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SENIOR ELIZABETH ABBEY•JUNIOR ZACHARY BUSEY• FRESHMAN WILLIAM CAMERON•SENIOR VIMLA DAYAL•SOPHOMORE RHEGG DELARA•JUNIOR JOE DENG•SENIOR JAMES FREDERICK•FRESHMAN HALEY FURSTNER•SENIOR BENJAMIN DONOVAN•JUNIOR TESS DUNCAN•SOPHOMORE DYLAN DUNN•SENIOR EMRAH GULTEPE•SOPHOMORE PAIGE GULDERFINGER•JUNIOR ADEELA HAMMONS•SENIOR NATALEE JONES•FRESHMAN IAN KAISER•SOPHOMORE OLIVIA LYNCH•SOPHOMORE CLAUDIA ADAMS•FRESHMAN TUBA AGBAS•JUNIOR BRIAN AITKIN•SENIOR HUGO LOPES•SOPHOMORE GARRET LYNN•SOPHOMORE PAUL MACKENDER•FRESHMAN ANNA MARKEN•FRESHMAN YESENIA MALDONADO•SOPHOMORE VINCENT PARSONS•SENIOR TONYA PARELMAN•JUNIOR NICOLE PRENEVOST•SOPHOMORE NICKLAUS POWELL•SOPHOMORE KESHAV RAMASWAMI•SENIOR GLENN SAGER•JUNIOR PATRICK SCHUELE•SENIOR ASHISH SHARMA•FRESHMAN BRANDON SHATTO•JUNIOR PETER UHL•SENIOR EMRAH GULTEPE•SOPHOMORE LAUREN TRIPP•SENIOR LINDSAY VANATTA•SOPHOMORE ALEXANDER WEST•SENIOR PATRICK ZILLER•JUNIOR MASON WOODERSON•SOPHOMORE DRAKE WINN•SENIOR DANIEL WYDNER•JUNIOR TYLER WYSONG•FRESHMAN AMCHELLE CLENDENIN•SOPHOMORE JEFFREY COLE•FRESHMAN JORDAN EIMER•SOPHOMORE JACK ESBERG•FRESHMAN ANDREW SIMPSON•JUNIOR DAWN SELDER•SENIOR PATRICIA SMITH•SOPHOMORE ANTHONY STEINMETZ•FRESHMAN CARTER STOLBERG•SOPHOMORE JUSTIN STULTS•SENIOR RYAN TUSCHHOFF•JUNIOR MARY TANNER•FRESHMAN CARA SHAW•SOPHOMORE KELLY ALLEN•FRESHMAN JOEL ANDERSON•SOPHOMORE TREVON EMERY•FRESHMAN JACK FAY•SOPHOMORE CARLY GRIFFITH•SENIOR SHELBY GOCHENOUR•SOPHOMORE ALLYSE HACKLER•SENIOR MATTHEW HALLQUIST•JUNIOR NILOOFAR HAGHIGHAT•FRESHMAN SOPHIA HITCHCOCK•SENIOR ARIAS LOCKHEART•SOPHOMORE CAROLINE MARLAND•SOPHOMORE ROBERT MARTIN•SENIOR ANDREW MIKKELSON-RICHARDSON•JUNIOR ELIZABETH MCGRANAHAN•SENIOR CHRISTOPHER POPLAWSKI•SOPHOMORE ANTHONY PLESCIA•FRESHMAN WILLIAM PURDY•FRESHMAN SIMON QIU•SOPHOMORE ALEXANDRE SEQUEIRA-COSTA

SHARE PROJECT. • SOPHOMORE MEGAN HOGUE SAW THE SET OF THE FIRST “KING KONG” MOVIE WHEN SHE VISITED KAWAII ISLAND IN HA WATCH AND LEARN

During his first baseball game of the >season, > Right:senior Brady Anderson watches his teammates play from the dugout. During games and practices, their coach had them work together to learn from each other. “Our coach is very verbal and likes to yell a lot,” Anderson said. “He will call you out on things. He’s not afraid to get in your face and let you know what you’re doing wrong so we can fix it.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

SING YOUR HEART OUT

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Below: Singing the school song at the end of her final pep assembly, senior Laura Kaufman celebrates the end of her Lancer Dancer career with her fellow varsity dancers. “It was exciting but also sad,” Kaufman said. “I’ve been a Lancer Dancer for three years straight, so it was definitely a bittersweet ending.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

POP CULTURE DEBATE

>> SENIOR SPIRIT

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Above: During the final moments of Lancer Day, senior Stuart Jones cheers wildly after hearing that the seniors won the competition for the best overall float. Jones also took part in the soccer float as well. “Honestly, I knew I had to be on the soccer float, but immediately when it was done I ran over to the senior float and got on,” Jones said. “I mean, it was my senior year, so I definitely wanted to be with my grade and everyone on the float.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

Left: In a gameshow competition between the art department and the math department, junior Michael Stolle holds up a sign showing that, according to a randomly selected group of students at SME, “Slumdog Millionaire” was the most popular movie of the year. Stolle was one of the students who helped hold up signs at the final pep assembly of the year, after teachers from the two departments took guesses at the various question throughout the competition. “[Mr. Jason] Filbeck got really into the answers,” Stolle said. “When he thought something was questionable, he would definitely be yelling back and forth with Mr. [Nick] Paris.” Photo by Rachel English.

D FISHING SINCE HE WAS YOUNG. THE BIGGEST FISH HE EVER CAUGHT WAS A CATFISH, AND THE FIRST GUN HE EVER SHOT WITH WAS STARTING OFF THE YEAR

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Far above: (Left to right) Senior Rick Lopes wears his practice jersey while warming up for a soccer scrimmage. Photo by Kristin Barker. • While preparing for Lancer Day, senior Emily Mullet paints senior Christina Davis’s face. Photo by Amanda Marland. • During a wrestling match, sophomore Peter Stout traps his opponent in a headlock. Photo by Tyler Roste. • Sitting at the top of the main staircase, senior Michelle Williams works on a test. Photo by Alissa Pollack. • While performing at a pep assembly, senior Anna Seitz holds a pose with the rest of the drill team dancers. Photo by Sam Bolanovich. • Preparing to perform, junior Ted Dubois holds his drum close to his body while the rest of the student body packs into the gymnasium. Photo by Rachel English. • Sophomore Logan Heley rocks out during Lancer Day in his decade-themed costume. Photo by Alyssa Pollack. • Sitting outside the auditorium, junior Kaevon Tavakolinia prepares for his role in the play by practicing on his guitar. Photo by Amanda Marland. • Senior Michael Olson sits at the first pep assembly of the year with the rest of his grade. Photo by Anna Petrow. • Dressed in spirit wear on the first Lancer Link Day, sophomore Melissa Gregg makes funny faces while waiting for the leaders to begin the next game. Photo by Rachel English.


AWAII FOR HER PARENTS’ W E D

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SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY CLUBS SENIOR ADS INDEX

H E ALSO SAW ACTOR BEN STILLER’S HOUSE WHEN ON A MOVIE TOUR. • JUNIO R T E

AUGUST

4 20 34 52 66 80 94 106 122 138 228 280 468

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B OIS HAD BEEN HUNTING A


>>

was a master at FINI

7500 MISSION ROAD

SHING cross-word

puzzles. usually,

>> PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KS 66208 >> VOLUME 51

S OWN DREAM

T A SIGN READ IN G “Y OU ’R E OU R DR EAM BRUCE!” TO MIMIC HI

UNTERMAN WENT TO TW O OF BRUCE SPRINGSTEE N’S CONCERTS. SHE

BROUGH

>> 913-993-6600 TIMES

NIOR >> ENROLLMENT: 1849 >> SMSD. • .OJURG

>> SHAWNEE MISSION EAST

SHE CO M PL ET ED ON E PU ZZ LE EACH DAY FROM THE NE W YORK

ALBUM.

senior kate sachse

PHOEBE .

SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS

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Above: Competing in the high jump during a meet, senior Curran Darling manages to fly over the bar by arching his back and swinging his body onto the mat below. Darling joined the track team as a junior and continued to succeed in the event his senior year. “Track was a perfect fit [for me],” Darling said. “I’m doing track in college at Villanova. I really felt that I could use my athletic ability to do something at college, so when Villanova came and told me that they wanted me, I really wanted to go.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

A FRESH START

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Right: (Top to bottom) During the SHARE fair, senior Rikki Eymann presses a sticker to a potential SHARE volunteer’s cheek. She attempted to recruit students for her project by holding signs and handing out treats. “For my SHARE project, [Meals on Wheels], we would deliver meals to old people who couldn’t drive their cars to get food themselves,” Eymann said. “I [volunteered when] growing up with my grandparents. It makes me feel happy.” Photo by Tyler Roste. • Practicing powderpuff football at Franklin Park with fellow junior girls, Megan Klugman laughs after falling on the ground. Although the girls never played against the seniors because of weather conditions, they enjoyed practices to enhance their playing skills. “There would be awkward moments when the guys had to teach us how to tackle,” Klugman said. “But all the girls got to bond, and the guys taught us how to play and be aggressive.” Photo by Rachel English. • Bending with the rest of the varsity drill team girls, senior Johanna Cook performs her first personally choreographed dance of the year. As captain, Cook choreographed several dances throughout the school year. “When we choreograph, we pick out songs that are fun and upbeat so the crowd can get into it,” Cook said. “Once, we used the ‘Move, Shake, Drop’ remix.” Photo by Rachel English.

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OPPORTUNITIES PRESENT THEMSELVES

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Below: (Left to right) Dressed up for her own project, Restart-Art, senior Callie McGuire signs up for another SHARE project. “I was signing up for soup kitchen,” McGuire said. “I really loved it because you really feel like you’re giving back to your community.” Photo by Rachel English. • Practicing both offense and defense, sophomore Molly Rapphold does one of several girls soccer training exercises. “I like it when we do the three-on-two, two-on-one drill because we get to play offense and defense,” Rapphold said. “We always do cycles before games and practices where we get in a circle and do different drills to work on our touch and pass.” Photo by Andrea Zecy. • Senior Sarah Luby sits off the court during a varsity singles match with partner junior Nikki Reber. “Nikki and I started playing doubles together before my junior year,” Luby said. ”We decided we would be a good doubles team since we know each other so well.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley. • Performing in the April 1 orchestra concert, senior Matthew Snively plays the cello with the symphonic orchestra. “I have been playing the cello since third grade,” Snively said. “Before a concert we practice our music in class so that we’ll know it well enough for the concert.” Photo by Peter Bautz. • During her seventh hour Studio Art AP class, senior Hannah Johnston paints her tile in the north ramp. Johnston enjoyed being able to take a break from class, and getting to do something different. “I enjoy art a lot, but sometimes in a class like Studio Art, it feels forced,” Johnston said. “That’s why I liked painting a tile – it gave me an opportunity to get away from required artwork.” Photo by Anna Petrow. • Junior Michael Calvert practices outside before school with the Lancer marching band. “I don’t like getting up extra early,” Calvert said, “but it’s not that bad because it’s a good way to start your day outside. My favorite part is watching the drumline at the end of each show because I think they’re the best.” Photo by Andy Allen. Far below: Participating in a project sponsored by Coalition club, freshman Nathan Are tries to attract the attention of drivers on Mission Road. Are made a bold move by walking in the road, rather than on the sidewalk,and holding his sign up for drivers to slow down and see. “I think the walk was very effective because it raised awareness for invisible children in the community,” Are said. “I also think it raised awareness in the students because it was a major student club event.” Photo by Andy Allen.

>>

SEE

R MATTHEW CHALK LIKED BUILDING MODELS OF AIRPLANES, CARS, DESTROYERS AND SHIPS. HIS UNLCE INSPIRED HIM, BE

SCHOOL. HE USUALLY GOT HIS FRIENDS TO DO IT WITH HIM, BUT NEVER WHEN A PARENT WAS IN THE CAR. • SOPHOMOR 2 THEME


ALSO

ECAUSE CHALK USED TO GO OVER TO HIS HOUSE AND WATCH HIM BUILD. • JUNIOR P A

R K ER HEYING ENJOY E D

>>

D A NCING AND SINGING TO ALL KINDS OF MUSIC IN THE CAR ON THE WAY HOME FRO

There is so much more to life than just what we see. Beneath the surface, there exists a collage of reality that is our life. Behind the sign held by the Coalition club member, there exists a pickle-eating fanatic. Behind the face mask of the varsity football player, there exists a classical music lover. Underneath the theatre costume of the thespian, there exists a yoga guru. Behind the thick-rimmed glasses of the chemistry teacher, there exists an artist. No person, no book, no situation is ever just as it appears. Our lives are multi-dimensional. We are who we are because of the different things we do. Behind the doors of our high school, there exists a body of students with a variety of talents, hobbies and passions. With every page, we will discover something new about someone. Something that was there all along, but was unnoticed by many. We will bring attention to the side of the quiet, conservative friend that dances all around the house when no one is home. With every page, we will learn more about ourselves and our classmates. SEE ALSO

>> CLOSING SPREAD, pg. 488 OPENING SPREAD 3


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t ed to play for a small division three school. • SOPHOMORE ANDREW WATKINS HAD BEEN A BOY SCOUT FOR SIX Y

1 DYLAN ROGERS 12 >>

PROMISING TO HELP

During the first Lancer Link activity of the year, junior Jake Flemming hugs a freshman to try and pop a balloon. Because the balloon wasn’t between them, the balloon wouldn’t pop. “My balloons were rigged not to pop, so she had a hard time trying to pop the balloon,” Flemming said. “In the end, the balloon had to be popped with scissors.” Photo by Rachel English.

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SME student

“I like that seniors can go out to lunch [at SME] because we get to leave campus, and it’s a nice break. My favorite lunch spot is at home or a fast food place with friends.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 6 – 7

2 RACHEL RICE 10 >> SME tennis player “Before every match, Coach Ogden gives us snack bags, with tootsie rolls, granola bars, gatorade and candy. Then we warm up by hitting balls with teammates.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 8 – 9

“I like seeing new places than where we live. My favorite thing to do is to go to the beach, and some of my favorite places are Mexico and Belize.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 10 – 11

WASHING FOR FUNDS

Above: During the cross country car wash, sophomore Graham Redelsheimer squirts soap on a teammate wearing a shark towel hood. All runners participated by soaping, rinsing as well as cheering at passing cars. “It was fun to do,” Redelsheimer said. “I always like doing activities with sports teams, and this was the perfect bonding opportunity.” Photo by Alysabeth Albano.

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3 EMILY BATES 9 >> traveler

4 LORETTA PRENO >> SME secretary “I like [being secretary] because it’s diverse, and it goes really fast. Everyday is different. I used to work in the airlines, and it was fast and different, too. I’m always busy.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 12 – 13

“Cross country is really a team sport. The whole team experience is really great, and it’s a way to get away from everything during the day.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 14 – 1 5

CHAIRS AT THE FAIR

Above: While promoting his project at the SHARE fair, senior Michael Cray holds up a sign to attract potential volunteers. “The birthday club is a really good organization that helps to reach out to underpriviledged kids,” Cray said. “I like that you get to hang out with your friends and have fun while you do community service.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

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5 TONI AGUIAR 9 >> SME cross country runner

6 TREY WITT >> SME debate teacher “Getting to come into a [debate] squad that has a history of success and that was already comfortable with me since I used to student teach here made the transition so much easier. ” SEE ALSO: PAGES 16 – 17

7 HANNAH QUILLEC 11 >> SME gymnast “At meets, we always get there and run and then sit and relax before each event. My favorite was the vault because it was my best. My favorite [jump] was a round off on the vault and a back flip off.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 18 – 19

A SPIRIT-FILLED FREE THROW

Above: During a freshman football game, freshman Cooper Hylton chugs water to revitalize. “I get really thirsty during practice and games, especially when it’s hot,” Hylton said. “Football is a tough sport because we have to work really hard. We commit ourselves to working hard so we can play better and contribute to the team effort.” Photo by CC Creidenberg.

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n nis since age five. She trained with a competitive academy called KC United Tennis. After high school, she wa n

AUGUST

DAY. HIS FAVORITE ANIME SERIES WAS “MELANCHOLY OF HARUHI SUZIMIYA.” • Junior Sally Schoenfeld HAD played t e 4 AUGUST


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

YEARS. TO BECOME AN EAGLE SCOUT, HE RE-LANDSCAPED A GARDEN AREA OUTSIDE OF THE YOUTH CENTER AT HIS CHURCH, SAINT AND

EVERY MORNING • SENIOR DANIEL GRITZ WAS A MEMBER OF THE ANIME CLUB THAT MET AT CORINTH LIBRARY EVERY OTHER WEDNE AUGUST DIVISION 5


PROCEED WITH

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SEE ALSO

DYLAN ROGERS 12 “I work at Jaegers Paintball. I’m on a team called KC Shuffle with some guys from work. We usually practice once a week. It’s a lot of fun. The welts I get are pretty sweet.”

N O I T U CA >>

PAINTBALL PLAYER

EA TUDHOPE AND LEAH PICKETT.

Design by Whitaker Sherk, ANDR

progress

Next to the now inaccessible south doors, the construction crew works year-round to build the new extension which was to become the new gymnasium.

THE NEW SOUTH EXIT

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Above: Seniors Jenee Vickers and Lauren Bowles walk through the construction tunnel to the senior parking lot. Despite the hassles it brought to her senior year, Vickers knew that it would benefit future students. “I’m curious to see how it will turn out,” Vickers said. Photo by Rachel English.

HAMMERING TOWARDS COMPLETION

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Right: Working on the new extension by the south doors, a construction worker hammers away at a wall as students leave school for lunch. Although principal Karl Krawitz was excited for the construction’s completion, he regretted the inconvenience it caused for the both the staff and students. “It will be beneficial for students, faculty and even the community,” Krawitz said. “It takes a long time but as we get closer and closer to the next school year, people will be more excited.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

6 AUGUST

AUGUST 2008

SEPTEMBER 2008

OCTOBER 2008


NOVEMBER 2008

Sally Holmes 12

DECEMBER 2008

le “The entire school will be a jung gym, with everything – ropes anda slides and what not. There will bewe huge ball pit – like the ones when we were little – by the main stairs so r. can jump into it from the fifth floo We’ll swing on monkey bars and climb ropes to get to our classes.”

Adam Isenberg 10

iMAGINE

Tess Duncan 10

uni“It’s going to have lots of clouds, like be will It . stars ting shoo and corns s a magical Disneyland. The classroom able will be sparkly. Everyone will be You to fly and everyone will be friends. ride will swim to class in the lazy river or s in horses to class. There will be a circu the middle of the school.”

Students describe their ideal fantasy vision for SME after construction.

colate “It will be like Willy Wonka’s Cho rfalls, Factory. There will be fountains, wate . Evcandy and Oompa Loompas, naturally s to get eryone will sing. There will be slide s will cher blea The s. room class our of all to torium be made out of pillows and the audi ntom ‘Pha a with ter thea se inten will be an of the Opera’ chandelier.”

JANUARY 2009

>> AFTER A SUMMER OF CONSTRUCTION, SME STUDENTS BEGIN THE YEAR EMBRACING THE CHANGES THAT ACT TO TRANSFORM THEIR HIGH SCHOOL CAREERS.

T

he construction at East left the allergy-stricken students reaching for more tissues and the thespians scrambling for a place to perform. For some it meant making the long hike from the sophomore lot to the first floor or reconfiguring their bathroom routes. The school transformed as the year progressed and students learned to cope with the changes. When jewelry teacher Wanda Simchuck walked into her new room, she almost didn’t recognize it. In the corner sat a big cooling system and skylights that opened allowed light in from above. The tables were repositioned for easier navigation of the room. Ceramics teacher Shelly Trewolla also came back to a new room. She moved into the old jewelry room while Simchuck cozied into the old painting room. Trewolla’s smaller room kept her students closer. “With the new layout the kids that are working with their hands can watch the throwers from their seats,” Trewolla said. “They don’t have to walk across the room and I can talk to everyone at once.” Over the past few years, the other high schools in the Shawnee Mission district had had their share of new additions. This year was East’s turn. What used to be the spirit circle had been transformed into a separate foyer leading to the future auditorium. Space will also be used for new administration offices at the top of the south ramp. Because of the construction, the spirit circle was closed and the primary drop off location changed to the space by the library. One rainy morning someone forgot to unlock the library doors, forcing students to walk up to

the office entrance. Newspaper photographer sophomore Chloe Fishgrund was dropped off at the library that morning. “I had my camera with me that day and both of my bags got soaked,” Fishgrund said. “I was just glad my stuff inside stayed dry.” Over the summer, the restrooms were renovated. Each restroom was stripped down and dressed with stainless steel stalls, new sinks and automatic flush toilets. “I’m not sure about them,” sophomore Libby Steinbock said. “It’s like they aren’t really clean at all and whenever I go to the restrooms I get really grossed out because there is water all over the floor, the toilet paper is gone, and half the time the toilets don’t even work.” Some kids care less about the cleanliness and more about the availability. Some had trouble adjusting to the second floor bathroom by the cafeteria being off limits to students. Sophomore Cormac O’Conner made the mistake of using them twice. “It was before I had seen the signs,” O’Conner said. “And then again I forgot that they did it and went during seminar. I was yelled at by [coach Shawn] Hair.” He didn’t understand what inspired the change. “It’s like they think they use it differently than we do,” O’Connor said. The students worked throughout the school year to adust and adapt to the new changes at East, and soon came around to being hopeful about the future of the high school. Story by Katie East.

Photo by Nicole Luby

CHANGES AT EAST 7


COMPETITION CHECK

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Freshman Maggie Fenton hits the ball during a match. “What I like about tennis matches as opposed to practices is the competitiveness,” Fenton said. “It’s just fun to get out there and try to win for your school. My favorite part of a match is the feeling afterward if you won.” Photo by Rachel English.

OF M ND DESIGN BY WHITAKER SHERK.

NEW PLAYERS AND PRE-SEASON TRAINING HELP THE GIRLS TENNIS TEAM MAKE A COMEBACK AND WIN STATE.

Tennis players talk about different interests they have off of the court.

Photos by Rachel English.

8 AUGUST

>>

Why tennis is their thing >>

Katy Richardson 10

“Tennis requires more hand-eye coordination [than swimming]. Swimming is really intense and tennis is more leniant. It is a good sport to start the year off with.”

freshman Mimi Fotopolus was one of the top-ranked players in her age group in the Missouri Valley and was expected to push for the Lancers’ No. 1 singles spot. “This year we have more players that can place at state,” head coach Sue Chipman said. “I’m really excited about what our team can do.” Early season reports placed East among the top five schools to watch. The Kansas City Star’s Girls Tennis Spring review said that the team had the potential to make a “title run.” These predictions proved to be correct. In early September, East placed first at the Shawnee Mission District meet, winning 39 out of the 40 matches. In October, the team won the Aquinas Tournament and Sunflower League Tournament. They were named the Hy-Vee Fox4 Team of the Week. “When we’re on the court, we’re focused on winning and nothing else,” Luby said. “We know that we have a pretty good shot at winning state.” At the 6A State competition in Topeka, East took 1st place overall as a team. Luby and Reber placed 1st in doubles. Fotopolus placed 2nd in singles. “When we won, everyone was in tears because they were so happy,” Luby said. “To go out on such a good note and accomplish something that great is something we’ll remember forever.” Story by Jordan Dietrich.

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T

he black and orange tennis bag slammed onto the concrete. Senior Sarah Luby didn’t care. Slumped down next to her bag and with her head rested in her hands, she was so upset that she couldn’t even cry. By not helping catapult the team into a top three finish, Luby felt like she let her team down. At last year’s state championship, Luby and doubles partner, junior Nikki Reber, lost iwn straight sets, 7-6, 6-3, to Shawnee Mission West in the semifinals. The doubles team placed third. East placed fourth. “We thought last season’s ending was unacceptable,” Luby said. “And this year we’re out to prove that we’re better than that.” This year, East worked harder in hope of winning its first state championship since 1992. To prepare for the season, several team members attended a tennis academy during the summer, perfecting their serves, ground strokes and footwork. At early season practices and team meetings, players focused on their game strategy, court presence and team chemistry. “Our team really wants to get rid of all kinks in our game early on in the season,” Luby said. “That way we won’t have to worry about them when state comes.” In addition to this newfound focus, the team had a strong core of athletes to rely on. Along with Luby and Reber,

Caroline Dodd 9

“I like to paint because it’s very fun and relaxing for me. Tennis is quite intense and painting is definitely [not intense] at all. Painting you can’t really mess up but in tennis you can.”


LAUGHS AND GIGGLES

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Below: At practice, freshman Lilly Stalder socializes with her teammates. “My favorite part of practice is getting to be with my friends,” Stalder said. “I like practicing because it’s not as intense as a game, and you have more fun.” Photo by Rachel English.

ENERGIZING SNACKS

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Far below: Freshman Carolyn Welter hits the ball during practice, preparing for her upcoming singles match. Before each match, every team member received snacks to energize. “I like the snack baggies we get before every match,” Welter said. “They contain fruit snacks, goldfish, or candy.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

SLAMMING TO WIN

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Far above: During practice sophomore Kirstin Chadd watches where the ball lands after slamming it across the court. “When I’m out there, I feel like I can let everything go and forget about school and work,” Chadd said. Photo by Rachel English.

AIMING FOR VARSITY

SEE ALSO

>>

Above: Sophomore Corey Neidl works to make varsity during one of the first days of tryouts. She felt that the practices really motivated her to work harder at the matches. “Hanging out with the varsity team outside of practice really made me want to be on varsity next year.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

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RACHEL RICE 10 “I love the book and how Bella and Edward have a fun relationship. [My friends and I] went an hour early to the movie. We saw it, loved it, so we got out and bought tickets and saw it again right away. ”

TWILIGHT FANATIC GIRLS TENNIS 9


>>

CHURCH CHOIR SINGER

greece

SEE ALSO

EMILY BATES 9 “I go to Bible study every week, and I am in the church choir that meets once a week. I am not in choir at school, but I wanted to get involved in something else.”

colorado

C

APPRECIATING THE SCENE

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Above: Sophomore Graham Stevenson and senior Hannah Fink pose for a picture on a lookout near a Greek church. “When you looked back on the town, it was like looking back in time,” Stevenson said. “Everything was so natural.” Photo courtesy of senior Hannah Fink.

D

DRYING OCTOPUS

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Above: A boat dries octopus while docked near a Greek restaurant. “I took a the picture because I thought the boat was charming,” senior Hannah Fink said. “It seemed characteristic of Greek life.” Photo courtesy of senior Hannah Fink.

FLIPS AND TURNS

Above left: Sophomore Kirsten Clark attempts a flip on the trampoline during the Chicago trip under the close watch of professionals. “We were tired from doing eight miles that day and we didn’t think we’d have the energy to bungee jump, but we did,” Clark said. “It was a blast. I got three flips in.” Photo courtesy of junior Jessie Sykes.

>>

uts, scrapes and altitude sickness. Not exactly what sophomore Kirsten Clark thought she would get from a cross country trip. “Mt. Ida was my least favorite day,” Clark said. “That was the day everybody either fell in mud or got scraped by thorn bushes. I got altitude sickness so I didn’t even make it to the top.” Every other year the girls’ varsity cross country team spent almost two weeks in Grand Lake, Colorado to bond as a team and train in the altitude. Even with the cuts and bruises, the trip allowed for bonding time for the team. “On the way up to Colorado we didn’t watch any DVD’s or anything, we just talked and did silly things like making friendship bracelets,” Clark said. In addition to bonding in their cabin, the intense altitude in the mountains helped with their training for the fall season. “We ran up a 14,000 foot high mountain; the run was really steep,” Clark said. “When we finally got to the top, it felt so amazing to have accomplished it with all your teammates.” The end of their summer trip didn’t put an end to the team’s bonding. “Because of spending so much time together, we really got to know more about each other,” junior Maddy Rich said. “During practice we can tell when somebody’s down and now we know how to help them get back up again.”

UNSEEN expectations

onkeys trotted in a single file row up the 500 steps to the top of a Greek cliff. Once there, junior Andrew Mohn looked down on the city of Santorini, full of white adobe buildings with bright blue shutters. “Santorini was so incredibly pretty,” Mohn said. “It was my favorite place we went on the trip.” Four East students traveled to Greece with Dr. Worley on the annual Latin trip. In Greece, they learned about the culture, incorporating previously studied topics. “It was interesting that we learned all the stuff before and then we saw the statues and places in real life,” Mohn said. Usually the students ate meals on the cruises they took, but they also experienced authentic Greek food in the cities. “The food was so good!” senior Hannah Fink said. “The last few nights we went to a lot of cafés called tavernas. The teachers ordered all the food for us before we got there so we could try everything.” To get the most out of the trip, they took day trips from their hotel to visit museums and to go on city tours. “One night in Athens we went up the funicular, a subway that goes almost straight up to the acropolis, the highest point in the city,” Fink said. “Everything was glowing. It might sound cheesy, but it was magical.”

Students share eye-opening experiences from their trips around the world.

colorado

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“Running up the mountains was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done, but it was worth it because we [teammates] got to hang out. I already knew everyone on the trip, but we became even better friends.”

Hannah Fink 12 “Before the trip, I saw homeless people as people who just couldn’t hold jobs, but they’re a lot like us. Big companies have job cuts and they just can’t make ends meet. These people are just unlucky. “

10 AUGUST

greece

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chicago

Hannah Jane Stradinger 10

Nathan Are 9

“I was surprised at how nice the weather was. It was really beautiful, but then some parts were really touristy. Parts of Athens were like commercial America. It was kind of sad to see how commercialized it has become.”

Graham Stevenson 10

PAINTING TO INSPIRE

chicago

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greece

“Greece is obviously beautiful in the coast and landscape, but the people are genuinely beautiful both inside and out. They are so open. Even if they didn’t speak English they were willing to try to communicate.”

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Right: Junior Nicole Luby works on a painting to be hung in a children’s center in Chicago. The center had been a church before the pews were removed to create a basketball court. “The painting was supposed to inspire kids to get active,” Luby said. “It was a lot of fun. Everyone wanted to help with the painting so we ended up having a couple going.” Photo courtesy of junior Jessie Sykes.


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o STUDENTS GAIN DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES WHILE TRAVELING AROUND THE GLOBE.

tribution center, stacking cans of corn and green beans into boxes for victims of house fires. Another day, she worked at a soup kitchen. “Inspiration Café, the soup kitchen I went to, was set up like a restaurant,” Sykes said. “We played the role of waiters by taking the ticket and the meal from the window ledge and taking it to the people.” While serving grits and turkey bacon to the many round tables surrounding the large room, Sykes got a chance to understand the situations of the people there. “The people I talked to had such a great outlook on life, even though they were homeless,” Sykes said. “The trip made me reevaluate my life; I learned to just be happy I’m alive.” Stories by Sydney Henley.

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH.

e BIG CITY OBSESSION

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horts, jeans and dress shirts sat in piles, jumbled up together on the homeless shelter floor. “I feel like I’m at Bloomingdales’!” a woman said as she searched through the assortment of clothes. Nearby, freshman Nathan Are folded a plaid flannel shirt. He was at the Inspiration Corporation’s homeless shelter in Chicago with the Village Presbyterian Church youth group for a service trip to work in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and food distribution centers. Outside of the homeless shelter’s peeling red doors, the woman in charge talked with the group about people in the shelter. “It’s not just the stereotype of homeless people – dirty old men,” Are said. “They’re just like you and me, but just got tough breaks.” One day junior Jessie Sykes worked at a dis-

Left: A view of the city and the Chicago river depicts one of the locations students visited during the trip. “I love the big city atmosphere of Chicago,” junior Kat Jaeger said. “You’ve got the big buildings and this beautiful river. It’s like everything in one city.” Photo courtesy of Jessie Sykes.

SUMMER TRIPS 11


CONGRATULATIONS [SME student] Dr. Karl Krawitz continues his tradition of recognizing student awards and efforts by sending personalized notes to seniors.

to: Kristin Barker 12

YOU CAN DO WHATEVER YOU FEEL

Above: Dr. Krawitz does the YMCA in his Village People garb, dressed as a construction worker for the pep assembly. “I’ve done these things in the past, so it’s not outrageous for me to do that,” Krawitz said. “It’s all in the spirit of fun.” Photo by Kit Andreson.

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“Congratulations! ‘Large Varsity Camp Champions.’ This is a credit to your dedication and commitment to excellence. More importantly I want to thank you for making SME a tremendous school...No one can appreciate your efforts more...”

CABINET MEETINGS

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Below: Krawitz jokes around with administrators during a principal cabinet meeting. “I would call the meetings very trusting in leadership of the district,” Krawitz said. “I have a lot of respect and admiration for the administration.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“...You are being recognized as a commended scholar by the National Merit Program. Your commitment to leading is appreciated. You obviously have a belief in yourself that drives you forward- absolutely terrific! Certainly want to thank you for the recognition you have brought to our school...”

to: Bernadette Myers 12

MY NAME IS...

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Above: Krawitz addresses the students during the first all-school pep assembly. “It’s an opportunity to excite kids, inform them and support them at the same time,” Krawitz said. “I lead them in the right way without taking away enthusiasm.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

A HELPING HAND

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Left: Dr. Krawitz gives his game input to athletic director Jim Ricker during an East football game. “I try to analyze and understand what’s going on as an old coach,” Krawitz said. “It’s like having another set of eyes on the field.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

12 AUGUST

Photo by Rachel English.

EMMA

S. COLLIN

MEET DR. K BY DESIGN

DR. KARL KRAWITZ OVERCOMES VARIOUS OBSTACLES TO BECOME A FAVORITE.


SEE ALSO

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LORETTA PRENO SECRETARY “I bake for my daughter’s first grade class. I help in the classroom every once in a while and go on field trips if they need more parents, but I mostly bake for their parties.”

BAKER

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n the day of the first match of the season against Pembroke Hill, senior tennis player Sally Holmes was paged to the office during passing period. At the office, she was handed a square white envelope which had a glossy card inside with a picture of fall leaves, the word “Leadership” and a quote. Inside was a long note written in perfect cursive from Dr. Karl Krawitz himself. It started off telling Holmes to “stay positive and always focused, [and to] encourage the underclassman” and ended with wishes of good luck. This wasn’t the last personalized card Holmes received during the year, nor was she the only student to receive one; dozens of athletes and academic students alike received cards of congratulations, and student journalists and PTA moms got a few as well. This touch was just one of many that made Krawitz a principal different from those before him. Krawitz came to East after a long history of working in education. A graduate of Baker University, Krawitz went on to teach and coach in the Olathe School District before moving into the principal positions at Indian Trail Junior High, Olathe North and Olathe East. He became an Associate Professor of Education at Baker University, where he helped found a new doctorate program in education before realizing that high school administration was where his heart lie. “I missed being around [high school students],” Krawitz said. “I missed going to the events… With grad students, there’s no football games, there’s no choir concerts.” Although Krawitz loved academia and still continued reading and researching after leaving Baker University, he found that the life of a college professor wasn’t sufficiently dynamic. “It was too slow,” Krawitz said. “You know, I’d go home at night and I’d be stuffed in another book, and so I was somewhat bored.” Krawitz was much more active as a high school principal, since he planned to go to 80-85 percent of all school events, including ones that few people attended. To Krawitz, it seemed obvious that students should support each other in every sport and every activity, not just basketball and soccer, and he intended to set an example. “I’m not probably the status quo administrator,” Krawitz said. “I don’t like the status quo; I like change.” Krawitz questioned some other status quo ideas that few addressed; he didn’t think that high schools should run from 7:40 a.m.-2:40 p.m. because “society is geared more towards later times and sleeping in.” Also, he wondered whether seniors and juniors should spend part of their day outside of the school learning about professions instead of sitting in school, and he thought the ACT and SAT said very little about a student’s potential for success. In short, he wanted to make big changes. “This is old. This is old,” he said, gesturing towards the school. “And new means that you have to be different.” He made big changes in Olathe East High School by helping introduce an experimental policy on cell phones in which students could use their cell phones at school, whenever they weren’t in class. He appealed to the students to respect the teachers, since he believed that they could. “Sometimes we create rules thinking that it’s going to provide more control, and it creates more problems,” Krawitz said. “I think my role is to be a motivator and cheerleader of students and to be supportive of what they do. I’m not into lots of rules and guidelines.” Krawitz’s urge to reform prompted him to implement the same cell phone policy at East, to try to reverse a trend of mass failures on AP exams and to attempt to curb underage drinking among students. It could have seemed like a daunting path, but Krawitz found that the Shawnee Mission School District allowed him a significant amount of leeway to test his ideas. “You can’t imagine what this does for motivation for people who are supposed to be doing the motivating,” he said. Krawitz didn’t have illusions as to the difficulty of these tasks, but he stayed motivated by limiting his goals to things that he could directly affect. “You should never become stressed over things you can’t control,” Krawitz said. “You can’t do anything about the past, but you can do everything you want about the future. That’s why you’ve gotta be optimistic.” Maybe it was significant that among all the books about education that filled Krawitz’s office, his favorite was “Leadership and Self-Deception- Getting Out of the Box” by the Arbinger Institute, since “getting out of the box” was exactly what Krawitz aimed to do during the year. He tried to branch out in new ways one student at a time, thank-you note by thank-you note, sports game by sports game and innovation by innovation. He always remembered what his dad once told him: “If you truly, truly enjoy your work, you will never work a day in your life.” If this was true, Krawitz had been unemployed for 20 years. Story by Leah Pickett. Photo illustration by Rachel English.

NEW PRINCIPAL 13


LANCERS ON 3...

Jordan Elliott 12

Mallory Kirby 11

Henry Foster 10

Brian Aitken 11

Ali Swope 9

Hannah Satterlee 11

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Yelling a battle cry at the beginning of the race, Wooten leads his team to a fast start out of the gate. The battle cry has been a tradition for several years. “[Yelling] gets everyone excited to run, and it also intimidates other runners,� Wooten said. Photo illustration by Alysabeth Albano.

Adam Simmons 9 Mike Sullivan 12 Rachel Kaskie 11

Emily Kerr 9 Blair Fletcher 11

Crossing boundaries

Hanna Jane Stradinger 10

Toni Aguiar 9

Alyx Delgado 11

Jay Lehoczky 11 Christa McKittrick 9

Allie Marquis 12

Kirsten Clark 10

Brandon Royle 12

Reid Frye 9

>> 14 AUGUST

Jane Mahoney 12 Patrick Mayfield 12

Katie Crawford 9

Taylor Haviland 11

Maddy Rich 11

John Rowe 11 Chris Hasselwander 12

DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH.

Leah Chesbrough 11

Melissa McKittrick 12

Brian Simpson 12


SEE ALSO

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TONI AGUIAR 9 “I write little things I notice about people, and what’s happening today in our world – like things that I think should be changed. I try to keep a notebook, but sometimes it’s just spur of the moment.”

WRITER

THE FINAL PUSH

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Preparing to push up the final hill in time trials, freshman Evan Nichols tries to claim a varsity spot by keeping in the top 10. Nichols placed fourth and remained on varsity for the rest of the year. “Sometimes it depresses me when I think about the race,” Nichols said, “so I try to zone out because it helps keep my legs moving.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

HELPFUL COACHING

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Below left: Hugging Coach Trisha Beaham, senior Allie Marquis expresses her excitement after having a good practice. “She [Beaham] and I are really close,” Marquis said. “She is a friend and a coach. I pretty much tell her everything.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

>> REWARDING WORKOUT

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Left: Enjoying a popsicle, freshman Jake Belzer relaxes after a hard practice. Popsicles were given every Wednesday to reward the runners’ hard work. “During your run, you try to do your best to make sure you get a popsicle before they run out,” Belzer said. Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

RECORD TIMES

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Middle Left: Running at the North Meet, junior Ben Jensen tries to catch up to fellow teammates. Jensen ran a personal record at this meet. “When you run, it hurts, but you feel good at the same time,” Jensen said. “You have an accomplished feeling.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

COACHES INVOLVE MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS DURING PRACTICE TO PREPARE. By the numbers

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he SME Cross Country team lined up on the sidelines after the Greg Wilson Classic. Having completed their traditional pre-race chant of “Rufio!” and post race chant, the members prepared to cheer on a new version of Lancer runners - Middle School Cross Country. In a sport about endurance, sweat and tradition, the Lancer program was ready to support its newest members. The high school cross country team alternated between speed workouts on the track and the “road runs” which focused on longer mileage, but it was up to the team captains to show the freshmen that Shawnee Mission East Cross Country was about much more. “As a senior it’s important to set a good example by making sure we’re doing every hill and each little stretch,” senior captain Brian Simpson said, “but we also want to show the freshmen that it’s fun. It’s a family type thing and hopefully we can set them up to be in our position as seniors.” With the addition of a middle school program for the 08’-09’ school year, the Lancer Cross Country family prepared to grow even more. The middle school runners arrived after high-school practice two days a week, ready to run with coaches Tricia Beaham and Michael Chaffee. According to Beaham, the idea for a middle school program was collective amongst coaches in the area.

Remember the year with statistics from the 08’ season

165 20 20 6

CROSS COUNTRY MEMBERS

VARSITY MEMBERS

JUNIOR VARSITY MEMBERS

TEAM CAPTAINS

“The motivation for me was to give each young person entering middle school an opportunity to be involved in a sport,” Beaham said. “Cross Country offers a healthy, competitive avenue for kids to display a talent that they might have hidden within themselves.” Senior Allie Marquis also took a part in training the next generation of Lancer runners by pacing them during their track workouts and leading them in stretches when she had time after varsity practice. “I love going out to see how they’re doing,” Marquis said. “Plus, they’re interested in us as high school runners. They come up and ask ‘is it hard for you too?’.” The coaches enjoyed watching the middle school runners improve at every practice. “The satisfaction is remarkable,” Beaham said. “They’re desire becomes even stronger to reach bigger goals. For kids entering high school that have participated in the middle school program, they will already know what the sport is all about.” The middle schoolers participated in the Greg Wilson Classic as well as Rim Rock in Lawrence. “It’s fun to have the younger athletes observe and cheer the high school runners and vice versa,” Beaham said. “Absolutely this will continue in the future.” Story by Maureen Orth.

CROSS COUNTRY 15


Peggy Bell SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

“When I worked with a dyslexic student [at University Academy], I learned to use a lot of memory aids and technology. That’s helped me reach students here, because a lot of the strategies that worked with him also work with other students.”

a new

WITH EXPERIENCE FROM EITHER A UNIVERSITY OR PAST N BY DESIG

NETY MINUTE CLASSES•BLOCK SCHEDULING•SEVEN MINUTE PASSING PERIODS•THREE TO FOUR CLASSES A DAY HAWNEE MISSIONBrenda EASTTretbar HIGH SCHOOL•FAX 913-993-6899•PRAIRIE VILLAGE KANSAS•7500 MISSION ROAD•SHAWN COUNSELOR RLS TENNIS•BOYS SOCCER•FOOTBALL•CROSS COUNTRY•BOYS SWIMMING•GIRLS BASKETBALL•CHEERLEADING•W “At Wichita East, I worked WING DANCE CLUB•ROBOTICS CLUB•MARTIAL ARTS CLUB•MATH CLUB•INTERNATIONAL CLUB•FOOD CLUB•FILM AP with IB students. I think ANCER DAY•MORP•BONFIRE•SPIRIT WEEK•THE CAN DRIVE•WHIFFLEBALL TOURNAMENT•MOLE DAY•COIN DROP WE that program really helped RINCIPAL- me DR.KARL KRAWITZ•SECRETARY-LORETTA PRENO•ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL-STEVE LOE•ATHLETIC DIRECTO here. I have students from there attending colleges that current PANISH NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY•SHARE•LANCER LINK CREW•FRENCH NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY•ENVIRONMEN students are applying to, so I know STRONOMYEast CLUB•DECA•HERALDERS•LATIN CLUB•NATIONAL ART HONOR SOCIETY•NATIONAL FORENSICS LEAGUE• what it takes to prepare the applications.” AWNEE MISSION HAIL TO THEE LANCERS WE WILL ALWAYS BE WE STAND BEHIND OUR COLORS BRIGHT COLOMBI N. ORTO RIA N AND ALEX

globe – key component of study in world geography classes, the focus being study of how the world fits together gavel – instrument for conducting law, a central governmental topic

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“I was at Shawnee Mission West for a semester, and it showed me how to interact with high school students. I learned a lot of teaching techniques from there like the ‘Cell Ink Project.” I took what they did with it at West and shifted it to fit here.”

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Jennifer Chaffee

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

becoming a E

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LANCER

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16 AUGUST

New teachers and administrators talk about how past teaching experiences have helped in

their adjustment to SME.

E

DAVID MUHAMMAD

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ver since he was a teenager, social studies teacher David Muhammad led classes for adults and teenagers. He was a martial arts instructor with his father. This experience led him to becoming a teacher. “My father is a martial arts instructor, and I helped with teaching adults and children,” Muhammad said. “It seemed natural to go into teaching.” Graduating from Emporia State University, Muhammad decided to become a teacher because of his martial arts coaching background, but his previous experience still could not prepare him for the crazy first day. “The first day was nuts,” Muhammad said. “There were 140 students all looking at me, thinking ‘Who is that kid teaching us?,’ but it felt natural by the end of the day.” Muhammad planned to use his martial arts background to start a martial arts club at East after noticing a lack of alternative sports that students could participate in for fun. “There are a couple of students here who worked under my father, and they were excited to hear I was coming here,” Muhammad said. “I never really wanted to coach other sports for kids, so I decided to start the martial arts club.” With the support of his father’s previous students, Muhammad’s club began to gain attention from other students in the school. “It’s growing, so I’m going to try to make it happen,” Muhammed said. “We’ve had three practices and at each one, more kids came. I’d like to start competitions, get a kid up to that level.” Another thing Muhammad would like to see change is the tolerance of the students. “So many of the students are close-minded without even knowing it,” Muhammad said. “I’d like to see people become more diverse and help them to become more diverse.” Stories by Chandra Swanson.

PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.


SEE ALSO

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TREY WITT DEBATE TEACHER “I’m a TV junkie, and I always have been. I love watching all the new shows, anything from UFO Hunter to Lost and Desperate Housewives.”

TELEVISION JUNKIE

OUTLOOK SCHOOLS, TEACHERS FIND WAYS TO FIT INTO SME.

Y•COLOMBIA BLUE BLACK AND WHITE•SEMINAR CLASSES•BLUE KNIGHTS JAZZ BAND•CHORALIERS AND CHAMBER NEE MISSION SCHOOL DISTRICT•WWW.SMSD.ORG•PHONE NUMBER 913-993-6600•1,900 STUDENT POPULATION•PR WRESTLING•BOYS BASKETBALL•GIRLS SWIMMING•BOWLING•TRACK•BOYS GOLF•GIRLS SOCCER•BOYS TENNIS•DR PPRECIATION CLUB•CHESS CLUB•CLUB 121•FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTAIN ATHLETES• LEADERS EMBRACING ALL DIV EEK•FREQUENT FRIDAYS•DOWNS SYNDROME DANCE•PEANUT BUTTER DRIVE•LANCER OF THE DAY RITUAL•CHARIT OR-JIM RICKER•ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL-JOHN MCKINNEY•ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL-HEATHER ROYCE•SECRETARY-JUL NTAL SCIENCE CLUB•ACADEMIC DECATHLON•BPA-BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS OF AMERICA•CATEGORIES•NATION •PEP CLUB•THESPIANS•INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP)•THE HONORS PR IA BLUE BLACK AND WHITE HIGH SCHOOL DAYS TOO SOON ARE GONE BUT FOND MEMORIES LINGER ON MAY OUR fedora – Bickers wears this because according to him, “what historian doesn’t want to be Indiana Jones?

>> KIM VAN NICE

money – central to the study of economics

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cell model – one of the key components in studying the cell- a frequently studied topic in Biology

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biology textbook – number one tool for test preparation

O

n the first day of school, honors, AP and IB biology teacher Kimberly Van Nice hurriedly gathered her materials for her next class. Although she had student-taught at Blue Valley West, this was her first day in front of a class by herself. “The first day was crazy,” Van Nice said. “I felt very overwhelmed and anxious about it.” As the day progressed, Van Nice became more and more comfortable with her students. Her time as a student teacher had prepared her well, but she still had to make adjustments in her teaching styles. “The hardest part is the constantly changing schedules,” Van Nice said. “The day-to-day activities changed. It’s more difficult to plan, keep on track and extend the classes.” She found support in her students, however, who helped her to become associated to the school. “I was expecting it to be a good school,” Van Nice said. “It helps that I have good students who want to learn and want to be here.”

C

ROBERT BICKERS

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oming from a Texas school designed for pregant students to Shawnee Mission East, social studies teacher Robert Bickers had to adjust to many differences. “[SME] is bigger, ten times bigger, physically and population-wise,” Bickers said. “At the other school, I saw about 50 students a day. Now, I see about 150 students and have to remember all those names.” After the first day, however, Bickers felt comfortable teaching his students and was able to apply some of the same teaching techniques he used in Texas to his Economics and U.S. History classes at East. “I try to get them working cooperatively and with each other,” Bickers said. “Building and fostering intellectual curiosity is important. Students come in already knowing about things I never knew about as a teenager.” Although Bickers had to adapt to many new faces, a much larger school, different classroom dynamics and earlier wake up times for a longer commute, his enthusiasm for teaching history never faltered. “What I like about history is that it covers everything,” Bickers said. “If I want to, I can study the history of science, the history of music; it encompasses everything.”

NEW TEACHERS 17


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GYMNASTICS TEACHER

SEE ALSO

HANNAH QUILLEC 11 “I teach gymnastics classes at Kip’s. I teach the young girls who are like three and four years old really basic stuff like rolls.”

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ROLLIE POLLIES

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Above: Before practices, senior Sam Benson and sophomore Andrea Zecy always eat snacks. “Sam is usually there before me just sitting on the ‘rollie’,” Zecy said, “so I always run and jump over her while we laugh hysterically.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

ophomore Andrea Zecy was focused on the vault ahead of her. She took off down the runway, heart and feet pounding together. As she approached the vault the upcoming flips and landings ahead rolled over in her mind. Suddenly, her size eight-and-a-half feet halted to an abrupt stop. Someone had moved out into the vault runway, directly in front of her. “Everyone is really careful not to interrupt someone else, but there are so many girls it just happens sometimes,” Zecy said. The number of girls in the gymnastics program reached 25, a large number for the sport and a challenge for everyone. Many sophomores and juniors joined the team for the first time, making the number of gymnasts larger than the usual 10-20 seen in previous years. “I saw the Olympics, and it was so exciting and impressive all the things they could do,” sophomore Madeline Goss said. “I wanted to learn.” With the focus on USA gymnastics medals and new super stars in the summer Olympics, many girls began to live the dream – to be able to flip like Shawn Johnson. “I don’t have a fear of falling, so it was just an adventure, like a dare,” junior Brooke Royle said. For returning teammates, the new numbers were a huge change, both difficult and encouraging. “It has given me a lot more motivation to work to keep my spot on the team,” sophomore Lindy Black-

man said. “I have to make sure I keep improving and make my routines harder so I can stand out more.” Many returning gymnasts, like Blackman, saw the larger team as a helpful factor, as there were more girls to encourage others. “Everyone is always encouraged to get more involved each and every year,” junior Grace Gillaspie said. “Some years you don’t want to do anything because it’s new and you’re not ready for it. But now [gymnasts are] realizing ‘ I can do this and have fun with it even if I’m not good at it’.” But with all the girls deciding to take a chance, adjusting was definitely difficult. “It’s a little harder for the girls who are going to be competing and want to use the equipment and other girls are on it,” Gillaspie said. “But [the amount of girls] is a good thing, because everyone should get involved even if you’re not a pro.” To solve the space issue, coach Tiffany Mische set up a rotation system for practice, separating the girls into groups of varsity, returning JV, and non-competitive. These leveled groups worked on one event each practice. Through the hardships the gymnastics team formed a positive outlook and worked together. “Everyone knows they have these girls to say ‘hi’ to in the hallway,” Blackman said. “Everyone’s been really accepting and really helpful, showing [the new gymnasts] the ropes and making sure they don’t get lost in the crowd of girls.” Story by Emily Collins.

