank for $200,000. Atkins Homes LLC from Traditional Bank for $206,000. Byer Homes Inc from Whitaker Bank Inc for $215,000. Keeling Classic Homes LLC from Bank Of Lex for $225,600. Ck Ptnr LLC from Bank Of Lex for $235,000. Commonwealth Designs Inc from Traditional Bank for $245,367. Briggs Co from First State Fin for $262,627. Robinwood Inv LLC from Kentucky Bank for $318,619. Monon LLC from Traditional Bank for $326,012. Rasnick Family Ptnrship Lllp from Republic Bank & Tr Co for $350,000. Trek Prop LLC from Bank Of Lex for $353,378. James T Nash Bldr Inc from Traditional Bank for $355,196. Dragonfly Prop 2 LLC from Bank Of Lex for $372,500. Owen Matthews 2 LLC from Bank Of Lex for $372,500. Synthesis Prop Group LLC from Traditional Bank for $372,601. Rasnick Family Ptnrship Lllp from Republic Bank & Tr Co for $375,000. Owen Matthews 2 LLC from Bank Of Lex for $377,674. Howard & Nash Communities LLC from Traditional Bank for $390,000. Barton Creek Holdings Inc from Community Tr Bank Inc for $420,000. Swk Prop LLC from Jpmorgan Chase Bank Na for $452,037. Mdr Ctr LLC from Bank Of The Bluegrass for $475,000. Howard Homes LLC from Traditional Bank for $597,977. James T Nash Bldr Inc from Traditional Bank for $600,000. Saunier Dev LLC from Traditional Bank for $700,000. Community Action Council for Lex Faye Bo from Central Bank & Tr Co for $750,000. Luckys Krazy Kustomz Inc from Kentucky Bank for $850,000. New Circle Rd Prop LLC from Kentucky Bank for $850,000. Carefree Holdings LLC from Republic Bank & Tr Co for $1,000,000. Rml Constr Llp from Branch Banking & Tr Co for $1,150,000. Eagle View Ventures LLC from Branch Banking & Tr Co for $1,800,000. Kwg Prop LLC from Kentucky Bank for $1,949,050. Thoroughbred Energy LLC from U S Bank Na for $2,400,000. Security Tr Bldg LLC from Bank Of The Bluegrass for $2,512,418. Burlington Hgts Cond LLC from Traditional Bank for $2,800,000. Horse Park Travel Ctr LLC from U S Bank Na for $17,050,000.


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Business Lexington May 10, 2013  

This issue of Business Lexington explores immigration reform and human resources issues.