BALANCING ACT

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Left: Having no taste for the beam, junior Grace Gillespi gets scared whenever she has to do anything upside down. Practices tended to make her nervous, though at meets she felt very confident with the help of her fellow teammates. “Lots of JV go to Varsity meets, and Varsity goes to JV meets also.” Gillespi says. “Whoever isn’t competing brings a cookie cake for everyone.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

STRETCHING OUT

THE LAST HURRAH

Gymnasts prepare for a variety of exercises, kicks and flips.

Below: As one of the two seniors on gymnastics, Sam Benson peeks out of the line during Senior Night. The close team joked and had fun during practices to avoid getting burnt out at the end of the season. “The thing that I’m going to miss most about gymnastics is the support and just being with the other girls,” Benson said. Photo by Lucy Faerber.

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Photos by Kristin Barker.

“[Stretching] is one of my favorite parts of practice because that’s when we laugh hysterically before we have to be serious and work.”

Andrea Zecy 10

JUST DOING HER THING

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Above: Although her favorite event is floor since she cannot fall off, sophomore Lindy Blackman enjoys performing on the beam because it is her strongest event. The encouragement and closeness of the team helped with any anxieties that easily developed. “I don’t really like the beginning of meets when everyone is stressed about their tricks,” Blackman says, “but at the end everyone gets to sit around and eat cookie cake.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“We spend 20 minutes stretching our hamstrings. We spend extra time especially on stretching our wrists and our ankles also.”

Lindy Blackman 10 18 AUGUST


splitting

teams JUST HANGING OUT

>>

DESIGN BY MALLORY STEVENSON.

NEW ADDITIONS TO THE TEAM POSE CHALLENGES TO TEAM UNITY BUT ALLOW FOR A NEW ROTATIONAL SYSTEM DURING PRACTICES.

Left: Hanging from the uneven bars during gymnastics practice, senior Elizabeth Beck feels comfortable enough to fix her hair before a routine. Having free time during practices allowed the team to encourage each other to practice their skills. “As a freshman, I was really nervous on the first day,” Beck said, “but everyone was very welcoming so I tried to do the same this year for the underclassmen.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

GYMNASTICS 19


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ESHMAN MARK TOWSTER WAS A REFEREE FOR THE HEARTLAND SOCCER ASSOCIATION. HE REFEREED FOR SOCCER TEAMS WITH KIDS R

RIDING THE BOWL

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Pedaling over the concrete of the bowl at the Prairie Village Skate Park, junior Jake Green prepares to make a jump. He practiced daily to prepare for upcoming tournaments.“I compete like four or five times every six months,” Green said. “At JoMo Pro once, I entered in the pro class, and I got fifth out of 50, or something like that.” Photo by Rachel English.

E STUDIED THE LANGUAGE INDEPENDENTLY FOR TWO YEARS, THEN BEGAN TAKING BEGINNING JAPANESE 2 AT JCCC. SHE ALSO LIKED 20 SEPTEMBER


SEPTEMBER

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RANGING IN AGE FROM SEVEN TO FOURTEEN. • SOPHOMORE SHELBI WADE WAS VERY INVOLVED AT THE CHURCH OF THE R E

“We were helping raise money for Invisible Children. It’s an organization that tries to stop children from becoming child soldiers fighting in Rwanda. We went to lunches and asked people to donate money.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 22 – 23

DEDICATED FANS

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Above: Enduring the rain, freshman Chandler Pruneau and some friends cheer on the boys soccer team. Pruneau and her friends made it a point to go to as many games as they could, even in bad weather. “It was early in the season, and it was really rainy,” Pruneau said. “By the end we were all soaked. After that we went to all the games. It’s something that [we] freshmen could do because no upperclassmen go to the games.” Photo by Rachel English.

volleyball 2 LOGAN WECKBAUGH 10 >> SME player “Volleyball was really fun, and I had a great time with [coach] Kurle and the girls. I think we improved throughout the season.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 24 – 25

3 COLIN COIT 12 >> fashion designer

>>

“My grandma was a sewer during the Holocaust which started it, and my dad was a photographer. I have been in a couple school fashion shows, and I got first place in both. I’m going to JCCC next year to study fashion design.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 26 – 27

4 HEINZEN LO 12 >> SME soccer player “I play soccer because I just enjoy playing. I play mid-field, so I get a lot of exercise, too. I like how there are lots of different strategies to win the game. You always have to keep thinking during the game.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 28 – 29

A MESSY SURPRISE

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Above: Laughing with students from Prairie Elementary, junior Kathleen Ireland, along with other NAHS members, helps the elementary school host the event ‘Art in the Garden.’ “We were only expecting them to paint little designs,” Ireland said, “but little girls came and shoved paint brushes in the can and slathered it all over us. It got pretty messy.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

5 LUKE HOLSINGER 9 >> SME student “I like the music program. It provides chances to learn more about music and see different parts of the country. I’m in the concert orchestra. We went to a Kansas City Symphony practice session for their concert. It was interesting to see how they practiced because [orchestra teacher Jonathan] Lane wanted us to know how to conduct ourselves in his orchestra class.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 30 – 31

6 SARAH GENTON 10 >> SME golf player BREAK IT DOWN NOW

>>

Above: Sophomores, juniors and seniors gather around junior Zach Busey as he dances in the middle of the circle of people during the Blackout dance. As a member of Link Crew, Busey helped host the dance and make freshmen more comfortable as newcomers to East. “I cut loose and just danced like a maniac,” Busey said. “I can perform easily when I’m surrounded by people.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“It was fun to go to practice every day after school, and it was fun to talk and play golf. All the tournies are fun. Each one is different because each course is different so you play differently every time.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 32 – 33

S URRECTION. WHILE AT CHURCH, WADE HELPED THE SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN. THIS WAS HER FIRST YEAR HELPING OUT. S H E

1 XUAN QIN 12 >> Coalition club member

WORKED MAINLY WITH A SECOND GRADER NAMED LUKE • JUNIOR NICOLE PRENEVOST WAS OBSESSED WITH JAPANESE. S SEPTEMBER DIVISION 21


what you see >> MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Right: At the Walk for Invisible Children, Freshman Nathan Are steps onto the street in an attempt to get the drivers’ attention. Students arrived at The Village at 6:30, where they walked to school to raise awareness. “I really wanted to get their attention,” said Are. “It was really awesome because I could see the people in their cars looking at us and reading our signs, and finding out what we stand for.” Photo by Dan Stewart.

making

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ed tape was X-ed onto sophomore Rebecca Calstrom’s black t-shirt. In the Macy’s parking spot next to her, a group of juniors passed out signs saying, “We Walk Because They Walk.” “[The walk] was chaotic,” Callstrom said. “but everyone was energetic and really into it.” Students of all grade levels hurried around the parking lot, plucking up signs, slapped on red tape on each others’ shirts, and piled in a line two to three people deep. ____ members marched south on Mission Road to the school, holding up bold signs and flaunting their matching black shirts with red X’s on them. The walk not only raised awareness for Invisible Children, a charity that helps children in Darfur, but also showed the club’s potential at making a change. “The day was exciting for me to see the groups of friends of all different classes coming together,” senior Jessie

visible tthhee

Light, founder of the group at East, said. Agna facil ipit luptate dolor sit lan ut in venibh esto dolore commod min henim venim zzrilla facillu ptatuer at, se venis nim dolor sisl dolobore consequisim nos auguercin veraestrud modolor iuscilla faccummy nos adigna feugueros num il ullandrem quisismod tem voloreet atie min eugue facidunt utat praeseq uisisci liquam zzriustisi. El ulluptate faccum nissecte dolorem do dipsum incilis nostrud do dolor sumsandit wis aliquatum il iriusci enit landre magna feu feugue min velit la alit vendionse dolor secte tat. Mincip ea feugait nis doleniamet aute tin etue modit aliquatumsan ea feum esequis adionsendre modo od magna feuguerosto consequat. Or sum delesequisit delese magna facipis eril utatisi. Sandre vero conum quat. Peros deliquat landreros augait non venibh er.

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september 22


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Mayfield slid a red bead onto a black string. It symbolized the physical suffering of the Invisible Children in Uganda. “We worked on the bracelets for about 20 or 30 minutes,” Mayfield said. “We made about 500.” Of those 500, only about 100 sold during the first couple weeks. This money, along with the money from other fundraisers, like the Dance Marathon and the Change for Change bottle, will go to a program through Invisible Children called Schools for Schools. “[Schools for Schools] is a program that pays teachers’ salaries, and buys uniforms and books for 10 schools in Uganda,” Light said. “This is where all of our fundraising will go because this year Invisible Children is holding a competition and whatever school in the nation can raise the most money will get to send a teacher and a student to Uganda.” In order to raise the money, raising awareness for the club was a necessity. The red-X’s worn around school brought attention to the newly found club. The red X was founded at Northwest and started as a symbol of the walk, but Light thinks that it is more than just that. “When a student is marked with a red X, its not a negative or a positive thing,” Light said. “When you wear it, it shows that you are an advocate for children in Uganda.” Stories by Sydney Henley.

STUDENTS INVOLVED IN COALITION WORK TO RAISE AWARENESS AND MONEY FOR THE INVISIBLE CHILDREN OF UGANDA. SEE ALSO:

f

or many students that are not members of Coalition, the club is defined by the red-X’s on the ground outside classrooms, red, green, white, and black beaded bracelets worn by students, and the empty water cooler bottles used to collect money for Change for Change. But the club has another side that is unseen. After school one day, a group of students including junior Emily Mayfield twisted and beaded the bracelets sold for fundraising on the south stairwell. Students met after school in the cafeteria to paint the signs seen at the Coalition walk to school. Sitting next to ___ in a (brick, etc?) building overlooking Lake Tahoe, the idea of Coalition Club was started. “I heard about the club in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, on a leadership camp for STUCO,” founder of the club at East senior Jessie Light said. “I then learned that a counselor at Shawnee Mission Northwest started the club there. It sounded like a good idea to bring it to East.” The Coalition Club supports raising awareness for the sex trafficking in Asia and causes such as Invisible Children, an organization Light heard about in 2006 in a presentation to East. “After hearing the presentation I was intrigued but I didn’t know much about it,” Light said. “So I educated myself on what the organization actually does and thought it was a great cause.” Munching on Cheez Its in a tan plastic chair in Mrs. Bramley’s room,

what you don’t see

>>

THERE IS HOPE FOR BETTER TIMES

Below: At Village Presbyterian Church, juniors Alexa Schnieders and Alexandra Ferlas applaud the introduction of the Invisible Children “Roadies.” Students and other supporters watched the new Invisible Children video, “Go.” “Although seeing the atrocities in northern Uganda is extremely disheartening, it’s an encouragement to hear how our generation is striving to make things better,” Schnieders said. “I’m glad that Coalition brought us the showing of “Go” to gain support.” Photo by Rachel English. Right: At a Coalition meeting, junior Sarah Are and senior Jessie Light discuss plans for the club. Along with junior Anna Petrow, they lead Coalition events and meetings every Thursday. “When I first found out about Coalition, I went to Sarah first because I knew she’d be good to work with and be passionate about it like me,” Light said. “We work well together and have fun getting Coalition organized.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

BORED PIANO PLAYER “I did play piano when I was young, but I didn’t really like it though because it was sort of boring. After two years I was done. My parents were forcing me, so I stopped practicing and they were like fine.”

>>john francis 11 coalition 23


REAPING THE REWARD OF SUCCESS

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Joining together in a huddle, freshman Taylor Wolf and her teammates celebrate a winning point. Although she started as a JV player, Wolf was moved up to the varsity team after varsity player junior Kareen Schwartz tore her ACL. Being moved up to varsity motivated Wolf to play harder. “Because we are a young group, other teams sometimes underestimate us,” Wolf said. “But at the end of one game, I am always ready to play a new game against a new team.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

24 SEPTEMBER


CONCENTRATION

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Far left: Waiting for the other team to serve, freshman Hayley Hansford concentrates on the ball, anticipating where it will be placed. “Although it is nice to take a break and play easy teams, I still love the satisfactory feeling after winning a long and hard game,” Hansford said. Photo by Anna Petrow.

DIVING FOR THE BALL

TOWEL BREAK

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Left: Sitting out during a game, junior Monica Talavera, freshman Taylor Wolf and sophomore Julie Aliber use their time to relax, get water and watch the game. According to Aliber, however, being on the bench had its responsibilities. “Because volleyball is a team sport, everyone is always involved in the game,” Aliber said. “When we sit out, we call balls for the team and cheer them on. It’s hard work.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

SEE ALSO

>>

Middle left: Anticipating a tough game, junior Lindsey Sauls huddles with her teammates as they try to forget that the game will be a challenge. “Last year I would get nervous before games,” Sauls said. “This year, as captain, I’m ready and know what needs to be done.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

>>

LOGAN WECKBAUGH 10 “When I was little, I used to play a lot of Hot Wheels. For Christmas [one year] I got a four story mini car garage and it had a car wash in it and it was pretty high-tech.”

HOT WHEELS KID

WITH NEARLY 30 INCOMING FRESHMEN, THE VOLLEYBALL TEAMS RECOGNIZE THAT THERE IS...

DESIGN BY MALLORY STEVENSON.

ROOM TO GROW Lindsey Sauls always cheered her team on from the sidelines. Sauls tried to push and encourage them. She liked to keep the intensity and energy of the game at its max. Hansford joined the varsity team with little experience, bringing with her only three years of volleyball prior to playing for East. Being such a young player gave Hansford plenty of room to grow. “I’ve gotten a lot smarter with where to play the ball,” Hansford said. “I’ve learned to use the team rather than play as an individual.” That’s where the older girls came into play. They gave her tips and suggestions on how the game should flow and what to do with the ball. “We would help each other whenever we could,” Hansford said. “In order to excel as a team we all need to be at the top of our game and we push each other until we get there.” The other girls got to watch Hansford grow and improve. “Hayley came in really scared,” senior Sydney Danner said. “She stepped up a lot and now she’s walking around like she owns the place.” Dowis expected the teams to continue to improve throughout the season as the girls became comfortable with one another and built the foundation as a team. As the season progressed, Danner came up with plans of her own. “I think we have what it takes to make it to state this year,” Danner said. “We continue to get stronger on and off the court.” As for next season, Dowis expects more skill development. “We’ll continue to grow,” Dowis said. “But as for state [next year], we’ll just have to see what happens.” Story by Katie East.

strutting stuff their

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bout a hundred girls stood in the hall, anxiously awaiting the posting of the rosters. The volleyball coaches were making their final decisions. Within minutes dreams would be made and others would be crushed. As soon as the list touched the wall, the nervous girls pressed closer, each trying to find her number. Once freshman Hayley Hansford caught a glimpse of her number, she felt a wave of relief and made her way out of the crowd. She was one of two freshmen to walk away that day knowing they had a place on the varsity volleyball team. There were 40 girls in the volleyball program this year at East. 34 were underclassman. Compared to last year’s 16 freshmen, 24 new freshmen were suiting up for all four teams this year. The varsity team was made up of two seniors, two juniors, one sophomore and three freshmen, making it the youngest varsity volleyball team in years. After graduating six seniors last year, the number of returning letter winners wasn’t nearly enough to build two full teams. “Teams come in cycles,” varsity coach Scott Dowis said. “When we graduate as [many] as we did, we rebuild the team. These freshmen will play until they graduate and then we’ll rebuild again.” Since the team was being rebuilt, difficult challenges arose. Not only was there a lack of experience, there wasn’t much of a team connection. But, the freshmen proved to Dowis that they could step up and take the challenge. Weekly team dinners and inside jokes helped the team build a connection with one another. Support from the older girls helped the younger girls become comfortable as a team. Junior

Girls who tried out for volleyball talk about the positives and negatives of making the team or getting cut. Photos by Nicole Luby.

“I take six classes of dance a week so when I found out I didn’t make [the team], I was a little relieved. I didn’t want to give up dance, but at the same time, I wanted to be on some kind of team and I thought volleyball looked easiest. Now I know the ropes for try-outs next year.”

Abby Davis 9

“Since I’ve been playing volleyball since fourth grade, I kind of expected to make it. But I didn’t get invited to the special practice with the other girls, so that made me try harder during the rest of tryouts and do the best that I could to show that I was good enough to make it.”

Ashley Lemos 9 VOLLEYBALL 25


september 26

the

HIGH-WAISTED SKIRT

the

TUCKED-IN OXFORD

Drew Macnamera 11

2008

Tara Raghuveer 11

& STYLE TRENDS08 STUDENTS TELL WHAT MADE IT FROM THE RUNWAY TO THE SME HALLWAYS IN

“High-waisted skirts are an easy way to wear skirts at school. They’re a good alternative to a normal skirt. Plus they’re fun and they come in tons of different colors and patterns,” Raghuveer said.

“Around freshman year I just decided I wanted to look put together. Sperrys, button-downs, even the belt is a part of that look,” Macnamera said.


When I get up headbands are just easy. Even if my hair is like freaking out they can make it look alright.

Even for guys animal print is cool. But for girls, you just can’t like go overboard.

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The only thing wrong with these is that they make so much noise... But they come in lots of colors!

An outfit says a lot, but some would argue that it’s the accessories that make the look.

Harrison Wendlant 12

“I only wear clothes that have some sort of artistic input in the design and they’re completely unique,” Wendlant said.

the

DESIGNER DENIM

the

BUTTONLESS CARDIE

Hannah Fink 12

“I like that everybody has different kinds of them. You can get them long, short, in different fabrics, really anything you want. And they’re so comfortable,” Fink said.

styles and trends 27


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music 28 SEPTEMBER

song: ‘I’ll Make a Man Out of You’ Mulan Soundtrack

>>

“It gets me going for the game.”

song: ‘See No Other Way’

>>Slightly Stoopid

“It’s just kind of this regae and we recognize it with game time.”

THE FINAL MOMENT

song: ‘What I Got’

>> Sublime

“I listen to it because it calms me down before the games.”

Above: Squatting at the CBAQ soccer game, Michael Cray waits nervously during the penalty kicks. “I was definitely nervous. It didn’t feel right,” Cray said. “I thought we were going to lose at that point, but I had hope that Matt would step up in goal.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

>>

Gordon Green 11

IN

Matt Moedritzer 12

Mitchell Jennings 12

mind >>

Soccer players talk about their favorite songs to listen to before a game.

CHEERING TO WIN

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Right: Junior Sam Logan cheers for his friends at the soccer game. “A lot of my friends are the guys on the team, and the games are so awesome,” Logan said. “This year’s team is really great, and I’m just a huge soccer fan.” Photo by Rachel English.


WHIT AK

E R SH

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Love DESIG

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of the season

LOSS OF THE GAME VARSITY BOYS ENJOY THE SEASON BY PUMPING UP FOR GAMES AND WORKING HARD IN PRACTICE.

PERFECTING THE GAME

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Below: Senior Jack Brugger tries to head the ball during a scrimmage with his teammates. “Scrimmages help us to use our style of playing on the field,” Brugger said. “When we do it, it’s a good time to practice everything at once.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

B

lasting Lil Wayne’s “You Ain’t Know,” senior Matt Moedritzer stepped out of the passenger side door, feeling the bass rumble through his body. Another car pulled up in the parking spot next to him. Soon three more cars arrived in the soccer complex’s parking lot. The players dragged their bags out and started dancing to the beat of Lil Wayne. The 18 players danced around in the mostly empty parking lot, getting pumped for the upcoming game. “We ride out [to the games] separately, usually in five cars,” Moedritzer said. “We meet at someone’s house before and watch ‘300’ or ‘Entourage’.” Although Olathe East was fired up and wanted revenge from their loss last year, Shawnee Mission East’s team of 15 seniors and three underclassmen had an edge over the other team. When Kelly came in as the new coach for the varsity team, he knew that the amount of seniors could be a struggle. “With our number of seniors, it could have gone one of two ways,” Kelly said. “They could play together well and help each other out, or they could have a lot of senior leadership but not gel together as a team. The seniors in our team really seem to play well together.” When Lil Wayne’s song ended, the team went into the soccer complex together. Olathe East was already there, warming up. The players saw the group of dedicated fans crowded together in a small section of Olathe East’s stadium. They far outnumbered the opposing team’s fan base. The game started and everyone noticed Olathe East’s aggression. But the fans wailed out chants, singing “Colt 45” when Shawnee Mission East scored, keeping up the energy. “Their chants are sometimes really funny,” Kelly said. “At the game against Lawrence a fire truck came racing past 95th Street by the field and all the fans started to cheer, ‘We’re on fire!’” To increase their chances of winning the game against Olathe East and the rest of the games, Coach Kelly rearranged formations. The changes helped in the game by keeping the players energized and more alert in the new positions. But the team felt that luck played a part. “It was our second goal and the ball got crossed and Zach Colby did this superman-like header and Tyler Owens tapped it in from the goal line,” senior Matt Moedritzer said. “Zach took out like three people.” Together, the fan’s support and team’s energy led to a victory of 2-1. “That night the rankings came out and Olathe East was first in state and we beat them,” Moedritzer said. “We were always confident, but it sort of woke us up and showed what an opportunity we had to make it to State.” The team took that confidence with them to win four games in a row. Finally, the team went up against Olathe East for the second time. This time, Olathe East was not willing to lose. After losing 3-0, the team ended their season with an overall record of 11 wins, five losses and two ties. Kelly felt satisfied with the team’s performance. “I make sure they play their hardest because the worst thing is to walk off the field and know you didn’t do as well as you could,” Kelly said. Story by Sydney Henley.

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STEALING TO WIN

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Above: Senior Justin Krivena steals the ball during a game against Shawnee Mission North. He was mentally prepared for the game because of the practices. “My favorite part of the game is definitely when we score our goals,” Krivena said. It means we are doing well and winning.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

SEE ALSO

AN INTRASQUAD COMPETITION

Far Above: Frustrated during half time at the Blue and Black game, senior Charlie Ludington stresses over being tied with the junior varsity team. “Some of the JV team were still angry and thought that they should have made varsity,” Ludington said. “They wanted to show Kelly that they should have been [made varsity].” Photo by Rachel English.

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HEINZEN LO 12 “I’m interested in mechanics of cars, so I just read random stuff on the internet. I’m majoring in mechanics engineering [in college] because I just like how the mechanics work in a car.”

CAR LOVER BOYS SOCCER 29


WO A ALL IN

DAY ’S

>>john francis 11

SEE ALSO:

BORED PIANO PLAYER “I did play piano when I was young, but I didn’t really like it though because it was sort of boring. After two years I was done. My parents were forcing me, so I stopped practicing and they were like fine.”

mployee ALISON BURTON 10: rangler at Winding River Equestrian Center HANNAH LANG 11: Indian Hills Country Clublife gua rd Below: Senior Ali Ellerbeck works with an autistic child, drawing pictures with magic markers. “[My job is] much more interesting than just sitting in an office stuffing envelopes” Ellerbeck said. “Plus, the kid is adorable and says some of the funniest things.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

bill came into talks to change the insurance legislation in Kansas for children with Autism. Ellerbeck’s mother, a developmental pediatrician, introduced her daughter to the bill because of her interest in law. Through the community supporting this legislation, a mother of an autistic boy, Matthew, contacted her to work with him in his daycare. “I basically work with the child to make sure he gets along well in daycare.” Ellerbeck said.” I see that his activities go along with his therapy outside of school.” Every day after school Ellerbeck drove the seven minutes to Roseland in her dinted blue Windstar Minivan to spend two hours with five-year-old Matthew. ”Autism is different in every case but is always characterized by some sort of deficit in normal social interaction,” Ellerbeck said. “I try and work with him to help him understand that the way to ask a kid to play with him is not by whacking him in the head with a toy.” Matthew also has echolalia, a repetitive disorder. “He can recite an entire TV commercial, though it won’t have any context or meaning to the situation in which we’re in,” Ellerbeck said. Ellerbeck trained to work in patterns with Matthew, so every day they had a set schedule of therapy. After free time, Ellerbeck worked on reading and drawing with Matthew. works on taking orders and staying on task which he is rewarded for. Play time outside helps the social aspect of Matthew’s disorder which Ellerbeck oversees but does as much as she can to let Matthew be independent. Next is group work, Ellerbeck used the Behavioral Method Technique by encouraging Matthew to make short term goals such as listening to the teacher.

september 30

Below: Sophomore Greg Tracy pushes her teammate out of the way as sonal things. “jehrh fjfkfiflsla akdiruriskdjfkasfjkldf jkfj kdjkdjfk djfkjdkfj dkjfdkfjdkjfkdjfkdkjdf kdfkjdkfjdkjfdkjfdk jfk jjsjkfjkldas,” Tracy said. Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

w

Greg Tracy

Ali Ellerbeck

a

A WOODEN MASTERPIECE

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>>

A HELPING HAND

PER 9: babysitt OO C Y MOLL

ood shavings caught in the ray of sunlight pouring through the window. A soft chiseling of metal to wood created a calming effect in the back work-room of Beckmann Violin Shop. Sophomore Greg Tracy worked on shaping the body of a guitar. Tracy began his apprenticeship last summer after taking Wood/Metal Shop class all of his freshman year. He worked under the guidance of his uncle, Ken Beckmann, the owner of the shop who had been making violins since 1979. With the help of his uncle, Tracy learned this trade early and in a profitable way. After six years of piano and two years of cello, Tracy began taking double bass lessons from Beckmann in 8th grade for the Mission Valley Orchestra. Here, he began his real musical education and even used his classical training to teach himself electric bass. Tracy used this wide range of musical knowledge in the construction of instruments and vice versa. “It’s very important for musicians to know how their instruments work,” Lane, Tracy’s school orchestra teacher said- I see now why you mentioned him above, but try to make it fit in better there. If not, this should work fine. “It makes it so that they can find if there is a problem with how they are using it for if the instrument itself is messed up.” Last part of quote and sense? “I want to get an internship in Italy and lean to design and make furniture, come back home and start my own company,” Tracy said. Although he does not have a set plan to follow his uncle in the violin making business, the training he received will help him in any woodworking he chooses. “I use all of the same equipment, tools, and type of math work for the building of a guitar as I do with a table,” Tracy said. “quote about how this can relate to life BLAH BAHB.”


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WHETHER HELPING AN AUTISTIC CHILD, MAKING GUITARS, OR WORKING AS A FIRE THROWER, STUDENTS FIND INTERESTING JOBS IN THE KANSAS CITY AREA.

Jane Turner

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ext to a hula-hooping, living-statue and a man creating instruments from garbage, a crowd erupted with applause as 2 flames danced in the air above freshman Jane Turner. She twisted to the band’s music, spinning fire. “All I thought the first time [I spun fire] was ‘This is so cool, I can’t believe I’m doing this!’” Turner said. “It’s still like that every time, it’s just so exciting.” Turner’s older sister began spinning fire in 2006, and a year later Turner joined her in performances. By working with lacrosse socks and tennis balls, Turner learned the synchronized movement of the chains and fire around her body, over her head, and soon, behind an audience member’s back. Her freshman year, Turner began using the long chains with petroleum cubes lit on fire and soon after began performing at First Fridays in the Crossroads Art District. “There are musicians, human statues and mimes and everyone is so cool,” Turner said. “They welcome newcomers, it’s like a family, a weird family.” At Crossroads, Turner performed in a parking lot for tips, only enough to pay for the petroleum. “It’s technically a job, I have to work with it, but it’s really just my form of art,” said Turner. “The thrill of performing with fire is enough for me.” However, playing with fire was dangerous and came with risks and injuries. Turner wore cotton clothing, closed toed shoes and a bandana to hold back loose bangs. Still, accidents happened. “I’ve burned my jeans, eyebrows and eyelashes” Turner said. “But the fire doesn’t hurt; it’s like just being in the heat, like a desert. When I’m performing I barely feel that heat, the adrenaline doesn’t let me.” Turner worked tirelessly during after-school sessions, lunch period practices and late night performances to perfect the art that she loves. “It’s something different,” Turner said. “Everyone should have something off of the ‘norm’ in their life, but if you’re going to work with fire, practice with something not so hot first.”

finding the

Students talk about how they make their jobs more interesting. Andrea Brown 12 job: lawn mower

“Sometimes I mow in weird patterns like in spirals or make up songs about mowing in my head.” HELLO

my name is

Hannah Lang 11 job: Indian Hills lifeguard

“Some of us [employees] didn’t get our pictures taken for the employee board, so we put up celebrity names and their pictures. All the little kids were so excited because they thought there were celebrities working there.”

Zach Nass 10

job: Foo’s employee

“We [employees] get discounts on the [ice cream] we get to buy when we’re off work; their stuff is really good so I really like to take advantage of that offer.”

Taylor Harris 12

job: helper at old people’s home

“We have nicknames for some of the people, like ‘eyelash lady’ and ‘hot-chocolate lady, since she usually has like six hot-chocolates every day.”

Molly Cooper 9 job: babysitter

“Sometimes I bring the kids little things to do; once, I brought nail polish for the little girls I was babysitting and gave them little makeovers.”

LEXA FESSLER 12: Patty Beller’s dance instructor GRAC

Below and Right: Freshman Jane Turner practices her fire-throwing skills using her trusty red socks. “It’s really the adrenaline rush I like the most,” Turner said. “Because really- what’s more fun than swinging around things that are on fire?” Photos by Meghan Benson.

BuZZ

>>

>>

PLAYING WITH FIRE

E CILLESPIE 11: Gymnastics coach ARIANA SHERK 10: Babysitter STEPHEN NICHOLS 12: Fourth grade boys’ soccer coach

ter ZACH NASS 10: Foo’s employee NELLY HAGHIGHAT 11: Bagel and Bagel employee MOLLY JENNINGS 9: Preschool teacher JACEY GORMAN 12: Panera

unusual student jobs 31


in the

driver’s seat

A NEW TEAM DEVELOPS LASTING FRIENDSHIPS AND STRIVES FOR SUCCESS DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH

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DRIVING IT HOME

Junior Caroline Sheridan swings using her driver. “I usually line up on the left side of the tee box. Then, I get behind the ball to guage how I should hit it,” Sheridan said. Photo by Peter Bautz.

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DRIVING IT HOME

Above: Junior Caroline Sheridan swings using her driver. “I usually line up on the left side of the tee box. Then, I get behind the ball to guage how I should hit it,” Sheridan said. Photo by Eliza McCormick.

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PRACTICE SWING

Junior Erika Davee lines up to tee off. “Driving was my favorite this year because I got a new driver,” Davee said. “Since it goes the farthest, it feels like you are getting the most of the shot.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

ushed giggling filled the silent green at the fourth hole. Sophomores Drew Auer and Lindsay Ward shouted “Four!” and junior Erica Davee screamed and ducked for cover. At the fifth hole the other golfers burst into laughter. The false warning of a dangerous flying ball always brought about this exaggerated reaction from Davee. The girls golf teams, made mostly of sophomores and juniors created not only state awards, but also great friendships to last. “These girls are great, you know from tryouts you already have something in common with them, golf,” sophomore Aubrey Leiter said. New to the JV team this year, Leiter was surprised by how kind everyone was and how close she got to the others in such a short amount of time. “It’s sad that our season is so short, especially for the JV team,” said Leiter . “I would have loved to spend more time with these girls playing the game we all love.” Golf is played individually but everyone contributed to the team score and helped each other improve through the season. “In the end when you’re on a team all the scores come together and you have to make sure your score is good to help the team score,” sophomore Sarah Genton said. “But not only do the scores help the team in a whole, motivation is key to the success of the team.” You’ll see [your teammates] between holes and they just reassure you you’re doing well or it’ll be okay if it’s not your day.” When it comes down to it, these serious golfers are just high school girls enjoying themselves with their friends. On the way home from tournaments, the team stoped by the closest McDonalds or Wendy’s for a team dinner. Here the Varsity, Sub-Varsity,

and JV golfers gossiped about previous opponents and the boys at school. “We always play ‘Would You Rather?’” Genton said. “It’s like a tradition, we always have a blast with that.” Moving on to unadulterated inside jokes and ragging on each other’s weaknesses finished off the team dinners. These golfers not only have fun at team dinners, but also on the green. “It takes forever to play a round,” Genton said. “It’s really easy to start conversations. We talk about the differences in school , dances, and boys.” With a total of 4 and 1/2 hours spent playing a round at a tournament the golfers are able to make new friends. “It’s easy to get to know the girls out there,” Genton said.” When you’re comfortable with the players it takes a lot of the nerves off. But some teams know how you use the talking to their advantages and get inside your head.” With competition ruling nerves, mind tricks add to the tension at tournaments. But these golfers have teammates to back them up. “ It takes a lot off of nerves when you know there’s a friend near by,” Genton said. With one great score there is a team behind it, helping each other is key to the success of individuals. Adding teamwork to the great friendships formed on the green these girls were able to improve their games and finish with a successful season. “Golf is such an iffy game, very day-to-day. It might be your day or not, and when it’s not, your teammates will see you on the course and try to help you” said Auer. “They’ll give you advice or just smile and tell you ‘ It’s going to be fine.’” Story by Emily Collins.

>> PRACTICE SWING

Right: Junior Kristina Genton takes a practice swing before teeing off. “It gets me mentally ready for the shot,” Genton said. “It helps me feel what I want to do with my swing.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

september 32


PLANNING IT OUT

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Far left: Junior Caitlin Benson takes out her pitching wedge. “It’s your short game that’s hard because you have to figure out how hard to hit the ball without going over the green,” Benson said. Photo by Emily Brandmeyer. Left: Sophomore Elizabeth Ward kneels down to read the green’s slope. “Sometimes it’s tough because of the ups and downs,” Ward said. Photo by Peter Bautz.

Erika Davee 11

what

that’s

said

GOAL CHECK

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Junior Erika Davee talks about the golf season and what helped her through.

Above: Sophomore Elizabeth Ward kneels down to read the green’s slope. “Sometimes it’s tough because of the ups and downs,” Ward said. Photo by Peter Bautz.

“I believe

that golf is a complete mental sport. It is an individual sport but the support from other girls is really important. We all get really close even though they are not people i see on the weekend. • I believe that i have really improved my game since this year.”

“I hope

that we continue to get closer as a team and we continue to support each other. •I hope the girls are successful at state. I want the girls there to take one shot at a time and to play their hardest until the final hole. •I hope we have more team dinners because of the team bonding.”

“I am

SEE ALSO:

different because my strengths vary from day to day. Some days I rely on my driving. Sometimes it is my shortgame. I just have to wait until I see what I have that day. •I am motivated to play a lot of golf this summer. I will definitely work on my shortgame.”

BORED PIANO PLAYER “I did play piano when I was young, but I didn’t really like it though because it was sort of boring. After two years I was done. My parents were forcing me, so I stopped practicing and they were like fine.”

>>john francis 11 girls golf33


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K E AND FIVE-LAYER CAKE. • JUNIOR SARA SCHENKELBERG LIKED TO WATCH FOOTBALL AND BASKETBALL GAMES. SH

1 ROBERT ENDERS 10 >> SME Lancer “The school spirit is one of the strongest in the area. East has a great atmosphere; everyone is friendly and gets along pretty well.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 36 – 37 Singled-out participant “It was fun to watch, because SM South people came. I was eliminated first round, and it was sad; I really wanted that date.”

2 CLARK WALDON 12 >>

SEE ALSO: PAGES 38 – 39

3 CAMILLE BRECKENRIDGE 9 >> performer “Everyone was kind of a family [during the musical] because we spent so much time together. We’d help each other on homework backstage.”

A SPIRIT-FILLED ASSEMBLY

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Above: During the Halloween pep assembly, senior Abby Weltner sits and stretches with senior Katie Bartow. Weltner always stretched before practicing her kicks and jumps. “It’s a fun adrenaline rush to perform in front of all of those people,” Weltner said. “I just go over the dance as much as possible to make it as perfect as I can.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

SEE ALSO: PAGES 40 – 41

4 JOHN HART 12 >> homecoming candidate “The dance was definitely fun. It was kind of funny to see my parents in the crowd of teenagers looking very awkward when [the candidates] were up on stage.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 42 – 43

5 ELLIOT FAERBER 9 >> football player “The games were fun because we had a lot of freshman fans come; it’s fun seeing your friends cheer you on.”

6 AMELIA MURPHY 12 >> Chem 2 student “It’s really hard and challenging; it’s definitely one of the hardest classes at East, so it’s an accomplishment to understand the topics.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 46 – 47

WASHING FOR FUNDS

Above: During foods class, sophomore Carmen Lang makes a smoothie with fruit sherbert. Lang cooked a new dish everyday, her favorite being cookie cake. “We usually switch categories every month so we might make stuff with bread one month, and then make stuff with eggs another month,” Lang said. “My favorite things we’ve made are chicken cordon bleu and chicken alfredo pasta.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

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SEE ALSO: PAGES 44 – 45

7 JAKE PARELMAN 11 >> choir member “I like the friendly atmosphere [in choir] this year. We always accomplish a great sound, and it’s a great community to be a part of.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 48 – 49

8 JENNIFER GRAY 10 >> cheerleader “I wasn’t that involved my freshman year, so [this year] I wanted to do something I really liked that would help me get more involved.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 50 – 51

CHAIRS AT THE FAIR

Above: During the induction ceremony into Latin Club, sophomore Spencer Brown chants the ‘Junior Classical League Pledge.’ Brown joined the club as a freshman and served the role of ‘Spirit of Latin Two’ during his sophomore year ceremony. “It’s generally a silly thing,” Brown said, “but it’s an opportunity to dress up in togas which Latin kids generally like to do.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

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E A WEEK WITH FRIEND GRACE DEGOLER. THESE DESSERTS INCLUDED PEANUT BUTTER BROWNIES, LEMON BARS, FUNFETTI C A

OCTOBER

ET FROM HIS HOUSE. HE RAN BY HIMSELF ON THE TENTH HOLE. • FRESHMAN LANIE LEEK COOKED DESSERTS ON C 34 OCTOBER


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HE WATCHED THE CHIEFS EVERY SUNDAY AND IOWA STATE BASKETBALL DURING MARCH MADNESS. • SENIOR BERNADETTE MYERS LIKE FIRING IT UP

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During the StuCo Homecoming bonfire, sophomore Logan Heley heats up his marshmallows. He arrived after eating dinner at Culver’s for Culver’s night, making the marshmallows a perfect dessert. “The fire got really hot, but the sacrifice was worth it when I got a perfectly burnt marshmallow,” Heley said. “Sometimes champions have to work harder than their opponent.” Photo by Rachel English.

E DAY OR NIGHT. • SOPHOMORE NICK LUCAS ALWAYS RAN THREE TIMES A WEEK ON THE INDIAN HILLS GOLF COURSE ACROSS THE STR OCTOBER DIVISION 35


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Above: Making a peace sign, sophomore Grace Boehm walks with the sophomore float and shouts to the crowd lining Mission Road. Boehm and 15 other sophomores worked on the float the night before at sophomore Meagan Dexter’s house and picked out their outfits. “The theme was ‘Crazy 80s,’” Boehm said. “Basically I went to the attic and looked at my mom’s old stuff.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

SPORTING THE ‘60s

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Above: Sporting peacesign necklaces and a tie-die shirt, senior Tyler Roste dressed for the ‘60s for the senior float theme ‘Time Machine.’ “My favorite part of the day was probably just the fact that the weather started out really bad,” Roste said, “but that it then ended up being a really nice day for Lancer Day.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

BLAST OFF

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Above: Popping up out of the moon, junior Keegan Ring holds up a sign for the junior float. The float represented the year 1969 when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. “19 and 69 are my two favorite numbers,” Ring said. “We had a trailer that looked like a moon. We were supposed to be blasting off of it.” Photo by CC Creidenberg.

DESIGN BY ANDREA TUDHOPE.

AFTER A LONG DAY OF RAIN, LANCERS KEEP THE NEARLY 30-YEAR LONG TRADITION GOING.

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allways were enveloped in Columbia blue, black and white by spirit wear and streamers thrown across staircases and doorways. But the colors were darkened by the rainy sky outside the windows. During 3rd hour on Friday the sky turned a dismal gray and sprinkles of light turned into heavy rain. Tired students worried about what would come of their floats they worked so hard to finish and guard the night before. On Thursday night freshman Carolyn Welter camped outside with friends to guard their ‘Disney Land’ float. For the generations-themed Lancer Day parade the freshmen decided to use an idea that related to every generation. “We were down to ‘Rock and Roll’ and ‘Disney Land,’” Welter said. “So we voted and decided that ‘Disney Land’ would be more exciting for little kids.” A small group was able to finish the float made of cardboard and paint in just one day. “We enjoyed every part of it,” Welter said. “I wasn’t thinking it would be so exciting but just being able to be a part of the tradition was worth the work.” But with the threat of sophomores coming to sabotage and an enemy sister, sophomore Emily Welter, right inside her house, the freshmen were afraid they would fall victim to a well-known Lancer tradition. However, there was no sabotage. The only threat to the float’s safety came the next day with the weather. Sophomores were too busy to be on the offense Thursday night. In the garage and driveway of sophomore class president Meagan Dexter’s house a small group of hard workers cut, spraypainted and taped, tirelessly working on their ‘80s float. Most of the float was finished by one a.m. and ten girls stayed the night to guard it from any attack. At school on Friday sophomore Katy Westhoff’s wor-

SHOW GOESON

CRAZY DECADE

AINON MY PARADE

and the

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ries escalated when the rain came. “Our float was almost entirely made of cardboard,” Westoffe said. “We had a giant boom box with a huge cassette on top to make the [number] eight in ‘80.’ One person worked on that cassette tape for eight hours and I knew that cardboard was not at all waterproof” All of the workers worried that their efforts would go to waste. But in the midst of the manic students, junior Holly Lafferty kept her cool about the rain. “I figured it would stop,” Lafferty said. “It always does.” The junior ‘Moon Landing’ float focused on a specific event in history, not a specific time period. “We had a great turnout,” Lafferty said. “In total about 100 people helped out. We needed it to make a big rock and rocket out of newspaper.” The rocket was stolen at the parade but the juniors were just happy there was a parade at all. “We weren’t sure what to do after the rocket was stolen,” Lafferty said. “But we just went on with everything and it turned out to be just as fun as the other years – rain, rocket, or not.” After only about an hour and a half of raining, the skies went dry and the sun came out again. The atmosphere of the school lightened with the weather as the students realized Lancer Day would go on as planned. With perfect timing, the floats were able to arrive at the school unharmed, the only remaining threat being sabotage. The students joined with alumni to continue the Lancer Day tradition of 50 years of sunny Lancer Day parades. Sophomore Molly Troutman passed by a trolly full of 1972 graduates as she heard ‘the sun always shines on Lancer Day.’ Story by Emily Collins.

Students talk about how they contributed to the parade and how they reacted when it started to rain.

Scott Watson 10 “Leading up to it I spent a fair amount of hours spraypainting a lot of cardboard boxes. The girls really took charge. They had a lot of ideas that most men couldn’t grasp their minds around. I had heard the saying [it never rains on Lancer Day] a hundred times that day. But when it started to rain, I was skeptical.”

Alison Stephens 11 “We had the float party at my house. I had my house open to literally the entire junior class. We started two days before the float party. I spent eight hours give or take of actual work on the float. I figured if it was going to rain, it was going to rain. I knew we would still do it and that it would be fun even if it was in the rain.”

Jennifer Latshaw 12 “I spent the Saturday before Lancer Day with NAHS painting store windows in the Village. I was in StuCo when it started to rain. We were thinking that we had planned all of this and of course it was going to rain on the 50th. But we realized that the parade was still three hours away and it could pass based on how the weather changes here.”

CRAZY DECADE

Walking alongside the senior float, seniors Hannah Gasaway and Harrison Wendlandt lead the >final > Right: float of the parade to the Prairie Village Shopping Center. Gasaway dressed as Ginger Spice from the Spice Girls to represent the ‘90s. “Everyone tried to dress up as the different decades,” Gasaway said. “It was a good variety. All groups of friends joined in – it didn’t even matter.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

36 OCTOBER


LAUGHS AND GIGGLES

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Far left: Marching with fellow drum line members on Lancer Day, junior Brian Rogers keeps a straight face under his aviator glasses while concentrating on his part. “The drums I played this year are a lot heavier than last year so it was physically demanding,” Rogers said. Photo by Anna Petrow.

TENNIS TEAM SPIRIT

>>

SEE ALSO

Left: Waving to the crowd, juniors Lauren Reynolds and Ellen Stanziola stand on junior Lauren Bleakley’s dad’s firetruck representing the girls tennis team. After running into some complications when the firetruck wouldn’t turn on, members of the girls tennis team worked to make a successful float for the parade. “This was the first year I was in it,” Reynolds said. “I was a part of the crowd the past two years. But it was so much more fun being in it. You get to see everyone that came out to see the parade and give them candy.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

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ROBERT ENDERS 10 “I run my own lawn-mowing business. Right now I just have five neighbors’ lawns. It was originally my brother who started it. He graduated two years ago and passed it on to me.”

LAWN MOWER LANCER DAY 37


show ‘Don’t Forget the Lyrics.’ In the end, Gray won the date while junior Keegan Ring and the rest of the male contestants were rejected. “I thought I had a pretty good shot,” Ring said. “After I made it in the top five, I thought it was in the bag.” While Ring faced rejection, Gray had fun with his date. “We already knew each other from STUCO,” Gray said. “It was fun to hang out with her and even better when I did better than her at my challenge.” Gray’s challenge was the ‘Chubby Bunny,’ a test to see how many marshmallows he could fit in his mouth. Gray fit 13 while Brandt only made room for nine. Ring’s best friend senior Alex Collingwood raced in heels with Ring during a competition. He was skeptical about going at first, but they needed more guys. He didn’t have any better plans, so he agreed. “I wasn’t too invested in winning,” Collingwood said. “I found out about it on Facebook a few minutes before it started. It was fun to do something different with friends on Friday night.” The boys were bummed about not getting the date, but they weren’t crushed. They had more fun hanging with friends and eating chocolate chip cookies than they did competing for the date. “It doesn’t matter that I didn’t get the date,” Collingwood said. “I can get enough dates on my own.” Story by Katie East.

A MESSY MATCH

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Right: Seniors Carly Haflich and Alyssa Jonson shave a balloon for one of the competitions. Both girls shaved without popping it. “It was really fun and creative,” Haflich said. “I was very happy that I got to do this one instead of some of the others.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

ENTERTAINMENT AT ITS BEST

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Middle right: Reacting to all of the contestants’ wacky stunts, senior Sarah Pavlu smiles from the audience. “We all got out early in the competition,” Pavlu said, “but it wasn’t that bad because we could see everyone else struggling to win.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

THE AFTERMATH

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Far right: Senior Tommy Gray spits out all 13 marshmallows he stuffed into his mouth during the ‘Chubby Bunny’ contest while senior Mike Sullivan watches in the background. “The audience was really into it and very involved,” Gray said “They created a great atmosphere to compete in.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

38 OCTOBER

DESIGN BY MALLORY STEVENSON.

MATCHING C

licking heels filled the hallways as boys desperate for a date raced in the hall for a challenge. Inside the cafeteria, about 30 students sat in long rows of chairs watching the boys compete in their challenges. A girl behind a curtain questioned the potential daters and challenged them with props such as a basketball goal stationed in the corner. ‘Singled Out,’ an old MTV dating show, made a stop by East on November 17. STUCO recreated the cancelled show in the cafeteria. Senior boys competed for a date with a girl hidden behind a curtain. Every year STUCO seniors recreated the show during the can drive. Singled Out was exclusive to seniors for participation, but anyone could watch. All the proceeds from Singled Out were combined to those from the can drive. “Not only was Singled Out fun to participate in, but it was always fun to raise money with friends from different schools,” STUCO class president senior Tommy Gray said. Some of the challenges included running in heels, stuffing mouths with marshmallows and shooting threepointers. The girl testing them on personality and athleticism was the senior STUCO secretary from Shawnee Mission South, Carley Brandt. Hiding Brandt was STUCO executive treasurer senior Jennifer Latshaw. Senior Clark Waldon was in charge of keeping the music going during certain challenges, including one based off the FOX game

Seniors continue the tradition of ThE dating game ‘SINGLED OUT’ in their efforts to help out with the can drive.

FACE YOUR FEARS

From shaving balloons to racing in heels, participants go to great lengths to score a date.

Regan Jamieson 12 “I had to sing ‘I want it that way’ by the Backstreet Boys. I hadn’t heard it in a while, but I’ve had the chorus engraved in my brain since elementary school. I’m not a very good singer, but it was still fun.”

Mike Sullivan 12 “I got out on the first Pepsi/ Coke challenge, but the girl gave me the golden ticket to get me back in the game. I made it to the final challenge with all the questions and I only got about two right. I kind of knew the girl so I had an idea of some of the right answers. I just wanted the TCBY gift card.”

Alyssa Jonson 12 “Shaving the balloon was actually really easy. The worst part of it was that it was extremely messy. At first I was a little worried that the balloon would pop but once we got started everything was fine.”

Gina Legrotte 12 “When I got out on the first Pepsi/Coke challenge, I was a little relieved because I could just sit back and watch everyone else play. It would have been kind of fun to stay in but I still stand by my choice that Pepsi is better than Coke.”


‘MAKING UP’ THE COMPETITION

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Far left: Senior Mike Sullivan attempts to paint one half of senior Christina Beynon’s face while his friend, Shawnee Mission South senior Peter Friedel, paints the other half. The two competitors were judged on who did a better job painting. “Peter was the main guy from South and he’s one of my best friends,” Sullivan said. “I was one of the final three when I competed, and painting her face was one of the things we had to do.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

FAST WHEELS

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Far left: After riding a bike in circles, senior David Spero gets his knee stuck in the handle bars and falls. “[Senior] Amy Esselman, one of my good friends, was cheering me on from the side lines,” Spero said “She was a great inspiration and made me keep going.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

A HAPPY HOST

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SEE ALSO

Left: While hosting the event, senior Jessie Light laughs at the crazy stunts. She was a STUCO officer, so she was very involved in running the competition. “The audience was really into in and very involved,” Light said “They created a great atmosphere to compete in.” Photo by Rachel English.

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CLARK WALDON 12 “I started collecting CDs when I was in fifth grade. I started with older stuff like Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones. Then I expanded and started looking at my own music and now I have over 250 CDs.”

CD COLLECTOR SINGLED OUT 39


MAKING IT HAPPEN

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Performing the song ‘People’ from ‘Funnygirl,’ senior Legna Cedillo battles her nerves while still making effort to put emotion into her performance. “It was my first solo in a musical,” Cedillo said, “and it was the first song I sang that night so there were a lot of nerves.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

ONE OF THE FAMILY

FRINGE ON TOP

senior Abba Goehausen laugh together in the choir room. “I loved their tradition of singing ‘Bohemian Rapsody’ in a big circle on opening night,” Bonjour said. “I was welcomed right in and treated like one of the gang.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

OPENING NIGHT STRESS

40 OCTOBER

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>>Right: Sharing a cast joke, teacher Jeanette Bonjour and

Left: Twirling an umbrella, senior Paige E. Anderson performs ‘Many a New Day’ from ‘Oklahoma.’ “The people on the center stage would have to sit or stand behind the whole time and wait to perform,” Anderson said, “so I ended up really enjoying listening to all the other acts.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

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Right: Performing his duties as crew chief opening night, sophomore Richard Latshaw leads the crew. “It got busy near opening night,” Latshaw said. “A couple things got messed up, but pretty much it was okay.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.


SEE SEEALSO ALSO

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CAMILLE BRECKENRIDGE 9 “I’ve been tap-dancing for 13 years. I started when I was two and had my first recital when I was three. You don’t have to be graceful when you’re tap-dancing. You just have to let loose and enjoy it.”

TAP DANCER

‘DO YOU WANNA HAVE FUN?’

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USING THE CAFETERIA AS A THEATRE ALLOWS FOR A MORE PERSONAL PERFORMANCE.

FIFTY YEARS IN REVUE T ip tap tip tap tippity TAP. Sophomore Grayson McGuire tapdanced on the linoleum cafeteria floors, audience members constantly moving their blue plastic seats to get the best view of the stage. Being so close to the actors, the audience felt like a part of the show. Every time McGuire tapped out in front of the parents and students who came to watch, he would try something new. “I loved making them laugh,” McGuire said. “Once I came on stage and read the sign upside down. Someone tapped me on the shoulder and said, ‘You’re sign’s backwards,’ and I was like, ‘Yeah, I know!’” Because of construction, the musical was moved from the auditorium to the cafeteria, challenging both cast and crew. “In an auditorium you are always taught to sing past the audience,” senior Andrew Sweeney said. “But in the cafeteria, I got the chance to make eye contact and make it much more personal.” Unlike the year before, the cast and crew had only four weeks to work on the musical. Although this brought longer and more stressful practices, the actors felt it was worth it. “This year gave everyone an opportunity with solos and duets,” junior Emily Bittiker said. “People who you don’t usually hear sing were able to sing.” Opening night was a frenzy of excitement. With the just-practiced songs fresh in their minds, the cast piled into the choir room. Theatre

KEEPING A STRAIGHT FACE

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DESIGN BY EMMA COLLINS.

Starting off the second act, East girls perform ‘Big Spender’ from the 2007 musical ‘Sweet Charity.’ “It was definitely one of the most fun acts,” senior Abba Goehausen said. “The audience absolutely loved it.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

Left: Freshman Samantha Bartow leads the girls chorus in a series of songs. “It was hard not to laugh at the audience,” Bartow said. “If you looked out you just saw everyone staring at you.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

‘ALL I CAN DO IS TRY’

Maureen Orth performs ‘Shy’ from >‘Once > Right:UponSenior a Mattress.’ “The song was completely fun because the character is just silly and outgoing,” Orth said. “So it’s funny that she’s singing a piece called ‘Shy.’” Photo by Anna Petrow.

teacher Brian Cappello came into the choir room and announced to the cast: “15 minutes until showtime.” McGuire jumped up from the slightly stained blue-carpeted floor and hurried to the grand piano. He played the first chord from ‘Seasons of Love,’ grabbing the attention of actors getting stage make-up done and a group of students dressed as servants playing Apples to Apples. The cast formed a semicircle around the piano. Seniors Katie Bartow and Legna Cedillo wrapped one arm around each other, singing along to the song. “After I would play ‘Seasons of Love’ the seniors would start crying,” McGuire said. At the last line of the song ‘Measure your life in love’ a few sopranos hit the high note of the last word, some better than others. The clock read 6:55 pm – time for the actors to flood the stage. The cast walked out of the choir room to the cafeteria side entrance. McGuire walked carefully in his noisy tap shoes. Once in the cafeteria, half the group hid behind folded cafeteria tables. The other half walked around the blue beams and took their places behind the gold curtain. Once the music of ‘We’ve Got Magic To Do’ started playing, the students became actors, eyes bright with excitement. “It’s not as big of a level as when you are in the auditorium,” Sweeney said. “But in reality, it’s exciting when everyone’s watching you to see all the work you’ve done.” Story by Sydney Henley.

DRESS-UP TIME

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Right: Performing ‘Three Little Maids,’ sophomores Alex Rorie and Jack Dee dress in kimonos for the amusement of the audience. “I was nervous at first [to dress in women’s clothing],” Rorie said. “But I just got pulled into and played the part because it was so fun.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

FALL MUSICAL 41


HALF-TIME CROWNING

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Right: Senior Johanna Cook laughs with her father during the half-time crowning of the Homecoming queen at the Oct. 17 football game. “He was more nervous than I was,” Cook said. “So we were just laughing trying to lighten the mood.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

A ‘TIMELESS’ DANCE

right: Juniors Molly Tidrick >and > FarCody Winlaw dance together at the timeless-themed Homecoming dance. “I saw a bunch of kids I knew from pack-of-pals all dancing together,” Tidrick said. “I went over to say ‘hi.’ I had a lot of fun dancing with them.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

DESPITE A FEW OBSTACLES, LANCERS ENJOY A TIMELESS NIGHT AND BRING IN 50 YEARS OF AGE-OLD FASHION.

>> “My friend and I wrote on the street in front of [junior Anna Petrow’s] house ‘Anna, Homecoming? -Zach,’ but I didn’t anticipate rain. The next day I was excited to see her reaction, but she didn’t have one. We basically already knew we were going together, but I had to ask her officially. I bought her two taco bell tacos and wrote ‘Homecoming?’ on the wrapper.”

Zach Busey 11

“I hid in a box to ask [senior] Kelly Greenfield to Homecoming, but she was out and about when I arrived. I waited in the box for like 40 minutes. In the process I lost a lot of feeling in my legs and when I popped out, my legs collapsed and I fell over onto the coffee table. It got pretty hot in the box.”

Will Snyder 12

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e watched the ball out of the corner of his eye, safely tucked in the arm of his teammate. He rushed ahead, taking the hits of the opposing men until a huge blur rushed toward him, slamming into his chest and knocking him down to the hard turf. A whistle blew moments later, his eyes opened to see what the play had come to, but the pain blinded him. With three minutes left in the first half of the Homecoming game, junior Tyler Woltemath was running a common offensive play when he was struck down by a North player. After the play had ended, Woltemath tried to get up but felt a sharp pain in his left knee. “I had no idea what had happened at that point,” Woltemath said. “All I knew was this hurts and this is not okay.” Later, Woltemath learned that he had a stress fracture in his right kneecap and a sprained joint. With the homecoming dance the next night and a date lined up, Woltemath had to think quickly and adjust his plans to fit his injury. “My friends and I had plans for dinner and the whole deal,” Woltemath said. “We still were able to keep everything the way it was, but getting dressed and walking around was difficult with my splint and crutches.” Woltemath and his friends continued with their night but cut the dance part short to accompany their injured friend. Through the setback of pain and troubled movement, Woltemath did not let his injury ruin his junior year homecoming. “It wasn’t how I pictured it,” Woltemath said. “But I had a blast and people knew what happened at the game and congratulated me on our team’s win. In the end it was all about the game and having a good time at homecoming no matter what went wrong.” *** Dresses, hair, and after parties were on the minds of sophomores Hannah Earley and Chloe Anderson, but their friends had forgotten them for one big detail. A group of their friends rented a party bus to drive them around for homecoming night; however, there was only room for 12 passengers, and Earley and Anderson where numbers 13 and 14. With only

three days left until the dance the two girls realized they had been left off of the official count for the bus. “I couldn’t believe it,” Earley said. “I was so mad at everyone but mostly the guys because they were in charge of planning and I knew they would mess something up; those guys usually do.” Earley and Anderson had to think quickly and try to find an alternate ride. In the end the two girls rode with Anderson’s mother in her gold mini-van and had a blast. “It was interesting.” Anderson said. “But we had so much fun it didn’t matter.” With everything working out, Earley and Anderson were able to enjoy their night. Looking beautiful and having fun topped off the girls’ night. They have no sour feelings toward any of their friends over the mistake. “It ended up not being as big of a deal as we thought it would be.” Earley said. “Things happen, but our night wasn’t ruined; that’s really all we’ll remember in the long run.” *** “Are you serious?!” sophomore Meagan Dexter screamed into her cell phone. At 8:45 Dexter went back to find her friends after greeting some other girls. She searched everywhere for her large group of friends but couldn’t find them anywhere. “I pulled out my cell phone and called my friend Emily, and I was so freaked out that I was screaming into the phone,” Dexter said. Dexter’s friends had left the dance to go to their after party thinking she was in another car on its way to the same party. “First I laughed but then I realized that she really was upset.” sophomore Emily Fuson said. “Then I felt bad and tried to help her find a ride so she could meet us at the party.” Within 30 minutes, a friend’s parent picked up Dexter and took her to the party. “It sucked and it’s still really embarrassing to talk about but I’ll laugh about it soon enough,” Dexter said. “I have an interesting story of my sophomore year.” Story by Emily Collins.

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH.

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42 OCTOBER

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TIMELESS

1966

When asking their dates to the dance, a few students suffer SNAFUs.

1962

MESSAGE

“Stardust” “Unchained Melody”


SEE ALSO

A WALK TO REMEMBER

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Senior Jane Mahoney laughs while being presented during the Oct. 8 Homecoming pep assembly. “We talked while we sat in the chairs because it was kind of awkward just sitting there,” Mahoney said. “Mostly by that point I was just relieved I had made it across successfully.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.

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JOHN HART 12 “I’ve been playing [for the Great American Basketball League] since third grade. Kids are still competitive, but if we lose it’s not as much pressure. It’s just a good chance to play in a relaxed atmosphere.”

GABL PLAYER

LAUGHING WITH DADDY

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Above: Senior Katie Bartow laughs with her father before the crowning of the Homecoming queen. “My dad lives in Florida, so it was fun to have him come,” Bartow said. “He was in a silly mood.” Photo by Rachel English.

DANCING IN THE MOONLIGHT

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Far above: Freshman Maggie Allen dances with her date, Dalton Johnson, from Shawnee Mission North. “It was fun bringing someone from another school because he got to meet everyone,” Allen said. Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

ATTENTION-GETTER

1984

2008

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“The Roaring 20s” “Evening on the River” “Sophisticated Ladies”

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>> “Color My World”

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1974

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Above: Junior Eve Marshall waves down a friend before the Homecoming pep assembly starts. “There were no specific seats at the assembly – everyone was everywhere,” Marshall said. “My friend was sitting right across from me, so I called her to get her attention.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

“A Knight in the Castle”

“As Time Goes on”

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HOMECOMING 43


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SPORTS FANATIC

SEE ALSO

ELLIOT FAERBER 9 “I play basketball, and I want to do track in the spring and baseball in the summer. I’ve been playing baseball since first grade. I like it because it’s in the summer, and we get to play outside when it’s warm.”

SUMMER PREPARATIONS

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Above: Running to help his teammates on the field, junior Tyler Woltemath shows that his summer preparation paid off. “Going to summer weights made me stronger and better,” Woltemath said. “It really helps when you’re in the fourth quarter and you’ve got something left in the tank.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

A PAINFUL INJURY

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Above: Grimacing in pain, junior Cody Rutledge sits injured by a tackle in the game. He wanted to be on the field, but he knew he could not. “It’s tough because you want to be out there, but at the same time you know that you have to get better and help yourself in order to play again,” Rutledge said. Photo by Rachel English.

BIG COLLISIONS

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Below: Junior Jake Fleming cheers for his team during the game. He enjoyed watching bit-hits and collisions. “I love to hit people and scoring touchdowns is always fun,” Fleming said. Photo by Rachel English.

A GROUP EFFORT

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Above: Senior Curran Darling observes the football meeting. He believed that practice was important in keeping the team together. “Getting repetition with the team makes the team think as one and work as a group,” Darling said. Photo by Anna Petrow.

seats in the frontline

Students express their opinions about what grade level deserves to sit in front at football games.

44 OCTOBER

Emily Frye 9 “I do think that it’s fair when seniors sit in the front at football games. Freshmen should be at the top and work their way down. It should be a privilege.”

Josh Barlow 12 “Seniors deserve to sit in front because we’ve been here for four years, and it’s a tradition. Also, we start all the chants and have the most school spirit, and most of the players are our friends.”

Nick Lucas 10 “I don’t really care at all who sits in the front. I usually go sit with my brother [senior Chase Lucas] and his friends and respect seniority, but they have to respect my legit self as a sophomore.”


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wenty minutes until game time and the locker room was quiet. The only audible sound was that of cleats clicking across the floor. Varsity head coach John Stonner came in and pulled the boys together for his last pre-game talk. While the players knelt around their coach listening to what was at stake, two brothers realized their season together could very well be over after the night. Sophomore Robby Moriarty joined varsity as starting quarterback halfway through the season. He was moved up after starting quarterback senior Curran Darling was diagnosed with mononucleosis and second-string quarterback, sophomore John Schrock injured his back. Already on varsity was Robby’s older brother, senior Joe Moriarty. Robby’s first game was the team’s fourth game of the season against Olathe North. Although they lost 50-6, Robby threw a touchdown pass to sophomore Krey Bradley in the middle of the fourth quarter. It was Bradley’s first varsity touchdown. It was Robby’s first varsity touchdown pass. Even in a less-than-perfect season with a record of three wins and six losses, Joe was proud of his brother. “We’ve had some rough games,” Joe said. “[Robby] was starting for two or three of those games when we just got pounded. I think we were able to experience losing together and facing it together, and I think that it brought us closer.” The fifth game of the year, Robby’s second, wasn’t as bad as his first. Even with the 37-7 loss to Lawrence Free State, Robby threw for 116 yards. The highlights of this game were a touchdown pass to junior Kevin Hertel and Robby’s first completed pass to Joe. “In a situation like this with the quality [of a player] that Joe is, any younger brother would look up to an older brother like Joe,” Stonner said. “I think their teammates have a lot of respect for them because they’re both extremely hard workers.” From the sidelines he watched Robby play the field as quarterback after being thrown in as a starter within minutes of the initial kickoff. The same thing happened to Schrock before the Shawnee Mission South game after Darling was unable to play. Schrock had a huge drive up the field during what the team considered their biggest game of the season. For some of the team, the biggest feat of the season was the comeback to beat Shawnee Mission South, their biggest rivals, during game three. After being down 16-0, they came back and won 24-16. They beat South for the fourth consecutive year, the longest streak in school history. For others, their biggest accomplishment was taking the Nut Cup back from Shawnee Mission North with a 19-3 victory seven games into the season. “The most memorable part of this season for me was throwing a pass to Joe,” Robby said. Joe’s last high school game was against Shawnee Mission West, a 55-21 loss. After junior Kris Hertel ran in a touchdown, newly recovered Darling threw a pass to senior Marcus Webb for the second touchdown of the game. At the end of the fourth quarter, Joe scored his own touchdown. Robby threw the pass to Joe. It was his last high school play. “They had a couple passes and a touchdown pass,” Darling said. “I know that was exciting for them.” As exciting as the season was for them, Joe missed football more as time passed. He was glad to have his brother with him in the huddle during his last season and hoped to see him do well in the future. “Now that he has experience, I think he could definitely be a starter next year,” Joe said. “But it is weird knowing there is no next year for me.” Story by Katie East.

ble dou

DESIGN BY WHITAKER SHERK.

coverage

With the help of brotherly love, the football team works towards victory during the 2008 season.

FOOTBALL 45


STILL IN THE GAME

CONCENTRATION

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Right: Playing ‘molesical chairs,’ the mole, senior Sally Holmes, cheers as she gets a seat and proceeds into the next round. “The mole is supposed to be really happy in the morning,” Holmes said. “So the teachers thought I’d be a good mole because they were sure I’d be excited for one of the best days in chemistry.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

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Below: Searching his Bingo board, junior Kaevan Tavakolinia participates in one of the many Mole Day activities. Before playing Bingo, he played ‘molesical chairs.’ “I didn’t eat anything,” Tavakolinia said. “I was too busy playing games. ‘Molesical chairs’ is potentially the best thing that has happened to mankind.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

IS THAT AVOGADRO’S FACE?

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Below: Standing in front of the game, ‘pin-the-nose on Avogadro,’ senior Sam Benson stands in front of the Avogadro poster as a Chemistry 1 student searches for the face. As the Mole Day coordinator, Benson set up the gaming groups. “The people in charge of games really worked hard to add new, creative games to Mole Day this year,” Benson said. Photo by Anna Petrow.

WHACK-A-MOLE

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Above: Popping up from a hole in the ‘human whack-a-mole’ game, senior Winn Clark tries to avoid the rubber blowup hammer aimed for his head. Clark and several other past Chemistry 2 students painted mole noses and whiskers on their faces and wore plastic hard hats to fit their roles as the moles in the game. “We kept chanting, ‘You’re weaker than salicyclic acid!’ as people kept missing our heads,” Clark said. “It was a lot of fun, but my knees hurt because we were kneeling for like half-an-hour.” Photo by Rachel English.

time to party 46 OCTOBER

Remember Mole Day from start to finish.

4:45

6:01

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Chemistry 2 students begin set-up

Mole Day countdown

Ten ‘Commolements’ and mole cheer

Bagels, doughnuts and chips

Games gallore

Mole Day ends


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IE DAN D BY JOR DESIGN

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S UDENT T S B I STRY 2 NG OF CHEMI ER A MORNI ITH GETH IES W PUT TO AND ACTIVIT MOLE. GAMES HELP OF THE THE

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inking, snorting pig noises came from the alarm across the room. Senior Sally Holmes wobbled out of bed and hit the snooze button. Five minutes later blaring ‘BEEP BEEP BEEP’ from her second alarm clock shook her out of her dreams. After slamming the top of the CocaCola polar bear alarm clock next to her bed, she looked at the time: 4:15 am. It was the ‘best day of the year’ according to chemistry teacher Steve Appier. Despite the fact that Holmes’s eyes refused to open, Mole Day had finally arrived. “I got to school by 4:50 [am] to help set up with the Chem 2 students even though I didn’t really have to,” Holmes said. This year Holmes was elected to be the lucky student who got to dress head to toe in a brown, fuzzy mole costume. Although it was hot inside the giant suit, she was excited to finally get to be the mole. “Last year the chem teachers thought I was too short for the costume,” Holmes said. “But this year I asked if I could do it and they all agreed.” Once at school, she lugged the furry mole costume around, refusing to put it on until the last second. Right before 6:02 am, when the countdown began, she pulled the giant head on and sauntered in the cafeteria. To get people excited for the celebration, she threw candy at them and participated in mole-sical chairs. “I was really boiling in the costume though,” Holmes said. “The eye holes were far apart and I couldn’t see well so I kept running into things.” While Holmes attempted to play ‘molesical chairs’ in the large costume, Chemistry 2 IB student junior Jack Walker snatched a Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut from the snack table. He figured he deserved it since he had been there since 5 am. “I was in the group that had to call and get the prices on all the food

AMELIA MURPHY 12 “I have seven classes a week of rehearsal. My ballet group performs at retirement homes and in Theatre in the Park pre-shows. I was also the sugar plum fairy in our performance of ‘The Nutrcracker.’”

BALLERINA

before we bought it,” Walker said. “[Earlier that morning] we rearranged tables and organized the food table.” Walker looked over at all the Chem 1 students playing ‘mole-sical chairs.’ As a Chem 2 IB student, it was his responsibility to help organize the event, not necessarily to participate. While he watched the students all in matching Mole Day shirts sprint to grab an empty chair, he saw Holmes trip as she tried to get the last empty seat. “She lost in ‘molesical chairs’ several times,” Walker said. “But she kept playing.” With only a few minutes left of the Mole Day festivities, Holmes shuffled over to the ‘whack-a-mole’ game. She threw a piece of candy at the top winner posted on the scoreboard. Nearby senior Andrea Webber pushed her yellow construction hat up from her eyes as a sophomore boy with a little too much aggression took a practice swing. Webber and the other students dressed as moles rearranged themselves under the colorful board. “It was definitely an interesting experience having people whack you with a blow up bat,” Webber said. “Some people were overly violent. I got quite a beating that day.” Bobbing with the beat of this year’s Mole Day song, the ‘whack-amole’ Chem 2 IB students took turns singing solos. But eventually, people started to catch on and they were forced to do it randomly. “I didn’t get hit more than anyone else did,” Webber said. “A few people were fast and hit us everytime, but by the end they started getting better and we started getting worse.” After running straight into the corkboard on the cafeteria wall, Holmes took the oversized mole head off and wiped sweat from her forehead. ‘The best day of the year’ was finally over. Story by Sydney Henley. MOLE DAY 47


Choir director Ken Foley and junior Beck Johnson talk about changes in the choir department.

MUSICAL OUTING

Below: At the East Area Choral Festival, junior Celia Herman sings with the Choraliers. East choirs sang with area elementary and middle school choirs.“I like how I interact with people of all ages in Choraliers,” Herman said. “Everybody’s really fun.” Photo by Max Stitt.

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before after

before before

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At East, Foley saw more dedication among the students. “I feel like there’s a real urgency about the music here,” Foley said. “I am pushed more to challenge the students daily, which is exciting. It has opened up new opportunities for me – I can take it to a new level.”

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Below: During men’s choir, sophomore Alex Rorie sings ‘Fergus an’ Molly.’ Music was a big part of Rorie’s life. “I personally express myself through music, and I live through music,” Rorie said. “It’s great to have a group of people who love music as much as I do.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Though a large percentage of Pembroke Hill students were involved in choir, many lacked dedication. “Although we had really good choirs, it was a little limiting for me,” Foley said. “Many were involved in choir because they liked it, but were not passionate about it.”

before before

BRINGING MANY CHANGES, CHOIR DIRECTOR KEN FOLEY IS ISTRIKING

SOCIAL DOWNTIME

Below left: At the Fall Concert, junior Harper Coulson and senior Chad Allen talk while waiting for their performance. “In the downtime between performances, it’s great to sit down and talk with the guys,” Coulson said. “Between performances and during commutes I’ve really gotten to know everybody.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

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CHOIR CONNECTION

after

Below right: During the men’s choir Chipotle Tour, senior Andrew Sweeney encourages elementary school students to do choir by showing them that they could participate in other activities along with choir. “I would ask them, ‘Who of you guys does sports?’ and explain that we do that, too,” Sweeney said. “We were just trying to make that personal connection.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

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A BREATH OF FRESH AIR

Above: On a warm day, Chambers singers senior Paige E. Anderson, junior Lois Wetzel and senior Callie McGuire practice outside. “It feels like your senses are more alive when you are outside, because you can feel the sun and the air,” Wetzel said. “It’s cool because the sound is all around you.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

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THE WINTER CONCERT

right: During the Winter Concert, choir director Ken Foley leads the Choraliers at the Village Presbyterian Church. The church offered to host the concert since >the > Farauditorium could not be used due to construction. “I can’t describe how good it makes me feel to help the students to grow,” Foley said. “That’s what keeps me going.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

48 OCTOBER

were able to overcome this problem by switching pieces several times throughout the block period. “When you say you’re going to choir, people say ‘You’re crazy – you want to go sing for an hour and a half?’” Lawrence said. “But it really helps that the majority of the people in choir actually want to be there.” To help ease into the new year, Foley kept many of the old traditions. For example, he still began classes with backrubs and singing the school song. “Mr. Foley is very respectful of old tradition,” Sweeney said. “He didn’t come to make waves and change everything, and people really respect that.” As the year continued however, Foley changed and added aspects to the choir program. He ended the traditional Blue Moon concert, but planned to replace it with a new ‘showcase’ production. Also, the class was sometimes divided in mixed formation, a system that allowed students to sing next to people in different sections. “We all get to jumble together,” Sweeney said. “We’ve never, ever done that before. It’s cool, interesting and I kind of like it.” Although this year brought many changes and challenges to the choirs, the spirit and passion of the students and the teacher remained the same. “[Foley] is more patient and relaxed, but he’s still passionate about music,” Bittiker said. “There are moments when you’re rehearsing and you hear all the sounds come together. You just can’t explain the feeling to anyone who’s not been there.” Story by Chandra Swanson. DESIGN BY GABY THOMPSON.

Fo r m e r c h o i r teacher Tra c y R e s seguie’s strict teaching style helped Johnson connect with him. “He was really tough,” Johnson said. “He was a football player at heart. I respected his style because he had so much energy and passion. Mr. Resseguie really wanted everyone to be the best they could in everything they did.”

Foley expected students to “police themselves” in both singing and discipline, and did not yell. “He teaches us to be self-motivated because in real life, no one’s going to make you do anything – you have to put it on yourself,” Johnson said. “During class, he has you figure the notes out yourself and listen to everyone else around you.”

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hattering voices hummed through the choir room as the students prepared for their first class with a new director. They greeted one another, telling summer stories and wondering about the new class. “My group of friends were kind of anxious to see who this guy was, what he was about,” senior Andrew Sweeney said. “Very few people knew [choir director Ken Foley] and so [the atmosphere] was nervous, but not in a negative way – more of an expectant way.” After former choir director Tracy Resseguie announced his departure, many students were worried about the new teacher and block-scheduling. “The first day when Resseguie said he was leaving, I wasn’t sure if I would continue choir,” junior Emily Bittiker said. “But I decided to wait until I was not as emotional.” When the new school year started, Bittiker and her fellow classmates were glad they continued choir. “Mr. Foley is really conscientious to not be ‘that mean teacher,’” junior Kiley Lawrence said. “He really tries to be kind so we’ll respect him and be good because of that.” Bringing his teaching style from Pembroke Hill, Foley introduced new warm-ups for the choirs by incorporating hummed scales and sight-reading. “At the beginning of class, the atmosphere is really fun and pretty relaxed,” Bittiker said. “Everyone has a bunch of friends. When we start singing, people start focusing in more.” Keeping focused for one and a half hours challenged the choirs, but they


SEE ALSO

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JAKE PARELMAN 11 “I am in Mr. Foley’s outside choir called the Y Chromotones. It’s a group of around 12 or 14 boys from schools around KC. Everyone in the choir is extraordinarily talented.”

Y CHROMOTONE MEMBER CHOIR 49


voices from the

discuss cheerleaders’ roles on the court SIDELINES >> Students and the effects their cheers have on the stands.

“It’s nice to have [the cheerleaders]. I think it would be kind of boring without them. They get everyone excited and everyone goes crazy and jumps around a lot during the cheers.”

“I really like it when the [cheerleaders] cheer because I think it’s fun and gets people excited. The banana cheer gets the crowd more involved because they are actually doing something.”

Spencer Andreson 9

Mary Joyce 10

LET’S GO KRAWITZ, LET’S GO!

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Above: During the winter pep assembly, principal Karl Krawitz eats as many bananas as he can while senior Megan Alley and other cheerleaders stand by to peel them. Krawitz ate six bananas in two minutes to excite the watching crowd. “I think everyone got really excited and was cheering and going crazy [while he ate] ,” Alley said. “When Dr. Krawitz got up after and starting talking, it was really fun and everyone was excited.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

HELPING WITH RIBBONS

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Above right: Sophomore Kristen Fischer sits with one of the young cheerleaders during the SME cheer clinic. The SME cheerleaders always held several cheer clinics throughout the year for girls in both elementary and middle school. “The little girls sometimes get really attached and you just kind of get to know them really well,” Fischer said. “Some of the older girls want to pursue cheerleading [in high school], so it kind of helps them get a little head – start to know some of the cheers.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

THAT 70’S FLOAT

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Below right: Laughing, senior Jenny Howard stands with fellow varsity cheerleaders as the school joins in Prairie Village to hear the winners of the float competitions. Cheerleaders dressed up for the ‘70s era with tie-died shirts, colored tights and beaded jewelry. “I liked our really bright and flashy shirts,” Howard said. “Hippie seemed to be really in style this year, so it was fun to do.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

50 OCTOBER

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PERFORMER

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JENNIFER GRAY 10 “I love performing for people. In 8th grade we did ‘High School Musical,’ and I was the nerd [Martha Cox] who ends up liking hip-hop. I am going to be singing forever, just because I love it.”

“I think it helps “The banana cheer to have cheeris getting really leaders because annoying because we wouldn’t they [cheerleadcheer otherwise. ers] do it way too But I think they are kind of much. I’ve gotten elbowed in obnoxious at times during bas- the face doing the banana cheer ketball games because they are and a bloody lip. But it kind of just kind of in the way.” pumped me up a little bit.”

Maggie Townsend 11

David Degoler 12


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DESIGN BY ALEXANDRIA NORTON.

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EMI LY F RYE

bananas CHEERLEADERS

CHEERLEADERS START THE YEAR WITH STRONG SCHOOL SPIRIT DUE TO A WIDE VARIETY OF INTERACTIVE CHEERS.

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he first pep assembly was coming to a h if t close. As pep exec serf he niors Brian Simpson and Allie Marquis closed with a statement about the upcoming fall sports season, the varsity cheerleaders flooded into the center of the gym. “Hey everyone!” yelled a cheerleader. “This year, thanks to Dr. Krawitz, we’re bringing back the banana cheer!” Hoisting a bright yellow, inflatable banana in the air, the varsity cheerleaders broke into the banana cheer. Catching on, the students throughout the gym jumped to their feet to join in. The cheerleaders decided to bring back several previously-banned cheers. “Last year, the cheer was banned by the principal because [former principal Susan Swift] thought it was dangerous,” senior Megan Alley said. “Krawitz was fine with that though, so we’ve being bringing out the banana more and making it bigger.” The cheerleaders first started thinking about reviving some of the older, traditional cheers at their annual cheer camp at Emporia State University. There, the varsity, junior varsity and sophomore squads bonded as a team, and learned new techniques for stunts, crowd involvement and most importantly, the cheers. “We wake up at 7:00 in the morning and don’t stop screaming until 11:00 at night and we all lose our voices,” Alley said. The banana cheer had been a tradition at East for as long as anyone could remember. The newer versions heard at soccer games and pep assemblies were extensions of the original. One, the ‘Form the Mullet’ cheer, was based on senior soccer player Justin Krivena’s mullet. “There are a whole bunch of verses that we never do, but then Justin got a mullet and we decided we had to bring it back,” Alley said. “[The crowd] got really excited and into it.” After a year-long break from the banana cheer, the student body welcomed the cheer wholeheartedly. “Sometimes the crowd starts it,” sophomore Abigail Leek said. “We get really excited when the crowd gets really A THRILLING PERFORMANCE excited. It’s just so much fun.” Above: At the Halloween pep assembly, cheerleaders and drill team members Story by Chandra Swandance to Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ song. Senior Kristin Barker and her fellow varsity teammates painted cat faces on each other for the holiday. “Drill team asked son. a ye

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us to do [the thriller dance] because they thought it would be fun for Halloween,” Barker said. “Let’s just say it was different. But I think the crowd liked it. It was just something fun for the holidays.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

CHEERLEADING 51


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O TOGRAPH FAST EXPLOSIONS, LIKE A PAINTBALL HITTING AN EGG. • SOPHOMORE ISABELLE HUYETT RAN THREE TIMES A W PROMISING TO HELP

1 JOHN ROWLEY 12 >> Conservative Republican

Sitting on the ramp during her Art Foundations class with Mr. Filbeck, freshman Sarah King draws her shoes in her sketchbook, planning to paint them in a square on the ramp wall. King’s mom was an artist, so she was raised to love and appreciate art. “I’ve always been into it,” King said. “I like drawing things that make people think – stuff that is going on in the world and the environment, and how people treat each other. I want to draw things that people can look at and get something from looking at it.” Photo by Rachel English.

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“My aunt is a speech writer for Senator [Richard J.] Durbin. I stay pretty current on political events. My dad will have the news on, and we’ll hear something about Obama and rant and rave. I always end up in debates – it doesn’t matter if it’s teachers or students. My dad and I are Republicans, everyone else is really democratic.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 54-55 ads 2 HANNAH WALTER 10 >> yearbook manager “I feel special being a part of the yearbook. It’s a lot of work helping out with all of the ads, but it’s really cool seeing the ending product, and remembering all of the work that it took. Next year I’d really like to try something with more design technique.”

SHOW YOUR GUNS

Above: Warming up for the next game, sophomores Peter Frazell and Sam Amrein, and freshman Jack Sayler show off to intimidate the other team during the SHARE Dodgeball Tournament. Sayler was the only freshman on a team of about 8 sophomore boys. “Everyone dressed up before the game,” Sayler said. “We all wore short soccer shorts and cut-off shirts to show our guns off.” Photo by Rachel English.

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SEE ALSO: PAGES 56-57

3 KRISTIN BARKER 12 >> MORP attendant “The best part of MORP was probably dressing up with all of my friends at my house and eating pizza before the dance. I wore black tights with pink fish nets over them, a snake-skin dress and a green and pink vest with a fur collar. It was all stuff from my house, and some was my sister’s old MORP clothes. The dance itself was really fun and they played really good music.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 58-59

4 HANNAH GERWICK 11 >> SME lunch-eater

SEE ALSO: PAGES 60-61

5 KENNEDY GRIMES 9 >> SME basketball player “Our freshman team did well this year. The team gets along really well. We are all pretty close friends, which helps us play well together. Basketball is my favorite sport because it’s fun to play, and I like the workout.”

SO HAPPY TOGETHER

Above: While waiting in line for their burritoss during the mens’ choir Chipotle tour, juniors Jake Parelman, Kaevan Tavakolinia, Beck Johnson and Cody Rutledge break out into song, singing songs like ‘Silhouette’ by Thrice and ‘Happy Together’ by The Turtles. On the tour, the choir went to all of the middle schools and elementary schools that feed into SME. “The best part of the tour was just seeing the reactions from the little kids and how happy they were that we were there,” Parelman said. Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

>>

“I like that [lunch] is kind of a break from classwork and that you can spend time with your friends and talk. You don’t get many chances to do that while you’re in class. I look forward to going out to lunch [next year] because the cafeteria is so crowded. It will be nice to have a chance to go home and relax a little.”

SEE ALSO: PAGES 62-63

6 TUCKER NELSON 12 >> DECA member

SEE ALSO: PAGES 64-65

ROCK THE VOTE

Above: Working for the mock presidential election in the library, freshman Trenton Barnes tears up a ballot. Barnes was assigned to work for the election because he was in Legal Studies. The students who helped out were instructed to tear up the ballots after recording the votes. “I did it so they couldn’t be counted again,” Barnes said. “It could make the outcome of the election wrong.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

“[On the DECA trip,] I really enjoyed the ‘Mike and Juliet’ show. It is a TV talk show similar to ‘Regis and Kelly.’ While we were there, they were interviewing a psychic that claimed they could talk to the dead. I thought it was really cool to see how a TV show is made, and to see what goes on during the filming.”

ED

BOTH TECHNICAL AND ARTISTIC ASPECTS, AND ALLOWED HIM TO CAPTURE THE EXACT MOMENT HE WANTED. HE LIKED TO P H

NOVEMBER

SENIOR MATT LAVOIE TOOK HIS CAMERA WITH HIM EVERYWHERE. HE LIKED HIGH SPEED PHOTOGRAPHY, WHICH COMBI N

52 NOVEMBER


1

2

3

4

5

6

WEEK TO SPEND TIME OUTSIDE AND STAY HEALTHY. HER FAVORITE SONG TO LISTEN TO WHILE RUNNING WAS ‘HOT AND COLD,’ BY KATIE P

IOR DANIEL THOMPSON WAS A LIFE SCOUT. HIS FAVORITE ACTIVITY WAS BACKPACKING THROUGH NEW MEXICO WITH OTHER SCOUTS. NOVEMBER DIVISION 53


RS WATCHING THE ELECTION ALL NIGHT. SHE AND HER DAD DID A LITTLE DANCE WHEN OBAMA WON. • JORDAN EIMER 9 WAS MORE OF A REPUBLICAN THAN A DEMOCRAT, ALTHOUGH HIS

DESIGN BY ANDREA TUDHOPE.

CHANGE

has come for america

WAITING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

>>

Above: Serving at a local democratic bureau, junior Ben Jensen waits for his next call to come through. After going there three or four times, Jensen had accumulated 12 total volunteer hours. “My picture was on the obama.com blog because of working at the offices.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

WORKING FOR THE COUNTRY

>>

Above: Volunteering at Colonial Church for the 2008 presidential election, senior David Hobart creates a voter card using the encoder machine. During his full day, Hobart’s mom thankfully brought him a Goodcents sandwhich. “It got old because I was there all day, but it was fun getting to be a part of the election,” Hobart said. “The experience was cool seeing it first hand. Plus I got paid and got a T-shirt.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

DEMOCRACY POSSE Below: Typing at her encoder machine, senior Jane Mahoney works the polls at the Brighton Gardens retirement center. Mahoney had to be there from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. “Since I’d never voted before, it was really interesting to see how everything worked,” Mahoney said. “It was really busy in the morning, but overall, everything went smoothly.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

AFTER THE MANY MONTHS OF CAMPAIGNING, STUDENTS, REPUBLICAN, DEMOCRATIC OR UNDECIDED, COME TOGETHER TO WELCOME THE NEW PRESIDENT.

J

unior Jessie Jacob typed possible Democratic voters into a campaigning computer the day of the 2008 presidential election. She let her fingers take a break as she stared out the window, covered with Obama signs and red, white and blue posters. She may have been one of the youngest working at the Kansas City, Missouri campaign office, but she wasn’t alone in wanting to contribute to the election. Across town, junior Holly Lafferty worked fast at handing out encoded voter cards to keep up with the line forming out to the parking lot at Mission Methodist Church. “We had some interesting people,” Lafferty said. “Some came through and said, ‘Who should I vote for?’ They just didn’t understand, I guess.” Many Shawnee Mission East students helped in the 2008 presidential election, either by voting for the first time, campaigning for a presidential candidate or working at election polls. Another student that made a point to get involved was junior Anna Webber. She found that working the election polls was a good experience for her since she was too young to vote. “I wanted to be able to vote but was too young,” Webber said. “[Working at the polls] was my way of being a part of it.” Besides working at the polls, students such as junior Jessie Jacob worked at campaigning of-

Republican and Democratic students justify their choice candidates and explain why the candidates earned their support.

fices. Since Missouri was a swing state and voting was close, Jacob campaigned for her favorite candidate in Kansas City, Missouri. “I campaigned for Obama at the KCMO headquarters,” Jacob said. “I put signs on sticks and entered data on the computer.” While there, Jacob saw the excitement and energy people had for the campaign. “The office was really enthusiastic,” Jacob said. “There was this big drill sergeant guy who, every hour, would say, ‘ARE YOU READY?’ and we’d say, ‘All fired up and ready!’” Since the 2008 election was a very tight race and much of the election focused on young voters, newly turned 18 seniors such as Jane Mahoney took advantage of their age and got involved. “I voted early at the place where you get your license so I could work at the election office at Brighton Gardens,” Mahoney said. Other students like senior Carly Haflich missed the election date by days. Haflich’s birthday was 11 days after the election. Often times, students who couldn’t vote felt that contributing to the election was the least they could do. “Even though I couldn’t vote, if I could get one person to vote it would make up for mine,” Jacob said. Story by Syndney Henley.

“Do not yield. Do not flinch. Stand up. Stand up with our President and fight. We’re Americans. We’re Americans, and we’ll never surrender. They will.”

John McCain

2004 Republican National Convention, August 30, 2004

“I think his message was a message of patriotism. Because we’re Americans and we stand for certain values, we need to support what our country supports. That is something he stands for – for core American values and sticking up for what you believe in. America becomes an impossible enemy to defeat because we stick behind our values. McCain believes what he believes not just because it’s a Republican platform, but because he truly believes it.

Adele Daniel 11

Moderate Republican

’T A

SIDING WITH YOUR

CANDIDATE

>>

BIG FAN OF MCCAIN. SHE WENT WITH SIX OTHER FRIENDS TO JUNIOR TIM SHEDOR’S HOUSE • AMANDA PRIVATERA 11 WAS A DEMOCRAT. SHE ATE SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS AND SAT WITH HER PARENTS AND HER YOUNGER SIS

TE

NEIGHBORHOOD, CHEERING, RINGING DOORBELLS AND HIGH-FIVING THE PEOPLE WHO ANSWERED THEIR DOORS. • ANNA SWANSON 11 CONSIDERED HERSELF A REPUBLICAN, BUT WASN

54 NOVEMBER


S PARENTS WERE FOR OBAMA, EIMER HAD NO PREFERENCE. HE WATCHED THE ELECTION WITH HIS MOM AND COUSIN. • JACK ESBERG 10 WAS UNDECIDED AND HAD NO POLITICAL AFFILIATION. HE WATCH

EVERY SECOND COUNTS

>>

On the night of the election, juniors Jessie Jacobs, Ben Jensen, Joe Newman and Lauren Epstein do some last-minute campaigning, showing their support for Obama at the Country Club Plaza two hours before the polls closed. “We got a lot of positive feedback,” Epstein said. “We had a notion that Obama would win.” Photo by Anna Petrow. Below: Obama signs can be found all around the city in many different places. Photos by Lauren Bleakley and Emily Brandmeyer.

SEE ALSO

>>

>>

“If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time; who still questions the power of our Democracy, tonight is your answer.”

Barack Obama

Election Night, November 4, 2008

“Obama is correct in saying that this is a historic election where the people truly chose the victor. I don’t think anyone could’ve imagined this election 20 years ago. He references a really amazing campaign that he ran that mobilized hundreds of thousands of people that hadn’t voted before.”

Jordan Holsinger 12

“On the subject of Osama bin Laden, he is responsible for the deaths of thousands of innocent Americans. He is now orchestrating utter attacks on the United States of America. We will do whatever is necessary. We will track him down. We will capture him. We will bring him to justice, and I will follow him to the gates of hell.”

John McCain

GOP Presidential Candidates Debate, May 3, 2007

“I think that the personal feeling overcame the ability to effectively coordinate a response. Emotion overpowered reason and hindered realistic response. Immediate action is justified, but I think he took it personally, which clouded the feasibility of the goals.”

Thomas Duncan 12

Moderate Republican

JOHN ROWLEY 12 “When I’m making something everything has to be really symmetrical. It’s been that way ever since I was little. I’m kind of OCD. I always have to have my shoelaces tied the same way.”

SYMMETRICALLY OBSESSED “Look, when I was a kid, I inhaled frequently. That was the point.”

Barack Obama

Talkshow Interview, 2008

“He was trying to show that he is just a normal person, and that he’s not perfect. I think part of his point was that there are a lot more serious things for the government to deal with than people smoking weed, like the environment and economy.”

Duncan McHenry 11 Democrat

Yellow-Dog Democrat

MRE AGBAS 12 WAS A DEMOCRAT. HE WENT TO AN ELECTION PARTY AT SENIOR ALI ELLERBECK’S HOUSE WITH ABOUT 10 FRIENDS. WHEN OBAMA WON, AGBAS AND HIS FRIENDS RAN THE STREETS IN TH

2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 55


adding the personal touch

“I wanted to spread some holiday cheer. Everyone wanted to put ornaments on it, and it brought us all together.”

Journalism Room residents describe how they personalize their ‘living space.’

“I make posters because everyone enjoys a chuckle when they walk into the room. I don’t think any other classroom makes fun of kids for the heck of it.”

Paige Cornwell 12

Taylor Haviland 11

BEHIND THE SCENES

>>

Shooting a photoshoot for the ‘Most Likely to Be Mac and PC’ sidebar in the senior portraits section, senior Meghan Benson takes the photo of the winners seniors Chris Poplawski and Stephen Nichols. In preparation for the photoshoot, Benson set up the lights, the umbrellas and the white sheet for the background. “I love the photoshoots,” Benson said. “They prepare me for what I want to do as an adult. I like taking professional portraits.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

the st. louis trip

Members of Hauberk and Harbinger staffs attended workshops in St. Louis and explored the city. THE GANG’S ALL HERE

>>

Left: Standing on a balcony at the Busch Stadium, journalism staffers take in a view of the city. Journalism trips served as a way to develop writing, designing and photography skills while providing an opportunity for both staffs to bond. “When I went to St. Louis, it was a group of people that I didn’t know very well, but that I knew I wanted to call my best friends by the end of the trip,” junior Tim Shedor said. Photo by Rachel English.

A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

Anheuser-Busch Brewery, senior Lucy Faerber takes photographs of the >exterior > Right:ofAtthethefactory. The students were given a tour of the factory, where they saw its giant fermenting tanks and famed Clydesdales. Photographers took their cameras along, and enjoyed capturing the city in pictures. “It was fun taking pictures of the arch,” Faerber said. “We got to see it from different views.” Photo by Rachel English.

BIRD’S EYE VIEW

an elevator at the Gateway Arch, senior >Bernadette > Right: In Myers looks at the interior of the arch. Two elevator systems consisting of eight egg-shaped compartments allowed visitors to travel to the viewing area at the top of the structure. “The elevator went slow and was kind of uncomfortable,” Myers said. “But it was really pretty to see the city from above, and appreciate it as a whole.”. Photo by Rachel English.

56 NOVEMBER


Anna Petrow 11

“Journalists are really motivated by food. We’re always prepared to eat. It’s like a mini kitchen in the back room when we have food.”

Chandra Swanson 11

SEE ALSO

“It was among the treasures found at the SHARE garage sale. What better way to spice up the journalism room than a flying pig?”

>>

HANNAH WALTER 10 “I’ve been on the ripcord at World’s of Fun three times. It’s really exciting and gets me scared, which is fun. The first time I was really scared to go on it, but I like it because it felt like I was flying.”

RIPCORD RIDER

DEDICATING TIME AND TALENT TO THEIR PUBLICATIONS, NEWSPAPER AND YEARBOOK STAFFERS WORK HARD IN

SINGLE FILE FOR FOOD

>>

Far above: At a newspaper deadline night, hungry staffers line up for dinner. “They’re pretty good meals,” freshman Evan Nichols said. “My favorite was Oklahoma Joe’s. It’s a little weird eating in the journalism room though.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

GIVING THEIR BEST SHOT

>>

Above: During a February pep assembly, photographers are ready to get the perfect Drill Team shot. “Taking pictures at pep assemblies has a lot of perks, because we get to sit front row,” senior Sam Bolanovich said. “It puts you closer to the action.” Photo by Rachel English.

SALTY SURPRISE

Left: Around Christmas time, yearbook staff members dig in to a can of popcorn, a surprise gift from DeCloud Studios, who provided the student portraits. “It was really crazy, everyone was pushing in to get popcorn,” junior John Francis said. “It was really kind of them to give it to us.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

DESIGN BY GABY THOMPSON.

estimated 500 page Hauberk was produced, requiring more than 1.5 hours of work everyother-day. Because of the constant flow of journalists running through the J-Room, it became personalized to the staffs and their work. “I think there was a mechanical dog in there for a few weeks,” Orth said. “Who knows why. I’m sure it has some interesting story.” Stuck in a hodge-podge room with 20-40 people sharing the common goal of putting out a great publication brought staff members together. “I don’t exactly invite the whole staff over on Fridays,” Nichols said. “But I say ‘hi’ to them in the hallways and at games and outside of school.” For some, the forced closeness of staff turned into real friendships. “One late night someone will be talking about a movie then that Friday we’d decide to go see it together,” Orth said. “There’s something to be said for having even just the one thing of being on staff in common to form friendships.” But with mounting stress due to deadlines the staff encountered problems. “Communication is probably the biggest problem,” Orth said. “Getting everyone on the same track for a design, story, and pictures to make a cohesive spread and a cohesive book as a whole.” But in the end the staffs pulled through each deadline to get their work completed to their best ability. “There were a lot of technical problems and some normal stress-induced issues,” Nichols said. “But it’s nothing that really held us up.” The student-journalists jumped into reallife-like positions to put out more multi-award winning publications. After all of the stress, deadlines, late nights, speeches from editors and extra hours in the J-Room, the journalists of the Hauberk and Harbinger worked towards the ultimate goal and reward, Distribution Day. “Distribution Day is what it’s all for,” Orth said. “When your peers crack open their books, [they] think it’s so cool and look for their pictures, but staff members can also look for the things they did to create the [publication]. It’s just incredibly fulfilling.” Story by Emily Collins.

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P

hotographs of spread designers – turned rappers covered the white board around the joking messages written to friends in separate hours. An editor rearranged the mound of backpacks on the deep blue couch to find a place to sit with her Macbook. Buttered popcorn crushed under a photographer’s feet. A writer looked through another pile for the jacket she left in the room the month before. With all of the extra time spent in the journalism room, Hauberk and Harbinger staff members found themselves creating a second home in the cluttered and crowded rooms along with their pseudo-families – their staff to create award winning publications. “There were really talented staffs this year,” senior Harbinger editor-in-chief Stephen Nichols said. “When people can bounce ideas off of each other it only improves the overall work.” But for multitaskers like sophomore Katie East, Harbinger photographer and a Hauberk writer and ads manager, ‘the J-Room’ was a push-pull. “I try to balance all of my jobs but it gets hard,” East said. “Sometimes I end up working on yearbook during newspaper class and viceversa.” The journalists got into routines to get the most out of the time and space available to them. “I have a favorite computer,” senior Hauberk student life section editor Maureen Orth said. “The second one from the end on the right. So that’s the one I work on at every late night.” Along with professionalism and stress of creating the publications, there was an apparent comedic and social relief to the pressure. “Music is huge for our staff,” Nichols said. “We won an iTunes gift card in Dallas so everyone got to pick a song. There’s a lot of variety.” For both staffs, food was an obvious must. “The refrigerator is definitely a staple,” Orth said. “There’s always someone snacking in the room.” Getting comfortable was important for the staff members who spent large amounts of time in the J-Room during lunch, seminar and before and after school. “I try to be there as much as I can,” Orth said. “I always make it to the late-nights every other Wednesday night.” A total of 16 issues of the Harbinger and an

JOURNALISM 57


>>

EVEN-NUMBER LOVER

SEE ALSO

KRISTIN BARKER 12 “When I eat, I always have to eat an even amount. So if I have one cookie, I have to break it into even amounts. If I have a piece of pizza, I have to eat even bites of it. People always make fun of me for it.”

STUCO members decorate with toilet paper before morp TO DRESS UP THE GYM FOR AN egyptian theme.

I

DARE TO DANCE

Jennifer >Latshaw > Right: Senior dances with friends at the MORP dance. One of her favorite songs to dance to was Sir Mix-A-Lot’s ‘Baby Got Back.’ “When the ‘butt’ song came on, everyone who was around got really into dancing,” Latshaw said. “It was only like halfway through the dance so we were just getting warmed up.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

58 NOVEMBER

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Above: While throwing toilet paper, junior Amanda Privitera played ‘kickball’ during MORP set-up. “[Senior] Tommy Gray and I danced with the special needs kids,” Privetera said. “That was fun. They were really fun to dance with.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

POOFY PERFECTION

Above: At MORP, sophomore Kirsten Clark dances with her friends. Her poofy dress proved difficult to dance in, but Clark had fun at the dance anyway. “Everybody really liked to play with my dress,” Clark said. “I really liked the song ‘Shout!’ because everybody was jumping around, even the boys.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

>>

egyptian BY WH ITAKER SHERK.

DANCELIKE AN

DESIGN

KICKBALL

TOILET PAPER TIFF

Below: Freshman Tom Lynch hangs toilet paper from crevices in the bleachers before MORP. “When we found more toilet paper, everyone just went for it, and everyone was just fighting over all of the toilet paper,” Lynch said. “Whenever someone tried to throw theirs and it would come down, people would try to steal it.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

>>

t was 8:30 pm when sophomore Gail Stonebarger finally finished spraying the perfect amount of hairspray in her poofed hair. When she walked into the gym at 8:45 pm the night of MORP with her friends, she wasn’t very impressed. “I got there late so I didn’t get to see most of the decorations,” Stonebarger said. “Once I got there it did look a little trashed, though. Most of the toilet paper was on the gym floor.” Although some students didn’t understand the point of having toilet paper strung around the bleachers and bunched up on the ground under their dancing feet, STUCO members felt it was worth the mess. “We had to vote between glitter and mummy [for the theme],” junior Ben Jensen said. “We thought TP’ing was more fun than throwing glitter everywhere.” After students danced on the toilet paper and water spilled from the water cooler onto the ground, the gym was a mess. But before everyone else got to the dance, STUCO members worked at perfecting the look. “After school we went to set up for the dance,” Jensen said. “We went through about 40 rolls. We were about to run out, so some people went to the STUCO room and grabbed a whole drawer of streamers.” Jensen felt it was the most fun set-up he’d ever been to, and other members agreed. “The set up was really fun,” junior Amanda Privitera said. “For a while there was a kickball game going on. We also wrapped each other up in toilet paper.” After hours of preparation, the gym was completely TP’ed. Toilet paper hung from the bleachers, and black, green, red and yellow streamers connected the basketball nets. “At first I was skeptical about how it would turn out and thought it would be hard to clean up,” Jensen said. “But it ended up looking cool because all the streamers and the toilet paper connected to each other. I ended up really liking the theme.” During the dance, toilet paper gradually fell on the ground and random pieces were thrown around. Wet toilet paper was jumbled up in piles on one side of the gym, and streamers fell to the ground from the once-snug place on the basketball rim. While everyone else headed out to the cold of the parking lot, STUCO members including Privitera cleaned wet toilet paper off the ground with the big janitor broom. Although the mess was a lot to clean up for STUCO members, the dance itself was a great success. “My favorite part about MORP was the costumes,” Stonebarger said. “I loved the ones that were outrageously sparkly from when kids were little and wore them for dance recitals. Overall, this MORP was a lot more fun and crazy than last year.” Story by Syndey Henley.


DANCING DELIGHT

>>

Wearing a shirt from Pete n’ Repeat, sophomore Lauren Newell dances with sophomore Abigail Leek. Newell met with more friends before the dance to get ready. “It was more fun this year [than last year] because I really danced,” Newell said. “The best part was just dancing with my friends.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

TOILET PAPER MADNESS

>>

Below: Sophomore Chris Melvin sets up for the dance. He liked his MORP outfit better than the outfit he wore freshman year. “We were having a ton of fun just screwing around, and we were getting pumped for the night,” Melvin said. “It was all around a good dance.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Freshmen describe the outfits they put together for MORP.

dress me UP

with freshmen Emily Kerr and Elliot Faerber JERSEY

BLOUSE

“My jersey showed my accomplishments in little league basketball.”

“My grandmother brought the blouse back from Hawaii.”

VEST

JACKET

SKIRT “This summer our theme for swim championships was ‘80s workout,’ so I bought that.”

SANDALS “I borrowed them because I needed fabulous shoes to wear.”

Emily Kerr 9

Photos by Rachel English .

“This was my third grade scout vest. It was extremely tight.”

“My hoodie had a lot of characters on it so it showed multiple personalities, and that is cool.”

PANTS “My pants were really vivacious. They completed the outfit.”

Elliot Faerber 9 MORP 59


Photos by Eliza McCormick.

NEW FAVORITES The cafeteria

SKIIER

>>

“[My family and I] go skiing a lot in Aspen, at least once every year. I like doing mogles and blacks. Double blacks are hard, but it’s fun when you get through them; you feel good you actually did it.”

offers a number of new food options.

SEE ALSO

HANNAH GERWICK 11

CHICKEN SALAD $1.75 per salad

HAM WRAP $1.75 per package

CHICKEN PANINI $2.00 per sandwhich

BASKING IN THE SUNLIGHT

>>

Below: Junior Brice Roberts, junior Annie Haines and senior Emmett Starkey sit outside during lunch. Starkey made a point to sit outside as often as possible during the school year. “It’s nice to get outside and not be in SME for a while,” Starkey said. “I hate being inside in the winter, so I sit outside as often as the weather permits. It’s sunshiny and wonderful. I would do school outside if I could. It’s just so much better outside.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

Mr. Nickels’ room - 310 “On even [block] days I eat in Mr. [John] Nickels’s room. I can use his computer, and it’s not like the library where you can’t eat.”

Tricia Townsend 12 .

60 NOVEMBER

A FINAL CHAT

HEN HOUSE LUNCHES

Above: Seniors Lyndsey Seck and Kelsey Henry sit in the Hen House dining area during open lunch, eating salads and fruit. They often ate at Hen House like many other students from East. “You can get a salad for really cheap and choose everything that’s on it,” Henry said. “It’s really close which is good, because all the construction makes it take a long time to get back into the school. Plus it’s like the healthiest place to go because of all the choices.” Photo by Rachel English.

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2

Left: While sitting outside during lunch, senior Savannah Duby draws in her sketchbook for art class. “If I’m working on my sketch book during lunch, it’s probably because I have a deadline or I just thought of something awesome,” Duby said. “If it’s a really nice day, sitting in the sun is better for being creative.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

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David Riott 12

WORK TIME

>>

1

Band room - 213 “I’m in there for two hours out of seven, and I keep my stuff in there. I don’t have to deal with annoying underclassmen who are throwing food and yelling at each other.”

Seniors find eating spots outside the cafeter i a

eating OUTSIDE the box >>

Left: Freshman Kyra Slemp talks to friends while waiting to go back to class. “[My friends and I] usually just talk after lunch when we wait for the bell to ring,” Slemp said. “I like it because it gives us more time to hang out before we go back to class. It’s a fun part of the day.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.


MEALTIME MADNESS DESIGN BY ALEXANDRIA NORTON.

EATING PATTERNS DEVELOP DURING CAFETERIA MEALS AND OPEN LUNCHES.

SENIOR DINING DECISIONS “I love being able to leave. Even going to my house is just a break in the day. It makes the day seem shorter and more enjoyable. Sometimes I can catch up on a TV show, or if I forget something at home it’s great because I can go and get it. I usually go to someone’s house, where [I] can kind of eat for [my] own taste and have the comfort of the people who are with [me]. [Open lunch] is something you look forward to all four years. It’s a great senior privilege.”

“I think open lunch is awesome. Food in the cafeteria sucks; therefore, anything outside the school, including roadkill, is awesome. That’s number one most important. The number two most important reason: the time limit is a good excuse for speeding. [Open lunch] is cool because it’s different in the way that back in the Czech Republic for example, you would have to walk in the miserable cold to eat. But here, because we all drive, it’s much more pleasant.”

Jordan Holsinger 12

Sarah Pavlu 12

Michael Magstadt 12

UNDERCLASSMAN FEEDING FRENZY

>>

“The cafeteria is way too noisy and way too crowded – you can barely move through there. Plus the school food is not very good and way too expensive. I think all the drinks are overpriced. If you want anything besides milk, like a bottle of juice, it’s like one dollar and fifty cents, or more. I wish the quality of the food was better. The pasta a lot of the time is pretty soggy. And all the lunch tables are covered in food or spilled drinks or whatever.”

Danielle Norton 9

Jonathan Dawson 10

Rachel Kaskie 11

CHICKEN AND FRIES

“When I go out, I generally end up at Goodcents because it’s just easy to get to and you can get a lot of food for a cheap price. I just get one of the foot-long sub [sandwiches], and I usually go with [senior] Emmett Starkey.”

Jacob Hamilton 12

PROPEL

“I usually buy Propel like once a week. I’ve always liked it, so I was happy they had it at East. A lot of people buy it. I bet [the coffee shop workers] realized a lot of people liked it at lunch, so they sell it there now too.”

Emma Pennington 9

COOKIES

Photos by Eliza McCormick.

Andrew Forbes 11

in the at, ating out to e s. g her e Whet ria or goin h favorite s e cafet nts establi stude

Natalie Hofmeister 12

>>

OP 3 THE T

>>

MR. GOODCENTS

Below: Junior Tara Raghuveer sits with junior friends during lunch. She usually sat in the cafeteria but ventured outside during warm weather. “I like getting to see everyone that I don’t see in my classes,” Raghuveer said. “It gets really loud in the cafeteria, so I really like when we get to sit outside.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

“[Chicken and fries] are definitely more appealing than the others things down [in the cafeteria]. I buy them a couple times a week because it is one of my favorite things outside the cafeteria, too. They are like two bucks.”

Anna Leek 12

“With the issues with the economy, it’s just a lot easier to go to someone’s house for lunch. We don’t have to spend as much time waiting to get our food at a resteraunt. It just makes the process a lot easier.”

LUNCH-TIME DISCUSSIONS

cafeteria favorites

“I go to Panera a lot when I go out to lunch. I usually get the broccoli-cheddar soup. It’s pretty close to East and it’s healthy and good for you. Also, it’s pretty cheap.”

HOME

Above: Sophomore Una Walkenhorst sits in the courtyard with sophomore Tyler Cecil during lunch. “We sit outside whenever it’s nice out,” Walkenhorst said. “It’s nice because it feels like you’re getting away from school, even if it’s just for 45 minutes.” Photo by Alysabeth Albano.

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“It’s nice to talk to friends and that sort of stuff [at lunch], but it’s nothing too special. I do really like the chatter – the noise. It’s a great sense of community and makes the school feel more together. But I really don’t like the smell. It smells too much like a ‘highschool cafeteria,’ like of BO and bad food. So I bring my lunch. My mom makes really good white bread. It’s a really cool process because she makes the dough and it comes out really good.”

PANERA

Above: Sophomore Drew Auer talks with sophomore Jill Anderson while waiting for the lunch passing period to end. “I really like that passing periods are longer this year,” Auer said. “They definitely give you more time to socialize, and you aren’t as stressed out about running to different floors.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

A LUNCH DATE

“I wish the cafeteria was a little bigger because it’s so jam-packed when we try to leave. Also, the underclassmen usually sit at the long, rectangle tables so I don’t always get to talk to everyone. But I like that sometimes, if I don’t have enough money, the lunch ladies will cover for me and I can bring money the next day. I love how we can sit outside when it’s warm, and I like how we have those little sun roofs so when it’s snowing we can see the snow.”

out-to-lunch favorites

SAVED BY THE BELL

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“I think [open lunch] is lame. We don’t get any time [to eat]. We get to the place and we have ten minutes to eat and get back to school in time. It’s just stupid. [The district] might as well have not given it to us. It’s encouraging us to be unsafe – have unsafe driving habits. I think they should invest in offering better food options [at school]. It would save a lot of gas [for seniors eating at school], a lot of time and ultimately benefit the school.”

“They are delicious. They are so good and you can just break them into pieces and eat them in little bites. There’s always at least a few people at our lunch table who buy them.”

Sanne Postma 12 LUNCHES 61


DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH.

UNDER PRESSURE

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Above: Shielding the ball from the defender, junior Hannah Satterlee looks to pass to an open teammate. “If we play as a team and want the win more than our opponents then we always pull out a victory,” Satterlee said. “During intense games, our defense usually determines the outcome.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

TIME FOR RELAXATION

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Left: Relaxing after the try-out, junior Maddy Rich laughs at a teammate’s comments. “We know when to be serious during games and practices, but after we can goof off,” Rich said. “It’s rewarding to hang out with my teammates after a hard practice.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

62 NOVEMBER


SEE ALSO

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KENNEDY GRIMES 9 “I take pictures for fun. I take pictures of the environment and nature. It’s usually stuff around my house. I do this when I have free time, and I like it because I can do it by myself.”

PHOTOGRAPHER

THE GIRLS BASKETBALL PLAYERS WORK THROUGHOUT THE SEASON TO CONTINUE THEIR WINNING TREND.

BREAKING THE PRESS

PRE-GAME MOTIVATION

LOCKDOWN DEFENSE

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Far above: Pushing the ball upcourt, junior Haley Dalgleish tries to break the press. “When the game gets really intense, our team has to stay calm and play like ourselves,” Dalgleish said. “We can’t freak out.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

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their places on the team. They worked to make their team successful and move onto higher teams in the years to follow. “Practices are tough because there are so many drills that really get you in shape,” senior Natalie Parsons said, “but we really couldn’t do well without them. They are what make us good enough to even get out on the court.” The games brought more work and pressure. Young players struggled to keep up with the more advanced players but soon found themselves reaching the level of comfort necessary for a team to work together. “Being with those girls is intimidating at first,” sophomore Molly Rappold said. “But soon enough you find yourself being friends with them and finding that comfort zone on the court.” In every aspect the varsity team, along with lower level teams, stepped up to finish a successful season. The hierarchy of classes was dismissed as everyone helped to make a cohesive and winning season. “I’m really proud to call this my senior year,” Parsons said. “It has really been a blast, and while having the fun we’ve had, we’ve also accomplished a lot.” Story by Emily Collins.

OFF COURT

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final shot would bring them ahead, a simple toss into the wide open basket, nothing more than an easy aim and flick of the wrist. Junior Janna Graf had an opportunity to win the game against Olathe Northwest with a shot she had made hundreds of times before. Suddenly those reassuring words were erased from her mind and replaced by ‘impossible,’ ‘difficult,’ and ‘ridiculously hard.’ The sudden pressure eliminated all confidence for an individually league-ranked player. But with one shift of her right foot and a slow bend of her knees, Graf pulled the ball above her head and released. The ball fell through the hoop with grace, adding another win to the season for the Lady Lancers varsity basketball team. The Lady Lancers worked especially hard to pull off a great season. Beginning with try-outs, the competition was heavy. There was only room for the best of the best and those prepared to work toward being the best. “I saw a lot of girls who really know how to play the game not get called back for practices,” Graf said. “It’s sad but it has to happen. I’m just glad there are so many girls interested in playing.” The girls who made the cut worked above the norm to keep

Above: Huddling before a home game, senior Natalie Parsons participates in a team chant. “This year is brand new, so we have to face new challenges,” Parsons said. “We’re more of a team this year and not just individuals.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

Above: Guarding the defender, junior Alison Stephens tries to stop her from getting an open shot. “When it gets intense, I try to stay motivated and use the strengths of my teammates,” Stephens said. “I just have to work hard and believe in myself.” Photo by Rachel English.

Players share unseen events off the basketball court.

RUNNING THE PLAY

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Far left: Looking to swing the ball in a half-court set, senior Libby Jandl tries to continue running the play. “This year we have really good teamwork because we get along well on and off the court,” Jandl said. “We’re also balanced because someone new steps up every game.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

CONCENTRATION

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Left: Shooting during try-outs, sophomore Breana Gray practices her free throws. “I basically have to block everything out,” Gray said. “During practices, if we miss both, or even one, we have to run downand-backs.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

the

Janna Graf 11

>>

Photo by Kit Andresen.

“Sometimes in the locker room before a game, we all do a ‘chain squeeze,’ where we all hold each other’s hands and squeeze each other. It’s pretty relaxing for some reason and takes our thoughts off things.”

>> “Our basketball team went to a store in the vilLauren Dodd 11

Photo by Lucy Faerber.

lage and we put on a fashion show to raise money. It was fun to dress up with the whole team because each of us got to choose our own dress. It was cool to hang out as a team that day. Our team does a lot of team bonding stuff, so this wasn’t that huge of an event.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL 63


.11/20/09 SING YOUR HEART OUT

Participated in the Mike and Juliet Morning Show taping. Sat in the audience at the 106th and Park (BET) taping. Worked at a DECA workshop. Visited Madame Tussaud’s wax museum. Saw the Rockettes Christmas Spectacular show.

. 11/19/08

“We looked around at the wax guys [in Madame Tussauds.] I got to hug F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wax figure. Later, we went to NBC to see all the sets, like the SNL set. They showed us a movie about the history of CNN and somebody got to do a fake news cast. Somebody said they saw Alec Baldwin get into a cab. Everyone was really tired [at the Rockettes] from not getting sleep so everyone else passed out but me. BET was an experience. I sat next to the loudest girl and you could even hear her shrieking on the broadcast. When the camera was on me I would wink and smile and frown.”

David Hobart 12

I WANT TO BE A PART OF IT Arrived at LaGuardia Airport in New York. Checked into the Pennsylvania Hotel in New York. Visited Times Square at night. Grabbed a late-night hotdog.

“[The 30 Rock crew was] standing right in front of one of the entrances to the Rock Center and there was one of those town car limousines. We didn’t see any of the actual people but we saw people getting in and out of the limo. There were so many lights and everyone was yelling and trying to see. You weren’t supposed to walk through, but we snuck through the filming and lights. I couldn’t tell what the director looked like but he seemed kind of frustrated because there were so many people around and everyone wanted to see. It seemed really hectic to film in a place that public.” Abby Weltner 12

• WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009 STUDENTS ARRIVE IN NEW YORK AND GRAB A MIDNIGHT SNACK • THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2009 STUDENTS TAPE A TV SHOW AND ROCK OUT IN TIME SQUARE • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2009 STUDE

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FUTURE SEWANEE STUDENT

SEE ALSO

TUCKER NELSON 12 “I’m going to University of the South/Sewanee in Tennessee. It’s the size of SME. I wanted to get away from the Johnson County bubble and branch off and do my own thing.”

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NEW YORK DECA SENIORS EXPLORE THE CITY ON THEIR ANNUAL NEW YORK TRIP.

64 NOVEMBER


.11/21/09 swim the seas

“[Friday] was probably one of my favorite days. The Bloomberg Tower was so cool. I’ve never seen a building that was so architecturally amazing. We got all this free food – They have every single kind of food you could ever want on every single floor. The technology they used was incredible. The building, which is U-shaped, has this link and it goes around the entire building from right to left so you can look at the screen and see weather, stocks, anything. My favorite part of Christie’s was when they took us into the private vault. We were inches away from all of these [pieces by Money] and important works by all of these famous painters and artists. Most people can’t ever get that close to that type of art so it was just a really unique experience.”

Toured the Bloomberg Tower. Visited the NBC studio. Met Madame Alexander in a DECA workshop. Entered the vault in Christie’s Auction House. Traveled to the top of the Empire State Building. Saw “The Little Mermaid.”

Kristin Barker 12

WISH ME LUCK

Rode through the Financial District on an NYC bus tour. Met Lady Liberty. Visited Ground Zero and saw the site of the 9/11 attacks. Traveled to SoHo and Chinatown. Danced the ‘Napkin Dance’ in Little Italy.

11/22/08

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“A few people got to go to the stock market and the New York Stock Exchange but I wasn’t one of them. In the morning we got up and ate a light breakfast. The Statue of Liberty was all the way across the river so we saw it from a distance. The financial district wasn’t that crazy since we were there early in the morning but it was still cool. At Ground Zero they had just started rebuilding the Freedom Tower so it was pretty sad because you think about how seven or eight years ago all of those people died. Chinatown was the craziest. There were people at every corner trying to sell you a watch or DVDs or something. Near the Financial District there was this huge bull that everyone was taking pictures of. I decided to climb up on top of it and goof around. I was the only one who rode it. [In Little Italy] there was this guy there who told us to check him out on iTunes and he was playing the napkin dance. We pretty much just stood on top of our chairs and threw our napkins in the air but it was still pretty funny.”

Justin Krivena 12

ENTS GET ‘AUCTIONED OFF’ AND LEARN HOW TO SPEND THEIR MONEY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2008 STUDENTS START FROM THE BOTTOM AND TRAVEL THE SEAS • SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2009 STUDENTS BOARD THE AIRPLANE HOME •

FLY AWAY HOME

11/23/08

.

Packed their bags. Checked-out of the Pennsylvania Hotel. Said goodbye to New York City.

“We had to get up really early. I packed the morning of so I was kind of rushing around. Everyone had to meet up in the lobby and we took a shuttle bus to JFK. We had to connect flights, so we just ate lunch in the airport. It was funny because every time we were walking with everybody, it was this huge mass of people so whenever we’d see a taxi we would all yell in a New York accent, ‘Hey! We’re walking here!’”

Anne Berry 12

DECA TRIP 65


STUDENT BANDS INCLUDING ‘MR. FISH,’ ‘I AM THE PRIVATE’ AND ‘CIRCUS ABSURD’ PLAY AT A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS IN KC.

CHILLING SUCCESS

Above: Junior Kaevan Tavakolinia rocks out on guitar during a ‘Mr. Fish’ practice. “The best part is when we’re so perfectly in sync we can look at each other and know what’s going to happen next,” Tavakolinia said “There’s a chill that runs down your spine when you know you’re doing it right.” Photo by Rachel English.

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‘Mr. FIsh’

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osters of zombies, fish and unidentifiable creatures were plastered on the stark white walls of the hallways. As students shoved past each other on their ways to class, small papers fell down from the staircase above. Upperclassmen, knowing the drill, gracefully caught single fliers before they hit the ground. “Mr. Fish is playing as an opener for Gnarls Zombie this Saturday!” read the flier. ‘Mr. Fish,’ a well known band at East, used these fliers to promote themselves. “The administration hates it when we throw the fliers,” junior Kaevan Tavakolinia, bassist for ‘Mr. Fish,’ said. “So we try to hand tangible fliers to people – it gets a better response.” ‘Mr. Fish’ sent out these fliers for almost five years. During that time, the players grew as musicians and began to receive recognition around the school. “I get recognized at the gym sometimes,” Tavakolinia said, “But it’s not like I do it for the popularity. I do it because I love the music, and I plan to keep doing it for that exact reason.”

CIRCUS ACT

Sophomore Greg Tracy plays the bass during ‘Circus Absurd’s’ Jan. 17 concert. “It’s a feeling of accomplishment after you’ve worked hard and then it all comes together,” Tracy said “You can look at the music you’ve written and see how it affects others. You kind of impress yourself.” Photo by Rachel English.

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Quarter Machine by Mr. FIsh >> All day I pound the pavement with the rubber of my shoe I try hard not to forget you, but it’s hard not to forget you i’ll ...

for the weekend

KEYS TO SUCCESS >> Band members describe what it takes to keep the band working in harmony. “We’re all just really into our music. We practice in my basement usually and I am always open for jamming.”

Joe Newman 11

68 DECEMBER

“We try to make joint decisions or we just go by majority rule. If a member still can’t deal with a decision we have no problem letting them go. We don’t want to deal with bad attitudes.”

Greg Tracy 10

“We try to stay connected through e-mail. We start each practice just by talking and getting everything on the table.”

Nathan Goldman 11


SEE ALSO

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NOAH QUILLEC 12 “I like doing choir and (the band I sing for) ‘Real Politik.’ I like having two different forms of music. Some is so personal, but then in choir I get to share it with so many people.”

CHAMBERS CHOIR SINGER

‘I am the Private’

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oft strumming grew to louder chords. A melody of male voices singing of changing weather and changing lives came to life through small black speakers. Junior Patrick Robinson and senior Brandon Gardner of Blue Valley formed a small acoustic band, ‘I Am the Private,’ their sophomore year. The band got their start on MySpace, where many of the songs from their self-titled EP played on strand from the home page “We like to put our music out there for anyone who wants to listen to it,” Robinson said. “MySpace is very popular – it’s the true monopoly of this aspect of entertainment. It gives starting bands a chance to show what they’ve got.” With many local bands aiming for the same venues, ‘I Am the Private,’ known as IATP, was at the top of the list playing ‘Yahweh,’ ‘The Refuge’ and ‘Main Street Café’ at various house shows and benefit concerts. Their original lyrics and technical guitar parts put them above many hopefuls. “We love to play shows and see our fans,” Robinson said. “When you get really passionate about performing, you portray to the crowd what is in your mind.” Using MySpace had definitely gotten their words of ‘Love Lost and Lullabies’ and ‘Paint the City’ out to the world of high schoolers, other local bands and even professional musicians. Much had been said about IATP, but one statement on their page caught viewers’ attention: “Don’t underestimate the power of the two, they can make something out of anything.”

YOU CAN’T STOP THE BEAT

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Below: During a practice at one of the band members’ homes, sophomore Brian Rogers plays the drums and sings along to the beat. “I like playing the drums because it’s a lot more emotionally driven,” Rogers said. “I feel like I can express myself a lot better on drums than on any other instrument.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

PERSONAL TOUCH

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During the Coalition club fundraiser at Village Church, senior Noah Quillec rocks out on his guitar with the band ‘Real Politik.’ “I like this music because it’s [our] own,” Quillec said “When you write it, it means a lot more.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

FINDING YOUR NICHE

his favorite in>strument, > Right: Playing senior David Hobart practices with his band, ‘Real Politik.’ “I like playing the guitar because it’s like the most expressive instrument out there,” Hobart said. “You can change the sound and it’s really emotive. That’s what drew me to the guitar.” Photo by Rachel English.

‘Circus Absurd’

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hipped wood planks vibrated from the outside porch until a break in songs allowed time for joking between band mates. In the tightlypacked, partly soundproof room, the dull drums grew to a loud thump as the guitar and bass growled beside the harmonic techno-style keyboard and deep feminine vocals. Sophomores Trevor Collins and Greg Tracy joined senior Morgan Kopp of Blue Valley, JCCC student Garrett Murdock and 18-year-old Lindsay Martin to make up their alternative rock band, ‘Circus Absurd.’ The members defined ‘Circus Absurd’ as a culmination of different performers joining together for a common art. As the name stated, the band brought together musicians from different backgrounds and influences to create a one-of-a-kind sound in their new self-titled album. “Everyone is interested in different kinds of music, and we all bring what

we like together to write our own kind,” Collins said. “It makes the music really personal for us.” The group wrote their own music, Murdock and Morgan creating most of the sound. “I write at any random time that something comes to me, even if I’m not in the right state of mind,” Murdock said. ‘Circus Absurd’ celebrated their CD release in January and worked to build a larger fan base. Fans thought the varied musicians produced a fresh sound and were finally able to listen to the local performances at home. As Tracy, Collins and their band mates continued creating new music, their fan base grew, looking forward to more recordings and performances. Stories by Emily Collins.

STUDENT BANDS 69


>>

FOCUS, GREEN, CLASSY.

t was only the first meeting, but senior Chad Allen had already broken one of the primary rules for the Shawnee Mission East Establishment for Croqueteers and Fine Gentlemen. “There is certainly no denim,” junior Jack Logan said. “No jeans at all.” This was one of many ways East’s first ever croquet club prided itself on being gentlemen, as the name boasted. The club, founded by Logan and junior Harper Coulson, was made up of five juniors and five seniors who hoped to continue the club in the coming years with a fraternity-like brotherhood. “It’s not an extreme athletic sport,” senior John Hart said, “but you can enjoy the beauty of the outdoors and be playing a sport.” Many issues were addressed at the KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE WICKET early meetings, including the duties of Above: During practice at junior Harper Coul- the members, proper attire and history son’s house, junior Clay Finley aims for a shot. of the sport. The boys also fit in mulMembers enjoyed the outdoors, but had trouble finding places to play. “Croquet gives me some- tiple games of the sport. These games thing to do outside,” Finley said. “We’ve been allowed Hart to see where the problems playing at people’s houses, but hope to move to were in their playing conditions. Loose Park.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

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70 DECEMBER

environmental club

DESIGN BY GABY THOMPSON.

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very Wednesday at 3 p.m., senior Savannah Duby walked the halls dumping clear plastic tubs filled with crunched water bottles and crumpled homework assignments into Glad Force Flex trash bags. That was just one of the small steps Duby and the rest of the Environmental Club took to make SME a bit greener. This year, many new members joined the club after the all school assembly Duby organized in the fall. Duby invited guest speaker Kristin Riott to present a powerpoint about the effects of global

“We could find a flat surface to play on,” Hart said. “The backyards are too bumpy. Croquet is traditionally played on a flat surface, like a putting green. We can also get a better croquet set.” Logan saw a necessity for this club. “It’s not a sport that’s offered [at East],” Logan said. “We wanted something else to do. It’s different.” Once Coulson and Logan created the club, they established rules and standards for the members. “[Members] uphold the name of the establishment,” Logan said. “They have to display the traits of a fine gentleman, who speaks properly, keeps himself well-kempt and has a clean style.” This clean dressing style included a tucked-in shirt – no T-shirts. The only acceptable hat was a golf hat. Blazers were allowed on cool days, though a nice sweater was satisfactory. Neckties were encouraged, and Hart hoped for all-white outfits. And, of course, no denim. Story by Kevin Simpson.

warming and what the students could do to reverse the process. “I don’t want kids to think that just because they are in high school they can’t do anything to help the environment,” Duby said. “In high school is when kids can really start building environmentally helpful habits.” Another event Duby organized for the school was the ‘Trash Smash.’ The Trash Smash gave kids an opportunity to get together and do something for the earth. They picked up trash from around the school and got it recycled.

A PERSONAL CONNECTION

During a spring seminar period, junior Augie Borchers helps senior Savannah Duby empty re>cyclable > Right: material. Borchers’ family encouraged recycling at home and inspired him to join the club and care about the environment. “I don’t think the next generation should deal with cleaning up because of mistakes we made,” Borchers said. “It’s just something I’ve always felt.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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martial arts club

s they practiced kicks the whole length of the weight room one Wednesday night, sophomore David DeCant pulled at the leg of his jeans, which made it difficult to move. Martial Arts Club instructor David Muhammad tried to relate ‘street clothes’ to martial arts. “Chuck Norris can still do Martial Arts in his jeans,” Muhammad said. “But you don’t see 50 Cent trying it – his pants are too big.” First year teacher Muhammad approached the administration at the beginning of the year about starting a Martial Arts Club. “Martial arts is a big part of my life,” Muhammad said. “My dad taught me when I was young, and I’ve kept with it ever since.” Muhammad saw martial arts as a way to teach kids how to respect themselves and others, as well as learn self-discipline. He also saw it as a way for kids to defend themselves and stay in shape physically without playing and conditioning for a sport. “Martial Arts isn’t just about the physical aspect,” Muhammad said. “It is also very spiritual, and it takes years

MAINTAINING CONCENTRATION

Below: At a Martial Arts Club practice, senior Emre Agbas learns a new technique from leader David Muhammad. “[The club] is really disciplined,” Agbas said. “We must always show respect to our leader, and have mutual respect for everyone.” Photo by Rachel English.

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FROM SERVICE-ORIENTED TO SELF-DISCIPLINED, JOCULAR TO GENUINE, UNIQUE CLUBS AT EAST ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO

& stay

croquet club I

and a lot of practice to master. And even if someone has been doing it for years, there are always new things to learn or improve.” Stories by Katie East.


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“The shirt symbolizes that I support recycling and that I’m involved.” “Wednesdays we take recycling bins outside. I get a good feeling of cleaning out the world.”

OLD SHOES

T-SHIRT

Club members show the proper apparel for their groups.

“We [collected] old shoes for people in Africa and all over the world.“

DRESS SHIRT

“We wear nice shirts because it goes with the old tradition of croquet ettiquette.”

SPERRYS

“The shoes are classy and give good support. They are the proper sporting apparel for croquet.”

MALLET

Laura Allen 12

“The mallet is the weapon of choice. It is the most vital piece in the matches.”

MEMBERS: 9

SPONSOR: Ken Foley

SPONSOR: David Muhammad

LEADER: Emre Agbas

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“It is traditional to practice barefoot.”

Tamas Kapros 9

ENVIRONMENTAL CLUB MEMBERS: About 15 LEADER: Savannah Duby SPONSOR: Kristin Carmody

SEE ALSO

MEMBERS: 10 Harper Coulson LEADERS: and Jack Logan

BARE

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After collecting recycling bins from classrooms, Environmental Club member Chris Poplawski empties one of many bins into the larger recycling bin by the junior lot. Poplawski felt it was his responsibility to help recycle. “If we don’t recycle, no one will, and the paper will be wasted,” Poplawski said. “I recycle because it is a part of my morals. I don’t want to waste things.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

MARTIAL ARTS CLUB

“Belts show the progression of skill. The darker the color, the higher the skill.”

FEET

DOING HIS PART

CROQUET CLUB

“It’s comfortable to practice in, and symbolizes uniformity and togetherness.”

BELT

Brian Simpson 12

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BEN JENSEN 11 “I volunteer at the Village Food Pantry every Saturday morning. It’s really eye-opening. I learn to appreciate the stuff I have a lot more. I go so often that when there are no adults, I’m the one in charge.”

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Above: Tip-toeing through the mud at Prairie Elementary School, junior Nick Wassmer retrieves the ball to continue the shoot-around. “We try to practice all the time, even when it’s not perfect playing conditions,” Wassmer said. “One time, it rained the day before and the field was like a Jell-O swamp.”

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Above: Attempting to head the ball into the goal, junior Matt Creidenberg fights junior Mac Tamblyn for the ball. “Practices are competitive, but it’s not like a Shawnee Mission East basketball practice,” Creidenberg said. “Everyone wants to win, but we like to have fun too.”

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Although they didn’t have scheduled practices, and the Sunday night games were not mandatory, everyone agreed that all of it was too fun to be missed. Every Sunday they met up at Prairie Elementary to dribble around and warm up before carpooling out to the All-American Indoor Sports field. “[The games] make Sundays infinitely better,” Tamblyn said. “Before playing for the team it’d be me stressing out about homework all day. But now I can wait to stress until late at night after the game.” Between their schedules of school and soccer games, the friends tried to find time to hang out whenever possible. “A lot of time when we have a game late at night and no school the next day we go to [junior] Zach [Busey’s] house and have a bro night and sleepover,” Rodgers said. But that Sunday, school awaited them the next day. They paid for their slushies and taquitos and pushed open Quik Trip’s double doors. They all headed to their cars to go home and finish up the dreaded AHAP reading and pre-calculus homework. By the next Sunday-night game, the empty Quik Trip cups in their cars’ cup holders would be replaced by coffee mugs. The soccer shoes and shorts in their backseats would be cleared out, backpacks and textbooks taking their place. The rest of the week they would be students, not soccer players. But the next Sunday, they would be a united front once again: ‘The Dancing Lions.’ Story by Sydney Henley.

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Above: Sitting on the sidelines, junior Parker Heying watches his teammates on the field. “If we’re not playing, we usually let the players know what’s going on and what they can do better,” Heying said. “We’re usually positive.”

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hite cherry slushie? Rooster Booster? Or maybe a smoothie? Junior Brian Rogers contemplated his choices as he stared at the slushie machines. Deciding to go with a mix of Dr. Pepper with white cherry slushie, he filled his 24 oz. cup. He heard the Quik Trip door open and three pairs of indoor soccer shoes tap on the ground as another carload of teammates came toward him. Soon the whole team scrunched together near the slushie machines. The players joked around as they sipped their drinks, talking about the crazy slide tackles in the soccer game they just played. “We have one big tradition,” junior Alex Cox said. “We go to Quik Trip after every game and get slushies and other goodies.” The summer before his junior year, Rogers collaborated with fellow soccer fan junior Parker Heying. They came up with the idea of starting a recreational soccer team for their friends who either didn’t make the East team or just wanted to have fun playing on a more relaxed team. And so the ‘Dancing Lions’ began. The team prided itself on not only being a good team on the field, but also on being one that extended its friendships off the field as well. The relaxed games and optional practices helped to form great friendships. After failing to make the East team, junior Mac Tamblyn, not wanting to give soccer up, decided to join the Dancing Dragons. “The pressure’s not as great [as playing for East],” Tamblyn said. “Everyone’s out there to enjoy playing soccer.”

COACHING FROM THE SIDELINES

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DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH AND ANDREA TUDHOPE. PHOTOS BY ANNA PETROW.

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Juniors continue their soccer careers BY playing on THE recreational soccer TEAM, ‘The DANCING Lions.’

72 DECEMBER

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BE LO W : JA KE was verbally abused by an op

Right: Name: Zach Busey 11. Favorite soccer movie: ‘Kicking and Screaming.’ Position: Defender. Beginning of team: “It started out with a few guys just wanting to play at Prairie Elementary, but [junior] Parker [Heying] found the league,” Busey said. “It seemed like it was something fun to do. And it hasn’t stopped being fun. It’s a great way to be physically active.” THe team: “We mess around, but we don’t lose sight of being competitive,” Busey said. “The teammates don’t let it get out of control. When I started playing for the team, I didn’t really know them that well. Now, I’m friends with the guys, and we hang out. It’s a chance to stay active.” Greatest moment: “I got a goal at the last second,” Busey said. “I slid and kicked it in. It was from the red line. I usually play defense, so it was pretty sweet because I don’t really score goals.”


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RIGHT: Name: Will Chertoff 11. Favorite PLAYER: Wayne Rooney from Manchester United. “Since I’ve gotten into soccer, he’s been my ‘fav,’” Chertoff said. “He has an amazing right-footed shot.” Position: “Midbench,” Chertoff said. “Just kidding – Midfielder.’ TEAM TRADITION: “After every game, everyone is like, ‘QT?’” Chertoff said. “We usually get slushies. [Junior] Will Penner has perfected the art of slushie-making.” GREATEST MOMENT: “When we won the division title against some guys our age,” Chertoff said. “They were big complainers, so it was a great win. It was our first undefeated session after many losses.” BEGINNING OF INTEREST: “During the Euro Cup, everyone seemed to be getting into it, so I thought I’d give it a shot,” Chertoff said. “I thought it was a simple game, then I realized how complex it is.”

SEE ALSO

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NICK WASSMER 11 “I’ve unicycled for three years. My entire family unicycles and my dad taught me. I unicycle at parks and around the neighborhood, but I don’t do it very often.”

UNICYCLIST

DIVING FOR A DEFLECTION

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Fully extended, junior Brian Rogers dives to block a shot. “As a goalie, you don’t know where the shot’s going to be,” Rogers said. “A lot of times it can suprise you.”

RECREATIONAL SOCCER 73


Emre Agbas 12 “You take a test with a bunch of complicated questions. Before the competition, you make a binder full of information to help you out, unless you happen to know a bunch of stuff about astronomy. I think it is the hardest event.”

Andrea Brown 12 “It is just like the CSI forensics, except it’s a lot less dramatic. The scenarios they give you are kind of lame, but also pretty interesting. The had us do things like blood splattered analysis with artificial blood.”

Joe Deng 11

“It’s a 35-question multiple-choice test. It goes from basic algebra I up to calculus. The questions are challenging and the time constraints are short enough to make it feel rushed but long enough to find all the answers.”

Michael Smythe 12 “Three judges hold out an envelope with two or three peices of paper. After reading the options you choose the subject that you want. You get 30 seconds after choosing it, and then you have to talk for one and a half minutes about the option.”

Ben Donovan 12

“There are two types of tests. The written part is a 10-question multiplechoice test about a subject. For the oral test, you are split into varsity, scholastics or honors depending on your GPA. I think it’s good because it shows if teams work together well and how they’ve prepared.”

Patrick Schuele 11 74 DECEMBER

Above: Senior Michael Smythe was a member of both Academic Decathlon, picture above, and Science Olympiad, pictured far above. Photos by Meghan Benson.

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SCIENCE OLYMPIAD

themain events

Despite having common students, the clubs Sciene Olympiad and Academic Decathlon differed in their main events.

ACADEMIC DECATHLON

“This is pretty much writing a procedure for a lab. One person comes in a room and watches a structure being made out of straws, marshmallows, toothpicks and things like that. Then you write a description clear enough for your partner to replicate the structure.”


SEE ALSO

SPENCER BROWN 10 “I like to go to math contests. [The team] usually can’t solve the problems, so if you can you get big prizes. There are some interesting people. It’s fun to meet people who have the same interests as you.”

the >>

MATH COMPETITOR

OF SMART DESIGN BY MALLORY STEVENSON.

STUDENTS CHOOSE THE ACADEMIC CLUBS, SCIENCE OLYMPIAD AND ACADEMIC DECATHLON, OVER ACTIVITIES INVOLVING ARTS AND THEATRE.

O

TIME FOR FUN

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After taking a short break, Science Olympiad members seniors Michael Smythe, Xuan Qin and Emre Agbas walk to the next event, ‘Picture This.’ “This is pretty much Pictionary with science terms,” Agbas said. “We got second place at that event. It was an exciting break from the usual science stuff.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

STOCKING UP ON KNOWLEDGE

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Above: Flipping through the informational binders, senior Ben Donovan and junior Joe Deng prepare for the upcoming Academic Decathlon competition. “It greatly increases our performance if we study,” Donovan said. “Our teamwork is really shown during the ‘Group Super Quiz.’ We do really well in that.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

JOIN THE CLUB

>>

Left: Standing in an English classroom at St. James Academy, senior Xuan Qin waits with some Science Olympiad members while others participate in the Herpetology event. “Herpetology is my favorite event,” Qin said. “It is basically where you go and identify different reptiles and amphibians. I just find it really fun.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

ne minute left. Junior Joe Deng concentrated as his partner’s hand quickly moved across the page. He still couldn’t recognize the messy drawing. 45 seconds left. Deng racked his brain as he followed the path of the scribbling pencil. 30 seconds left. Finally, he recognized the drawing as a scientific term he learned back in elementary school days. “PHOTOSYNTHESIS!” This Pictionary-like event was just one of many science-related events that Science Olympiad members competed in. Involved in both Academic Decathlon and Science Olympiad, members such as Deng and senior Michael Smythe felt the pressure of the clubs’ demands. Along with studying for his IB classes, Deng tried to find time to study for Academic Decathlon subjects and attend Science Olympiad competitions. “For Science Olympiad usually the practices aren’t that much pressure, but for regionals and state we take more time to prepare,” Deng said. “For state in Academic Decathlon we usually prepare a lot for a few weeks beforehand.” Academic Decathlon took more time and effort for members than Science Olympiad did. With events such as the Prepared Speech, students practiced for weeks in advance to talk about any topic they wanted to. Junior Ben Donovan chose to talk about electric cars, but in the past topics as strange as Guitar Hero came up. “For the prepared speech you study for weeks ahead, but you only get three to four minutes to actually say your speech,” Donavan said. Academic Decathlon had a wide range of topics to chose from – such as an impromptu speech or a written test – but Science Olympiad was focused only on science related events. “It’s more application than pure science,” Deng said. “It can be about anything, like health sciences, forensics or an event where you build something like an electric vehicle.” In some Science Olympiad events students paired up and collaborated to finish a written test. But with the numbers of members down from past years, it was a struggle to succeed in competitions. “At the practice meet I went to [for Science Olympiad] we didn’t have enough people to have partners,” junior Qi Chen said. “We had to do the events by ourselves.” Members such as Deng were appreciated because of the low numbers in both clubs. Although the popularity was low at East, Academic Decathlon stood strong with four dedicated members. The diverse curriculum that ranged from social science or economics to art or music was one of the reasons Deng decided to join the club. “I like both clubs because I always find an event or two in each that I’m really interested in,” Deng said. “And a bonus [of being in both clubs] is that I get to hang out with friends.” Story by Sydney Henley.

ACADEMIC DECATHLON AND SCIENCE OLYMPIAD 75


Conner Wilkins 10

P L AY

DESIGN BY WHITAKER SHERK.

WORKING TOGETHER, VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL PLAYERS TRAVELED TO EMPORIA AND PLACED THIRD IN THE STATE.

“I always take a shower before my games to warm my body up. I started taking showers before my games in the seventh grade. It relaxes me and gets me to not think about the game. It loosens my muscles.”

T

wenty-one seconds on the clock. It was a tie game against Shawnee Mission Northwest. Senior Marcus Webb had the ball, stalling at the top of the key. The clock ticked down. Five. Four. Three. Two. Webb took the shot. Missed. Senior Curran Darling tipped it in. With less than one second left on the clock, East had won third place in the 6A Kansas State Championship. “It might have been third place, but at least our seniors got to end their careers with a win,” junior Scott Kennedy said. “They deserved it.” After the game, the boys finished loading their belongings and fought their way into the seats of the rented vans, scheduling haircuts or bragging about their scheduled post-season pedicures. They talked about how they went to Emporia as the seventh seed and came out with third place medals. The team went into the substate tournament as the second of eight seeds with a 14-6 record against Shawnee Mission North. (OR NORTHWEST?!) In the second game of the tournament, East was matched against the third seed, Lawrence. Webb scored the final basket with three seconds left, putting East ahead with a two-point victory. With the Sub-State Championship under their belts, the Lancers headed to Emporia. The state tournament was held at the Civic White Auditorium, a venue that held over twice as many people as the East gym. “The size of the arena made each play so much bigger which lifted the intensity level so much higher,” Kennedy said. “It was unbelievable that so many students came out to support

Jordan Pfeiffer 11 “Before every game I raise my hand in the air, and I look to see if it is shaking or not, and if it is then I know that I need to calm myself down. If it is shaking, I basically stretch and sometimes dribble my basketball as hard as I can on the floor and the jitters kind of go away.”

Sam Kovzan 11 PREDICTED VICTORY

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Below: Celebrating the substate victory in Lawrence, junior Jackson Harter shouts with his team. During the game, Harter knew they had the potential to win. “We were pretty much in it the whole game,” Harter said. “At the end, with 11 seconds left, [senior] Marcus Webb hit a three and won the game.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

TOUGH BATTLE

>>Right: Coach Shawn Hair watches his team play their semifinals at Emporia. He admitted it was a tough game. “Both teams were really playing hard,” Hair said. “More than anything it was a physical game, and we probably didn’t catch as many breaks as we would like to catch. Our team battled hard.” Photo by Katie East.

76 DECEMBER

PART

their

“I always wear the same socks. They are white running socks with a purple stripe at the tip. I have been wearing the same socks to my games since seventh grade. I think I lost them for two weeks one time and I missed a game and I think I did a little worse at that game.”

EVERYONE isf

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Superstitious Lancers do everything possible to tempt fate their way.

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us all the way in Emporia.” The boys’ first game in the state tournament was against Olathe East. The Lancers spent the first half trailing Olathe. Ahead by two with 13 seconds left, Webb pushed the score up to 54-51 with a free throw. Students stormed onto the court with two fingers in the air, signifying that they were only two wins away from the state title. “I knew going into the Olathe East game that it would be a dogfight,” senior Charlie Ludington said. “I think we can win our next game as long as we execute our defense and make smart plays on offense.” Game two was against the third seed, Wichita Southeast. Wichita was up by six at half-time. After questionable calls and a lengthy 16 minutes, the deficit had grown to 17 points, sending Southeast to the championship game. “I think the officials let it get out of hand a little bit,” Webb said. “We played with heart. I thought we were going to beat them. It was hard to lose. It was something we all wanted so bad.” Despite the loss, the boys weren’t going home yet – they still had to play for third place. The next day the boys went back to the auditorium to play Shawnee Mission Northwest. Thanks to Darling’s tip he took the Lancers from a tie game, to a 53-51 victory over the Cougars. “I’m proud of our season,” Darling said. “We have accomplished more than all but one team in school history, and I’m proud to be able to say that.” Story by Katie East.

MIND SET TO WIN

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Right: Grabbing for the ball at the the state quarter finals game at Emporia, senior Curran Darling believed his team would win. “We believed in each other, and we knew we could win,” Darling said. “The coaches stepped it up. They scouted the other team so that we knew just about everything about the other team. We were mentally prepared.” Photo by Rachel English.


SEE ALSO

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CHASE LUCAS 12 “I play Call of Duty a lot. I’m very good at playing video games. I play after school usually every day. They are fun and they put off doing homework.”

VIDEO GAME PLAYER

DEFEATED

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Senior Jack Slaughter plays in the Jan. 6 varsity boys basketball game against SMNW. At the time the team was undefeated, but ended up breaking their record by losing the game to SMNW. “It was a really frustrating loss because we all played really hard, we just didn’t play smart,” Slaughter said. “We kind of beat ourselves.” Photo by Rachel English.

BOYS BASKETBALL 77


DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH.

Sticking AND MY

ME INSTRUMENT Junior band members discuss their experiences with their instruments.

FRENCH HORN

Bridget Bergin 11

“Playing the french horn is enjoyable because of the challenge that comes from learning new music and sharing it with others. It exercises both the right and left parts of the brain, so it’s a good brain exerciser.”

TENOR DRUM

David Beeder 11

“I put a lot of practice time out of school because the things we do are really demanding. The stuff we do takes a lot of coordination. We try to make the best of the situation.”

SNARE DRUM

Paul Wolff 11

“During a drumline performance in front of a big crowd, I never make eye contact when I’m playing. If I do, I probably would mess up because I would lose my concentration. Sometimes my hands sweat because I’m a little nervous.”

Colin Hoefer 11 TUBA

“I switched instruments. I went from baritone to tuba. I switched because they needed another tuba in band. I like playing all the pep band songs the most because the tuba has all the base lines. So most of the stuff that people hear is played by us.”

FRISBEE GOLFER 78 DECEMBER

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STAYING IN FORMATION

Playing the trumpet, senior Elizabeth McDonald keeps in formation during a football game half-time show. “During the summer we have a band camp where we learn and memorize the music, so that one school starts, we have to only learn the formation,” McDonald said. “Once we learn a formation, we add onto it throughout the rest of the year.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

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“I can’t really play golf, so I like frisbee golf instead. I like working hard to improve my skills at throwing the frisbee. I also like it because it is intense like ultimate frisbee, but it is also more relaxing.”

SEE ALSO

CAMERON ROBLES 11

with it

WHILE DEALING with FEWER participants, BAND STUDENTS make most out THE situation.


LAST MINUTE PREP

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Far left: Marching in a half-time show, sophomore Andrew Goble plays the bass drum in formation. “Usually about a week before we just stay after school to prepare and hammer it out,” Goble said. “Sometimes we do it like 10 minutes before the show. It always works out.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

SPREADING THE JOY

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Left: Playing the flute at a concert, senior Michelle Braslavsky watches band teacher Kim Harrison directing to stay in rhythm. “Concerts are important to me,” Braslavsky said. “They allow us to express ourselves, and [allow me to express] my love of music. It is a chance to put your practice into play and provide enjoyment for others.” Photo by Dan Stewart.

FOLLOW THE LEADER

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Above: Looking up occasionally at band teacher Kim Harrison, junior Matt Chalk plays the saxophone. “When you don’t have someone to lead you through a song, it’s really easy to get off,” Chalk said. “[Mr. Harrison] helps lay down the time and the foundation for the tone fluctuation.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

NOTE READING

Above: Plucking the cello at a full orchestra practice, junior Joe Deng plays the song ‘Dream Pantomin.’ “To learn new music, I use repetition,” Deng said. “I break it down a lot and play it at different rhythms.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

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next level by auditioning and becoming members of the smaller groups around East. Jazz band was available to those from band and orchestra, and it mixed instrumental sounds to create music reminiscent of the classic Big Bands. The Blue Knights were less well known but performed outside of school events often. A crowd-favorite, the East Drum Line, was made up of a mix of the best percussionists, and many students thought of watching it as a truly unique and rewarding experience. “People get really excited by the Drum Line,” junior Brian Rogers said. “The volume and attitude really have an effect on people.” Despite the great enthusiasm among both band members and other students for the Drum Line, the marching band still greatly suffered in numbers. “When I was in middle school I would see over 100 people in the marching band,” Beeder said. “This year we started out with about 80. I’d say that is a significant drop.” With this, the dedicated students stepped up to make the best of what they had and not ruin the reputation and stature they had gained from their past performances. “The talent has not left the smaller ensembles,” Beeder said. “It’s not about the numbers, it’s about the ability and this year is one of the best years for the jazz band.” For those who chose to stay in the band program, there was a certain, personal reason for each one. “I guess you could say it’s a huge part of who I am,” Rogers said. “I don’t know what I’d do if I wasn’t playing drums as a Lancer.” Story by Emily Collins.

PRACTICE PAYS OFF

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W

alking into the cluttered band room, it was hard to notice missing pieces or added messes but the absence of a band mate was very apparent, and, unfortunately, it was common. Beginning the school year with a small number, the band members and band teacher, Kim Harrison, only grew more worried as musicians continued to drop the class. The decreasing numbers had an impact on the leadership, sound and competitiveness. Students who had been playing an instrument of some sort chose to end their musical career at East this year for various reasons personalized to their expectations and availability. “Playing soccer really put a stress on my time,” junior Gordon Green said. “I couldn’t balance both and school work.” For others it was a natural process. “ I just lost interest in my instrument,” sophomore Robert Enders said. “It just happened like that and it’s okay with me.” For others, quitting never entered their minds no matter what other activities or commitments they had during the school year. “I have a big commitment to percussion,” junior David Beeder. “[It’s been] seven years, and I just love to play. It’s the thing that I do.” For others, it was the future that drove them. Musicians had scholarship opportunities that could make and break the decision between music schools and universities. “I have a plan for my life and music is a huge part of it,” senior Emmett Starkey said. “I will stick through whatever this program throws at me to get where I need to.” Many students took their band experience to the

Left: After finishing a performance at a concert, freshman Elizabeth Rogers smiles into the crowd. Rogers was a percussionist. “It’s nice to know that all your practice paid off when you put on a concert,” Rogers said. “When there’s a bigger crowd, it’s nice because you can please more people.” Photo by Rachel English.

BAND 79


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UNIORS MASON WOODERSON AND ZACHARY FAIR SPARRED ALMOST EVERYDAY AFTER SCHOOL. THEY SPARRED AT THEIR HOUSES SO TH PANDA PATTERNS

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Preparing to make her fourth print, freshman Clara Stahl uses the hallway to spread out and complete her print-making project for Art Foundations. Although she thought the rubber was hard to carve, Stahl liked the printmaking process and the class. “Mine turned out pretty well,” Stahl said. “I like art a lot, and I am in Ceramics now. Next year, I’ll be in Ceramics again.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

NOT A HUGE COUNTRY MUSIC FAN, SHE LIKED UNDERWOOD BECAUSE SHE DID NOT HAVE THE TYPICAL COUNTRY TWANG IN HER VOIC 80 JANUARY


JANUARY

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HAT NO ONE WOULD THINK THEY WERE ACTUALLY FIGHTING. • FRESHMAN NATALIE PIERCE LIKED TO PLAY MELLOW SONGS B

SEE ALSO: PAGES 82 - 83

2 KILEY LAWRENCE 11 >> Atheist CATCH A SNOWFLAKE

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Above: Trying to catch a snowflake in her mouth, sophomore Gabby Vandergriff looks up at the cloudy sky with her friends after school. Vandergriff enjoyed the snowy weather in moderation. “I don’t like winter that much,” Vandergriff said, “but it is fun when it snows, especially the first time of the year.” Photo by Katie East.

“Last year I decided that I was an Atheist. But more than that, it’s been a gradual realization that I don’t believe in a god of any kind. My mom is Christian, my dad is Jewish, but my brother and I are both Atheists. I don’t find anything wrong with religion, it’s just not for me.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 84 - 85

3 DANIEL GRITZ 12 >> Robotics Club member “I’m on the build team, so I don’t need to know how to do the extremely complex stuff such as the programming. I’m glad with what we have accomplished this year. It’s really cool to see a pile of aluminum bars and motors become something complex that can do some amazing things.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 86 – 87

SWING INTO ACTION

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Above: At a Swing Club practice after school, seniors Laura Allen and Emmett Starkey demonstrate a basic step. Allen developed a passion for swing-dancing when she first danced at the Louis & Company Dance Studio. This passion inspired her to be involved in the Swing Club, and then go on to become the club’s vice president. “I came to high school and went to Louis & Company, loved it and got hooked the first night,” Allen said. “It is a good way to be with your friends.” Photo by Rachel English.

4 BRANDON ROYLE 12 >> SME wrestler “We qualified 11 guys for state, which is very good for us because we have 13 guys total on the team. My favorite part in wrestling is the competition, the intensity and the difficulty of it. It’s by far the hardest sport I’ve ever participated in.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 88 – 89

5 ANDY ALLEN 12 >> SHARE volunteer “I am in the Birthdays SHARE project. We go to underprivileged schools and bring gifts and donuts. It’s just fun because a lot of my friends go, and I get to spend a lot of time with them. It’s also pretty rewarding because it makes the kids feel great. They probably would not otherwise have a Birthday, and it feels good to help out with something like that.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 90 - 91

6 CAROLINE SHERIDAN 11 >> SME student TRY, TRY AGAIN

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Above: Laughing in IB Biology 2 Honors, senior Kate Sachse tries to make a DNA model with her partner senior Jordan Holsinger using marshmallows and blue food-coloring. Although they performed experiments often in the class, this experiment was a fun break from the normal routine. “It was a creative way of making DNA,” Sachse said. “But in the end we realized that using marshmallows and food coloring wasn’t a good idea. It made a big mess and we had to start over.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

“I do fashion design and construction at Broadmoor. I did clothing here freshman and sophomore year. I really enjoyed the class so Mr. Boyer suggested I look into Broadmoor. My dad works for Gear for Sports and Underarmor. He sells clothing to golf courses, and I would always help him organize the clothes. So I grew up really liking it. Someday I want to go into fashion merchandising, and work under a fashion designer.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 92 - 93

AV

“[Bowling] was really fun. It was a nice way to kick-back and have fun with friends. Both my sisters did it for a year or two, and I decided to join in on the tradition. We traveled to Topeka for a tournament. It was fun catching up with people that I had known but had never really talked to.”

Y JACK JOHNSON ON HER GUITAR. SHE HAD AN ANTIQUE ACOUSTIC GUITAR HANGING ON HER WALL THAT HER FRIEND’S MOM G

1 DAVID FRIZZELL 10 >> SME bowler

E HER. • SENIOR PAIGE E. ANDERSON’S FAVORITE ‘AMERICAN IDOL’ WAS CARRIE UNDERWOOD. ALTHOUGH ANDERSON WA

JANUARY DIVISION 81


Far below left: Perfecting her form at practice, senior Whitney Kraft practices getting the ideal strike. The boys on her team always celebrated after their strikes. “They would jump around and holler,” she said. “They would really move.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

PUMP IT UP

Far below right: Celebrating after bowling well at Park Lanes Bowling Alley, senior Reid Hintz puts his hands together with the rest of the team. He was at a tournament, and he thought it was fun because of the seniors. “We’d always have a crazy celebration,” he said. “I’d always jush push up my fists or do a quick push-up or something.” Photo by Rachel English.

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LIFEGUARD

READY TO STRIKE

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“During the summer, I work at Young’s Pool in Overland Park, and in the winter I work at Sylvester Powell. One time at Young, a small girl went face first into the water, and I jumped in and pulled her out.”

SEE ALSO

DAVID FRIZZELL10

FOLLOWING FORM

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At the AMF West bowling alley, senior Sean Robinson practices his bowling technique. “I bring the ball back behind me, bring it forward and always want to get my first two fingers out of the hole before my thumb,” Robinson said. “This creates the hook on the ball. I always make sure to follow through.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

Clair Finke 11

CUSTOM

“I got my ball at the pro shop where we bowl. The coaches like you to have your own ball so you can practice with the same ball that you throw at the meets. I named it ‘Peek-a-boo’ because that’s what the color was called in the binder where you pick your colors.”

82 JANUARY

Ali Dees 10

Bowling club members reveal the “I got my ball at Bowler Metcalf Ltd. The color color and style of is ‘Blue Ice Storm.’ I like their bowling ball. having my own ball because it fits my hands. It’s hard to bowl when you don’t have a ball that fits. It’s nice to have because I don’t have to worry about finding a ball at the bowling alley.”


GETTING A

competitive

DESIGN BY WH ITAKER SH

ERK.

EDGE BOWLING TEAM MEMBERS WELCOME SUCCESS AS TWO OF THEIR BEST MEMBERS PULL IN RECORD-BREAKING SCORES.

S

he picked up her 12 pound spare ball, silver with Bugs Bunny. She slipped her fingers into the yellow holes of her plastic ball. Holding the ball to her chest, sophomore Ali Dees stepped up towards her lane. She centered herself, closed her eyes and imagined a strike. She swung her arm back, and as it came forward she felt her ball slipping off her fingers. She watched it smoothly glide down the lane towards the three pins left standing. It struck all three. Spare. This year was a record breaking year for both boys and girls varsity bowlers, thanks to two sophomore bowlers. Dees set the girls record of 266 out of a 300 CONCENTRATE point game, the best score ever to be gotten by a girl. Above: Senior Brady Anderson follows through with his strike at Olathe East. “When I bowl, I Last year, the girls highest score was 240. start with a four step approach and let go of the The boys also set new records this year. Sophoball with a nice high leg kick which should result more Johnny Sheahan, the only sophomore on the in a perfect strike.” Photo by Anna Petrow. varsity bowling team, scored a 279 out of a possible 300. Not only were the individuals doing better, but the teams were as well. “Last year the boys bowling team won like two meets and this year we won five,” Sheahan said. “Everyone is doing better which makes it more fun to compete.” Being only sophomores, Dees and Sheahan felt honored to set the highest bowling scores in the history of their school. “It was really cool to get the highest score as a CELEBRATE sophomore,” Sheahan said. “The team and school Above: Excited about his strike, Anderson gets and coaches were all really supportive. They said my ready to do a dance. “After I get a strike, I make sure to celebrate in a crazy but appropriate fashname on the loud speaker on the bowling alley.” ion, usually the stanky leg dance.” Photo by Anna They also announced his name on the announcePetrow. ments the next day at school recognizing his achievements. “I know most kids might think it’s dorky or something to be so excited about bowling,” Sheahan said. “And maybe it is, but it means that I am the best that our school has ever seen. Not many kids can say that about their sports.” Both of the sophomore bowlers planned on continuing bowling for the rest of their time at East, but for different reasons. The main reason Dees planned to bowl was because everyone in her family bowled in high school. For Sheahan, it was simply for the love CONGRATULATE of the game. Above: His friends praise him for his strike. “We are very loud and vocal, and we high five each “I’m proud of my score, but I hope I can beat it next other,” he said. “Our team motto was to have the year,” Sheahan said. “My goal for next year will just be most fun and make sure that everyone felt good anything higher than 270.” Story by Katie East. or was encouraged.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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BOWLING 83


BAKER

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lyl good gingerbread cookies. I made 300 of them for Christmas and gave them to my friends.”

SEE ALSO

KILEY LAWRENCE 11 Audu“Ibi mina ashaitan i errajeem likeAllah bakingicupcakes the best, but I also make real-

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginnin my soul within me with compassion – abundant is Your faithfulness! Subhanaka All thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. haolam, Asher kidshanu bemitsvotav vetsivanu al netilat yadayim. Baruch Atah, ETERNAL FATHER, by virtue of Your generosity and love, I ask that You accep

alfie kass

jewish

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n orange kippah poked out from a tangled mess of brown locks. Junior Alfie Kass chose to wear his kippah, signifying his daily commitment to Judaism during the third quarter. “[Before], I didn’t really care that much about my religion,” Kass said. “Then I went on a trip with a Jewish youth organization, and it really made me look at [my religion] differently.” After establishing this new outlook, Kass decided to help students of the same faith to lean on each other and have fun. His junior year, he served as president of the Jewish Students Union (JSU). This helped him to open a new line of communication for those students. “We don’t really push religion,” Kass said. “It’s

christian

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just a chill place to hang out with people of your own religion.” Even with greater comfort throughout the school surrounding the religion, there were still preconceived ideas about it. “We get a lot of money stereotypes which are completely untrue,” Kass said. “If [people] want to be jerks, then they can. I just walk by and try to ignore it.” Kass became accustomed to discussing the tough topics involved in his beliefs. “[My friends and I] get into debates about beliefs, abortion, gay marriage,” Kass said. “It’s important to share my beliefs and ideas with others.”

anne johnson

battle of parishes commenced annually at the end of the fiscal year. Bright and early, after mass and after communion was blessed and received, athletic competitions took place followed by dancing contests. These contests set apart the winning parish as the best Catholic church in the small section of India that housed only three other parishes. Junior Anne Johnson was one of a strong group of Catholics in India. Her time was spent with Hindu friends, who she separated from on Sundays to go to Mass while they went to the temple. “We were really separated by that, but I remember going to my friend’s temple one time,” Johnson said. “But it wasn’t difficult being friends with them.

I grew up that way; it’s all I remember.” Two years ago, the Johnsons moved to the United States and joined Cure of Ars Parish in Overland Park, Kansas. Though she was a devout Christian, her appearance caused others to believe otherwise. “Sometimes people think I am Hindu,” Johnson said. “They assume I am because I’m from India, and many people there are Hindu.” Although she was often mistaken for another religion, Johnson didn’t care. Instead, she was encouraged to further embrace her own religion. “Anyone could make mistakes when judging things,” Johnson said. “I just really hope to grow more in my beliefs in Christ and grow deeper in my faith.”

khadijah Smith

muslim

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er friends knew she was Muslim. They knew she worshipped every Sunday and listened to the taileem. Her boy friends understood she was off limits to date. They knew she was not able to smoke or drink on both legal and religious grounds. “I’m not supposed to mix with the opposite sex,” junior Khadijah Smith said. “I still have guy friends, but we don’t go on dates, not even group dates. There is nothing that says you can’t have friends.” Smith grew up between her Muslim father and Christian mother. When they split, she lived with her father and eventually chose to follow the Muslim faith. However, with that decision came responsibility and repercussions. “My step mom is kind of against Islam, and sometimes she doesn’t allow me to wear my hijab [scarf to cover hair, symbol of modesty],” Smith said. “I do what she says just to keep the drama at a minimum.” Smith enjoyed wearing her hijab as a symbol of her religion and its be-

84 JANUARY

liefs. “It’s not about labeling myself as a Muslim. I just prefer to wear it,” Smith said. But with the physical sign of Islam came a large amount of ideas from media, government and personal stereotypes. “Since 9/11 especially, people just think Muslims are violent people who are going to blow up buildings and kill innocent people,” Smith said. “But really, Islam is a faith of peaceful people.” Smith explained her beliefs to those who questioned it at lunch, in class or at friends’ houses to steer them away from false ideas. “I am who I am, my faith is what it is,” Smith said. “There are extremists in every religion. It’s something that I have to deal with, and for others there are extremist behaviors that they have to deal with.” Stories by Emily Collins.


ng, is now, and ever shall be, world without end, Amen. I gratefully thank You, O living and eternal King, for You have returned lah humma wa bihamdika, wa tabaraka ismuka, wa ta'ala jadduka, wa la ilaha ghairuk.Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with Holy Mary, mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. Baruch Atah, Adonai Elohei’nu Melech Adonai Elohei’nu. And blessed is Your Name, and exalted is Your Majesty. And there is no deity to be worshipped but You. pt all my actions, and that You multiply their value in favor of every Soul in Purgatory. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen. Photo by Kit Andreson. Photos by Meghan Benson.

in their

OPPOSITE PERSPECTIVES

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Left: With a Muslim father and a Christian mother, opinions at home conflicted at times for junior Khadijah Smith. Living in a mixed-religion home taught Smith to see things from different perspectives and express her opinions respectfully. “Sometimes we have our differences and don’t get along,” Smith said. “We just all have to be careful about what we say.” Photos by Peter Bautz.

STICKING THROUGH

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Above: When junior Anne Johnson moved to the United States two years ago, she brought her religion with her. Although people often thought she was Hindu due to her nationality, Johnson’s parents raised her as a Christian and encouraged this faith in their home. “The principles we follow in our house follow our religion,” Johnson said. “We pray every day and follow many of the rules of our religion.” Photos by Anna Petrow.

A NEW VIEW

junior Alfie Kass’s Bar Mitzvah was held during his seventh grade year, true >eagerness > Right: Although to embrace his Jewish heritage did not come until his junior year. Kass’s decision to

hands

During prayer, these students often use certain objects. Photos by Kit Andreson.

“This is a rosary. When you pray the rosary, you are asking Mary to pray for you. In India, we sang the prayers, and at home we say them in Tamil.”

Anne Johnson 11

fully devote himself to his faith had a great impact on his life. “My faith makes me feel guided, and I’m happier a lot more of the time,” Kass said. “Religion makes me feel more responsible for myself; it makes me watch out for my actions more.” Photos by Andrea Zecy.

STUDENTS FROM DIFFERENT RELIGIONS HELP OTHERS TO SEE

THROUGHTHEIR

eyes

“This is a kipa, or yamikah. Wearing a yamikah reminds you that God is watching you and encourages you to make good choices.”

Alfie Kass 11

“This is my headscarf. It symbolizes modesty. Covering myself with one is a way of purifying myself before prayer.”

Khadijah Smith 11

DESIGN BY GABY THOMPSON.

STUDENT RELIGIONS 85


WORK IT OUT

MR. ROBOTO

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Above: Junior Qi Chen and sophomore Tyler Cecil program the robot on the computer. “We were basically trying to get the joystick to move the right motor,” Chen said. “We work in lab view when we program.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH.

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

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Junior John Opsahl fixes the robot’s bottom roller. “I’m the head of the mechanical team,” Opsahl said. “I have like three or four guys that I show how to do stuff.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

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SME ROBOTICS CLUB MEMBERS BLEND THEIR TALENTS AND PUT TOGETHER A WINNING TEAM.

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Above: The SME Sargon Robotics team competes at the Kansas Regional Competition. “It’s a game of strategy,” junior John Opsahl said. “It’s one of our team strengths. Other teams don’t really think about it.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

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Left: Sophomore Niko Colom works on getting the electronics attached to the robot’s plexiglass. “I have been helping all around,” Colom said. “I have helped with the bumpers, pit design, website and outreach.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

B+L+E+N+D Robotics team members describe what gets plugged into the club’s equation.

SHOOTER

“The robot’s job is to pick up the moon rocks and get it to me, the shooter. The shooters then have to get it into the trailer.”

Kyle Engelken 10 T-SHIRTS

“I tried to make the tshirts look like pop art. We did them by hand with silk screening, but it was worth the effort.”

John Troupe 11 NICK-NAME

“We call our robot the ‘brave little blender.’ Last year it was the ‘brave little toaster,’ but this year it looks like a blender.”

SHARING THE KNOWLEDGE

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Above: At a Brookwood Elementary School outreach day, Robotics club member Duncan Gibbs helps kids with their projects. “My favorite part is the kids,” Gibbs said. “I appreciate their enthusiasm. I like seeing them doing the problem solving.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Nathan Klein 12

SEE ALSO

GAME TIME

cooting into the battle ring, ‘Brave Little Blender’ suddenly refused to respond to the remote control. Sophomore Tyler Cecil grabbed the robot and brought it to the side of the ring to work on it. After a few minutes, the team gave up on the 120-pound blender-shaped robot. East’s team looked to the other two school teams in their alliance for a replacement. Although ‘Brave Little Blender died’ and got 30th robot overall, he put up a good fight. In the semifinals with the replacement robot, East’s alliance lost by 15 points. “Although we lost in the semifinals, ‘Brave Little Blender’ was still a successful robot,” Cecil said. “We had two point matches until the last one.” Upon hearing the phrase ‘robot battle,’ most people may think of tiny robots hitting each other. But instead, the Robotics Club’s 120-pound, $7,500 robot was supposed to try and throw small orbit balls into the opposing robot’s trailer tied to the back of it. Three teammates from each team stood around the arena and helped their robot by tossing balls into the other robot. Although the battle was what the clubs were known for, it took much more than a single day of battle to define the SME Robotics Club’s year with their ‘Brave Little Blender.’ The team’s robot didn’t make it as far as they’d hoped, but he still made them proud. By working on the robot for six weeks straight, the team bonded not only with the complex bot, but also with each other. “My favorite part of being on the team is just seeing each other so often,” junior Qi Chen said. “We see each other every Monday and Wednesday, and even more during the season. We learn to get along and we share each other’s successes and failures. We’re really close.” Although battling to win, the Robotics Club prided itself on caring more about the final outcome than the present battle between schools. Founders of the club knew that many of the members would someday be engineers and needed to learn to work together. This focus for the competition was shown when East’s alliance was forced to rely on other teams for help. Without the replacement robot from another team, the alliance could not have gone on after ‘Brave Little Blender.’ “[Founders of the club] encourage the idea that while competing everyone helps each other out,” Cecil said. “There’s a lot of energy [at the battles], but if one school’s robot is down, everyone comes in to fix it.” With its new website and growing number of members each year, the SME Robotics Club grew in popularity. Before, the team relied on technology-savvy students who had a true love for building robots. Students heard of the club in different ways. Chen, for instance, was in a Hydrogen Car Club in eighth grade. The club got him interested in the idea of building a robot once he got to high school. Sophomore Tyler Cecil had his own reasons for joining. “My freshman year I heard an announcement about [the Robotics Club] and in my mind I thought of battling bots,” Cecil said. “From day one I thought it was the coolest thing.” Story by Sydney Henley.

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DANIEL GRITZ 12 “My favorite authors are George R.R. Martin and Neil Gaiman. I really like the ‘Song of Ice and Fire’ series [by Martin]. It avoids the normal hero vs. evil story. [Martin’s] not afraid to kill off nice characters.”

SCI-FI AND FANTASY READER ROBOTICS 87


FISHERMAN

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“I usually like to fish at Leawood Park. Fishing has been a hobby for about my whole. My grandpa got me into fishing because he used to take me fishing as a kid.”

SEE ALSO

BRANDON ROYLE 12

THEIR

WRESTLING OPTIONS JV wrestlers contract Staph infection during the season, but work to keep spirits high with regular practice schedules and DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH. season meets.

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s he looked in the mirror he saw every wrestler’s nightmare. A big, bright pink splotch graced JV wrestler sophomore Bobby Dettenwanger’s forehead. He thought about reaching up to scratch. He wanted to scratch it, but he knew what it was right when he saw it, and the last thing that he wanted was to spread it. Later on that day while he walked the halls at school, Dettenwanger saw fellow JV wrestler sophomore David Hill with Band-Aids laced around his elbows, which Dettenwanger could only assume were hiding the infection that he himself had contracted. During wrestling season last year, nearly all of the JV boys team contracted Staph infection from the hours that they spent sweating and tumbling around on the same mats everyday for about four months. There was not much that the team could do for the mats to keep them clean except disinfect them with cleaning solutions, which the team remembered to do more often after the small outbreak this season. The team knew before-hand that poor sanitation could lead to an infection like Staph. Staphylococcus is a type of infection that is carried by 25% of all people. It is usually found being carried in the nose, the mouth, the genitals and the anal area. The type of Staph infection that involves the skin is called cellulitis, and is treatable with antibiotics. Staph infection usually starts with a small cut or scrape on the skin’s surface. It typically has symptoms of rash or redness. Not all Staph infections need to be treated, but when it is severe and it goes without treatment it can lead to fever and night sweats. The Staph that most of the boys contracted was not severe enough for any treatment other than to be washed and covered with cream and Band-Aids. “I had marks on my forehead that looked like huge pimples that had been picked really bad,” Dettenwanger said,

“or like someone scraped my head against the sidewalk.” Although the majority of the team was infected, they didn’t get time off. The boys just covered their wounds and got back on the mats to practice and compete. “It wasn’t a big deal that we had to keep wrestling,” Hill said. “The coaches are tough, and none of us really expected a break.” The main reason the team didn’t get a break was because of the number infected. “With so many kids infected, we couldn’t afford to let everyone sit out,” assistant coach John Carr said. “And with wrestling, kids need to keep practicing to stay in shape and keep their weight.” “The Staph wasn’t only inconvenient to wrestle with,” Hill said, “it was also kind of embarrassing to explain to people that the rash that they saw was Staph infection.” Most of the wrestlers had this same problem with their infection. “I was sort of jealous of the places other people’s showed up,” Dettenwanger said. “Mine was in the very middle of my forehead where everyone could see it.” Some of Dettenwanger’s friends joked around with him about catching the infection from him. “I know they were just joking around with me, but some took it a little too far, and it got old really fast,” Dettenwanger said. Although it was only a minor set-back in their training and a temporary clash against their complexions, the boys dealt with this challenge among others. “Just because it was only something small doesn’t mean we like it,” Dettenwanger said. “I think I can speak for us all when I say that we hope it is the last time something like this happens to our team.” Story by Katie East.

Inside Perspective Teammates share their insights into the technique and practice needed in wrestling.

Chase Woofter 10

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“I always focus on my next match because anything can happen. You can’t take anything lightly. You have to prepare the same everytime.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

Pete Uhl 11

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“We lift weights and try to gain endurance by running a lot. Sometimes, we give each other piggyback rides to make the workouts even tougher. [In a match], you have to make sure you can last the six minutes so you have a chance to win.” Photo by Rachel English.

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UNDER PRESSURE

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Attempting to flip his opponent, senior Michael Perez tries to keep up his intensity in the second period. “There’s not a lot of time to get your stuff done,” Perez said. “You’ve got to get out fast and get points quickly to get the advantage.” Photo by Rachel English.

GETTING AN ADVANTAGE

AN UPHILL BATTLE

Far left: Practicing hand-wrestling techniques during practice, junior Tanner Johnson tries to gain the advantage. According to Johnson, these moves were frequently used in matches. “Before a match, I try to visualize it,” Johnson said. “I go through the motions and think of different scenarios that I will probably be faced with.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

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Left: Conditioning for the season, junior Jeff Rutherford runs intervals up the hill to the senior lot. “I heard this quote once, ‘Once you’ve wrestled, everything in life is easier,’” Rutherford said. “I don’t fully agree with that, but wrestling’s still pretty tough. Photo by Lucy Faerber.

CROWD SUPPORT

Holding his opponent in a ‘head and >arm’ > Right: position, sophomore Carter Kerr at-

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Left: As a team manager, sophomore Bailey Spickler supports the wrestlers at a meet. “The guys don’t have many fans at their meets,” Spickler said. “So, it’s important for the people that are there to support them.” Photo by Ali Yaqubian.

TIMELY TECHNIQUE

tempts to pin him. “It takes a whole lot of time to learn the little things [with technique],” Kerr said. “The more experience you have before matches, the more advantage you have over your opponent.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

WRESTLING 89


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SKATEBOARD PHOTOGRAPHER

SEE ALSO

ANDY ALLEN 12 “I like to take pictures of my friends skateboarding. We go to different places around Kansas City. We usually go to a big stair set or a gap, and we’ll throw down.”

SHARING A STICKER

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Above: Receiving a sticker from seniors Rikki Eymann and Abba Goehausen, senior Bryan Parman looks dressed up for the SHARE fair. “I was [at the SHARE fair] for the blood drive project,” Parman said. “I didn’t do much there, but I dressed up in an obnoxious costume.” Photo by Rachel English.

DOWn SYndrome dance

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ancing with her friends at the Down Syndrome Dance, senior Katie Bartow felt a tap on her shoulder. A boy she didn’t recognize from another school shyly asked, “May I have this dance?” He blushed as Bartow took his hand and led him into the middle of the dance floor. “It was really sweet when he asked me to dance,” Bartow said. “It just kind of showed how everyone there had a great time.”

90 JANUARY

At the Valentine’s Day themed Down Syndrome dance, special needs students got a chance to socialize with other students from around the city and in their school. To make the night as memorable as possible, chair Bartow went early and decorated the cafeteria with streamers, Valentine’s Day posters, and cool lights. The karaoke and dance filled night was something many of them looked forward to throughout the year.

Senior Anna Leek saw the special needs students daily at the coffee shop and social skills class, and they talked her into going for the first time her sophomore year. “My favorite part of the dance as seeing everyone that went last year,” senior Anna Leek said. “A lot of the kids are from other schools so it was really fun to see how they’ve changed since last year’s dance.” Stories by Sydney Henley.


SEPARATING FOR SERVICE

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Far left: Working at the SHARE fair, junior Gaby Thompson separates clothing. “It was so fun seeing the crazy stuff that came in and trying on costumes,” Thompson said. “We saw all this junk and wondered where it all came from.” Photo by Rachel English.

EASY RIDER

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Middle left: Being pushed by junior Amanda Privatera, junior Annie Bennet rolls around in a wheelchair. “My friends are actually in charge of the Brighton Garden SHARE project,” Bennet said,” so that was their way of attracting people to their stand.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY

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Left: During the Down Syndrome Dance, senior Anna Leek stands next to senior Jordan Halsey. Throughout the night they danced several line dances, including the “Electric Slide” and the “Macarena.” “This was my second year going to the dance,” Leek said. “It was so fun to meet new people and dance; you dance with everyone.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

a shared

experience DESIGN BY STEPHEN NICHOLS.

STUDENTS WORK TO IMPACT THE SME COMMUNITY BY JOINING SHARE PROJECTS THAT RANGE FROM HELPING THE ELDERLY TO WORKING AT THE ANNUAL BLOOD DRIVE.

HOop dreams

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enior David DeGoler waited while the kids ran to grab basketballs at the edge of the court. He caught the ball as a ten-year-old boy threw it toward him. He recognized the boy from his previous visit. DeGoler helped him dribble, showing him techniques so that the ball wouldn’t get away from him. The boy made it to the end of the court and smiled back at DeGoler. “My favorite part of the project is getting to play with the kids,” Degoler said. “I really enjoy playing with them, and you can tell they have fun too.” Every other week co-chairs Degoler and senior Joe Lynch and

other volunteers drove down to 79th and Roe. There they played basketball with underprivileged kids ages ten to twelve who had anger control problems. The practiced lay-ups, free throw shots and all other aspects of basketball. Playing basketball gave the kids an opportunity to put their anger into sports, in addition to having fun. Since many of the kids came regularly to the program, DeGoler and Lynch recognized the kids each time they went. “I love seeing the kids’ faces every time,” Lynch said. “They have a lot of fun playing, especially since, because of their social problems, they don’t get an opportunity to play otherwise.”

PET PALS

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s the dog knelt down to drink from his water bowl, senior Sarah Pavlu petted it’s soft fur. The paralyzed dog dragged his back legs behind him. As he lapped up water, Pavlu watched him cautiously; the employee at Pet Connection told her earlier that he could easily drown in his own water bowl if no one was watching him. Although the dog could not walk well, he still brought a smile to Pavlu’s face when he nuzzled her hand to be petted. “I feel like [Pet Connection] really needs our help,” Pavlu said. “Plus it’s really easy to help out; we just walk the dogs or play

with them.” Because of their love for animals, Pavlu and senior Alyssa Jonson signed up for SHARE’s Pet Pals. On Saturdays, they went with a group of freshmen and members of SHARE to Pet Connection in Mission and helped out by cleaning cages, walking dogs and giving the cats social time by playing with them. Since Jonson planned on becoming a veterinarian in the future, Pet Connection seemed like a good SHARE project for her to do. “My favorite part of going to Pet Connection is walking the dogs,” Jonson said. “It’s really relaxing on a nice day.”

SHARING A MEMORY SHARE participants talk about past experiences during various volunteer events. “I really loved helping out at St. Vincent’s. We gave the kids piggyback rides all afternoon, and I think I had just as much fun as they did.”

Camille Goehausen 9

“It’s just fun just seeing the kids get presents, and sometimes they think that the toys and yo-yos are really cool.”

Margaret Brill 11

“For some of the the kids, the only stuff they get is the stuff you bring them. You kind of realize how lucky you are.”

Stewart Jensen 11 SHARE 91


DESIGN BY MEG SHACKELFORD.

MIXINGitUP MISSING NEARLY ENTIRE DAYS OF SCHOOL, JUNIORS AND SENIORS SACRIFICE TIME AT EAST TO PURSUE THEIR PASSIONS.

PUZZLE PIECES

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reshman year, senior Harrison Wendlant blindly enrolled in Catherine Siegel’s Commercial art class. It instantly stuck with him, so he decided to enroll in the Graphic Design Technology 1 class at Broadmoor his senior year. Studying at Broadmoor allowed Wendlandt to improve his skills, creating short and long term benefits. “My greatest accomplishment was actually being chosen to complete a second year project, despite being a first year student,” Wendlant said. “We’re currently working on a real package design for a First Round sports Drink.” Along with small accomplishments came larger goals for the future. “The skills you learn at Broadmoor are actually skills you need to know if you ever want to go into the Graphic Design field,” Wendlandt said. “Next year I’m planning on attending KU Fine Arts and majoring in Graphic Design and Illustration, then eventually getting a job in the field.”

ABSTRACT FUN

Above: Senior Hannah Anderson plays around with an abstract color wheel on Photoshop during her Graphic Design class. “I always get stuff done early so I can have play time,” Anderson said. “A lot of times I frame my projects and give them to my friends as presents.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

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graphic design

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Above: Senior Hannah Gasaway puts together pattern pieces she drafted. They would eventually make up her senior Prom dress. “It has been my favorite project all year,” Gasaway said. “I really want to start dying fabrics on my own outside of class so I can change the color of it if I want.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

fashion

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ince he was young and tagged along with his dad to ballet recitals, senior Colin Coit had an artistic eye and a passion to flatter women in clothing. His senior year, Coit took interest in the Fashion History and Design class at Broadmoor. The work continued outside of school, as Coit used the lessons in class to create extra clothing, much of which he wore himself. “I made a belt that’s reversible, brown on one side and then a sort of woven sea of colors [on the other],” Coit said. ”I wear it all the time; it’s cool to say ‘I made it’ when someone asks where I got it.” Coit hoped to work at the Betsey Johnson boutique as a fashion merchandiser, although job opportunities there were often scarce. However, being a man in fashion was something to overcome; the stigma of being a male designer followed Coit as he developed as a designer. “[While] it’s a greater challenge,” Coit said, “I’ll deal with it until I prove everyone that I can [design] as good as or better than any woman.”

POURING IT ON

SERVING THEIR BEST

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Above: Senior Jim Stanton, junior Andy Wickersham and senior Erica Hollingsworth laugh while making a dish in their culinary class. “My favorite assignment that we have done is probably working with the seafood,” Stanton said. “I like experimenting with the different cooking methods.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

92 JANUARY

c u li n a r y a r t s

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Below: Senior Jacob Selby lays out pancake batter with his ladle. “Other than having free food all the time, there is always something to do, which I like the most,” Selby said. Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

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s a freshman, senior Paxton Gross saw a commercial for Ace of Cakes, and he marked it on his calendar to watch later that week. After half an hour of watching, Gross was hooked. He knew then that Broadmoor was an obvious choice to follow through with this promise to himself. “It gave me experience to be comfortable with cooking so that when I go out in the industry I won’t look dumb,” Gross said. But the learning experience came with some difficulties. “The toughest part is getting the recipe just right and using the correct techniques and mastering them,” Gross said. Gross planned to enter a qualified culinary school and continue his education of baking and pastrymaking, assimilating himself to the Head Chef on Ace of Cakes. Stories by Emily Collins.


STACKED CUISINE

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Left: Senior Danielle White puts a reuben club sandwich together in her culinary class. “I feel most comfortable with making entrees like these because their preparation is more interesting, and there’s a lot more going into it,” White said. “Appetizers are short and not that fun to make.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

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cooking items Danielle White 12 can’t live without

“I love working with

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wood grills. I think the wood adds a lot more flavor to the food than regular oven grills.”

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“I can’t live without my skull cap. I’m not going to wear anyone else’s! We always have to have something covering our heads.”

SEE ALSO

“Rubber gloves are a must for sanitation reasons. We wear them when we work with raw meat or fish.”

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CAROLINE SHERIDAN 11 “I volunteer with middle schoolers on Wednesday nights. We do service projects someimes. I like being able to be there for them and help with their transfer to high school because I remember that age.”

CHURCH VOLUNTEER BROADMOOR CLASSES 93


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ERY DAY IN GYM. • SOPHOMORE THOMAS LOUDON HAD PLAYED ICE HOCKEY SINCE HE WAS THREE YEARS OLD. HE PLAYED FOR CARRIAGE

GETTING INTO CHARACTER

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Leaning his head towards the ceiling, junior Brice Roberts patiently waits while senior Christina Benyon finishes his makeup for the spring play, Woyzec. Roberts played the charlatan, the character who ran the circus. “I probably had the most intense makeup out of anyone else in the show,” Roberts said. “I had to tie up my bangs so that they wouldn’t fall into the makeup. It was a big part of the expressionistic nature of the play.” Photo by Rachel English.

games were once a week on either saturday or sunday, and he played with friends such as sophomores David Owen 94 FEBRUARY


FEBRUARY

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E CLUB AND THE JUNIOR BLADES BEFORE JOINING THE KANSAS CITY OUTLAWS TEAM HIS FRESHMAN YEAR. • JUNIOR MA G

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“I didn’t do photography back [when I lived] in Holland. [I started] because all of the projects looked interesting when I came here. Everyone can find a story behind an image. An image says more than words.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 96 – 97

CREATIVE DEDICATION

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Above: Sitting with her friend, senior Gina Legrotte, senior Hannah Eggleston eats lunch in front of the art classes. Eggleston was an active art student, taking photography, painting, ceramics and drawing throughout high school. “[Legrotte] and I couldn’t go out for senior lunch because of the weather, so we decided to work on our projects after we were done eating,” Eggleston said. “I always really like being creative and mixing colors.” Photo by Patrick Mayfield.

2 HUNTER STEVENSON 11 >> SME swimmer “This year was more of a team effort winning the League [championship] and getting third at State. At State this year, [my] 200 free relay was completely different [without seniors from last year], but we still won.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 98 – 99

3 JOHN KURTZ 12 >> Sweetheart candidate “David Beeder, Sam Watson and [Robert] Enders were the ones to wake me up. They blew an air horn and freaked my dog out. She went into attack mode. You could say I was really surprised. I didn’t think I would actually get [nominated]. It was definitely a cool experience because it only happens senior year. [The boy nominees] got to eat a free lunch at Johnny’s, which I liked because [I regularly] don’t really get to hang out with all the nominees.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 100 – 101

4 ALLIE FIELDS 11 >> SME lancer dancer

CHEERING FOR A CAUSE

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Above: While protesting at the Fred Phelp’s rally, seniors Lyndsey Seck and Kelsey Henry cheer for donations. They, like many other East students, collected donations for the fight against AIDS. “Being [at the rally] was a surreal experience,” Seck said. “It really opened my eyes to how small-minded people can be. It just blew my mind.” Photo by Rachel English.

“I’ve taken dance classes since I was little. There are even some girls on my [drill] team that I have been dancing with since then. I came to high school knowing that I would have a group of friends that I would get to see every day, which I loved. I am really hoping to be on the varsity team next year, but you never know how [tryouts] will turn out. No matter what happens, I will be happy because I’ve had a great experience with the Lancer Dancers.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 102 – 103

5 NATALIE HINE 11 >> Woyzec student director

INTELLECTUAL PASTTIME

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Above: While sitting in the library after school one day, senior Stuart Jones watches while friends play chess. He played about once a month, whenever he had free time while in the library. “I didn’t even know how to play in the beginning; I didn’t even know where any of the pieces were supposed to be moved,” Jones said. “It takes some brain power, so its different than most games.” Photo by Patrick Mayfield.

“[Woyzec] was a really experimental show. Most theaters don’t do it because...the main character is schizophrenic, so it’s really difficult to find an actor who is talented enough to play the role; we were lucky enough to find [senior] Alec Hynes, who is incredibly talented. I did a lot of organization. I sat in on every rehearsal and made sure everyone had everything they needed. It was a really interesting and awesome experience to watch the characters form. SEE ALSO: PAGES 104 – 105

G I E TOWNSEND TANNED EASILY WHEN SHE WAS YOUNGER. BECAUSE OF HER COLOR, HER PARENTS CALLED HER MARGARITA. •

1 SANNE POSTMA 12

S ophomore Alex Pirotte played GABL basketball all winter during his freshman and sophomore years. Hi FEBRUARY DIVISION 95


1 POSITIVELY NEGATIVE

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Below: Searching for the perfect photo, sophomore Dana Sherard looks through a strip of negatives. Picking out pictures to develop was difficult due to the negatives’ small size. “I look for good contrast and lighting,” Sherard said. “I also like the picture to be focused and have good composition.” Photo by Rachel English.

the assignment

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for assignments such as ‘texture’ and ‘angles.’ “The assignments are never really technical,” Hartnett said. “It’s a lot of opinion based especially in Photo 2, we become more like artists than students.” But the photographers are technically still students and must follow the procedures to get the shots they need for due dates and the photos they want to develop. “There are basic things to do anytime you want to take pictures, like load the camera and get the correct settings,” Hartnett said. "I have a cheat sheet." Perspective: A visible scene, esp. one extending to a distance. The way in which some one sees a subject. A tool used to express the mood of the photographer and their viewpoint on the subject and theme of their assignment in Photo classes 1 and 2.

erspective: The state of one’s ideas, the facts known to one, etc., in having a meaningful interrelationship. A mental view or prospect. An assignment in Photography 1. The very personal aspect of art classes showed through their styles of going about shooting and capturing the mood they wanted to create. Sophomore Lindsey Hartnett, a Photo 2 student, learned through class and personal experience what to look for during an assignment: everything. “It’s all about keeping your eyes open and looking at things while driving instead of just seeing,” Hartnett said. “When you make mental notes of parks or buildings throughout the year you have a data base of places to use for assignments. I’ve gone to Antioch Park to get grass texture and to St. Louis to shoot a gravel road.” Nature was the most useful tool for Hartnett as she sought out subjects

PS O

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d e ve l o p i n g t h e

DESIGN

BY G

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POSITIVELY NEGATIVE

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Below: Using a light table, junior Valerie Fisher chooses a picture to develop. Instead of holding negatives up to a light to see them, students can simply lay them down on a light table. “Once on the light table, you can look at them up close,” Fisher said. “I use it whenever I need to light up a picture better.” Photo by Rachel English.

96 FEBRUARY

along with creatively.” With chemicals and creative juices flowing in room 204, the students created a comfortable atmosphere. Red party lights illuminated small sections of the dark room, but life bumped into the room through the round sliding doors through the odd words and beats of Bjork. “Mr. Finkelston plays really off-thewall music,” Meurer said. “His CD collection is random and a little confusing. If you’re the kind of person who is motivated or inspired by music, his is definitely going to do it for you.” After disappointments, scares, reshoots and chemical spills, the production of an actual print is true excitement. “It can be frustrating, but after the product comes out, you really feel accomplished,” Meurer said. Development: A significant consequence; significant event. The production and sometimes destruction of photos which Photography 1 and 2 students labored over. Stories by Emily Collins.

2

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evelopment: The act process of developing; progress. The most frustrating and rewarding step of Photo. After chemical baths, recycling, reels and funnels, the film was uncovered by a water rinse. But not before dodging attacks. “There are a lot of things that can go wrong through the process,” Photo 1 student, sophomore Riley Meurer said. “You can expose your film when you take it out of the camera, over agitate, which leaves streaks on the film or even touching and completely ruining the film.” To help the students save their film more often than Meurer’s 6 out of 8 destroyed rolls, the dark room was enlarged and rearranged for better efficiency. “It’s very easy to let you creativity flow when things are in the right places," Meurer said. “[Art teacher Adam] Finkelston always has paper or any odd thing I’m missing. His motto is ‘ask and you shall receive.’ He supports us in that way

the class

STUDENTS LEARN THE PROCESSES OF PHOTOGRAPHY THROUGH TAKING AND DEVELOPING PHOTOS IN CLASSES OFFERED AT EAST.


SEE ALSO

>>

SANNE POSTMA 12 “Where I work back home in Holland we give surfing, wind surfing, body-boarding and parasailing lessons. I miss the beach a lot, so I’m really looking forward to summer.”

SURFING INSTRUCTOR

DOWN LOW

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Left: During his seventh hour Advanced Photo class, junior Ali Yaqubian takes pictures by the junior lot for an assignment. Yaqubian enjoyed all kinds of photography. “I shoot a lot of skateboarding,” Yaqubian said. “It is a good hobby and a good form of creation.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

WINTER WONDERLAND

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Far Left: On a randomly snowy March Saturday, junior Avery West takes a picture of one of many random objects around her neighborhood. “I was looking for a variety of textures for an assignment – something like a rusty fire hydrant or smooth water,” West said. Photo by Rachel English.

FINDING THE PERFECT SPOT

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With many urban subjects to choose from, junior Kiley Lawrence takes pictures near a colorful graffiti wall in downtown Kansas City. Lawrence took pictures for her assignments in many different places, her favorite being an old abandoned farm near St. Louis. “I usually drive around remote areas to find things to shoot,” Lawrence said. “I find interesting places I otherwise wouldn’t find.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

3

the finished product

Photography students tell the stories behind their photographs.

“ANNE”

“AN INFERNO”

“LINES OF SPACE”

“MYSTERIOUS FIGURE” “LIVING IN CONSTRUCTION

Brady Anderson 12

Emma Tyler 10

Matt LaVoie 12

Ellen Stanziola 11

Katie Fay 11

“I thought it would be creative to morph two faces. I had seen similar pictures before, so I was inspired to try it myself.”

“I took the picture down at the Plaza. I was assigned ‘lines and space,’ and I liked the bridge with Japanese lanterns.”

“It’s a picture of the construction when there were only a few beams. I wanted something abstract so that nobody would know what it is.”

“I took this picture because of the proportion between the stairs and the girl, which makes her look smaller than a regular person would.”

“I was walking down an alley at the Plaza and liked the way it looked. I tried different exposures, and picked the middle exposure because it showed more contrast.”

PHOTOGRAPHY CLASSES 97


MEETING

expectations DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH.

THE BOYS FAIL TO WIN FIRST PLACE AT STATE BUT STAY STRONG WITH A THIRD PLACE FINISH.

400 yard freestyle relay took third place at State. Another swimmer who found success at the State meet was sophomore Andrew Watkins. In his 100 yard breaststroke race, he dropped more than nine seconds on his time throughout the season. At the State meet, he finished sixth in that race. “It was cool to get so much help from all of the upperclassman swimmers,” Watkins said. “They helped me learn techniques and strategy. It was cool that by the end of the season, I could keep up and compete with them.” Sophomore Nathan Simpson, a swimmer who didn’t necessarily earn bragging rights TEAM-FIRST Above: Swimming the 100 yard breaststroke at the Olathe from State races, gained something else from Invitational, senior Spencer Sherard places second, scoring points for the team. The team went on to place first overall. “It’s the season. He learned what could happened rewarding for the whole team to win because everyone knows when hard work, dedication and talent were all that they chipped in,” Sherard said. “To win a meet, it’s a huge relief, and we feel happy about it.” Photo by Anna Petrow. put together. “The seniors were amazing to work with this year,” Simpson said. “They were such a big motivation. They were the ones who went out and swam the events and swam them well.” Simpson wouldn’t be happy to see the seniors leave at the end of the year, but he felt confident about his own swimming for upcoming seasons. “[The seniors] were experienced,” Simpson said. “They were able to pass down their knowledge.” Story by Katie East.

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is toes curled up around the edge of the rough board as his fingers gripped the edge beside them. He took one final, deep breath and then catapulted himself into the water, pushing off from the block with every muscle in his body. He let the water carry him a little ways before snapping his head up and bringing both arms up to push the water behind him. Senior Spencer Sherard was swimming his favorite style, the butterfly. For the first time in five years, East didn’t win the State title in mens swimming. They did, however, win their sixth consecutive League Championship on Feb. 7. Sherard placed third that day in the 100 yard butterfly and fifth in the 50 yard freestyle. He was also a part of the 200 yard freestyle relay. He had been a four-time state qualifier who was a part of the varsity swim team for four state titles in a row. Unfortunately, Sherard fell to third his senior year. At state, Sherard’s 200 yard medley relay took fourth place. His 100 yard butterfly earned him third place, and he got fifth place in the 50 yard freestyle. Sherard was a part of the 200 yard freestyle relay that won first place at the State competition. Another member of the 200 yard relay was junior Hunter Stevenson, who had three State titles on his record before his junior year. His

PRE-MEET ANTHEM

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Above right: Before an early season home meet, junior Harper Coulson sings along to the national anthem. “It’s just kind of a thing we do to make home meets more special than others,” Coulson said. “The home meets are special because we’re kind of expected to win, and there are a lot of parents and friends at home meets.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

TESTING THE WATERS

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Right: Trying to qualify for State in several events, junior Hunter Stevenson tries the Individual Medley. Stevenson qualified, but the butterfly leg of the race still challenged him. “It takes different technique than my other strokes,” Stevenson said. “It works a lot more with the shoulders and has a different rythm.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Dealing with pressure

>>

Coming off of a four-peat State championship, the boys swimming team copes with pressures coming from

“There may have been expectations from other people, but personally I didn’t really have expectations to achieve anything specific. I just expected us to do our best.”

Jack Walker 11 98 FEBRUARY

“[The expectation] are always at the back of our head, definitely always at the back of our heads. Our coach doesn’t put much pressure on us, but the entire team works hard to make the coach proud.”

Michael Stolle 11

“This year we knew we had a good shot at State but an even better shot at League, so we decided to focus more on League. We had realistic goals for this year.”

Jack Logan 11


WAITING HIS TURN

Looking on at the com>peting > Right:diver, junior Sam Logan

at State, sophomore Patrick McGannon smiles at his qualification for finals. “I wasn’t seeded at the beginning before the race,” McGannon said. “I was happy how I ended up performing better than what was expected.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

mentally prepares himself for his own dive. “I just run through the dive I’m about to do,” Logan said. “I try to focus hard on what I have to do and not focus on my competition.” Photo by Gale Stonebarger.

SEE ALSO

A SURPRISE FINISH

After finishing his 200 In>dividual > Right: Medley preliminaries race

>>

HUNTER STEVENSON 11 “I have a lake house that I go to during the summer. It’s an opportunity for me to get out and ride. I like getting in the air and jumping. The best move I ever pulled off was a Heelside 360.”

WAKE BOARDER

LAST MINUTE WARM UP

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During the State meet, junior Clay Finley warms his hands before his 50 yard freestyle race for preliminaries. He finished 5th at preliminaries and went on to place 7th in finals. “I just try to focus and think about what I need to do,” Finley said. “I try to fix the parts of my race that I messed up last time.” Photo by Rachel English.

past success. East placed first at the Sunflower League meet, Olathe Invitational, SME Invitational and the Topeka Invitational. They placed third at State. “We knew it obviously wasn’t going to be easy. We didn’t get our mind on the fact that we had to win State. I just knew that we would be happy if everyone did their best.”

John Hart 12

“Our coach told us at the beginning of the year that if we train hard and swim our best, that’s how good we are going to do. We were excited about how we did this year.”

Jon Reene 12

“I think [the pressure to win State] brought us together as a team more than anything. I think [pressure] is good to help you focus in on what you need to do”

Andrew Watkins 10 BOYS SWIMMING 99


Below: Senior Alexandria Norton hears here name announced as first attendant on the sweetheart court. “We had to wait in the choir room before and then wait in line in the gym, so my dad started telling jokes to lighten the mood,” Norton said. “When they announced my name I was so surprised because all of the girls were so amazing. It was an honor just to be nominated.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH.

WPA is a sweet success WITH a Candyland themed dance.

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SWEET Surprises

HEARING HER NAME

MAKE ME UP

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Above: Putting on makeup in her bathroom, junior Tara Raghuveer prepares for her night at the dance. “My dress was from a little store in The Crossroads,” Raghuveer said. “I thought it was unique, and I liked that.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

100 FEBRUARY

MIRROR, MIRROR

Above: Wearing matching dresses, freshmen Helen Dinkel and Marlena Smith chat at the WPA dance. “We went dress shopping together at Jessica McClintock,” Dinkel said. “She [Smith] had seen hers online and I saw mine in the store and they just happened to be similar.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

>>

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SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE LOVER

SEE ALSO

JOHN KURTZ 12 “I like making videos, and I love watching the ‘Greats’ of Saturday Night Live like Chris Farley and Will Ferrell. I just think that would be an awesome job to do that every Saturday night.”


DAD SAVES THE DAY

Below: Senior Alexi Brown’s father helps her replace her tiara after she was crowned Sweetheart Queen. “It was such an exciting moment. I was glad I got to share it with my dad,“ Brown said. “And he came in handy because my tiara fell off, and he helped re-crown me.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Senior Emily Mullet reveals how STUCO created the Candyland themed Decor. Month or two before>> Senior STUCO decides on the Candyland theme. Couple of weeks before >> map out what decor should go where. Two days before >> constuction begins. Work days enforced to mass produce candy and lollipop trees. 10 am Saturday, February 14 >> setup begins. Bord game pieces walkway taped to entry. Candy Hung. 1:00 pm >> Finish decorating. 8:30 pm >>Dance begins.

Making Candyland

ozens of roses were left at the florist as corsages and boutonnières were ordered in Costco-sized numbers. Romantic candlelight dinners were ditched for group dinners and pictures with parents. The cute and classic question of “Will you be my Valentine?” was replaced with “WPA?,” and candy land tickets replaced valentines. But the coincidence that WPA and Valentine’s Day landed on the same day only increased February 14th’s expectations. However, one group decided to take the laid back approach. “Our group just decided to have dinner at my house,” senior Hanna Cosgrove said. “It was a fun and relaxing evening for our last WPA.” Other parents in Cosgrove’s group helped cook and clean up, and the group returned to her house for a party after the dance. According to the Cosgroves, the easiness of the evening made it all the more fun. “It was just so much less stressful not having to wait at a resturaunt,” Cosgrove said. “Plus so many of our friends were in our group, and we had three nominees so it was awesome to just focus on being together and supporting our friends. “ *** Rather than attend to dance, sophomores Mac Dolliver and girlfriend Jennifer Gray decided to spend the evening together when plans with their group fell through. “I really love going to dances, but so many of our friends were out of town or had stuff going on that we decided we would just do something together because it was Valentines day,” Gray said. “He didn’t tell me where we were going, so that was a surprise.” Dolliver picked up Gray, and the two ate dinner at The Grand Street café where Dolliver surprised her with roses waiting at the table. Afterward, the pair went to a friend’s house for an after party. “It ended up being a really nice dinner and fun to get to hang out with friends too,” Dolliver said. “It was kind of the best of both worlds because I still got to get dressed up and cute and hang out with friends,” Gray said. Another group of sophomores were in for a surprise after letting parents plan their after party, which ended up taking place at a bowling alley. “We found out at ten o’clock where it was,” sophomore CC Creidenberg said. “I think the girls were mad they couldn’t change clothes. It was kinda fun, but I think I prefer just going to someone’s house.” As the night of February 14th drew to a close, the surprises concluded, and the Candyland castle was taken down. But whether it was sweet or tart, the evening remained one to remember.

it to

9:30>> Court presented.

“[Senior] Tony Rubaie asked me to prom last year, but I already had a date so I promised that we would go to one dance together. I let him think about it over the summer and he picked WPA. He already knew that we were going, but I still wanted to ask him in a fun way. I cut out a bunch of hearts and decorated his locker.”

“I guess I figured it was senior year so I wasn’t scared to do something too weird and outthere, so I duct-taped myself to the fourth floor window because I figured nobody had ever done that before. We kind of have an inside joke with ducks, too, so that’s why I wore the mask.”

Amilia Winter 11

Andrea Tudhope 12

Paige Kuklenski 12 Photo by Anna Petrow.

“[Junior] Whitaker Sherk asked [junior] Max McFarland to WPA. She made us change into ninja outfits at school and then we practiced in the hallway for like 20 minutes making our arms into ‘WPA.’ We snuck around his house and tapped on the windows until he finally came to his door.”

Photo by Anna Petrow.

Photo by Rachel English.

ASK AWAY... Girls ask boys to WPA in creative ways.

WPA 101


sporting BOOTS

Lancer Dancers wear rain boots when practicing on the football field.

“I’ve gotten a new pair [of boots] every year. A lot of seniors wear the rainboots for our senior pictures. It is easier to dance in because you’re not worried about getting your clothes dirty. Mine are pink and have dark pink hearts.” [See picture on right.]

Jennifer Meara 12

“My boots are black with white polka dots. We use our rain boots when we are walking on the field in the morning because the the field is muddy, and it’s much easier than wearing bare feet or tennis shoes. We also just wear them because they are cute.”

Emily Welter 10

Alexandra Ferlas 11

the

“Mine [boots] are black with different colored hearts on them. Mine were probably the most unusual. It’s the only thing you can wear without getting your feet really gross. We would always track mud, and it probably made the janitors really mad.”

KID CLINIC

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Left: Junior Annie Bennett performs a dance with a group of grade school girls after teaching them the moves at the annual Lancer Dancer Clinic. She also participated in the clinic when she was in grade school. “I remember being always excited to do it,” she said. “All the Lancer Dancers seemed so old. I was nervous but glad I did it.” Photo by Kit Andreson.

PEP PERFORMANCE

at an East pep assembly, sophomore Rachel >Duvall > Right:andDancing her team perform their latest dance. Lancer Dancers performed new dances for man of the pep assemblies throughout the year, which they would then perform during sports games. “It’s really fun because all of my best friends are on the team with me,” she said. “You get to just let loose and show your personality.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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102 FEBRUARY

than some of the girls had expected. Nationals only brought them closer. “At Nationals I realized how much this whole team means to me,” Nass said. “They’re all like family to me.” The seniors pushed the rest of the team to keep them motivated and up to the same performance level. “It was our senior year and it meant a lot to us to perform well, but that wasn’t the only reason we pushed each other so hard,” Cook said. “We are all close friends, and we wanted to see our close friends do well, too. It was even more incredible to see them doing well because of our friendship.” One of the biggest ways the seniors motivated the underclassman was simply by being seniors. The underclassman wanted to do well for the seniors and make them proud, proving they could maintain the level of performance expected by the team. “There can be pressure sometimes because we just wanted to do the best we could and make out seniors proud,” Nass said. “I had a hard time keeping up at the beginning because I didn’t know what to expect, but once it got down to it I focused on the goal at hand.” And what was the goal at hand? Making it to Orlando for Nationals and taking trophies away with them. “I couldn’t be more proud of the underclassman,” senior Laura Kaufman said. “They all stepped up and brought their own style and personality to the team. They were as much a part of the team as the seniors, and I don’t think we could have gotten this far without them.” Story by Katie East.

Above right: Practicing before school, senior Jennifer Meara prepares to march for the upcoming pep assembly. The team practiced with the band and performed at halftime at the football games. “A lot of times it’s muddy, so we wear rain boots,” Meara said. “Every year we get cute rain boots because it just makes it fun for us.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

THE PERFORMANCE

Sophomore Julie Chalfant performs during half time of the football game at Shawnee Mission North. “We get to perform in front of our friends and show off what we have been working on.” Photo by Lauren Bleakely.

>>

ive, six, seven, eight senior Lancer Dancers counted off in their heads as they performed for the rest of the school at the winter sports assembly. The dancers tested out a new routine, a different routine. It was a hip-hop routine. The girls all had skeletal bones printed on their baggy black hoodies, baggy armyprint cargo pants and black and white make-up on their faces. Each dancer was careful not to smile to maintain the serious mood of the dance. After the girls finished, they gracefully slid off the hardwood gym floor. All-American dancer senior Johanna Cook glanced at her teammates and the friends she had made as a Lancer Dancer, knowing in the back of her head that it was her last season on drill team. The hip-hop dance was performed to a mix of three songs. The first was ‘Lockdown’ by Kanye West, the second ‘Universal Mind Control’ by Common. The mix ended with part of the song ‘Damaged’ by Danity Kane. It was sophomore Megan Nass’ favorite dance of the year. “It was so different from any dance I have ever done,” Nass said. “It allowed us to become a completely different character and to just go crazy. Our choreographer, Bubba, did such a great job on it and came up with something that had never been seen.” The hip-hop routine the team performed that day was the same routine that won the Lancer Dancers fifth place in hip-hop at the national competition in Orlando. The team also won sixth in jazz at Nationals. With almost half of the team being seniors, the girls developed a bond closer

FASHION ON THE FIELD

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SENIORS AND YOUNGER VARSITY DANCERS WORK TOGETHER TO TAKE AWAY TROPHIES IN ORLANDO.


SEVEN SEE ALSO

FIVE

six

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8 Allie Fields 11 “I like to take pictures at home and when I go on vacation. I also have a kind of dark room in my basement where I can develop my photos. I like capturing moments you would’nt normally have a picture of.

Photographer DRILL TEAM 103


into

Getting

CHARACTER

Students disscuss how they embraced their character’s mentality before each show.

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DRUM MAJOR

“I had an entrance through house doors, so when the show began I was contained in these black curtains with red lights that we had hung outside. I would just stand there and think about what I had to do. Jack and I would talk in character too.”

Kaevan Tavakolinia 11

“I would go to the fifth floor right before call for stretches and it would be right when the sun was setting. I would look through the window and try to connect the colors to the opening scene when I think the town is on fire.”

Alec Hynes 12

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MARIE

STUDENT ACTORS TAKE A DARK SHOW TO A NEW LEVEL BY IMMERSING THEMSELVES IN THEIR CHARACTERS.

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olding his hands behind his back, senior Alec Hynes waited with patience for the award he was hoping he would receive. Four years of countless rehearsals. Four years of opening nights. Four years of grand finales. All of it led up to this moment in the pre-show tradition of his senior play. All the makeupsmeared faces of the cast of ‘Woyzeck’ stared at him as he finally recieved his award. “I got ‘The Stage Won’t Be The Same Without You’ award,” Hynes said. “I think that’s when it hit me that it was my last show.” The final night of ‘Woyzeck’ was an exciting night for all cast and crew members – especially for the seniors. It was their last play ever at East. “It was a great show to be my last one,” senior Grace Haun said. “[Being in the Little Theatre] in a lot of ways was better for Woyzeck. It’s a smaller theatre so it was more personal for the audience and the cast.” After the awards, the actors walked together to the backstage of the Little Theatre to prepare for the opening scene. Junior Sarah Evans held her creepy, long-fingernailed hands

together as she walked to center stage. The lights turned on and she set the mood of the play by reciting a dark fairytale about how everyone on earth was dead. The play proceeded, all the while keeping that same dark mood. Hynes, who played Woyzeck, was especially moved by the play’s dark mood. “Playing a character who’s neurotic was one of the hardest things,” Hynes said. “As much as I got into the character, the character got into me. I gave it my all. I’ve never worked so hard at anything in my whole life.” Although ‘Woyzeck’ was a difficult play to perform, the actors found it hard to walk away from as the last show of the year. Toward the end of the play, Woyzeck killed his wife and then was drowned by the town idiot next to his dead wife’s corpse. The audience applauded as the curtains closed on the dismal scene. “When I was lying in the pond after drowning I just stared at the ceiling and it was just this blow to my head that it was my last show,” Hynes said. “I wasn’t numb, but it was something like it. It was an overwhelming feeling.” Story by Sydney Henley.

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WOYZECK

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LOVER COSMETICS INTERN

SEE ALSO

NATALIE HINE 11 “I’m an intern at LOVER Cosmetics. I usually give people tips on how to apply make-up. I love the atmosphere I work in. I get to meet lots of Kansas City fashionistas that I didn’t even know existed.”

BLOOD SHIVERS

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Right: Senior Alec Hynes’s character Woyzeck stabs his wife Marie played by junior Kat Jaeger. “It took me a long time to work up to the stabbing because I have an enormous fear of blood,” Jaeger said. “We went through a lot of excercises to help [get rid of] my fear. Every time the blood hit me it made me shiver which worked for the scene.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

CONTORTION PREP

Below: Juniors Cara Rivers, freshman Duri Long and junior Kylie Morrow stretch before the show. “It was a very physical show,” Morrow said. “We all had to contort our bodies into weird shapes so warming up helped get us ready.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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“Before the show started I would go away by myself and try to get myself in the mindset of Marie and become a battered housewife. Alec and I played off eachother so well it got to the point where I was her.”

Kat Jaeger 11

SUCH A TEASE

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Above: Senior Meghan Benson stretches while getting into character before a performance. “They teased my hair really big for the show,” Benson said. “It was a cool effect but it hurt so bad. It took like an hour to wash out every night.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

SINKING INTO STUPOR

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Right: Senior Alec Hynes’s character, Woyzeck, attends the carnival with his family. “The carnies basically just added to the atmosphere,” Hynes said. “They give him a whole new insight to himself and he begins to see himself as inconsequential.” Photo by Rachel English.

104 FEBRUARY


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SPRING PLAY 105


WITH HIS SENIOR FRIEND CHASE LUCAS. • JUNIOR SAM CARPENTER HAD BEEN A SNOWBOARDER FOR SIX YEARS. HE ALWAYS

WE

MARCH

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NT TO KEYSTONE IN COLORADO THREE TIMES A YEAR WITH HIS FAMILY. HE WAS A SKIIER WHEN HE WAS YOUNGER BUT B A CRUSHING DEFEAT

1 TIMMY AHERN 10 >> SME baseball player

>>

Staring up at the scoreboard after losing at the semifinals State game, senior Johnny Delgado realizes his final basketball season has come to an end. The Lancers went on to win their final game against Shawnee Mission Northwest however, making their team third in the State. “The [semifinals] game was really tough because we’d been playing well the entire year,” Delgado said. “To have the season end in a screech is a bummer. But then we won and got third in State, so that’s pretty good looking back on it.” Photo by Rachel English.

“[Our team] practices a lot, like every day. I think we’ll be ready [for our first game]. We already know how to practice as a team.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 108 – 109

2 SUSIE MCCLANNAHAN 10 >> debater “I like the argumentation part of being a debater. When I argue my own points, I get points for [how well I do] it. Also, all of the people in debate are cool.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 110 – 111

3 MAX STITT 11 >> lacrosse player BLOOD RED DONATIONS

Above: While setting up for the blood drive, senior SHARE exec Lucy O’Conner ties red balloons to all the tables. All SHARE execs also stayed to watch over participants. “It was pretty early in the morning, like 6 a.m., and I’m not an early person,” O’Conner said. “I think the hardest part was unloading the huge truck filled with supplies.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

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“There’s a lot of coordination and skill that goes into [lacrosse]. It’s not something you could pick up really quickly. You kind of have to work at it.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 112 – 113

4 JOE LEWIS 9 >> SME track runner “I like running in Kansas weather because one day it’s cold, and the next day it’s warm. It’s not constantly freezing outside. If it gets really cold, you start to tighten up.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 114 – 115

5 EMMA YAFFE 11 >> dante club member

SEE ALSO: PAGES 116 – 117

6 GRACE FRITTS 9 >> SME soccer player

HOLD THAT POSE

Above: While performing during halftime at a JV game, sophomore Katie Cox holds position with the rest of the dancers. “We wore those tops for a dance that [sophomore] Olivia Lynch and I choreographed together,” Cox said. “It was to ‘Shut Up and Let Me Go.’ I wanted the audience to feel the energy.” Photo by Kit Andreson.

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“We meet every two weeks, and we discuss three to five cantos each time. We’re going to Italy this summer late June to early July, and so we’re having a bunch of fundraisers in a couple weeks.”

“I’m on JV this year. Not a lot of people know each other [on the team], but we have lots of team dinners and practices and stuff to get to know each other.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 118 – 119

7 BEN CARLSON 11 >> SME tennis player

SEE ALSO: PAGES 120 – 121

STRETCHING PALS

Above: Reaching for her toes, sophomore Hannah Jane Stradinger practices yoga with the Pack of Pals. Pack of Pals always met once a month to do activities like ice skating and bowling. “It was the first time we have done yoga,” Stradinger said. “At the end, everybody got certificates; it was really cool.” Photo by Gail Stonebarger.

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“I have played since about first grade. I started at Homestead Country Club. There are a lot of kids I know there; it’s very competitive, so it keeps you on your toes.”

OR AS LONG AS SIX HOURS. HIS FAVORITE GAMES WERE ‘HALO’ AND ‘CALL OF DUTY.’ HE TYPICALLY PLAYED BY HIMSELF O R 106 MARCH


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BECAME A SNOWBOARDER AFTER HIS ENTIRE FAMILY DECIDED TO TRY IT OUT WHEN HE WAS IN SIXTH GRADE. • SOPHOMORE JACOB RUD

GLISH ROOM AT SCHOOL. • SENIOR ALEX BUBLITZ PLAYED XBOX 360 EVERY DAY AFTER SCHOOL AND ON THE WEEKENDS, SOMETIMES MARCH DIVISION 107


above the

AVERAGE DESIGN BY CHANDRA SWANSON AND KATIE EAST.

BAND OF BASEBALL PLAYERS

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Pitchers discuss the different kinds of pitches.

PICK

PITCH:

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Laughing before the game, senior Dan Sweeney talks with his teammates, trying to keep a relaxed atmosphere. “We talk about the situation, like where you would want to throw the ball, and we go over the signs,” Sweeney said. “We boost each other up and kind of calm our nerves down.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

Jeff Soptic 12

“Two-seam fastballs are my best pitch. My greatest strength is throwing fast. This pitch is fast and it cuts so the batter can’t get an easy hit.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Aaron Kaufman 12 “My favorite pitch is the curve ball because it makes people look stupid when they have to duck out of the way. The ball moves a lot, so it’s a good one. I use it at least once with every batter, but I use the fast ball pitch more often.”


EYE ON THE BALL

Focusing on the ball coming from the >pitching > Right: machine, sophomore Krey Bradley participates in the hitting practice. “We have 45 minutes, either soft toss or machine hitting,” Bradley said. “Outside, we scrimmage a lot. Hitting is more fun than fielding because the practices are shorter.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

CHEER ON THE TEAM

HUDDLE UP

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Left: Watching his teammates on the field, senior Josh Kinney claps after a successful play. “I watch our pitcher, hoping that he throws a strike so we can get out of the inning,” Kinney said. “Sometimes we yell their last name or number to cheer them on.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Far right: Listening to the coach, junior Gabe Miller and his teammates focus on the game. “He tells us to stay calm and don’t mess up the plays,” Miller said. “It’s the first game and something is going to happen. It’s how you react that makes a difference. The first game, you get a lot of butterflies, but you’ve done it all before, so it’s not too scary.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

SHOWING DEDICATION AND COMMITMENT DURING PRACTICE AND GAMES, THE BASEBALL TEAM PLAYS TO THE BEST OF THEIR ABILITIES.

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A CLOSE SHAVE

Above: Trying to score a run in the first game of the year, sophomore David Becker misses a pitch. “I try to see how the ball comes out of the pitcher’s hand and then decide if it’s in the zone,” Becker said. “I did score one run that game.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

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TRIALS at TRYOUTS

Students explain what goes on behind the scenes at tryouts. Photos by Kit Andresen.

“The atmosphere is friendly and relaxed. The tryouts were inside a lot of the time because of the weather. Last year, I was with a lot of upperclassmen and this year I’m with my friends, so it’s more fun.”

Krey Bradley 10 “They do walking drills and different stances. The hardest part of the tryouts was having to get up so early. The tryouts began at 5:30 a.m.”

David Zeiger 9 “Nothing too exciting happens. We do drills and play catch. It’s pretty laid back for the upperclassmen but for the underclassmen, it’s a little more tense because they don’t know if they will make the team. The coaches look for character, athletic ability and baseball skills in general.”

Zach Amrein 11

SEE ALSO

he Shawnee Mission East baseball team was all about the steps leading the team to state. Practices prepared the players for games, games prepared the players for tournaments and the tournaments led them to the ultimate game. Senior Josh Kinney was completely dedicated to baseball. “The reason I keep playing is because it’s a passion of mine and it never gets old,” Kinney said. “If I didnt play, I wouldn’t have anything to do.” Practices were a big time commitment, usually lasting from 3-5:30 p.m. The team was broken down into three groups: pitching, outfield and infield. Each group had to train hard in their area to be as ready as possible. Senior Matt Hill worked most on knowing what to do in all different types of situations. “You just have to practice the play as much as you can and if it’s a scenario you have not practiced then you just have to go off your instincts,” Hill said. Games were a major high point in the season. “Players look forward to games because all the practice put in really pays off,” Kinney said. Typical games were comfortable at the beginning because the team didn’t want to be tense. In order to prepare for each baseball game, the team tried to stay relaxed and calm while also trying to have fun, joke around and stay loose before game-time. When it was time to be serious, they usually divided up and played catch with the same person each time. Following the same agenda seemed to be a common theme to each player’s preparation. Hill had his own tradition. “I get myself the same lunch before each game and follow the same routine,” Hill said. “I make sure to listen to music so I can get calm, relaxed and into the right state of mind.” Each player started off playing the game for a different reason. Kinney started to play because his old soccer coach started a baseball team and his dad suggested that he play. Hill had been playing ever since he was a kid. “I grew up around it, so I grew to love the game,” he said. Both of these seniors had the same goal this season – to make it to state. The farthest they both made it in the tournament on the SME team was the second game of regionals last year. “Tournaments are fun because the trophy that could be won at the end is a big achievement,” Kinney said. “They have a different feel then just regular games because every tournament game matters.” One of the strengths that helped the team work towards their goal was the great number of returning varsity starters, bringing them lots of experience and leadership. “After the way we hit last year, hitting would be one of this year’s weaknesses, but so far we look pretty good in that department,” Hill said. “We are a little short on pitching, but I think its all going to come together.” At East, the whole team strongly felt that they had to be really committed in order to play. “If you’re not, players and coaches don’t really want you on the team because it’s just a waste of time if one person doesn’t care,” Kinney said. Players showed how much they cared by their attitudes and by the way they carried themselves on the field. It was important for everyone to do everything they could to help the other people at their positions. “It doesn’t matter if it’s an upperclassman giving advice to an underclassman, or the other way around,” Hill said. As a whole, the varsity team planned to play their hearts out to make it to state. “This is a special year not only for the seniors, but for everyone because we have a pretty good team and want to do whatever we can to go to state,” Kinney said. Story by Mallory Stevenson.

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TIMMY AHERN 10 “I play on a [recreational] basketball team during the winter and spring called the Monsters. It’s a lot better than competitive basketball because we don’t have practices; we just have games once a week.”

REC BASKETBALL PLAYER


Debate occurs in the fall, forensics in the spring

MAKING THE TIME COUNT

Below: Working diligently on his assignment, senior Tommy Gray prepares for his next forensics performance. While he used the computer to prepares his performances, he used the computer to prepare for his debate tournaments as well. “For both debate and forensics, we use computers to find articles, journals and books,” Gray said. “I personally like forensics more, because it’s based on how you connect with the audience.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

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FAST FACTS: DEBATE V. FORENSICS Debate coach: Mr. [Trey] Witt, Forensics coach: Ms. [Jennifer] Hunter Debate is a team event while forensics is more individually oriented Mascot for both Debate and Forensics: Penguin

DEBATE AND FORENSICS STUDENTS EXPRESS THEMSELVES THROUGH COMPETITION.

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110 MARCH

Above: Junior Kelly Sabates helps junior Diana Lieb file articles for FX. “Foreign Extemporaneous [FX] is Diana’s competition,” Sabates said. “You get 30 minutes to prepare a 10 minute speech on a subject with the files and articles as back up.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

• EXPRESSIONS • GESTURES • FACTS • CHARACTER • RESEARCH • STANCE • APPROACH • LOOKS • PROOF • PENGUIN TALK • ARGUMENT •

THE GREAT

debate: Determining favorites between Debate and Forensics.

“Debate is better than forensics because it’s more competitive and intense. You actually talk about stuff that matters.”

Olivia Sullivan 11

“I like forensics because debate is all competitive and intense. This is individual. ”

Paige C. Anderson 12

“Debate is more significant because there’s much more p re pa ra t i o n . Forensics is just about looking good. ”

Will Penner 11

RESSIONS • GESTURES • FACTS • RESEARCH • STANCE • APPROACH • LOOKS • PROOF • PENGUIN TALK • ARGUMENTATION • EMOTIVE • • F A

CTS • EMOTIVE • REBUTT L

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FILING AWAY

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urrounded by piles of paper, pens and the glow of open laptops, several debaters scrolled through pages of online data. Each student was focused on discovering the latest information about alternative energy. This was the typical scene in the debate room. But early in the spring, different students sprawled around the room, working on homework, playing computer games and practicing speeches and performances. This was the same room, but an entirely different class: forensics. “[Forensics class] is like hanging out with your friends, cool and laid-back,” junior Kelly Sabates said. “We get a list of assignments and due dates and just have to finish the work on time. It’s a cool group of people, with lots of different points of view. And we talk to our coaches all the time about everything.” While the debate squad and the forensics team shared a room and many competitors, the classes were very different. “Debate is a team event, with you and your partner against another team, and it’s much more structured,” junior Dana Leib said. “Forensics is individual and has many different events: public speaking, acting and humorous interpretation.” Also, the competitions, or tournaments, for debate and forensics differed greatly. Debate competitions resulted in much more stress for the participants, more emphasis on data and research and more structure. Forensics was more open, with the competitors required to compete in two events within an hour and a half. “I got the Crusades as a topic for an Impromptu [performance-based event],” sophomore Austin Miller said. “You get five minutes to prepare a three-minute presentation. I didn’t know much about historical facts, so I ran around pretending to be the pope getting angry and then the Arabs getting angry. I actually got a [score of] one for the round.” The difference between the two classes sometimes caused tension between debaters and “forensicators.” “Some debaters think forensics is a joke because they think you don’t have to be smart, but you really do,” Sabates said. “It’s a friendly competition, though, because many people do both.” The atmosphere of the competitions and classes were very different, but overall, the two encompassed the same ideas: hard work and creativity. Story by Chandra Swanson.


SEE ALSO

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SUSIE MCCLANNAHAN 10 “I was really interested in learning [the language] after I went on [Mr. John] Nickel’s trip to China. It’s hard to memorize characters, but it doesn’t have tenses which is nice.”

CHINESE SPEAKER

WORK IT OUT

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Freshmen Chris Carey and Wil Kenney rehearse their forensics duet from “Clue: The Musical.” “It’s basically the characters from ‘Clue’ but with quirky twists,” Carey said. “We each have five characters to play. It was hard at first, but once we got it down it was really fun.” Photo by Rachel English.

EMOTIVE • REBUTTLE • EXPRESSIONS • GESTURES • FACTS • CHARACTER • RESEARCH • STANCE • APPROACH • ARGUMENTING • PENGU

K • ARGUMENT • EMOTIV E

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH AND EMILY COLLINS.

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EBUTTLE • EXPRESSIONS • GESTURES • FACTSSTANCE • APPROACH • LOOKS • PROOF • PENGUIN TALK • ARGUMENT • EMOTIVE • REBUTTLE • EX •R

WITH DEBATE AND FORENSICS STUDENTS

DEBATE AND FORENSICS 111


season favorites Varsity lacrosse players talk about their biggest win against Shawnee Mission South.

RAISING INTENSITY

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Right: Before a practice at Antioch Park, sophomore Reed Woltering warms up with a teammate. “I think warming up is important because you have to build up your intensity and get loosened up,” Woltering said. “It’s best when people take it seriously.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

HUDDLE UP

After a practice at Antioch >Elementary > Far Right:School, sophomore Dillion Simmons huddles up with the rest of his teammates. “When we huddle up, we sometimes talk about what we will eat for dinner,” Simmons said. “But we also talk about the usual stuff like what we will do during the game.” Photo by Rachel English.

112 MARCH

“We really beat up on them this year. It was fun to really crush them and have fun taking out our anger. The first five minutes of the game were the best; we had like six or seven goals within a 4 minute period.”

Taylor Haviland 11

“My favorite game was when we beat [Shawnee Mission] South like seventeen to three. They were really bad. [Senior Josh] Barlow had like six goals. Even a defender scored in the middle of the game.”

Erik Ernst 12

“We really beat up on them this year. It was fun to really crush them and have fun taking out our anger. The first five minutes of the game were the best; we had like six or seven goals within a 4 minute period.”

Max Stitt 11


inside

THE LACROSSE PLAYERS IMPROVE SIGNIFICANTLY DURING THE SEASON, DESPITE INJURIES AND FUNDING CONCERNS.

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DESIGN BY JORDAN DIETRICH AND JOHN FRANCIS.

MAX STITT 11 “I’m really picky about my bed. I like my bed to be messed up because it’s just more comfortable that way. My mom always used to tell me to make my bed, and I never would.”

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e ran down the field, reflecting body checks from the other team and swift slashes from their sticks. He carried the ball in the pocket of his stick. Varsity mid-fielder, senior Erik Ernst, stopped at the crease, and with a flick of the wrist, shot the ball towards the goal. Popcorn. The shot was put right into the goalie’s stick. This year, just as last year, the East lacrosse team wasn’t a school sponsored club or sport, though the teams were consisted mainly of East students. Only two of the players didn’t go to East. One of the players attended Bishop Miege High School, which didn’t have a lacrosse team, sport or club. Because it wasn’t school sponsored activity, the team was forced to provide their own funding. “It’s really frustrating to play for a school team that isn’t sponsored,” Ernst said. “We can’t use school fields, and we have to take care of our own travel plans and funding.” The costs of lacrosse added up for the boys. Some tried to raise money for the next year by planning a car wash in the spring. “It will be at the end of the year, so it won’t affect me or the rest of the seniors,” Ernst said. “But it will be a good start for next year’s boys.”

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MESSY SLEEPER

The average player needed to pay $600 for equipment and registration and another $200 a year for insurance. The insurance was necessary, especially for those defenders who enjoyed playing physically. “My favorite part of lacrosse is hitting people,” junior Tyler McKelvey, a defender on JV, said. For some people, the insurance was necessary. Last year, their goalie, senior Devin Conely, broke his knee cap and went through a year and a half of physical therapy. Ernst accidently broke someone’s ankle with a slash to his foot. Despite the injuries and the scramble for funds, the varsity lacrosse team peformed much better than last season. Last season, the team won two games. This year, the team started out strong with a 17-3 victory over Shawnee Mission South. The team started the season with five wins. “I’m glad this season is going so much better than last season did,” Ernst said. “I’d rather go out with a good season as a senior rather than a bad one, even if it isn’t a school sport.” Story by Katie East.

IMPROVEMENT AT PRACTICE

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Above: Practicing at Broadmoor, sophomore Darby Wooldridge tries to defend a teammate during an offensive drill. “Practice is pretty competitive,” Wooldridge said. “The coach is pretty serious about winning and improvement, so it rubs off on everyone; everyone tries to get better.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

FULL CONTACT

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Left: While facing Shawnee Mission Northwest, junior Max Sweet takes a hit during a game at Herritage Park. “Sometimes it gets rough in games, but that contact is the same as in practice,” Sweet said. “The pads we wear are a big help so that we’re not afraid of making contact.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

MAN UP

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Left: Facing Shawnee Mission Northwest, senior Greg Guthrie looks at the players on the field from the sideline. “I mock the defensemen and make fun of them,” Guthrie said. “Then I kick their [butts]. Once you make fun of them, you can’t suck.” Photo by Rachel English.

LACROSSE 113


114 MARCH

A DIFFERENT APPROACH

After a pereparatory stretch, running and some 40s [four meters with a pole], junior Carl Rodgers begins his vault . After, Rogers and friends discussed the day’s practice and the unique approach friend Connor Creighton took to his vault during practice that day. “Conner started at the top of the hill one day and ran a quarter mile before he vaulted,” Rodgers said. “It was funny because no one ever runs over 100 feet. Somehow he stepped perfectly and vaulted pretty high.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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DESPITE DIFFICULT WEATHER CONDITIONS, TRACK MEMBERS PUSH THEMSELVES TO DO THEIR BEST THROUGHOUT THE SEASON.

snow. heat.thunder.sleet DESIGN BY WHITAKER SHERK.


DRESS

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Alyx Delgado 11 SETTING FOOT

Practicing the long jump, junior >Grant > Right: Stauffer sprays wet sand as he lands. Others weren’t as graceful. “One jumper stuck his feet down too quickly,” Stauffer said. “His momentum made him land on his face.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

PUSHING IT

Below: Junior Ryan Olander sprints at practice to accustom himself to the race. It helped to have a teammate pushing him. “Running with friends makes it easier to get through [a hard practice],” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie

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Protecting teammate against the cold, junior Leah Chesbrough gets ready for practice. Stretching was indoors on cold days to keep the runners warm before practice. “You can’t put on too many layers,” Chesbrough said. “You start to warm up as you run.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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“During the winter we wear our shorts and gloves. We don’t vault much in the cold because we don’t want to be out there very long. At the beginning of the season we have to be in the weight room a lot to gain strength for the rest of the season.”

Connor Creighton 11

BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Above: Getting ready for practice, freshman Will Webber stretches his hamstring on the track. “In jumping you have to move your muscles a lot,” Webber said. “I do a lot of stretching before and after practice.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

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>her > Right: chilly

JOE LEWIS 9

but I think we form closer bonds and “On the days that I don’t have track, I like to play become a stronger unit from it.” basketball. It’s fun to just shoot hoops but not have With the random weather in Kanto play competitively. It’s nice to get away from my homework. I usually play with myself or my dad.” sas, the runners, jumpers and throwers saw different positives and negatives BASKETBALL PLAYER each week. “The crazy changes in Kansas are definitely confusing,” Gans said. “You really just have to be prepared to go out there and work in rain, snow, burning sun or freezing cold.” Some found rewards in the days their favorite conditions lasted more than 24 hours. “I look forward to brisk days when it’s cool enough Junior runners to be comfortable but the sun is out,” Turner said. “I can describe the differenjoy running and also see how strong I’ve gotten when ent outfits that they the wind doesn’t slow me down. It’s a sort of personal rewear during the ward.” track season. But some aspects were untouched by temperature and precipitation. The athletes took control of their seasons to get the most out of their work. “I just chose the most challenging events that I can work on to get stronger for soccer,” Delara said. “I’m still kind of slow but I’m working to get on varsity. I run the 100, 400 and 200 meter to get where I need to be for summer conditioning and try outs and the actual season “If it’s really cold, I wear Under Armour in the fall.” or sweats. If it’s reCleats were packed back into the gym bags, the sweat ally hot, I just wear pants run through the laundry and sore muscles healed. shorts and a t-shirt. Finally, the athletes appreciated everything they worked On cold days we through in their personal battles. stretch more. When “I’m a stronger athlete from it,” Turner said. “I know the weather gets hotter, we get more that I can run in the snow and gain consistency from every water breaks so we day practice. It’s a huge pay off; it’s just a pain for a lot of don’t get dehydratthe actual time your working.” Story by Emily Collins. ed.”

for the

GETTING COZY

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weat pants, sweat shirts, gloves and stocking caps bulged from Nike gym bags. Winter clothing joined running shoes to bundle up the stiff runners. Track and field took on the boy scout motto, “always be prepared” with conditioning beginning with snowy weather in February and state competitions in early May. With April showers in between, the athletes became accustomed to training and competing in every temperature. “There are those days when you have to bring stocking caps and long sleeved shirts,” sophomore Griff Gans said. “But then there are those days you have to pile on the sunscreen.” The athletes switched clothing with the changing season to keep their bodies safe and strong through the sometimes threatening weather. “When the snow melts in the early season, the ground is really wet and poses problems for warm ups and field events,” freshman Joe Lewis said. Even after the snow melted, the conditions didn’t let up. “The wind is my biggest problem,” sophomore Cole Turner said. “When it pushes against me, it can really effect my breathing and most definitely increases my time.” But the athletes learned to train their bodies to face everything that slowed them down. “It’s really all about stretching before, during and after practice and meets,” Gans said. “Pulling muscles is very common in the cool weather, and they can put a real halt on your season and hold you up through to the end.” In facing these weather conditions together, the team grew closer, which showed in their personal and overall team scores. “When it’s cold we huddle together,” sophomore Rhegg Delara said. “It not only physically brings us closer,

“If it rains, we can’t throw well because it’s muddy. When we train in the winter, we have to have at least one warm thing, but I’m kind of a nut kid and I just wear shorts and a t-shirt.”

Emily Mayfield 11

TRACK 115


DINNER INVITATIONS

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Above: At an after-school meeting, senior Landon McDonald and Bernadette Myers discuss the new invitations for the Dante Club’s fund-raising dinner at Lydia’s restaurant. “I’m looking for ward to it,” McDonald said. “I think it’ll be really instructive. I’ve been looking forward to meeting [Dr. Stephany] and seeing what kind of special insight he can give us about this subject we’ve been studying for so long. He’ll bring a new perspective.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

ANTICIPATION

Arriving at senior >Kate > Right:Sachse’s house on the first Friday of Spring Break, senior Paige C. Anderson gets ready for the club’s discussion on Dante’s ‘Paradiso.’ “Before meetings I’m actually usually pretty anxious because I’m nervous that I won’t talk enough or it will be something someone’s already said,” Anderson said. “So while I may feign excitement, I’m actually very nervous on the inside.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

ART SHOW

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Right: Showing some pictures of Italian art, senior Savannah Duby gives a presentation about the Uffizi Museum in Florence, Italy. At each Dante Club meeting, members gave presentations about sights they would be seeing on their summer trip to Italy. “The paintings, sculptures and sketches there are all masterpieces so it’s all really impressive,” Duby said. “For my presentation, I looked for paintings that brought up issues in Dante’s trilogy.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

remembering favorites Dante Club members reveal their favorite Cantos and explain why they are so memorable.

Canto 12

Canto 30

Canto 27

“It was the first time that a real definition for art comes up in the ‘Comedy,’ and I feel like the way he sees how art is needed for progression and to expand peoples’ viewpoints is something that is still important today. I feel like today, people get caught up in only studying what other people perceive as good rather than really thinking about the meaning and purpose of art.”

“I enjoyed that canto because it was something opposite of what we were expecting. I had been anticipating a tearful reunion, but what Dante got was a metaphysical shut-down.”

“I think that the whole point of the Divine Comedy is Dante’s journey as a person and him learning all these things and gaining all this knowledge and the idea that he is crowned by Virgil is kind of the idea that he doesn’t need a leader anymore. It’s a really cool moment for the Comedy as a whole and you kind of know this is the moment when Virgil is leaving and it’s a really important moment for Dante, so it’s a really important moment for us.”

Kate Sachse 12

Landon McDonald 12

Sarah LePichon 12

Examples of good art.

116 MARCH

Dante meets Beatrice.

Virgil leaves ‘Dante the Pilgrim.’


SEE ALSO

>> DESIGN BY LEAH PICKETT AND HANNAH WALTER.

HEIGHTS

CIRCLING UP

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Below: During an art presentation, seniors Sarah LePichon, Maureen Orth, Paige Anderson, Bernadette Myers and Landon McDonald look over senior Savannah Duby’s handouts. “The Italy trip is what’s keeping me sane right now because school is so overwhelming,” Myers said. “It’s the light at the end of the tunnel. So when we have the arts presentations, it means it’s getting a little bit closer, so I get really excited.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

“I have a horse that I’ve been riding for about six years, and I usually try to see her about twice per week. I compete over the summer but I mostly just ride for fun. I’ve always just loved horses.”

HORSEBACK RIDER

DANTE CLUB MEMBERS MEET THROUGHOUT THE YEAR TO DISCUSS DANTE’S ‘INFERNO,’ ‘PURGATORIO’ AND ‘PARADISO,’ WHICH FOLLOW DANTE AS HE TRAVELS TO PARADISE.

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hipping ice off your windshield and driving through the snow on a Saturday better be worth it. And for Dante Club members, all it took was a little hot chocolate and lots of discussion about poetry and prose to get them out the front door. “My favorite part of the club is discussion,” senior John Hart said. “I like to be able to hear others’ ideas about different parts [of the book] and how we can learn from it hundreds of years later.” For Dante Club’s twenty some members, the vision of a relaxing Saturday afternoon couldn’t keep them from their love of discussing 14th century literature. The dedicated group members met every two weeks in someone’s living room to discuss everything from Canto meanings of Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’ to relating his themes of humility and ideas about religion to their own lives. By reading all of his books and books that inspired him, such as ‘Metamorphosis’ by Franz Kafka, the club members became Dante experts. “This year a lot of people wanted to be in the club,” Hart said. “So we had to write why we wanted to be in it and how we thought we could contribute.” This selection process made it so only those dedicated and interested enough were involved in the club. Along with talking with each other, the club also got a chance to discuss the book with Dante scholars such as Professor Stanley Lombardo from KU. They spent an entire afternoon sitting in a circle and comparing Dante’s work to other works such as ‘Metamorphosis’ and discussing important themes throughout ‘Inferno.’ “[I’m looking forward] to how much we’re going to learn,” senior Sarah LePichon. “But I’m really intimidated because they know so much more than we do.” After reading and discussing Dante’s 626 page trilogy, the club was going to get a week and a half in June for a trip to Italy. While there, they would see museums full of artwork created during Dante’s time and see the towns referenced in his works. Although the trip would be a fun experience for the group, members appreciated the club for what is really was, even with its two to two and a half hour meetings and loads of outside reading. LePichon joined the club initially because she loved literature and wanted a chance to study it more in depth. But the real reason she ended up loving the club was something entirely different. “I feel that a lot of the time in school kids study just for grades or college,” LePichon said. “Dante Club goes away from that. It’s an awesome opportunity to learn in an environment where there’s no competition and you don’t have to worry about being judged.” Story by Sydney Henley.

READY TO DISCUSS

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reaching new

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EMMA YAFFE 11

Left: During a meeting about Dante’s ‘Purgatorio,’ three of Dante Club’s four boys, seniors Owen Gray, John Hart and Stephen Nichols prepare for the discussion. “When Mr. Pulsinelli asked me to be in Dante Club, he told me, ‘we desperately need more guys,’” Gray said. “It’s interesting because none of the guys are in IB so we don’t know as many of the girls. We always kind of sit together on the couches, and since there are so few of us we really came out to be pretty close.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

DANTE CLUB 117


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Hanging out on the bench, senior Sam Benson enjoys encouraging her teammates. “I don’t get much playing time because our other goalie, [junior] Jessie Jacob, is fantastic,” Benson said. “But when we’re on the sidelines we have a lot of fun, both when we’re focused and goofing off.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

Hanging out on the bench, eenior Sam Benson enjoys encouraging her teammates. “I don’t get much playing time because our other goalie, Jessie Jacob, is fantastic,” Benson said. “But when we’re on the sidelines we have alot of fun, both when we’re focused and goofing off.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

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to catch themOFFSIDES LED BY SENIORS, THE GIRLS’ SOCCER TEAM ADJUSTED TO CHANGES, CHALLENGING THE OPPOSITION TO

118 MARCH

A VIEW FROM THE SIDE

A VIEW FROM THE SIDE


DRIBBLING DOWN

JV outside mid-fielder >junior > Right:Megan Sullivan dribbles the ball to the goal. “I like to run down the sideline, then pass the ball and cross it,” Sullivan said. “I love to score and to have a good game with good passes and a lot of shooting.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

CARRYING TRADITION

Above: At the varsity team’s second game of the season against Leavenworth, senior Paige Cannady, freshman Lizzy McConnell, junior Lauren Dodd and senior Catherine Barrera listen to the coaches talk before the game. The team ended up winning the game 9-0. “It was really easy,” Cannady said. “They only took one shot. [Coach Jamie] Kelly talked about how it was a fun game for us, to just get used to each other’s rhythm and playing together.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

a CLOSER look SEE ALSO

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he soccer field at Mission Valley Middle School did not provide the best playing conditions. Random holes were scattered throughout. Dirt patches interspersed the grass. However, this didn’t stop this game from starting. In fact, this game had been played each year for the past four years. On one side of the field, the SME girls varsity soccer team stood in their white uniforms. Across from them, in red practice jerseys, were former players Kirby Thomas, Sarah Jones and Jenny Robinson, among others. This game was known as the Alumni Game. Previous players came back from college to scrimmage the current varsity players. The game was meant for recreation, but at the same time, the players’ natural will to win emerged. “It’s fun, but it’s competitive at the same time,” varsity member junior Sara Schenkelberg said. “It would be embarrassing that college students would be in better shape than us.” Once the regular season games began, these alumni players would not be on the field. Instead, the burden to win shifted toward the new varsity team. With about nine returning starters, the team hoped to greatly improve. Finding the newcomers to fill in the rest of the team would be a great hurdle to jump. However, finding this new influx of players did not lessen the year’s expectations. “There is a good balance skill at forward, midfield and defense,” Schenkelberg said. “[Coach Jamie] Kelly said that we should have the confidence in making state this year.” Kelly was the new soccer coach this year, after taking over from administrator Jim Ricker, who was now the athletic director. Kelly was the assistant for the last seven years. He was also the boys varsity soccer coach. Kelly hoped his job transition would be easy on the girls. “I knew that they would be used to my coaching style,” Kelly said. “They know how I do things. So far it’s been an easy one.” The girls played through a 21 game grind into May. With the new coach, new changes were seen in the system. “I’m trying a new formation this year,” Kelly said. “Although it is different from previous years, I think that it fits our team’s depth better. But we’ll see.” Although the coaches did not keep score during the game, the current varsity team handily won the Alumni Game. The score was stretched to such an extent that the coaches had to join the ex-players. “The game showed that we are a good team and will have a great season,” Schenkelberg said. ”It showed our weaknesses in how we need to communicate more, but I think we can fix that during the early part of the season. Overall, it showed that we gel well.” Story by Jordan Dietrich.

GET READY FOR GAME TIME

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sen looks for her electrical tape. “I always keep electrical tape in my bag because there’s kind of a tradition that everyone wears tape for the game,” Hemmingsen said. “The seniors always wear blue.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

Varsity girls soccer player senior Natalie Parsons explains the soccer move called ‘maradona.’

Pulling equipment out of >her > Right: bag, senior Dana Hemming-

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“It’s a soccer move you use when you have the ball and you’re trying to get away from another player. I’ve been doing it all my life. It was something I learned on my club team.”

Natalie Parsons 12

maradona STEP>> STEP>> STEP>>

1 2 3

Let the ball roll out in front of you.

Step onto one foot and spin 180 degrees.

Use the other foot to attack the ball and dribble away.

JESSIE SYKES 11 “The first time I realized I wanted to collect license plates was when I went to an ice cream shop and all of the walls were covered in them. Then I started looking for them at flea markets.”

LICENSE PLATE COLLECTOR

DESIGN BY CHANDRA SWANSON AND KATIE EAST.

KEEPING CONTROL

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Far left: Playing against Shawnee Mission South, sophomore Kirsten Clark gets ready to pass the ball to a forward. “As a defender, it’s your job to take the ball away,” Clark said. “The girl actually spit on me when I stole the ball from her, and I just turned around and laughed.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

BLOCK THE BALL

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Left: At an evening practice, sophomore Heather Nelson jumps up to block a goal during a warm up. “For this warm up, there are two teams and you pass to your team and try to shoot,” Nelson said. “Then you go to the goal and try to block the next shot. I think it helps with shooting and making quick desicions for when you’re acually playing.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

GIRLS SOCCER 119


ignon 4. David Henderson 5. Sam Amrein 6. Zac lous 2. PJ Guignon 3. Ross Gu h Nass 7. Jackso 1. Chris Fotopo n O’GormanBean 8. Dr e B n C 8. 1 ar l w s o on h C 1 r 9. e A et u P st . in 17 r E o n gl nt is a h C 20 ip h . C Mi . c 6 ew Sur fa 1 h a n el a H m e il l 21. Michael C ce 9. An 15. Ian Wis ra y 2 2 . dres Riv D a s t e 3 W 3 . x J e v l a A c . k 2 D 3 e i e n d o 3 s 4 k . c B a J T r o y o o r k r s e w P A n . 1 th s 3 er o te n hi y d e 3 r 5. M 2 Fr e d e ri c o Ze p 3. Max C 3 0. R o b b y e d a 3 6. Ke h a o 24. J o h n v in S i m i p Ku s o n 3 7. C hris Hea d y 3 8. reflecting on the

THE ROOKIE

PAST “All of our matches have been outstanding this year. Everybody has had a really good attitude and has shown lots of sportsmanship. We’re are really passionate about it. This is my first year playing on the tennis team, and I love being able to work with other people and learning to be flexble.”

“This year, the freshman presence has been great. Team bonding has gone really well, especially with [senior Chris] Fotopoulos as a leader. He gets our team together for practices, and it’s nice to have him as a team leader. Also, we haven’t lost yet, so we’re undefeated so far.”

PJ Guignon 11

PREPARING FOR THE COMPETITION

Using his strong forehand, sophomore Spencer Jarrold practices his strokes with a teammate. Practicing against his teammates helped Jarrold make sure each of this strokes were equally strong. “I try to practice them evenly, so that I don’t have a really weak stroke,” Jarrold said. “I practice my strokes and everything in general with my teammates because we are more of a challenge to each other. This makes it easier when playing against another team because they’re usually not as good as we are.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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THE VETERAN

Jack Dee 10

LUCKY CHARM

Wearing his >lucky > Right:shorts, junior Brooks Anthony goes in for a ground stroke at a team practice. Anthony wore these shorts at every match for good luck. “It’s more of a state of mind than a lucky charm,” Anthony said. “When I wear them I feel undefeatable. Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

ON THE HUNT

>ing > Topa

right: Durspring practice, freshman Michael Hill searches for a lost tennis ball. Hill’s goal for the year was to be more consistent. “When I’m not consistent in my playing, I lose a lot more points,” Hill said. “I hit it out a lot more, or into the net or past the baseline.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS

At a March match, freshman Drew Surface slams a forehand to his opponent. Although Surface had a steady forehand shot, >he> Right: hoped to improve all of his swings while bonding with older team members. “I’m trying to keep talking to the team, and staying in touch and getting to know them better,” Surface said. “The upperclassmen seem really nice. I’m looking forward to getting to know more people and playing better with them.” Photo by Mackenzie Wylie.

120 MARCH


on Bates 1 1. Spencer J arrold 12. Kashev ur tz 25. Ramaswami 13. Reed Walden 14. Cameron Robles Jack Tretb ar 26. Taka Sawaguchi 27. A Lo g a n H ndrew Sweeney 28. Andrew Mohn 2 9. Jacob Rudolph e le y 3 9. J a k e Ly b a r g er 4 0. M ic h a e l C al v e rt L a d d e r p o si ti o n s a s o f A p ri l 3 r d , 2 0 0 9

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ra 10. Ja s

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BEN CARLSON 11 “I’ve been playing since fourth grade. I mostly play during the holidays for my family. My favorite song to play is ‘Jingle Bells.’”

VIOLIN PLAYER

FRESHMEN AND UPPERCL ASSMEN PL AYERS COMBINE THE

IR ...

s ro es different DESIGN BY GABY THOMPSON.

THE ROOKIE

FUTURE “I plan to continue playing next year because we’ll be missing some seniors, and the team might be needing some leadership.”

THE VETERAN

Brooks Anthony 11 “I’m planning to play club tennis in college because it’s a great way to meet people. I’m really impressed with the young players on our team. I believe they have potential to do well next year.”

Andrew Sweeney 12

BIGGER CHALLENGES

Left: At an early practice, junior Peter Chow waits for a return from his teammate. Although Chow enjoyed practices and matches, he looked forward to further proving the team’s skills. “I’m looking forward to going to tournaments because you get to spend the entire day with friends, outside of school,” Chow said. “I think we’ll do better than last year because of all the returning players.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

MAKING A MARK

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Looking to the

poulos started a new practice system that focused on improving the future stars of the team. Players held this practice outside of regular practice in order to focus on specific shots like volleys or serves. “Without a doubt this is the best freshman class that has ever come into the outside practice program,” Fotopoulos said. “Bringing more kids into a private practice should help them focus more and better themselves [as players].” Fotopoulos himself was a team leader, making it to state all three years he was on the team. He helped train underclassmen players to be leaders for the team in future years. “I think we clearly have the best team,” Fotopoulos said.” “Plus it would be amazing to win state all four years I have been here.” To ensure a top finish at state, the team kept up its hard work throughout the year. With school practices and additional outside practice for new players, the East boys tennis team was stronger than ever. “We have a bunch of raw talent, but everyone is getting better,” Henderson said. “Players that were solid last year have improved. This will for sure take us to the state title.” Story by Will Chertoff.

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ackpacks down, bags out, racquets in hand. Players sprinted onto the court and readied themselves for a tough practice. During the warm-up, coach Sue Chipman kept a watchful eye on the boys, evaluated their talent and determined who would compete at the top of the ladder for the season. The Shawnee Mission East tennis team had always been competitive at the state level, but a few changes for the season made them better. The team’s main goal for the season was to win overall. “As a team our main goal remains, as always, to win state,” junior David Henderson said. Henderson felt that he needed to push himself harder to make up for the loss of previous senior leader, Jack Peterson. Qualifying for state was Henderson’s initial goal. Along with pushing himself, he felt the need to encourage the new players as well. “Last year in the qualifying rounds, I got drawn against one of the best players [Jack Sock] in the nation,” Henderson said. “It makes me even more determined to qualify this year to help the team.” Revised practices also contributed to help the team qualify for the competition. Players at the top of the ladder including junior PJ Guignon, sophomore Ross Guignon, junior David Henderson and senior Chris Foto-

Left: Practicing before a match, junior Jason Bates volleys with a teammate. Through both team and personal practices, Bates grew significantly as a player. “Since freshman year I have improved a lot,” Bates said. “I have improved my consistency and footwork, and now I’m 10th on the team.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

BOYS TENNIS 121


APRIL

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1 OLIVIA CAO 12

>> Hats for Hope participant

“I made five oil paintings and we found out that the Cancer Society’s ribbon is lavender, so I painted three top-hats with a lavender ribbon around them. Everyone who saw it thought it was good but I probably could’ve done better.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 124-125 softball 2 LYNZA HALBERSTADT 12 >> SME player

SEE ALSO: PAGES 126 – 127

3 SCOTT RAINEN 11 >> SME rugby player “I’ve played rugby since my freshman year. I play because it’s the only sport I play right now. It’s a lot different than soccer. You can’t really compare the two.”

MAKING MUSIC ON THE SPOT

Above: Senior Emmett Starkey plays his trombone during symphonic band practice. Being a member of both full orchestra and the Blue Knights jazz band, Starkey enjoyed both, but thought that jazz was more fun. “Jazz is the most fun for me,” Starkey said. “It is so open. The music on the page is only 10% of what ends up being played. It is just based on the creativity of the group.” Photo by Rachel English.

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“I’ve played softball at East for four years. The East team is much more dedicated than the recreational team I play for. I like the East team better because the players themselves are better.”

SEE ALSO: PAGES 128-129 Friday 4 CHELSEA OLSON 12 >> First attendant “I really like all the artwork at First Friday and all the cultural variety. I go every month. I usually go with a small group of friends. If you go with too many people you don’t get a chance to see the artwork.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 130-131

5 ARIANA SHERK 9 >> SME girls swimmer

SEE ALSO: PAGES 132 – 133

6 ALLISON ROEBUCK 11 >> orchestra member

STUDYING WITH A TWIST

Above: In her French 3 class, junior Johanna Hild plays a card game to practice the vocabulary. The game was designed to help the students with the chapter over words dealing with driving. “Everyday is different,” Hild said. “We had a tournament at the end of the chapter and we played it about three times in two weeks.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

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“I joined because I swam year-round in eighth grade and liked it. It’s a lot harder than cross country, but I really like the group of girls and the team dinners. At the dinners we eat pasta and a ton of bread. The main thing that everyone looks forward to is fruit pizza.”

“[Orchestra] is my biggest hobby. In third grade, the orchestra teacher came with instruments to let us try them out, and I picked one that no one would pick – the viola. I practice shamefully whenever I find time. My music friends are great. I identify with them more than anyone – they’re like my family.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 134-135

7 NICK LUCAS 10 >> SME boys golfer “Golf is fun because the kids on the team are legitimate. I like practice best because our whole team is together and we have more fun. Me and [junior Grant] Burnside bust scores on the golf course when we play.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 136-137

COMING OUT ON TOP

Above: Jumping above seniors Reid Hintz and John Reene, senior Grant Morris steals the frisbee during an ultimate frisbee practice. Morris found interest in the game when his older brother and his friends started playing at Franklin Park. “Every year there was a solid group of seniors that played almost every day after school and I sort of tagged along,” Morris said. “The games get really intense. We all get pretty competitive.” Photo by Rachel English.

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U SE IT FILLED HIM WITH ENERGY. • JUNIOR ERIN TUTTLE HAD STACKS OF BOOKS ALL OVER HER ROOM. SHE READ EVERY DAY A S

S OON AS SHE GOT HOME FROM SCHOOL. TUTTLE LOVED TO READ BECAUSE IT INTRODUCED HER TO A DIFFERENT W

T AT 8:45. • FRESHMAN KEVIN ASH LOVED CHIPOTLE. HE ATE THE BARBACOA BURRITO AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK BEC A 122 APRIL


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WORLD AND A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW. ACCORDING TO TUTTLE, YOU COULD PUT ANY BOOK IN FRONT OF HER AND SHE WOULD READ I SMILING AT THE MEMORIES

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During junior Brian Barrow’s candlelight memorial service, senior Allyson Leach smiles as his parents tell funny stories about his life to the crowd. Nearly 100 friends and family members gather to remember their loved one. Leach was one of the many who had developed a relationship with Barrow. “I saw Brian around almost every weekend, and he was friends with some of my best friends,” Leach said. “It was more of a celebration of his life. It was pretty sad when his parents spoke, but most of his friends were just remembering him and all of their stories, so there was a lot of laughing.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

HOMORE JORDAN HERRING HELPED LEAD A K-LIFE BIBLE STUDY FOR SEVENTH GRADE GIRLS FROM INDIAN HILLS EVERY MONDAY NIG APRIL DIVISION 123


BENEFIT WITH FRIENDS

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At the Hats for Hope auction, senior Emma Collins looks at the hats on display with fellow senior Maddy Weast. Collins attended to model a dress. “I was down there modeling for Monkey Wrench Clothing, Collins said. “I didn’t get to put a hat in the show this year, but a lot of the designs were really well done.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

SNOWBOARDER 124 APRIL

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“I have been snowboarding all of high school. I like the adrenaline rush that comes with flying down the mountain. I go as much as I can.”

SEE ALSO

OLIVIA CAO 12


wishin’ and a

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH.

NAHS members

design hatS to be auctioned ofF for cancer charity.

S CHECK IT OUT

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Above: Senior Maddy Weast places a bid on the felt hat by senior Emily Mullet. Weast frequently attended many First Fridays in order to support all of the various artists. “I always go to First Fridays,” Weast said, “so I was really excited that this one was for East, plus it was for a good cause.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

MAKE A BID

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Below: At the Hats for Hope auction, senior Paige Cornwell bids on a drawing by Jesse Thomas. The piece was a pen drawing submitted by Thomas.“I was down at First Fridays anyway and I just happened to walk into the East gallery,” Cornwell said. “I started looking at all the cool pics and then realized they were from East.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

enior Mary Jackson painted the finishing touches on her pastel work. In front of the purple background, a young girl played the saxophone with a black jazz hat on top of her head. She symbolized the women and men going through chemotherapy who wore hats to cover up their balding heads. “I used acrylic paint that I watered down to almost watercolor,” Jackson said. “I used the color purple because it is the color for cancer survivors.” For this year’s Hats for Hope, art teacher Adam Finkelston decided to transform the club so more artists at East could participate in the charity event. Instead of limiting artists’ creations to just hats, this past year Hats for Hope was open to all artwork, as long as there was a hat in the piece. Students created portraits, took photos, painted or created hats to be auctioned off to raise money for the American Cancer Association. “I did two portraits of various people wearing hats or other headgear,” junior Patrick Barry said. “I did one of Carlos Santana with a bandana on and

one of John Hooker, a blues musician who always wore wide brimmed hats.” Because Hats for Hope opened up the auction to all NAHS students, they were able to use their own skill and their own artwork to help make an even bigger impact around the city. This enabled them to raise even more money for the American Cancer Association. “The hats [in my portraits] created a shadow over the people’s faces, especially around the eyes,” Barry said. “Since [Hats for Hope] opened up to all NAHS students, I was able to make portraits for the cause, which is sort of my forte.” Unlike past years of doing the auction at Loose Park, the students were able to show off their artwork at a venue in the Crossroads Art District. “My friend has a gallery there, so I asked if we could use it,” junior Anne Scrogham said. “Being able to be in a gallery, we got to see the peoples’ reactions to our art. [Plus] it brought a lot of awareness to the cause because a lot of people came.”Story by Sydney Henley.

FAST FACTS: Hats for Hope

creations

of hope Artists explain their creations made for the Hats of Hope charity event.

Benefits: American Cancer Foundation

Second year under the direction of: Mr. Finkelsten

Held in: The Landon Gallery

22 pieces entered $500 raised

Made from: NAHS Volunteers

Occurred at April 3 First Friday

Anne Scrogham 11

Emily Mullet 12

Adrianne Whitham 11

“I made a purple hat because light purple is like the color for cancer survivors. I had never knitted before so I thought it would be fun to try a knitted beanie.”

“I made a felt hat by ‘felting’, or layering shredded layers of felt and doing a bunch of stuff to condense and harden it into a hat shape. It was a new thing to try for a good cause.”

“I started with a hat I bought from the antique mall then found embellishments from places like Hobby Lobby and Joanne’s craft store. I think they reflect me-I would have bought one. I love the styles from the ‘50s and ‘60s.”

HATS FOR HOPE 125


new

BALL Game

a whole

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AMIGOS VOLUNTEER

SEE ALSO

LYNZA HALBERSTADT 12 “I went to Paraguay. I built 18 latrines for different families and educated them about hygiene. I also learned all about their culture, and I improved my Spanish. It was a really life-changing trip.”

Design by LEAH PICKETT AND HANNAH WALTER.

GIRLS END their losing streak through new coaching AND HELP FROM new players.

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Above: During warm-ups on the first day of tryouts, seniors Carly Haflich and Hannah Eggleston share a laugh while practicing throwing. This drill was intended to stretch players’ muscles and improve the strength and accuracy of their throwing. “I was pretty relaxed because I already knew the coach, and I was a senior,” Haflich said. “I was pretty confident that I wouldn’t get cut.” Photo by Rachel English.

126 APRIL

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

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SENIOR CONFIDENCE

Left: In an indoor batting cage, freshman JV player Cara Shaw practices hitting a teammate’s pitches. Players also hit off of tees, which helped them improve on follow-through and balance. “We practice at stations, and we switch halfway through practice,” Shaw said. “[Hitting in the batting cage] helps me get the lesson.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

IN THE BAG

playing in a varsity softball game, >freshman > Right: While Caroline Nick catches the ball. Nick played catcher and short-stop on the team. “I feel relaxed and confident, and I want to win so we are always trying to do our best,” Nick says. “We’re pumped and fired up and supporting each other.” Photo by Rachel English


S

EN

PHOTOS BY ALISSA POLLACK.

SME girls softball players explain how they break in their mitts and make them their own.

“Since kindergarten T-ball, this is the second glove I’ve ever had. Some people like to oil their gloves to break them in, but I only have a couple times; I work on breaking it in at practice.”

“To break in my glove, I put a ball in it, oil it and put a rubberband around it; it makes it easier to catch the ball because it’s not stiff. It’s hard to find a good glove that you really like.”

“During games I like to tighten the velcrow on my glove before every single pitch. It helps me focus on the game and it’s something that I have to do every time.”

Andrea Erickson 9

Paige Gundelfinger 10

Nikki Beasley 10

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WATCH AND WAIT

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Above: At an evening game, freshman Shannon McGinley pitches from the mound. “It’s a lot harder to play [when the sun is setting,” McGinley said. “It’s harder to see the signs. As a pitcher, I just love throwing different pitches and challenging myself.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

WATCH AND WAIT

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Left: Practicing in the gym during tryouts, freshman catcher Kyra Slemp waits for a throw. “We work a lot on the basics of catching and throwing the ball [when practicing indoors],” Slemp said. “I like it because working on the basics helps me improve my overall game a lot.” Photo by Rachel English.

DEMO BATTING

varsity team >watches > Right: asThevarsity softball coach Deon Slemps and JV coach Mike Keenr demonstrate some batting techniques. “The coaches talk with us at practices about how to improve our technique,” senior Cari Chestnut said. “Like for batting, they might show us how to turn our foot at a certain angle. They’re really helpful about everything.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

y the final inning, Lawrence Free State was catching up. It had been a close game throughout, but as the game continued, the 4-0 lead East had began to disappear. Senior and catcher Carly Haflich watched the next batter with apprehension. In order to win this game, they needed to score the last batter out as quickly as possible. The batter hit a low grounder towards second base, and running to scoop it up, sophomore Paige Gundelfinger caught the ball cleanly. The last out had been scored, and for the first time since 2007, varsity girls softball won a game. Parents in the stands cheered as the players gathered on the field, cheering and congratulating each other. “As a freshman, it was hard to understand how great an experience this was, but to see the seniors’ and everyone’s reactions, it was amazing,” freshman and left-fielder Andrea Erickson said. “To be part of the experience was great.” After many changes, including a new coach and a young team, the softball team sought to improve and set their sights for state. The positive effects of the changes began from the first game, when sophomore Haley Fosnough-Biersmith hit two home runs in a row. With a win in their second game, the team’s hard work was beginning to pay off. “Everything’s almost completely new this year,” Haflich said. “We have new jerseys, new equipment and an all new strategy. There’s also a different atmosphere, nicer, more laid-back, and I really enjoy going to practice.” New varsity coach Dion Slemp was the assistant coach the previous year and brought several changes to the practices. By switching the junior varsity and varsity teams from outfield to hitting drills during practices, the players were able to focus on each part of the game. “His coaching style and how he talks to us makes us want to be better,” Haflich said. “If he critiques something and you fix it, it’s an immediate improvement.” Practices also became a time for the team to get to know each other. With five freshmen and no juniors, the young team worked to build a foundation for the following years. “[All of the freshmen] went out to breakfast one day because we wanted to retake a group picture,” Erickson said. “I enjoy being with the team and spending time with the girls. No one judges you, and everyone is really close.” As the team’s camaraderie and skill on the baseball diamond increased, they began to set their sights on state. “One [goal] for sure was to win a game,” Haflich said. “Now Coach [Dion Slemp] wants us to go to state. If we all play to the best of our ability, we’ll definitely get somewhere close.” All it would take was two wins during the season to send them on to regionals. But for most of the team, their commitment to the sport, to their teammates and to their mindsets was more important. “We all look up to the seniors, and all the underclassmen are close,” sophomore and pitcher Meagan Dexter said. “We know we’ll be spending the next several years playing together, so we’re establishing a team and developing a winning attitude.” Story by Chandra Swanson.

EMOTIONAL LOSS

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Right: After watching her team make a mistake on the field, senior Carly Haflich holds her face in her hands in the dugout while senior Lynza Halberstadt watches to see the restults. Teammates always watched from the dugout to support their teammates. “I was bummed. It’s hard when you’re on the sidelines and can’t be out on the field helping your team,” Haflich said. Photo by Meghan Benson.

SOFTBALL 127


WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

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Left: Before a match, the team huddles to get pumped up together. Although the team was a mixed group of boys of different levels of experience, different grades and even different schools, they succeeded in bonding and hoped to strengthen their relationships. “As a team we’re pretty tight,” senior Ben Gloe said. “We went on a trip to Tulsa, and it was a blast. I believe going on trips helps us bond as a team.” Photo by Gail Stonebarger.

SUPER SLAM

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Right: On his way to making a goal at their second match, junior Joe Barahana loses the ball as he is tackled by a Blue Valley player. Barahana was a forward, a position which required tackling on most plays. “I always have to be aggressive,” Barahana said. “You can’t play rugby and not be aggressive. It gives you an incredible high.” Photo by Rachel English.

PAINFUL AFTERMATH

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With seniors Perry Rieke and Alex Collingwood backing him up, senior Nick Benge fights to stay standing against the force of his opponent, hoping to carry the rugby ball down the field for a goal. “Getting hit is really not that bad,” Benge said. “During the game, your adrenaline is pumping so hard that it doesn’t hurt. After the game, all the bumps and bruises come up. You can barely walk.” Photo by Rachel English.

128 APRIL

>>

KOKOPELLI BUSSER

SEE ALSO

SCOTT RAINEN 11 “I clean dirty tables and take chips to customers. The only downside of my job is when I get salsa on my hands. I hate the job, but I’m quitting since I’m going to debate camp for four weeks over the summer.”

Team veteran David Hobart explains why

is better than football.

“Rugby is more fluid than football. Unlike football, it never stops. It doesn’t have downs; it’s just all one game, kind of like soccer.”

1


TRUE LEADER

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Right: On an overcast day at Franklin Park, coach Andrew Parkinson gives senior David Hobart directions during practice. Parkinson was on the national rugby team in England, and both he and his wife shared their skills with the East team. “He’s a great coach and a really awesome guy,” Hobart said. “We go to his house sometimes, and his wife often has doughnuts for us before the games and sandwiches after.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

ALLIGATOR, ALLIGATOR

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Right: Before their second game, senior Alex Collingwood and junior Jacob Johnson participate in the team cheer. The cheer, called ‘Alligator, Alligator,’ was started this year and was kept secret from anyone not on the team. “We actually have three cheers: one before a game, one after and another for after a practice,” Johnson said. “It gets us together as a team, ready for complete annihilation.” Photo by Rachel English.

you are on the team,” Johnson said. “The regular players throw out rugby terms, and the new players don’t know what they mean, but when they do, they get less overwhelmed.” Freshman Richie Diaz was one of the three freshmen who joined the rugby team this year, the other two being Tyler Knight and Gage Cameron. Although the practices were intense, the freshmen new to the game felt liked they belonged to the team. “The first practice was kind of weird,” Diaz said, “My friend told me about rugby and persuaded me to join. I didn’t really know about rugby, but everything clicked after the few practices we had.” In addition to learning rugby terms, new players quickly became part of a team. Before games, players would go to one of the coach’s houses and stuff themselves with bagels, doughnuts and other food, helping the players motivate themselves to play a good game. “The new players gave us a chance to get to know each other,” Johnson said, “and this year we have more of a camaraderie.” Along with being motivated as a team, the players got to know each other better by having randomly assigned rooms when they went to tournaments out of town. With all the new players, they felt like they had a good chance at doing well this season because of how much they had bonded. “What really motivated me is the competitive spirit of the game,” senior Grant Morris said. “It’s a rough sport, but at the end, we can come together by the brotherhood of the team and share a laugh over a soda.” Story by John Francis.

WARMING UP

Above: Hands ready, junior Sean Graybill catches a throw from a teammate during their practice. The rugby team practiced several times a week, often at parks, and warmed up together before games. “We like to get warmed up as a team and jog around the field,” Graybill said. “Sometimes, we get in a circle and throw the ball around before the game.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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R

uck. Crash. Knock on. It was a sunny day and the players of the rugby team could feel the intensity of the game as they heard the shouts of coaches, team captains, and fellow players. These confusing commands and crazy terms were yelled at the freshmen and newcomers. Even as a second year player, junior Jacob Johnson was overwhelmed by the rugby terms. “I had no clue what was going on or what they were saying,” Johnson said. “It was intense.” Despite all of the confusion, the players of the rugby were able to come together as a team. This year a lot of new players joined the rugby team, which was becoming a more popular sport at East. There were approximately twenty-two players, which were four more players than last year. “Last year we had a lot of freshmen and only a few returning seniors,” senior and team co-captain David Hobart said. “Returning sophomores know what they are doing and can relate to the game.” Some of the players came from football and were not used to the fast pace of the rugby game. In the first practice, the players would get comfortable with the flow of the game by avoiding tackling each other. “[During this practice] you come, learn the game, see if you like it, and if you do then

PASSING THE TEAM ON TO YOUNGER PLAYERS, THE RUGBY TEAM COMPLETES A LEGAL

DESIG N

BY G A

BY TH

OMP SON.

FORWARDPASS “In football they wear pads and things, and that’s nice, but I think it’s better without pads because you have to know your limits. You have to know when not to push it because you’re more vulnerable.”

2

“There are not as many simple passes straight down the field. It makes it more exciting because you have to move from side to side, tricking the other team.”

3

“When the ball goes out of bounds, instead of throwing or kicking the ball in, we use a jumper, who we lift up in the air, and he throws the ball in.”

4

“Rugby was around way before football existed. When football was invented, they were just playing rugby and incorporated other elements, but they all go back to rugby.”

5

RUGBY 129


POSITIVELY NEGATIVE

SME STUDENTS GET IDEAS FOR DISTRICT PIECES FRO

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At the Shawnee Mission School District Art Show, senior Nora Salle hugs friend, senior Marisa Stevens. “I went down to see the District Show to see my friend’s work,” Salle said. “Plus it was a nice afternoon. There was really impressive work from high school students.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

130 APRIL

M MEDIA, POP CULTURE AND

IDEAS OF THEIR OWN

“We did a project where we had to use emotion and when I saw a picture of this old man, I thought it would be really good. I used watercolor with ink. It took me like a week to finish the project.”

“A lot of my artwork is based on dreams and subconscious ideas that I have so they’re totally original. It took me three weeks. I carved Styrofoam and put a cement shell.”

“The assignment was to arrange it in any way that appealed to us. I wanted people to be able to interpret it in different ways. It’s off the page and a simple outline, and I’m very happy with it.”

“With this piece I just wanted to try something new. I usually go with more plain colors, but I wanted it to really stand out, so I did it bright, and I’m really excited it made it in the show.”

Lauren Engleken 11

Cydney Ross 11

Megan Deay 11

Sydney Danner 12


DESIGN BY ELLEN FRIZZELL, RACHEL ENGLISH, AND MEGHAN BENSON.

THERE’S A

FIRST FOR EVERYTHING

STUDENTS TRAVEL TO THE CROSSROADS DISTRICT ONCE A MONTH FOR ART, CULTURE AND A TASTE OF LIFE OUTSIDE THE WALLS OF SME.

GAZING AT THE GALLERY

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Above: At the Shawnee Mission School District Art Show, seniors Nora Salle and Marisa Stevens admire their friends’ artwork. Stevens had a piece in the show. “I think it’s really good to have your work in a gallery. It’s a cool feeling to see people enjoying your art.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

STREETSIDE SYMPHONY

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Left: Outside at the Crossroads, junior Sammi Rebein plays classical music to make an extra $35. She and other orchestra members played for passersby on the sidewalk of Southwest Boulevard. “It was the first time I’ve played outside, and it was really cold and windy.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

ART ON ASPHALT

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Upper left: Practicing for the upcoming Chalk Walk in The Crossroads, senior Laeden Galacia sketches a flame design using chalk pastel. At Chalk Walk, Galacia and junior DJ Burton planned to draw together for two days. “I’m excited because this is like free-style art,” Galacia said. “It’s like we’re going back to our roots.” Photo by Rachel English.

BANANAS FOR FASHION

>>

SEE ALSO

Far left: Admiring the artwork, junior Amilia Winter models a dress from Monkey Wrench Clothing. “All the dresses were really funky, crazy and bright,” Winter said. “They really stood out.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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CHELSEA OLSEN 12 “I sing and dance in my room for like thirty minutes everyday. Jazz Cannonball Adderley and the Thelonious Monk are two of my favorites. It’s a good stress reliever, to just kind of dance around for a little bit.”

STRESS BUSTER SPRING ART EXHIBITION 131


THIS YEAR, THE GIRL’S SWIM TEAM IS TAKING A...

TURN

PICK YOUR stroke

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“I throw my arms forward, cup the water and follow through my stroke with a powerful kick. I like [butter] fly because it’s a hard stroke to swim, and I feel really powerful when I swim it.”

>>

Girls describe how to swim their favorite swim team strokes

Design by Whitaker Sherk AND WILL CHERTOFF.

Marston Fries 9

INTO THEIR SEASON WITH INNOVATIVE EXERCISES.

“I throw my arms b a c k one at a time, pull t h ro u g h and kick with a steady rhythm. I like back because I can breathe, and the turns are more fun than the other strokes’.”

Emily Fuson 10 “I first shrug my shoulders up, and I pull up my arms and shoot forward. Meanwhile, I kick, bringing my feet up to my butt. I like it because I feel like I’m flying through the water; it relaxes me.”

Allison Kirby 11

A

s girls filed into the locker room immediately after school, they set their swim bags down, grabbed a snack and quickly got ready for dry-land warm-ups. At this point, they ran and did abs, leg and arm exercises. After working out with medicine balls and sprinting up the stairs, they grabbed their bags filled with towels, goggles, caps, fins and buoys, and they headed for the pool. Varsity girls swam from Monday to Saturday for at least three hours each practice. They even had some 5:30 AM morning practices. “We do Canadians on Fridays, which are really hard because you’re tired,” senior Melissa McKittrick said. “You basically divide up into lanes, and you do 100s on these really fast intervals. We’ll do some kind of main set, a couple of smaller sets and then a cool down.” Although daily practice for varsity was tough, it was also very rewarding. “We get feed back with Rob because he’s actually watching us swim,” senior Paige Ledbetter said. “We know what we’re doing wrong during practice rather than finding out during the meet.” While JV had a more laid back schedule, they still had a lot to accomplish at the five practices they attended each week. Ab workouts, stretches and jump roping made dry land entertaining and challenging.

132 APRIL

STAYING AFLOAT

Above: At a circuit practice, sophomore Tori Spencer kicks with her teammates in lane one. “Everyone likes circuits,” Spencer said. “It’s a fun team-bonding opportunity with JV and varsity.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Left: Spouting water while swimming backstroke, sophomore Dana Sherard finishes a backstroke set. After each set, the swimmers took a break. “In between sets,” Sherard said, “we talk or squirt each other with water using our hands.” Photo by Kit Andresen

PEP TALK

>>

BACK ATTACK

Left: Listening to coach Rob Cole lay out the stats for her first meet, junior Sarah McKittrick listens for her events. “Rob always tells us what his expectations and goals for us are before each meet,” McKittrick said. “It helps us stay motivated.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“I love JV,” junior Megan McGillicuddy said. “Wanda [Simchuck], our coach, is amazing. I feel like on JV, we all get really close.” But this year was much different from past years. Because many long-time swimmers quit, JV Plus, the team between JV and varsity, was removed; only four seniors remained on the varsity team, and many more freshmen made varsity. “We have a really young team this year,” McKittrick said. “I think we have a lot of energy, which always comes with a younger team.” Several past swimmers decided not to swim due to school and other extracurricular activities and jobs. “It stinks because we don’t get them on our team,” McGillicuddy said. “We don’t get to bond with them, and we lose their power on the team. It would be really great if they could stay, but we have new people. Maybe they could fill in the gap.” The current team needed to step up for the loss of past swimmers. All the girls agreed that they needed to work harder and bond more. “My last year on the team, I want all of us to get really close and enjoy it,” McKittrick said. “For the team, I just want us to do the best we can.” Story by Hannah Walter.


SEE ALSO

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>>

Swimming the backstroke, sophomore Molly Troutman pushes off the wall. Turns kept the continuous flow of a set moving fast. “By giving us sets that are one right after another,” Troutman said, “they boost our endurance.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“I volunteer at Operation Breakthrough. I love helping the little kids who are underprivileged. I work with the preschool kids ages three to six. We play outside on the jungle gym, four square and hopscotch.”

VOLUNTEER

DEFINE YOUR SPORT LADY LANCER SWIMMER: MOTIVATED, FRUIT-PIZZA LOVING, CARBO-LOADING, LADIES - Jacey Gorman 12

STREAMLINE

ARIANA SHERK 10

GIRLS SWIMMING 133


OFF THE STAND

Orchestra members discuss their favorite music pieces and why they like the songs.

“My favorite “My favorite piece “My favorite piece “My favorite piece piece was Barwas a piece called was probably the is Symphony No. bar’s ‘Adagio for ‘Dream’s PanDvorak Sym5 by Tchaikovsky Strings.’ It’s one tomime.’ I liked phony. I like it because it’s beauof the most beauitbecause it was because of the tifully written. It energy it has to it. It’s pretty really evokes powerful emotions tiful pieces I have ever played different from all the other piecand possibly the saddest. The es we played. The slow temp and challenging for the entire or- when I listen to it.” movement of the chords was re- dramatic, dynamic chords were chestra, but we always pull it ally inspiring.” interesting.” together.”

Hunter Stevenson 11

134 APRIL

Allison Roebuck 11

Brice Roberts 11

Jessie Light 12


STAND SHARING

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Far left: Sharing a stand, freshman Kennedy Burgess plays the violin during a practice at East. “Especially when your stand partner is not on the same level as you, it makes it harder to play,” Burgess said. “They sometimes get you off tune. But usually it works out." Photo by Rachel English.

PASSION

>>

SEE ALSO

Left: Playing the violin during a concert, senior Laura Allen closes her eyes during the song. “I would be a totally different person without music,” said Allen. “It has taught me to express my feelings through something that is not words.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

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PETER CHOW 11 “I enjoy it because I usually always know the song that’s on. I know the beat and everything, so it’s really easy to dance to. My favorite song to dance to is probably ‘Sandstorm’ by Darude.”

HIP HOP DANCER

ORCHESTRA STRUGGLES WITH BLOCK SCHEDULE BUT NOW VIEW IT WITH a new...

PERSPECTIVE P

arents who had arrived an hour early to the orchestra’s Collage Concert at Shawnee Mission West might only have noticed some shuffling of feet underneath the curtain, or the sounds of laughter drifting into the auditorium. That’s because behind that curtain, a photo shoot was in progress. Dressed in their suits and long black dresses, orchestra members posed for a photographer with their instruments. Senior Carrie Chestnut laid on her stomach with her violin perched on her back, one viola player jumped on another’s back, and seniors Jessie Light and Emily Mullet posed together. All of the boys in orchestra posed for a picture together. Each time the photographer called ‘who’s next?’ the scene changed again. This scene before the spring ‘Collage Concert’ was a quintessential example of the close bond of this senior class who came together through the struggle of dealing with the new block scheduling system and the loss of outstanding senior players from the year before. String players saw the biggest change in their work with certain members when they combine for full orchestra. “We have full orchestra a lot less and we have to set up halfway through so we lose time,” senior violinist Andrea Webber said. “Things are just very rushed. By the time the concert rolls around you realize that you only have two rehearsals left.”

Design by Jordan Dietrich and John Francis.

The new challenge of block scheduling was exacerbated by the loss of senior players from last year. “The [full] orchestra is suffering because of block, but the hardest part is that a lot of the winds [from the band] graduated,” senior violinist Natalie Hofmeister said. And although East continued to lead the district and state in number of students to make All-District and All-State band, they still suffered in other aspects. “We have a few student leaders but we don’t have really solid sections now,” Hofmeister said. However, the orchestra found ways to circumvent its weaknesses in order to improve and play upon its strengths. Director Jon Lane chose for the orchestra’s spring concert, a unique piece by the composer Humperdink, organized more small sectionals and encouraged students to work on pieces outside of class. This particular approach wasn’t especially taxing on orchestra members because the majority of the top orchestra players took private lessons, so they would practice every day anyway. Although the year had been a challenge, orchestra members looked optimistically towards the future. “Because we don’t have a big base, a lot of the juniors have had to step up,” Hofmeister said. “The younger people are carrying the orchestra.” Story by Leah Pickett

LOOKING AHEAD

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During an orchestra practice at East, senior Chelsea Olson looks up at director Jon Lane while playing the violin. “It’s pretty important to pay attention to [the director] while playing,” Olson said. “If we get off, he’ll bring us back in.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

DIFFERENT ANGLE

MOVING FORWARD

Above: Playing her part in the freshman orchestra, freshman Mallory Fisher plays ‘Divertissement’ by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. “[Being in freshman orchestra] is fun because we get to do more than in middle school,” Fisher said. “We get to do more solos and have professionals working with us.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

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Left: During an East practice, freshman Maddy Pigeon tries to play her instrument with the backside of her bow. “[Our teacher] told someone else that she was playing with the wrong angle of her bow,” Pigeon said. “I was kind of mocking her.” Photo by Rachel English.

ORCHESTRA 135


>>

YOUTUBE FANATIC

SEE ALSO

NICK LUCAS 10 “I search YouTube videos. “Muffle-Up” is one of my favorites. The weirdest thing I’ve found would probably be a storm trooper dancing non-stop for like five minutes.”

Weathering

THEIR

Hardships The golf team endures all kinds of weather during their practice and matches.

“The worst conditions were during tryouts. I had warmers in my pockets and my fingers were numb. You can swing and play easier if it’s hot.”

Andrew Herst 9

“When it’s cold and frigid it makes it harder to hold the club. Hot is hot but cold makes it hard to play.”

Joe Lynch 12

Ian Boat 11 136 APRIL

FREEZING TRYOUTS

Freshman Griffin Clark watches a put during the March 11 boys golf tryouts. The first day of tryouts occurred in fortybelow weather. “It was freezing,” Clark said. “It’s definitely harder to hit the ball when your hands are numb.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

>>

“The toughest is when it’s windy because you have to change everything to hit the right shot. Stance, where I’m aiming, how high-it’s all affected.”


CREATING

LINE

DESIGN BY MAUREEN ORTH AND EMILY COLLINS.

A MENTAL GAME

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Above: During the April first game, senior Will Snyder puts the ball. While putting, he focused on keeping a clear head.“When I swing, I try to think about something else,” Snyder said. “It’s a mental game, so you have to be careful not to over think.”Photo by Andrea Zecy.

SWING

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Above: At the golf game on April 1, freshman Grant Kendall drives the ball. April 1 was the team’s first game.“Basically when I swing I try to focus on one thing,” Kendall said. “It depends on what I’m working on, but if I focus on that one thing it keeps me from getting confused.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

AFTER ROUND ONE

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Right: After their round at the April first match, freshman Jeremy Young and sophomore Nick Lucas wait for the other players to finish. While they waited, they snacked to pass the time. “We were eating brats after we played,” Lucas said. “We were waiting for everyone else’s scores to come in.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

WITH A FULL TEAM OF FRESHMEN AND SENIORS, GOLFERS ATTEMPT TO LINE UP THE SEASON TO ENSURE SUCCESS.

H

e came to the front nine two over par. Senior Joe Lynch had spent a tumultuous day on the back nine green at the state tournament. And as he clubbed in to the first hole, he grimaced. A double. He was one of four juniors attending last year’s state boys golf tournament, and he wanted the seniors to leave on a “good note.” Then he started sinking birdies, 20 feet in on hole two, 10 on three, and another 20 on three. Last season proved the Lancers’ boys golf had hit its stride with Sunflower League and state championship wins. This year they planned on another success at the state tournament at the Shawnee Country Club in Topeka with returning lettermen seniors Chase Lucas, Will Snyder, Scott Humphry and Lynch. “[Winning state last year] gave them the taste of what it takes to win state and compete for a state title,” coach Ermanno Ritschl said. “Hopefully we’ll join that experience with this [year].” It was a tournament of surprises. Ranked number three in the team, Lynch became the Lancers’ best scorer during the state match while he played his personal best round all season, a 74. He tied for medalist at the end of the day.

Before the game, Lynch’s dad predicted his score just for fun: three bogies, three birdies and one double and 11 at pars. He wrote everything down on a note card and compared it with Lynch’s breakdown at the end of the match. He was exactly right. “I was just hoping for the best,” Lynch said. “[State] was pretty exhilarating because going into it, we weren’t favorites.” Between eight tournaments, two essential to league standings, the squad practiced a mandatory 10 hours over a four-day week. In addition to the four returning lettermen, junior Ian Boat was likely to take the fifth spot on the squad. The sixth spot was wide open, however, brewing competition between senior Nic Hasselwander, junior Grant Burnside and freshmen Conor Shrock and Henry Simpson. “We had high expectations last year, and we achieved them,” Ritschl said. “This year we have the same high expectations. We have a great bunch of golfers from top to end, from the seniors right to the freshmen. It should be an exciting year for all players.” Story by Tim Shedor.

BOYS GOLF 137


1

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RING THE CONVENTION. • SENIOR DESEREE BRUICE LOVED DISNEY MOVIES. HER FAVORITE DISNEY PRINCESSES WERE JASMINE FROM A CARRYING HER LOAD

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After spending an afternoon collecting recyclable materials from around the school, senior Savannah Duby dumps a bag of water bottles into the recycling bin in the junior parking lot. Duby was a member of environmental club and set up recycle bins around the school at the beginning of the year. “This is the first year we are able to recycle bottles,” Duby said. “Before, people used to treat recycling bins as trash bins, so the new company that took over school recycling really helped us out.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

TOP OF TWO MOUNTAINS IN COLORADO IN THE TWO YEARS BEFORE HIGH SCHOOL. THE MOUNTAINS WERE PTARMIGAN AND QUANDAR 138 MAY


7

8

MAY

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ALADIN AND POCAHONTAS. • JUNIOR ANNA SWANSON ATTENDED TO YOGA CLASSES. SHE USUALLY WENT ONCE OR TWICE A

“I do a lot for boy scouts like camping each month. We have tournaments for things like frisbee or waterpolo. I would always rather be playing sports or games.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 146 – 147

2 DEVERY NORTH 9 >> musical lover “I’m a freak about musicals. ‘Spring Awakening,’ ‘Chicago’ and ‘Chorus Line’ are my top three. That’s all [the music] I have on my iPod.”

AND WE’RE FILMING

SEE ALSO: PAGES 152 – 153

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Above: During an early morning pep assembly, junior Carl Skrukrud plays for the news station. The news station typically came every year to see the band play with the cheerleaders. “The cafeteria has pretty bad acoustics,” Skrukrud said. “But we sound really loud because it’s an enclosed space.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

3 GRANT ELLIS 10 >> injured athlete “I’ve dislocated my right and left shoulders over six times now. I can pop them out whenever. It first happened in football, then wrestling.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 162 – 163

4 JEREMY OSBORNE 10 >> computer browser “I sit at the computer for hours. When I grow up, I want to do something with websites. I could browse [the net] for eternity.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 170 – 171

5 DANIELLE JAMES 11 >> artist “I love drawing people and portraits. When I was going into eigth grade, I spent the summer in California taking art classes.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 184 – 185

ALL TOGETHER NOW

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Above: During practice on the field outside the school, sophomore Nikki Beasley does push-ups and situps in line with her teammates. The team always did strength training. “When we warm up, we always run first and then end by throwing to each other,” Beasley said. “When we aren’t hitting during warm-ups, we always do sit-ups and push-ups.” Photo by Nicole Luby.

6 BLAKE SPENCER 11 >> volunteer “I went to Mexico last summer with my youth group for a mission trip. We were there for six days, and we built a house.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 192 – 193

7 NICHOLE HEMMINGSEN 12 >> keychain collector “I started collecting them because my dad travels, and he gets me one every time he goes on a trip. My favorite one is from Pennsylvania. It is a silver and gold heart-shaped locket, and when you open it there is a picture of me and my dad.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 206 – 207

ABSTRACT DESIGN

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Above: During her art class, senior Olivia Sieck paints a design on the north ramp. All students in her class contributed to the wall several days before Thanksgiving break. “I picked to paint a swirly design because I’ve always liked abstract things,” Sieck said. “I picked yellow and purple because yellow is a warm color and purple is cool; I like mixing them.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

8 DENA RICE 12 >> perfectionist “I have extreme OCD. I’m really OCD about how my room looks, putting stuff away and [finishing] school work on time.” SEE ALSO: PAGES 216 – 217

W EEK WITH HER FRIEND, JUNIOR BECCA REA-HOLLOWAY. • SOPHOMORE AMY WILSON VISITED BLACK CANYON IN COLORADO. W

1 MARK HARKEN 9 >> boy scout

H ILE THERE, SHE AND HER FAMILY ATTEMPTED TO DRIVE DOWN THE TRAILS. • FRESHMAN TAYLOR RUNION CLIMBED TO TH

MAY DIVISION 139


WALKING FOR A CAUSE

MUSIC AND LYRICS

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Far below: After walking to school from the Prairie Village Shopping Center with the Coalition club, freshman Toni Aguiar talks with freshman Maggie Thomas. The walk was designed to raise awareness for children in Uganda, who have to walk to school every day. “We had tons of signs and you could tell that cars were slowing to tell what it was all about,” Aguiar said. “That was good because I wanted to do something to help the world.” Photo by Rachel English.

Below: After lunch, freshmen Kaitlyn Pattison and Kyra Slemp relax by listening to freshman Adrienne Morgan’s iPod. “We usually hang out and play games on her iPod- all kinds of games,” Pattison said. “Kyra usually wins; she’s good at them.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

YOUNG AND INNOCENT

During the Lancer Day Parade, freshmen Danielle Norton and Chan>dler > Right: Pruneau wear Minnie Mouse ears and hold signs. “It was Disney theme, and we made a really small float and held banners,” Pruneau said. “We were trying to show how Disneyworld is the happiest place on Earth and how freshmen homecoming would be the happiest place on Earth. I think we were trying to play up freshmen innocence.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

YOUNG AND INNOCENT

During a rainy-day freshman A team football game, freshman >Austin > Far right: English takes his helmet off on the sidelines during a brief time-out. The team called games played on rainy days ‘mud games.’ “The best games are played in the rain,” English said. “I would always get excited for mud games – they’re more fun.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

Lauren Adams Shayna Adams Toni Aguiar Hiba Akhtar Maggie Allen Kerstin Amandola

140 MAY


FRESHMEN

Joel Anderson Spencer Andresen Kristin Anthonis Rhonda Anzawi Nathan Are Melina Arruda

Kevin Ash Stefania Backs Lauren Baker Bahar Barani Corbin Barnds Trenton Barnes

Alejandro Barrera Emily Bates Alexander Beahm Andrew Beasley Hallie Beck Charles Belko

Jacob Belzer Noah Bertholf Philip Bever Kyle Biggerstaff Madeleine Biles Jonas Birkel

Kaley Blake Jonathan Blunt Miguel Bojorquez Amy Bonds Camille Breckenridge Dylan Brett

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 141


Adam Brownlee Rebecca Brownlee Katherine Buchanan Aaron Burgess Kennedy Burgess Michael Burrell

Samuel Byers William Cameron Matthew Cantril Christopher Carey Connor Carollo Devin Carver

Sean Cedillo Elizabeth Chaney Amanda Chao Simon Choi Sean Chomicky Morgan Christian

Isabelle Ciaramitaro Chelsea Clark Griffin Clark Tucker Clark Elizabeth Cloud Jeffrey Cole

Madelyn Collins Aidan Conley Joshua Cook Sarah Cook Stephen Cook Mollie Cooper

142 MAY


Sara Cooper Nelson Costello Emma Cousineau Alexander Crane Cameron Crane Taylor Crane

Katie Crawford Anna Cunningham Henry Curfman Leyann Dahlgren Logan Dalgleish Evelyn Danciger

Patricia Dannov Abigail Davis Brandon Davis Jenna Davis Spencer Davis Jade Delgado

Stephanie Denton

&

HIGHS LOWS:

2009

Morgan Denton

Slumdog Millionaire

“I really liked it because it opened my eyes about India. I didn’t really know anything about it before. I went [to see it] with a couple of friends because it was extra credit for Mr. Nickels’ world geography class. I liked how it ended up with a happy ending because for a while it seemed kind of serious.”

Emily Kerr 9

Freshman reveal their opinions of the big hit movies so far in 2009.

Twilight Movie “The first thing I did [when I heard there would be a movie] was call my friend so we could go and see the premiere. I thought it was really fun because you get to see one of your favorite books come to the big screen. I like how Edward is the perfect guy and how [the author of Twilight] picks out the best things about guys and puts it into one guy.”

Victoria Vaca 9

Twilight Movie

“Edward sets an unrealistic standard for guys. [I first heard about it when] some friend was reading it and they told me it was the new Harry Potter. I was really offended – I don’t think anything can compare to the awesomeness of Harry Potter.”

Luke Holsinger 9

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 143


BLACKOUT

STATIC CLING

PARTY

the cafeteria during the >freshman > Right: Inblackout dance, freshman Angelica White plays with one of the many decorative balloons. “I’d never been to anything like [the blackout dance] so it was a new experience and I like new experiences,” White said. “There was so much energy – it was just great.” Photo by Alissa Pollack. As other freshman >look > Faron,right: freshmen Chris Carey and

Richard Diaz Audrey Dicarlo Paige Dicarlo Meghan Dickinson Helen Dinkel Beverly Dobson

Caroline Dodd John Dods Wyatt Donnelly Emily Donovan Alexandrea Dressman Sarah Driks

Chloe Ducrocq Brendan Dulohery Abigail Dunn Nicholas Ecker Jacob Edwards Elizabeth Eggleston

Jordan Eimer Rachel Enderson Austin English Andrea Erickson Elliot Faerber Henry Falk

144 MAY

MOVING UP THE SOCIAL LADDER

Above: Chatting with friends at the freshman blackout dance, freshman Adam Simmons dances to the music. “It was a great opportunity to meet upperclassmen and other people in my grade, even though most of the freshmen stood around most of the time” Simmons said. Photo by Rachel English.

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Trey Henley dance for the crowd. “I thought when I first got there that it was really boring because only like ten people were there and I didn’t think people would show up,” Henley said. “Then a lot of people showed up and a lot of juniors came and it got a lot more fun.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Freshmen dance at the freshmenonly, blackoutthemed dance.

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DANCE REVOLUTION


Jack Fay Maggie Fenton Seth Ferguson Andrew Fischer Mallory Fisher Lukas Fleming

Melanie Fletcher Taylor Foley Brady Forbes Mimi Fotopoulos Amy Franklin Patrick Frazell

Marston Fries Alice Fritts Emily Frye Reid Frye Haley Furstner Matthew Gannon

Michael Garringer Benjamin Garten William Geddes Michael Gentry Tyler Germann Alice Gibbin

Kelly Gillespie Samuel Gilman Camille Goehausen Patricia Gonzalez Spencer Goulding Jonathan Granstaff

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 145


Andrew Green Sara Griffith Kennedy Grimes Kylie Guess Ellyn Gunya Joshua Gyamfi

Gage Hamilton Calvin Handy Hayley Hansford Elena Hardy Mark Harken Jessica Harmon

Mallory Harrington Jordan Harris Kellyn Harrison Heather Hartong Jack Haverty Caleb Hayden

Christopher Heady Jake Heckey Isaac Hendry Samuel Heneger Andrew Herst Blaine Hill

Blake Hill Michael Hill Kara Hines Sophia Hitchcock Sheaffer Hoefgen Henry Hoffman

146 MAY


Lonna Holly Lucas Holsinger

Victoria Holt Jennifer Horan

Andrew Hornung John Horvath

Katherine House John Howland

Molly Howland Casey Hynes

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 147


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SO HAPPY

TOGETHER

On the track, in the stands, and in the hallways, freshmen find friends. AFTER-SCHOOL CHAT

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Above left: Leaving school to carpool home, freshmen Julia Davis and Becca Brownlee talk about their day at school. “When leaving school, it’s a good time to talk about the good and bad things that happened that day,” Davis said. “We have the same teachers, so we talk about tests and stuff , and whether they were hard or not.” Photo by Rachel English.

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Above: At a cross country track workout, freshmen Emily Kerr and Katie Crawford push each other forward. “[Running with someone] makes the time go by a lot faster because we talk to each other about what we did at school,” Crawford said. “When you’re running by yourself, you get bored easily.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Molly Jennings Kurt Jensen Anton Johnson Kellie Johnson Oliver Johnson Matthew Johnston

Sarah Johnston Abigail Jones Adam Jones Amanda Jones Eloise Jones Tabor Jorns

Heidi Kaiser Ian Kaiser Zachary Kasmiskie Grace Keefer Grant Kendall Wil Kenney

148 MAY

FUN AND GAMES

Left: Sitting in the gym, freshmen Sarah Wilson and Jennifer Horan laugh during the Lancer Link Crew’s freshmen orientation. “I was thinking ‘high school is going to be interesting,’” Horan said. “[Freshman orientation] helped me relax a bit... I was kind of scared coming to a giant school.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

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IT TAKES TWO

Meghan Jackson

Keagan Jacobs


Katherine Keohan Emily Kerr Sarah King William Kirkpatrick Tyler Knight Ryan Knops

Jack Kovarik Paige Kovarik Vilma Kreka Kelly Kuhn Emily Kulaga Katelyn Kulaga

Daniel Kurtz-Enko Heloise Laffargue Sierra Laing Alex Lamb Emily Lang Theodore Lang

Alexandria Lavayen Jeanene Lawrence John Lee Justin Lee Mary Leek Lucy Lehoczky

Ashley Lemos Jordan Less’Ard-Spring Ashley Lewis Joseph Lewis Jacob Libeer Emily Lindeman

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 149


Jacob Little Gilbert Livingood Andrew Long Duri Long Gillian Long Mary Longan

Adam Lowe Sean Luenz Thomas Lynch Yesenia Maldonado Anna Marken Grace Martin

Haley Martin Deon Mason Keara Masson Michaela Mavai Sophia Mazzetti Benjamin McBride

Elle McClenny Elisabeth McConnell Elizabeth McCormick Jacob McCoy Chloe McCrary Shannon McGinley

Grayson McGuire Christa McKittrick Madeline McMahill Elizabeth Mergen Megan Metz Droste Milledge

150 MAY


Mickela Miller Frank Miner Elijah Mitchell Wendy Monarres Abigail Moore Adrienne Morgan

Kathryn Morgan Lucas Morgan Anna Moritz Lillian Myers Howard Iv Nelson Tyler Nelson

Makenzie Nesselhuf Claire Newman

Mary Newman Alex Nichols

TURNING UP THE

Students describe the heat of their work load as their freshman year progresses.

“It’s gotten more difficult as the year goes by just because [we are] getting ready for big tests and reading lots of books in multiple classes. It seems like the teachers expect more from us and we’re [finally] adjusting and finally getting homework. I probably do around 2 hours every night.”

Morgan Saterlee 9

Evan Nichols Caroline Nick

“[The homework load] depends a lot on what teachers you have. I personally don’t have a lot of homework but I have a study hall so that helps a lot. If I didn’t have a study hall it would probably be about an hour a night. ”

Jordan Eimer 9 “It depends on the night. Odd days I have a lot of hard classes and a lot of homework – probably like an hour and a half or two hours, depending on if I have a project or something. But my even classes are some of my easier classes. [My hardest classes are] probably honors world geography and German. For German there’s so many different ways that the language works so you have to comprehend all of it. For world geo it’s just a lot to learn.”

Mickela Miller 9

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 151


Devery North Danielle Norton Hayden O’Gorman Jackson O’Gorman Bean Kelsey O’Rourke Jesus Olivarez

Ellen Oliver Ashley Olson Jean Orr Kaitlyn Pattison Natalie Patton Emma Pennington

Dominic Perez Natalie Pierce Ashley Pierret Christopher Pinne Sophia Poppie Chandler Pruneau

Jason Pugh William Purdy Laila Radwan Rhys Raglow Benjamin Randloph Brittany Reed

Christiana Reene Maribel Regaldo Erin Reynolds Demi Rice Trent Richardson Samuel Rider

152 MAY


Louis Ridgway Patrick Riggin

Aidan Robbins Gregory Robinson

Elizabeth Rodgers Allison Ross

Nathan Ross Miguel Ruiz

Taylor Runion Jason Sabin

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 153


sharing SPACES Anna Moritz 9 “It was interesting that we had to share lockers. In middle school, we didn’t, so I was like ‘wait, we’re older now,’ but it’s nice that I have a chance to see my friends that I don’t have class with. ”

Freshman locker partners discuss the pros and cons of sharing their personal space.

Christopher Heady 9 “I was assigned with one of my friends, so it was reassuring to know that he wouldn’t be stealing my stuff. We’re pretty unorganized, so we kind of battle for space. When I open the locker in the morning, I kind of shove his stuff aside, but it’s not really an issue.”

“When I first got my locker, I called all my friends to see who had a locker near mine. When I called Anna, we realized we had the same number. It made my freshman year a lot easier to share a locker with someone I knew.”

“It’s different opening my locker and seeing someone else’s books in there. It wasn’t that way in middle school. But it’s not that annoying once you get used to it.”

Kathryn Morgan 9

Jack Haverty 9

Morgan Satterlee Caroline Savage Christopher Savage Takanori Sawaguchi Jill Saxton Jack Sayler

Courtney Schenkelberg Casey Schmidt Alex Schoegler Conner Schrock Mikael Schuck Jacob Seitz

Ryan Seybert Brandon Shatto Cara Shaw Kristen Shedor Eric Sieck John Simmons

154 MAY

Amy Sachse

Atiyen Samadi


Andrew Simpson Henry Simpson Reed Slaughter Kyra Slemp Marlena Smith Meara Smith

Madeline Sniezek Grace Snyder Nathalie Solger Scott Soltys Meghan Spivak Lillian Stalder

Emily Stanley Sophia Steckelberg Dylan Stein Joseph Steinmetz Catherine Sterbenz Samuel Stevens

Joseph Stockton Abigail Stolberg Carter Stolberg Michael Stonebarger Megan Sturm Tucker Styrkowicz

Samuel Sudekum Emma Sullivan Madeleine Sullivan Stephen Sundberg Stephen Surface Alisson Swope-Behm

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 155


Kristen Sykes Abigail Symes James Tankard Evan Tarry Brooks Tate Margaret Thomas

Samuel Thomson Mark Towster Isaac Travers Miranda Treas Jack Tretbar Molly Troutman

Jane Turner Emily Tuttle Shannon Tuttle Victoria Vaca Emma Vanbuskirk Gabrielle Vandergriff

Preston Vaughn Carlos Velasquez-Gomez Emilie Wagner Mary Walker Cheyenne Watts William Webber

Clayton Welsh Carolyn Welter Evan Westhoff Angelica White Christian Wiles Jacob Williams

156 MAY


Samantha Williams W Williams Jordan Wilson Sarah Wilson Joshua Winter

HANDY WORK

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Ian Wiseman Taylor Wolf Carolyn Wolff

On the track, in the stands, and in the hallways, freshmen find friends. FUN WITH FABRIC

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Left: During Sewing class, sophomore Carolyn Welter pins together a pattern in preparation for sewing it together. “I’ve made an apron, a bag and a pillow,” Welter said. “I thought it would be a good break from school. The best part about finishing a project is probably using what you’ve made and having everyone see it.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

Madeleine Wolford Tracy Woltemath Caroline Wooldridge SKETCH IT OUT

Sitting outside on the steps >to> Right: the Junior lot, freshman Jake Little

OUT OF THE BOX

Below: As part of her art foundations class, freshman Keara Masson paints flowers and swirls on the temporary plasterboard on the ramp. “[The design] was just something that I liked; I was just free-handing,” Masson said. “It was kind of a break... some of the projects [in Art Foundations] were kind of hard.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

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Elizabeth Wooldridge Larson Woolwine Jakob Yedo

sketches outside to get ideas for an upcoming project. “[At Foundations] was really laid-back and not as much work as my other classes,” Little said. “I’m not very good at drawing but that class helped a little bit with that.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

Jeremy Young David Zeiger Federico Zepeda

FRESHMAN PORTRAITS 157


TAKING A HIKE

TP TOWN

Below: Before the MORP dance, sophomore Chris Melvin and freshman Tom Lynch decorate the gym with toilet paper and streamers to fit the dance’s Egyptian theme. Despite the fact that Melvin thought the set-up was unorganized, he and the other students made it work. “It was kind of a contest to see who could make the coolest design, or hit the highest part of the gym,” Melvin said. “I focused more on trying to get the higher spots, like the basketball goals, to make a cooler look. Basically, the set up was very simple, but we got to go all out and see what the coolest things we could do were.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Far below: During the only school-day snow of the year, sophomore Elizabeth Colburn makes the trek up to the sophomore lot. “It was not a fun walk because the sophomore lot is so far from the school,” Colburn said. “But I don’t mind it because the seniors should be closer to the school than the sophomores.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

FACES AND FRIENDS

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Left: On Franklin Center day, sophomore Hannah Roste’s class watches one of their kids rides down the hallway on his new bike. Roste’s class and another class combined because they were hosting two brothers. “One of the kids loved cars,” Roste said. “We gave him a bike and he was just in shock – he just couldn’t believe it. It feels good to do something nice for someone in need.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

TIRED, BUT TRIUMPHANT

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Far left: Sophomore Lindy Blackman stretches to prepare for gymnastics practice to begin. At practice, the gymnasts worked on their routines after a brief warm-up consisting of tumbling and cartwheels. “I love getting to know the different grades of girls,” Blackman said. “It’s nice to see people in the hallway and know them.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Ashley Adams Claudia Adams Laurel Adams Stephen Adams Timothy Ahern Alysabeth Albano

158 MAY


SOPHOMORES John Aldrich Julian Aliber Kelly Allen Samuel Amrein Chloe Anderson Jill Anderson

Nora Anzawi Rachel Arnold Andrew Arri Ryan Ash Amber Atha Drew Auer

Marlio Avalos Samantha Bamford Brook Barnes Caroline Barnett Samantha Bartow Peter Bautz

Madeleine Bavley Nicole Beasley Dylan Becker Joseph Becker Natalie Bender Anna Bernard

Samuel Berry Kathryne Bever Catherine Birkenmeier Melinda Blackman Elizabeth Blessen Emilie Block

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 159


CENTER STAGE

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Below: At the fall musical review, sophomores Olivia Harlan and Samantha Bartow perform ‘Wash that Man Right Out of My Hair’ from ‘South Pacific’. “We chose [the song] because it really fit both of our voices,” Harlan said. Photo by Anna Petrow.

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ARTS AND

CRAFTS Throwing clay pots on the wheel, performing in the theater and engraving details, students show their artistic talents.

SPINNING HER WHEELS

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Above: In Ceramics class, sophomore Katie Griffith works on a cylinder pot. “I like putting textures on it to make it interesting,” Griffith said. “I thought [the pot] was good. I was surprised that it turned out to look so cool with the glaze.” The ceramics students rubbed off the glaze at the end so that only the crevices of the pot were glazed. Photo by Kit Andresen.

Grace Boehm Bailey Borgmier Courtney Boyd Sarah Braden Helen Bradley Krey Bradley

Jackson Brett Kylee Brooks George Brophy Spencer Brown Jaquan Brunt Hayley Bublitz

Brennan Burns MacKenzie Burroff Allison Burton David Burton Molly Caldwell Rebecca Callstrom

160 MAY

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ALL THE LITTLE DETAILS

Left: During her Ceramics class, sophomore Abigail Leek puts some new clay onto the wheel. “It’s really difficult when you’re throwing the clay – you have to be really careful,” Leek said. “Every little move you make with your fingers can mess up the pot or bowl.” Photo by Amanda Marland.


Sean Cameron Elizabeth Capps Alexander Carver Tyler Cecil Kelsey Chadd Kirstin Chadd

Julie Chalfant Anthony Christensen Jaeda Christensen Kirsten Clark Angela Clem Kirby Clements

Briana Cochran Elizabeth Colburn

Sophomores work towards their licenses by taking

DRIVING LESSONS Zachariah Colby Daniel Colebank

“I basically sat in a classroom and learned about all the rules. Then we had partners and took turns driving with a teacher in the back. When I started out I didn’t care about Drivers Ed that much but when it got going it made it quite a bit more exciting.”

David Crane 10

Andrew Collins Emily Collins

“The class wasn’t that great – it was eight hours on a weekend and we would take tests and watch movies. They pick you up after school in a Mustang and you get to drive around for a couple of hours, so that was pretty fun.”

Nicholas Morgan 10

“There are three separate driving times with the instructor, but I’ve only gone to the first one so far. We practiced in the parking lot last time and the next time, it’s supposed to be harder, with getting into traffic. I’d driven a little bit [before the class] so was never that nervous about it.”

Celeste Rinner 10

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 161


Kim Conrads Katherine Cox Jan Creidenberg Rebecca Crooks Prarthana Dalal Katherine Darling

Jonathan Dawson David Dechant Elizabeth Dee John Dee Alison Dees Marjorie Delich

Robert Dettenwanger Jacob Devries Meagan Dexter Aveek Dhar Katherine Diehl Nikolas Djiko

Caroline Doerr McNeil Dolliver Pablo Dominguez Oliver Dubois Dylan Dunn Rachel Duvall

Hannah Earley Katherine East Mark Edmonds Emily Ellenberger Grant Ellis Robert Enders

162 MAY


Collin Enger Jack Esberg

Brandon Evinger Ian Exline

Theodore Fields Kristen Fischer

Lauren Fischer Chloe Fischgrund

Haley Fisher Haley Fosnough-Biersm

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 163


>> taking Photos by Ellen Frizzell.

Calculus BC

“I was looking for a challenge, and wanted to get ahead to get further in math. The teacher does less examples and more application. The students have to do more understanding on their own, because there’s less guidance.”

Robert Enders 10

AP

How did your first AP class differ from your other classes?

European

History

“It’s more difficult, but more interesting. I’m really nervous about the exam and already started studying last semester. There’s a lot more pressure and we know that this is college level.”

Angela Clem 10

Micro/Macro

Economics “We spent most of first semester talking about theory. In Macro, we’re talking a lot about what’s going on right now. I like that because I probably wouldn’t have a clue what was going on without [the class].”

Hayden Frey

Micah Melia 10

David Frizzell

Emily Fuson George Galvin Kaitlyn Ganapini Madeline Gaughan Sarah Genton Duncan Gibbs

Lauren Gillespie Heather Glaze Andrew Goble Emily Goering Madeline Goss Amelia Grant

Breana Gray Jennifer Gray Cole Greenfield Melissa Gregg Carly Griffith Katherine Griffith

164 MAY


Ross Guignon Paige Gundelfinger In Chang Hahn Grant Halderman Jacob Hallquist Danielle Hammond

Kailey Hammond James Harbison Olivia Harlan Jack Harrigan Kaiha Harris Toyrena Harris

Michael Hart Lindsey Hartnett Samuel Hattaway Madison Haverty Logan Heidmann Grant Heinlein

TO THEIR OWN

BEAT

DANCING TO A LATIN BEAT

Below: Spinning sophomore Cassie Kerr, sophomore Alex Rorie dances the tango during the monthly Spanish Dance Club. “It’s extra credit,” Rorie said. “But I also love to dance. It’s a nice way to make new friends, not with the freshmen, of course. They’re always huddled in a corner.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.

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SWINGING

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Russell Helder

Swing club helps students meet new people and learn a new style of dance.

YOU SPIN ME ‘ROUND

During Swing Club prac>tice > Right: in the lunchroom, sophomore Susie McClanahan dances with sophomore David Dechant. “My favorite move, spinning, can be fun as long as you don’t get dizzy and the partner doesn’t keep spinning and spinning you,” McClanahan said. “It’s a great workout and it’s exhilarating.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

HANGING AROUND

Above: Performing with Swing Club during a pep assembly, sophomore Kyle Engelken picks up sophomore Emma Schulte. “We had a huge routine planned out and then three people quit, so the day before, we decided to just free dance,” Engelken said. “We didn’t prepare that much, but it was great – everyone clapped a lot.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

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Logan Heley

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 165


Jordan Herring Cj Hicks Todd Higbee David Hill Joseph Hodos

Matthew Hoffman Riley Hoffman Megan Hogue Morgan Holm Charles Hotchkiss

Hsiang-Tung Hung Allison Hunter Spencer Hunzeker Isabelle Huyett April Irvine

Adam Isenberg Perry Jackson Loren Jamieson Cory Jennett Brad Johnson

Mary Joyce Grace Junk Nora Kanally Alex Kaplan Joseph Kashka

166 MAY


Jacob Kaufman Jennifer Kaufman Tyler Kavanaugh Alexander Keller Samantha Kelly

>football, > Right:

Playing a game of sophomore Zach Nass runs around during Team Games. “Going outside that particular day was fun because it was sunny and nice,” Nass said. “A lot of kids in my class were athletic and made the game fun to play.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

RUNNING ON EMPTY

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Left: During their first-semester Gym Foundations class, sophomores Greg Tracy and Drake Winn take a break on the side of the track. “It’s really easy but it was harder when it was hot outside,” Tracy said. “We only ran fast when we were doing time trials. We normally took it pretty slow.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

UP IN THE AIR

Above: During Gymnastics class, sophomore Kendall Kohnle jumps rope with her classmates. “We could just mess around and do whatever,” Kohnle said. “After the gym was closed they let us use the big gym, so we just did aerobics and stuff.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

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Christopher Lanza Richard Latshaw

PHYSICALACTIVITY

Bryan Kurz Carmen Lang

KEEP AWAY

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Elise Kuklenski Molly Kurtz

Students in gym classes find the experience exhausting yet enjoyable.

Kyle Kerns Cassie Kerr Lauren King Kendall Kohnle Kelsey Kost

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 167


test-taking

TIME

Dejuanne Tucker 10

What did you do for your first standardized tests?

Lauren Stanley 10

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Jonathan Dawson 10

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168 MAY

Abigail Leek Jeffrey Lefko Aubrey Leiter

1 How did you prepare?

a. I took practice exam after practice exam,

classes and studied weekly. b. I read the booklets and studied with my friends. c. Preparation? I sat down, read the instructions, and began. “[To prepare] I studied and read all the booklets I got. My friends and I also got together and talked about what we thought would be on it. It did help, but it was still really hard, biology especially. It’s hard to know how to be prepared.”

2 Which test did you take?

a. Just the PSAT. b. Just the Plan. c. Both the PSAT and the Plan.

“I took the PSAT and PLAN because they’re good practice. The PSAT eventually is important for National Merit, so it was good to do it once. I think it’s nice to know the format so you know what to expect.”

Melanie Leng Brian Levota Holley Lewis

Benjamin Liu Shelby Loos Rebeca Lopez

Josiah Lowrey Nick Lucas Jacob Lybarger

3 Will the test help you?

a. It’ll prepare me the type of questions on the real SAT and ACT. b. The PSAT is good for scholarships. c. I don’t think it will actually help me that much. “It’s pretty beneficial because it opens the door to scholarship opportunities. I was surprised at how quickly [the PSAT] went by and wasn’t ready. Next year, this will help me [on the SAT] because I’ll be more prepared.”

Olivia Lynch Garrett Lynn Timothy Madison


Joshua Mais Katherine Mansfield Caroline Marland Emma Marston Robert Martin Daniel Martinez

Paige Martz Micheala Mathiesen Skyler McChristy Susan McClannahan Patrick McGannon Margaret McGilley

Jacob McGillicuddy Sarah McKittrick Robby Medhi Micah Melia John Melvin Mark Mergen

Riley Meurer Alison Meyer John Meyer Madeline Middleton Austin Miller Brett Miller

Caroline Miller Lauren Miller Logan Mitchell Nicholas Morgan Robert Moriarty Emily Morris

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 169


John Morrison Alex Moskowitz Pauline Mytinger Megan Nass Zachary Nass Corey Neidl

Ean Nelson Heather Nelson Samantha Nelson Lauren Newell Preston Norman Andrew North

Valerie Nutt John O’Brien Gillian O’Connell Cormac O’Connor Taylor Odell William Olson

Joshua Orpin Jeremy Osborne William Papineau Shayla Parcels Natalie Parker Vincent Parsons

Megan Pavlu Laura Perez Eric Peterson Alexander Pirotte Alissa Pollack Keshav Ramaswami

170 MAY


Molly Rappold Thomas Read

Graham Redelsheimer Jamie Reece

Ricky Reed Andrew Reineke

Mikaela Remer-Phifer Alicia Reyna

Rachel Rice Kathryn Richardson

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 171


he t s

g

n oki

lo

rd a tow

future What would you like to accomplish in your next two years of high school?

Emily Fuson 10

Michelle Richardson Kerri Ricketts

“Well, I’m really big into swimming so I’d like to make top eight in the state and challenge myself to get good grades. I’ve been working on swimming for such a long time and last year I didn’t place as a freshman but it’s always what I’ve wanted to do.”

Brandon Updyke 10 “[I would like to] hopefully not fail school, graduate and maybe go to college. I also want to play football next year. I really like football. I’ve never really tried out but my Weights coach [Chip Ufford] asked me to play next year. I’m happy I’ll have something to do.”

Celeste Rinner Cody Roberson

Michelle Richardson 10 “I think I would like to meet a lot of the people in drama. I wouldn’t be able to memorize lines, but there’s not very much pressure in theater and I like meeting new people. I would want to work on sets because as far as getting up on stage goes, I don’t think I’d be able to memorize lines.”

James Rosa Ashly Rosenstock Hannah Roste Jacob Rudolph Andrew Ryan Christina Schocke

John Schrock Emma Schulte Faye Schumacher Anthony Scott Adam Seligson Joseph Sernett

172 MAY

Connor Roberson Alexander Rorie


William Severns Anne Sgroi Lydia Shackelford Rituparna Sharmacharya Jesse Sharp John Sheahan

Dana Sherard Ariana Sherk Anousha Shirazi Dennis Simmons Margaret Simmons Kevin Simpson

Nathan Simpson Jacob Sirna Benjamin Slater Cameron Smith David Smith Emilia Snively

Kathleen Spencer Bailey Spickler Lauren Stanley Elizabeth Steinbock Graham Stevenson Daniel Stewart

Kaitlyn Stewart Gail Stonebarger Meagan Stoops Hanna Stradinger Paige Swanson Jeffrey Tate

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 173


Audrey Thompson John Thorpe Rebecca Thrasher Lucas Throckmorton Gregory Tracy

Lauren Tripp Dejuanne Tucker Cole Turner Conor Twibell Emma Tyler

Maurisa Valentine Shelbi Wade Ryan Waisner Reed Waldon Una Walkenhorst

Hannah Walter Elizabeth Ward Andrew Watkins Kathryn Watkins Riley Watson Scott Watson

Hope Waugh Logan Weckbaugh Raina Weinberg Connor Weir Nathan Welch Emily Welter

174 MAY


Allison Wendorff Alexander West Kaitlyn Westhoff Kaylee White Russell White

Andrew Wickersham Andrea Wickstrom Connor Wilkins Tanner Williams Brian Williamson

Amy Wilson Samuel Wood Chase Woofter Darby Wooldridge Zachary Wooldridge

Andrea Zecy

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HEADBAND STYLE

Spirit Days give students a chance to experiment with a new look. EIGHTIES SPIRIT

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A SPOT OF COLOR

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Chenshan Zhou

Far left: Working on her art project, sophomore Natalie Bender wears the 80s outfit her sister helped her pick out. “[My sister]’s really into 80s movies,” Bender said. “I loved 80s Day. It was one of my favorite Spirit Days. My friends really liked my outfit, but that was the only response I got.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Left: Chatting outside before school, sophomore Heather Nelson discusses after-school plans with sophomore Catherine Ward. “My friends and I got together and picked out outfits the night before,” Nelson said. “People kind of looked at me weird, but most people were dressed up anyways. It was a lot of fun.” Photo by Emilie Block.

SOPHOMORE PORTRAITS 175


RUNNING ON EMPTY

FLAVOR OF LOVE

Below: Before a pep assembly, junior Margaret Brill helps junior David Moore set his clock to the right time. He dressed up for Halloween with a gold, jeweled crown, a purple cape and a variety of golden accessories. “David had a clock on like Flava Flav’s clock,” Brill said. “But usually before pep assemblies, we stretch and go over the fight song.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

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Far below: Exhausted from a five-mile run, juniors Harper Coulson and Sam Logan lay down during cross-country practice. That day, Logan and Coulson wore short shorts and midriff-baring T-shirts. “That’s our everyday apparel,” Logan said. “We’re already pretty bad [runners], but it makes us look good. It’s just our style.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

RECRUITING FOR ART

SHARE fair, junior Amilia Winter recruits >people > Right:forAthertheMaddie Rose Art Center project. She wore a blue bow with white polka dots to attract attention to her table. “Of course I forgot to bring a change of clothes,” Winter said. “I had to wear my SHARE costume for the rest of the day.” Photo by Rachel English.

LEAPS AND BOUNDS

right: Running after the ball, junior Joe Craig winds >up> Far to slam it down the field. “[My favorite game] was a win against South,” Craig said. “It was a good win, and South sucks and I hate them.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

Ashton Adams Lindsey Agee Brian Aitken Caitlin Allen Zachary Amrein

176 MAY


JUNIORS Brooks Anthony Sarah Are Andrew Arnold Blake Arnold Heather Athon

Keelin Austin Madison Bailey Dustin Ballard Joe Barahona Valery Barajas

Holland Barling Spencer Barnhill Kelsey Barrera Bryan Barrow Patrick Barry

Jason Bates David Beeder Kathleen Belko Annelise Bennett Caitlin Benson

Bridget Bergin Charles Bernard Jonathan Bernard Timmy Bird Marlena Birkel

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 177


&

NOW

How have your tastes changed since freshman year?

Emily Bittiker Emilia Blake Lauren Bleakley

Fashion “Now, I've seen a lot of people wearing suede slouch boots. During freshman year, it was mostly Uggs and flats. I like the style this year – everyone is getting more of their own styles.”

Avery West 11

Television

Ian Boat August Borchers Olivia Botts “My favorite T.V. show freshman year was definitely ‘The O.C.’ and now it's ‘Gossip Girl.’ They're very similar, but the O.C. was better. It was pretty much my life.”

Steven Bradford Erica Brandli Margaret Brill

Alison Stephens 11

Gadgets “This year, there's the iPod and the iPod Touch. Back in freshman year, I remember the Razor was a lot more popular. I definitely like the iPod touch, because you have all your songs in one place.”

Natalie Brown Samuel Buchanan Griffin Bur

Joshua Thrutchley 11

Music “Freshman year, I listened to more heavy rock and heavy metal, like ‘Suicide Silence’ and ‘Underoath.’ Now I listen to Indie, like Joshua James and Chase and Bright Eyes. It’s changed because my personality changed.”

Lisa Giles 11

178 MAY

Brandon Burch Taylor Burkhead Baleigh Burroughs


Zachary Busey Connor Callahan Michael Calvert Anthony Camp Scott Cantril

William Carey Benjamin Carlson Jordan Carlson Nicholas Carothers Samuel Carpenter

Kinsey Cates Katelynn Cauthon Matthew Chalk Rachel Chaney Emily Charles

Qi Chen Will Chertoff Leah Chesbrough Peter Chow Nicholas Clark

Christopher Clarke Rebecca Clay Zachary Clements Stacy Coffyn Keegan Conrad

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 179


GETTING COMFORTABLE

>>

Below: Relaxing on the debate room couch, junior John Luther chats with juniors Clair Finke and Tara Raghuveer. “It’s quieter, more laid back,” Luther said. “The majority of my friends are also there, so it’s not just a bunch of kids [in the lunchroom] doing a bunch of crazy things.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

LUNCHTIME

LAUGHS

>>

SNAP!

>>

CHATTING OVER FOOD

>>

Above: Enjoying the nice weather, junior Molly Mahon eats lunch outdoors with some friends. “If it’s nice, it’s cool because you can get some fresh air,” Mahon said. “It puts you in better mood after a couple hours in school. We joke around and tell stories.” Photo by Rachel English.

Hannah Copeland Keelia Corcoran Carl Cornwell Richard Coulson Alexander Cox

Joe Craig Dylan Crandall David Crane Matthew Creidenberg Connor Creighton

Rachel D’Autremont Alexandra Dahlgren Haley Dalgleish Adele Daniel Erika Davee

Jake Davidson Jai Dayal Erik Dayton Megan Deay Alyx Delgado

180 MAY

Left: Laughing, junior Evan Myers carries a broken chair to a teacher. “It was cold, so the legs were stiff, and while I was leaning back, one snapped,” Myers said. “It wasn’t the first time that happened.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

For some students, lunchtime is a time for fun, friends and relaxation.


Joseph Deng Andres Diaz Lauren Dodd Kirk Doerr John Dollar

Alexa Donahue Theodore Dubois Jamieson Edwards Doni Eilenberger Lauren Engelken

Lauren Epstein Lauren Erickson Sarah Evans Zachary Fair Jesse Fancolly

Kathleen Fay Alexandra Ferlas Cole Fevold Alexandra Fields

Whether doing an art project, painting faces or tying balloons, juniors help each other out. BUILDING WITH BALLOONS

Below: Decorating the Village the morning before Lancer Day, junior Jessie Jacob ties a black balloon onto the balloon arch. “We had a techinque with some people sticking to colors and then we passed the balloons along,” Jacob said. “People were playing with the helium and doing the helium voice, which helped to soften the mood.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

>>

PERSPECTIVE

Above: Junior Aubrey Grantham listens as Drawing teacher Jason Filbeck shows how to line up the stairs. “I drew the stairs because I thought it would be challenging,” Grantham said. “Getting the lines straight and spaced evenly was really tricky.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

PLAYING WITH PAINT

Above: Borrowing from the tennis float theme, ‘Red Hot,’ junior Nikki Reber paints flames onto junior Dani Miller’s face. “We decided to see how flames would look on someone’s face, and I volunteered,” Miller said. “It was very tingly and, I’m not going to lie, burned for a while. It got in my hair and took forever to get out.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

>>

HELPING HANDS

>>

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 181


Kathryn Finke Clayton Finley Samuel Fisher Sara Fisher Valerie Fisher

Jacob Fleming Andrew Forbes John Francis James Franklin Claire Freeman

Emma Fritts Mary Galvin Rachel Gangwere Kristina Genton Hannah Gerwick

students enjoy some laughs WORK HARD, PLAY HARD >> East during school activities. GOING FOR THE TACKLE

>>

Below: Practicing for a powderpuff game, junior Megan Klugman tries to tackle junior Grace Martin for the Saturday Night Live drill. “Running after the people and actually tackling them to the ground was the hardest,” Klugman said. “But it was kind of funny to see how weak people were, people in your own grade.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

RALLY FOR A CAUSE

>>

Above: At an Aids Awareness fundraiser, juniors Amilia Winter and Tara Raghuveer yell to passing cars. “The organizers wanted to promote love and acceptance as opposed to hate and bigotry,” Raghuveer said. “We wanted to keep the signs positive and spread a positive message.” Photo by Rachel English.

SETTING IT UP

>>

Above: As they set up for the freshman dance in August, junior Link Leaders Harper Coulson and Margaret Brill play with some of the decorative balloons. The theme of the dance was “Blackout. “I think [the dance] was [successful],” Brill said. “I had fun as a Link Leader so hopefully [the freshman] had fun, too.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

182 MAY


Jared Giabbai Grace Gillaspie Janna Graf Kristina Grandon Aubrey Grantham

Sean Graybill Gordon Green Jake Greene Gage Grimes Ashley Guerricagoitia

Pierre Guignon Charles Gunya Lauren Hackworth Yong Hahn Weston Halberstadt

Emily Halter Teresa Harbison Jackson Harter MacKenzie Haugland Taylor Haviland

John Hawkins Anna Haynes Sarah Hemer Sydney Henley Celia Herman

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 183


Kaley Herman Elizabeth Hernandez Catherine Herst Evan Herstowski Kevin Hertel

Kris Hertel Parker Heying Johanna Hild Rocky Hill Natalie Hine

Collin Hoefer Audrey Howell Gretchen Hummel Austin Hunzeker Colleen Ireland

Kathleen Ireland Jessica Jacob Kathryn Jaeger Danielle James Benjamin Jensen

Stewart Jensen Ashley Johnson Beck Johnson Jacob Johnson Tanner Johnson

184 MAY


Se-Hyun Kang Benjamin Kaplan

Alfred Kass Scott Kennedy

Veronica Kerr Elizabeth Kessinger

Chloe Kester Katherine Kettler

Allison Kirby Mallory Kirby

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 185


>>

National Art Honor Society Secretary “On Exec Board, we get together and talk about what we’ll do as a group for the society, like the Winter Art Auction. I care a lot about art. It’s what’s important to me, where my interests are. On the Exec Board, you can channel your efforts better, because your voice is heard more.”

Patrick Barry 11

KC Soup Kitchen SHARE Chair “We go to the soup kitchen and volunteer serving food, or we can go and make [the food] before. I did [SHARE] freshman and sophomore year and wanted to be more involved. It’s really fun to see the people and connect with them and feel good about volunteering.”

Kelsey Kirkpatrick Kathleen Klehm

Megan McGillicuddy 11

Stage Manager for the Muscial “The stage manager is in charge of organizing the other crews and [communicating with] the crew chiefs and the adults. There's a lot of responsibilty; if something goes wrong, it's your fault. That aspect of it can be really stressful. But it's very rewarding when you see the play and know that you helped everything run smoothly.”

Megan Klugman Samuel Kovzan

Jake Davidson 11

Now that you’re an upperclassman, what leadership positions did you apply for?

Hannah Lang Kiley Lawrence John Lehoczky Dana Leib Adam Levin

Jack Logan Sam Logan Jesus Lopez Martinez Spencer Low Nicole Luby

186 MAY

Ashley Kurtzman Mary Lafferty


John Luther Megan Mack Madison Magalski Molly Mahon Hannah Mallen

Johannah Mallory Evie Marshall Grace Martin Amanda Massey Daniella Mata

Geoffrey Maxwell Mary McCandless Max McFarland Megan McGillicuddy Kelsey McGonigle

COOLING DOWN

>>

Below: After finishing a race at North, junior Ben Jensen tries to cool off with two popsicles. “My favorites are the green ones,” Jensen said. “I always feel really miserable during the race, but it’s worth it in the end.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

>>

Students find ways to participate in activities outside of school.

MIND GAMES

UPSIDE DOWN

Above: At a gymnastics practice, junior Hannah Quillec performs a balance beam move called a plange. “It’s like a handstand,” Quillec said. “You can make up new things at practice.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

>>

>>

Right: While competing with Shawnee Mission South, seniors Joseph Marx and Michael Smythe and juniors Adele Daniel, Dana Leib and Brice Roberts of the Categories team wait for the next question. “We’re all just a bunch of dorks,” Daniel said. “The competition is fun, but we all love answering trivia questions.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 187


Elizabeth McGranahan Charles McGraw Duncan McHenry Tyler McKelvey Andrew McNamara

Louis Mehlstaub Cody Meinking Dana Meyer Christopher Miller Dani Miller

Gabriel Miller Lexi Mische Andrew Mohn Jesuha Monarres Charles Moore

Caitlin Morley Kylie Morrow Louisa Morton Jonathan Moss Matthew Mueller

Alex Munns Drake Myers Megan Nemechek Anders Newman Joseph Newman

188 MAY


The iPod-listener “Usually I do my homework for that night, but after that I usually watch movies on my iPod or listen to music. Whether I get that much done depends on if I didn’t get the homework done from the night before. Then I kind of have to be productive.”

SECRETS r a n i m e

s

What kind of a seminar student are you?

The diligent worker “I go out in the hallway and work on my homework with a couple guys in my math class because it’s quiet out there. It’s kind of hard to be [productive] on Fridays, but other than that, yeah, I definitely am. I think it really helps. I think seminar along with block scheduling really cut down on the homework load.”

Parker Heying 11

Caitlin Benson 11

The reader The talker “Most of the time I just sit and talk and hang out with my friends. It’s in the choir room so it’s difficult to do homework because there’s not any desks. It’s definitely a distraction because there’s not enough places to do your work in there. Most people in my seminar don’t do very much.”

“I usually work on my vocab homework during seminar. When I do homework in seminar it’s easier to remember. Vocab relies a lot on memorization, and I can study in seminar before English. It gets me better prepared than studying the night before and then waiting for class the next day.”

Sam Kovzan 11

Zachary Clements 11

Azad Nowzari Ryan Olander Ryan Osborne Jacob Parelman Will Penner

Margaret Peterson Anna Petrow Jordan Pfeiffer Anna Piepenbring Amanda Pierce

Madeleine Pinne Elizabeth Piper Alexander Place Nicole Prenevost Amanda Privitera

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 189


Austin Puckett Hannah Quillec Tara Raghuveer Lauren Raibble Scott Rainen

Thomas Rappold Rebecca Rea-Holloway Samantha Rebein Maria Reyes Lauren Reynolds

Connor Rice Madeline Rich Lauren Riley Lyndsey Riley Luis Rivera

choosing FAVORITES FASHION DESIGN

190 MAY

What classes do you take at Broadmoor?

COMMERCIAL BAKING

MULTIMEDIA ONE

“We do a lot of designing and constructing, design boards, weekly portfolio pieces and pattern drafting. My favorite project so far has been the Red Dress Project for the Go Red Heart Association. We got to design our own red dresses, and they will be displayed at a shopping mall. I made one with a deep v-neck in the front and back, a tight fitted bodice, circle skirt and a glitzy fabric bow.”

“I’ve always wanted to open up my own bakery, so I wanted to get as much experience as I could. My favorite project was making gingerbread houses for the Bistro. We had to make a gingerbread house as colorful and creative as possible. I used skittles, Mike and Ikes and mini-wheats.”

“We do animation, photoshop and computer technology. It’s a prerequisite for film-making, which is what I want to do, and it’s a great way to express myself. My favorite project was stop-motion animation. I took it in a different direction, using photography. One of my friends had broken his leg skateboarding, and I took pictures of him skating, then falling and looking like he had broken his leg, from changing camera angles.”

Caroline Sheridan 11

Tori Wynder 11

Keelin Austin 11


Cara Rivers Elizabeth Roach Phillip Roach Brice Roberts Cameron Robles

John Robson Allison Roebuck Brian Rogers Lindsay Rooker Mildred Roque

John Rowe Brooke Royle Megan Russell Jeff Rutherford Cody Rutledge

Kelly Sabates Hannah Satterlee Lindsey Sauls Sara Schenkelberg Alexa Schnieders

Sally Schoenfeld Kareen Schwartze Laura Scott Anne Scrogham Sarah Sears

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 191


Sarah Sedorcek Dawn Selder Ryan Severeid Kelsey Shaffer Timothy Shedor

Hao-Cheng Shen Caroline Sheridan Whitaker Sherk Priscilla Siordia Annie Slaughter

Dara Slemp Dale Smith Kevin Smith Blake Spencer Ellen Stanziola

Grant Stauffer Alexander Steinbock Anthony Steinmetz Alison Stephens Hunter Stevenson

Michael Stolle Megan Sullivan Olivia Sullivan Kelsey Summers Anna Swanson

192 MAY


Chandra Swanson Leia Swanson

Jessica Sykes Alexandra Szczygiel

Monica Talavera William Tamblyn

Mary Tanner Kaevan Tavakolinia

Daniel Thompson Maria Thompson

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 193


CELEBRATING A WIN

>>

Joshua Thrutchley Molly Tidrick Elizabeth Tillhof Margaret Townsend David Towster

John Troup Sadie Trout Joseph Turner Natalie Turner Erin Tuttle

Peter Uhl Phoebe Unterman Hannah Vaughn Araceli Villanueva John Walker

194 MAY

PIERCING PAIN

Above: After cheerleading practice, junior Becca Clay helps junior Mary Galvin put her earrings back in. “I just got my ears double pierced,” Galvin said. “It hurt really bad because they were closing up.” Photo by Patrick Mayfield.

Faces speak for themselves as students take part in various events.

Above: Smiling to the crowd, junior Annie Bennett marches with the drill team during half-time at a football game. “It’s really fun to be part of the whole experience,” Bennett said. “Marching isn’t something I’m used to, so it was an entirely new experience for me.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

KEEPING SPIRITS UP

SELF-EXPRESSION

>>

>>

Below: Excited by a successful tennis match, junior Hannah Copeland performs her victory dance. “I have this goofy racket handshake I do with my partner, or I do a little dance inside my head,” Copeland said. “[But] the most exciting part is the snack bags we get before the game with pita cips, gummi bears and Cheez-Its.” Photo by Rachel English.


Nick Wassmer Madison Weaver Anna Webber Stefan Weinrich Gregory Welsh

Sadie Wendler Avery West Lois Wetzel Kylie Wheeler Maygan White

Adrienne Whitham James Williams Robert Williamson Alexander Wilson Cody Winlaw

Amilia Winter Paul Wolff Tyler Woltemath Kaitlin Woodson Victoria Wrede

Tori Wydner MacKenzie Wylie Tyler Wysong Ali Yaqubian Elliott Yohn

JUNIOR PORTRAITS 195


NO PRESSURE

ALL DECKED OUT

Below: During the Shawnee Mission South home game, seniors David Degoler and Bryan Parman cheer while the other team shoots a free throw. Both seniors wore costumes to show their school spirit. “It was pretty nerve-wracking but also fun because it was a nice honor,” Degoler said. “So Paige and I were just talking to calm ourselves down. Photo by Rachel English.

>>

>>

Far below: Sitting in front of the school at the Homecoming pep assembly, senior Homecoming court nominees Legna Cedillo and Paige Cannady laugh while waiting for the other nominees to walk across the gymnasium. “It was pretty nerve-wracking but also fun because it was a nice honor,” Cedillo said. “So Paige and I were just talking to calm ourselves down.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

BEGINNING TO LOOK LIKE CHRISTMAS

>>

Right: Standing in front of seminar class, senior Wraye Sewell presents two Franklin Center children. “We went to Franklin Center to talk to their mom, who was so sweet,” Sewell said. “It helped us really appreciate what we were doing.” Photo by Rachel English.

EYE ON THE PRIZE

>>

Far right: Senior Reagan Jamieson practices proper tackling techniques while seniors Mallory Stevenson and Lindsey Goins watch. “It was really fun,” Jamieson said. “We did a lot of drills to learn some basic offensive techniques.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

Alexxus Abreu Emre Agbas Andrew Allen Charles Allen Laura Allen

196 MAY


SENIORS Megan Alley Joshua Allmayer Brady Anderson Evan Anderson Hannah Anderson

Paige C Anderson Paige E Anderson Katherine Andresen Corey Arnold Ryan Ashley

Emily Atchison Nora Avalos David Baldwin Kristin Barker Sam Barker

Joshua Barlow Nicholas Barnes Catherine Barrera Katherine Bartow David Batson

SENIOR PORTRAITS 197


PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

have a studio in the Crossroads

Mary Bauer

Elizabeth Beck

Lauren Bowles

>>

“I’ve been involved with art since first grade, so I guess people are well aware that I’m very interested in it and am always doing it.”

Nicholas Benge

Meghan Benson Samantha Benson Melissa Benton Anne Berry Christina Beynon

Rachel Birkenmeier Barbara Blankenship Sam Bolanovich John Booton Steven Born

198 MAY


Lauren Bowles Emily Brandmeyer Michelle Braslavsky Alexandria Brewer Alexandra Brown

Andrea Brown Laura Brown

PUTTING TOGETHER A

>>

FOOTBALL GAME

It takes more than a football team to make a football game.

Deseree Bruce Jack Brugger

ON THE SIDELINES

being taken out, senior >Jonathan > Right: After Zeiger watches the game from the sidelines. “[When we’re off], we usually get everyone pumped up by screaming and yelling for the defense or offense on the field,” Zeiger said. Photo by Rachel English.

GAME TIME

>>

Ian Bryant Peter Brzozowski

Left: After hours of practice, senior Pat Sixta performs at a football game. “With block, it was hard not to play music everyday,” Sixta said. “Some days for practice, since we had limited time, we had to stay longer and work harder.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

WAVING THEIR FLAGS

>>

Below: Holding the flags high, senior Elizabeth Beck performs with the drill team and marching band. The drill team and band marched to the music of Carlos Santana this year. “It’s more than dancing with just a group,” Beck said. “We have other people out there that we can’t run into, forms and specific marks we have to be in.“ Photo by Andrea Zecy.

Alexander Bublitz Kyle Buck

SENIOR PORTRAITS 199


SHARING

>> IS CARING

PROMISING TO HELP

>>

Below: Dressed up for her own project, Restart-Art, senior Callie McGuire signs up for another SHARE project. “I was signing up for the soup kitchen,” McGuire said. “I really loved it because you really feel like you’re giving back to your community.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

Above: At the SHARE Fair, seniors Kristen Reynolds and Rikki Eymann advertise their project, Village Shalom. “I love dressing up,” Eymann said. “You just look through your closet and wear MORP clothes. Everyone gets really hyped up.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

Paige Cannady Louis Cantor Yidi Cao Kelsey Carothers Michelle Carter

Legna Cedillo Stephanie Chadd Max Chao Olivia Chao Linda Chestnut

Winn Clark Reed Cody Samuel Coen Trent Coffin Colin Coit

200 MAY

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS

Above: Using a SHARE poster as a megaphone, senior Colin Hayes encourages students to sign up for his SHARE project, Gordon Parks Birthday Parties. “It was fun being rowdy,” Hayes said. “It got people excited about joining SHARE projects and helped get people to sign up.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

>>

SHARE RECRUITERS

At the SHARE fair, students recruit for their projects and sign up for others.


Alexander Collingwood Emma Collins Marianne Collins

Katherine Collison Devin Conley Alexandra Conner

Johanna Cook Matthew Cooney Paige Cornwell Hanna Cosgrove

Kiersty Coulter Daniel Cox Thomas Cray Andrew Curtis Sydney Danner

Curran Darling Laura Darling Celestina Davila Christina Davis Vimla Dayal

SENIOR PORTRAITS 201


David Degoler John Delgado Eric Dickinson Ryan Dinyer Benjamin Donovan

Logan Dover Savannah Duby Thomas Duncan Hannah Eggleston Aden Eilts

Mariell Eikhovd Alexandra Ellerbeck

PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

never come back to Kansas City

Jordan Elliott

Eric Ellwood

>> Hannah Fink 202 MAY

“I want to travel a lot after college, and I might want to actually teach abroad. I would want to teach English as a second language, so I’d love to work abroad or live abroad. That might mean that I’d never come back to Kansas.”


Dodgeball tournament participants help raise money for the Can Drive. WINDING UP

Below: Playing for the ‘Lock for the Rock’ team, senior Jack Slaughter prepares to defend his team. “I was trying to hit someone with the ball as hard as I could,” Slaughter said. “It was all about intimidation.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

>>

KEEP THEM HONEST

Above: At the start of the game, seniors Abby Weltner and Lucy O’Connor start the game. SHARE Execs like Weltner and O’Connor acted as referees in the tournament. “We didn’t really know what we were doing,” O’Connor said. “The rest of us blew our whistles whenever we wanted to.” Photo by Rachel English.

>> RECOVERING

Above: Sitting out after his team, ‘The Leftovers,’ lost, senior Chad Zeller watches the next match. “I was recovering from a devastating loss in the championship to ‘Lock for the Rock,’” Zeller said. “We got completely shut out by the other senior team. I got into it because it’s a fun event.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

>>

DODGING FOR A CAUSE

>>

Derek Engelhardt Rachel English Erik Ernst Ashley Esry Amy Esselman

History Estill Varner Erika Eymann Anna Faerber Ryan Fager Claire Fallone

Erica Ferguson Joel Ferguson Alexa Fessler Hannah Fink Blake Firner

SENIOR PORTRAITS 203


PHOTO BY RACHEL ENGLISH.

PHOTO BY MEGHAN BENSON.

be Mac and PC

Alicia Fisher

William Fisher

>> Chris Poplawski and Stephen Nichols

“I primarily use Macs in journalism, so this isn’t that surprising. Maybe my affinity for Gap clothing contributed as well,” Nichols said.

Blair Fletcher Miranda Fletcher Zachary Foley Christopher Fotopoulos Daniel Franklin

James Frederick Ellen Frizzell David Gaeddert Logan Gage Laedan Galicia

L Gallagher Hannah Gasaway Benjamin Gloe Holly Glynn Abigail Goehausen

204 MAY


Lindsey Goins Jacey Gorman Michael Grace Owen Gray Thomas Gray

Kelly Greenfield Daniel Gritz Paxton Gross Lauren Gruenebaum Gregory Guthrie

Carolyn Haflich Anne Haines

juniors take note: seniors tell what NOT to do on a college visit Bring along talkative family members 1

Lynza Halberstadt Chelsea Hall

“We went on a college trip to American University, so it was a really smart group. My tour guide took us into a lecture hall, and after he was done my sister raised her hand and said, ‘I like that you have blackboards. We don’t have any at my school.’ It was pretty embarassing.”

2 Have navigational problems

Camille Karro 12

“We were in North Carolina trying to get to Wake Forest and my dad had set the GPS to ‘shortest distance.’ We were going through all these podunk little towns because we were taking the diagonal route through the state. Once we we figured it out, we cut like two hours off of our time.”

Melissa McKittrick 12 Matthew Hallquist Jordan Halsey

3 Wear uncomfortable shoes

“It was my very first college visit, and we were at Emporia. I thought it’d be really nice to look good, so I wore heels. My feet ended up hurting so badly that I don’t even remember what she said on the walking tour. When it was over I walked around the rest of the campus in my bare feet because I couldn’t take it anymore.” Sam Benson 12

SENIOR PORTRAITS 205


PHOTO BY ANNA PETROW.

PHOTO BY MEGHAN BENSON.

be the best couple that never was

Jessica Hammond

>> Allie Marquis and Brian Simpson

“We’re the Pep Club presidents, we’re both on the committee for Pack of Pals and we both do track and cross country. That’s probably why people voted for us – we’re together so much outside of school,” Marquis said.

Gale Harrington Shane Harris Taylor Harris John Hart Christopher Hasselwander

Nicholas Hasselwander Grace Haun Colin Hayes Dana Hemmingsen Nichole Hemmingsen

206 MAY

Jacob Hamilton

Granville Hare Zachary Harold


Cara Heneger Kelsey Henry

Matthew Hill Stephanie Hilsabeck

Reid Hintz David Hobart

Annalise Hodes Natalie Hofmeister

Erica Hollingsworth Sarah Holmes

SENIOR PORTRAITS 207


SIGNS OF THE ELECTION

How did you vote in the 2008 elections? Paige Cornwell 12 “I would vote yes for Question 2. When it comes to health care and education, it’s always good to have more funding. It’s very benefical to have the extra money.”

Jordan Holsinger Todd Hoover

Owen Gray 12 “It’s mostly economic policy and foreign policy that make me side with McCain. My belief is that if I was to go to war, I would want McCain as commander-inchief instead of Obama.”

Chad Allen 12 “I’d vote no on Question 1. I think that the judges do understand the election and it’s good to see their records in public, but it’s not the judges’ place to run. They should be appointed.”

Katherine Horrell Alexander Horvath

Margaret Schmidt 12 “I’m for Obama mostly because I feel like his energy issues are better. The way we use energy now isn’t efficient. It’s hurting the resources we have. Hopefully, his policies would change that.”

Young Hou Jennifer Howard Scott Humphrey

Ian Huyett Alec Hynes Mary Jackson Jennifer Jacobson Regan Jamieson

Elizabeth Jandl Mitchell Jennings Jennifer Jieh Scott Johnson Hannah Johnston

208 MAY


Kelsey Jolitz Andrea Jones Natalee Jones Stuart Jones Alyssa Jonson

Dora Kapros Camille Karro Aaron Kaufman Laura Kaufman Daniel Kelley

Hilary Kiehl

Michael Kim

PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

become Tech N9ne

1.

Robert Kimmel

>> Arias Lockhart

“I did kind of expect [to win] considering I’m like the only black kid in our grade. My favorite music is rap, but I don’t rap. Rapping’s not for me. I like Lil’ Wayne and some others mostly for their lyrics. A lot of other rappers rap about nothing, but they have more meaningful lyrics.”

SENIOR PORTRAITS 209


Joshua Kinney

PHOTO BY MEGHAN BENSON.

drive a smart car PHOTO BY RACHEL ENGLISH.

Jarrett Kirk

Logan Kline Dina Kostrow Andrew Koukol Whitney Kraft Justin Krivena

Paige Kuklenski John Kurtz Andrew La Prade Rebecca Lamberson Veronica Lang

210 MAY

Savannah Duby

>>

“People probably recognize me from the environmental assembly talking about changes in the planet. I would probably buy a Smart Car because its’ a better alternative than anything else there so far.”

Nathan Klein


Timothy Larrabee Jennifer Latshaw

SHOWING

>>

Matthew Lavoie Allyson Leach

SENIORSPIRIT Seniors cheer for the Lancers on Lancer Day and at pep assemblies. LANCER PRIDE

>>

Left: Standing with her fellow varsity cheerleaders, senior Taylor Twibell yells at the pep rally after the Lancer Day Parade. “The cheerleaders won the most colorful float award,“ Twibell said. “It was really fun to win the award and be recognized.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Paige Ledbetter Anna Leek

Gina Legrotte Elliot Lehrbaum SING IT LOUD

>>

Above: In the senior section, senior Natalie Parsons sings the school song at a pep assembly. “[My favorite part of pep assemblies] is the drill team,” senior Natalie Parsons said. “My favorite was the one with the skeleton outfits. It was really cool because everyone had a lot of energy.” Photo by Rachel English.

Jessie Light Joan Lindsey

PEP RALLY POWER

>>

Above: Showing his school spirit, senior Jeff Soptic cheers as Dr. Krawitz rides his motorcycle into the gymnasium. “Since he came, the pep assemblies have had a lot more life to them,” Soptic said.”I just can’t get over that motorcycle – it was amazing.” Photo by Rachel English.

SENIOR PORTRAITS 211


PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

work on Capitol Hill

Ariel Litwer

Heinzen Lo

>> Emma Collins

Charles Long Sarah Luby Chase Lucas Charles Ludington Andrew Lykens

Joseph Lynch Michael Magstadt Jane Mahoney Amanda Marland Allison Marquis

212 MAY

“I’m really excited to have been voted for, but I wouldn’t have guessed that’s what I’d be chosen as. It’s not really where I see myself in ten years. Maybe I should consider a career change.”

Arias Lockheart


Joshua Mason Tara Mason Dewitt Mayfield Stephen Mazzoni Ann McBee

Alyssa McCarthy Elizabeth McDonald Landon McDonald Mason McGinley Carolyn McGuire

Melissa McKittrick Alison Meagher-Manson

?

The choice is clear

Jennifer Meara Brittany Medina

Yet the college mail just keeps coming. Seniors tell what they really think about it. “For the most part I just throw all the mail in the trash. I don’t think it’s ever swayed me one way or the other. I also think it’s pretty evil for some really competitive colleges to send us mail to get us to apply just to reject us.”

Ali Ellerbeck 12 “I do think we get way too much mail. I was swamped with letters and e-mails. I finally ended up tossing it. It wasn’t worth going through.”

Charlie Long 12 Ryan Middleton Andrea Mitchell

“I feel like the amount of college mail ends up being counterproductive because I personally become immune to it. But I guess occasionally I might subconsciously start thinking about a college when I get the brochure.”

Gale Harrington 12

SENIOR PORTRAITS 213


Sarah Pavlu 12

TIME

When was the first moment you felt like a senior?

last olathe east game OCTOBER 28

moments in

“It was just all senior things, really. The senior barbeque and sitting in the front row at games. All the things you saw the seniors doing for the past three years, now you’re the ones doing it.”

AUGUST 18

AUGUST 18

first day of school

“I am the Pep Exec Treasurer. It really hit me that I was a senior when we were sitting up front during the pep assembly and my friends were the ones doing the talking. We were the leaders.”

Laura Darling 12

Matthew Moedritzer Teresa Moran Joseph Moriarty Grant Morris Emily Mullett

Amelia Murphy Ariel Muthyala Bernadette Myers Collin Myers Morgan Myers

Justin Neely Tucker Nelson Stephen Nichols Alexandria Norton Darci O’Brien

214 MAY

“At the Olathe East soccer game, we lost by two penalities or so. We were all holding hands on the sideline. And then on the last shot, it really hit me that this was our last game. The end came so suddenly. that’s when I realized that I was a senior.”

Laedan Gaelicia 12


Christina O’Connor Lucy O’Connor Alex Olson Chelsea Olson Michael Olson

Maureen Orth Tyler Owens Bryan Parman Natalie Parsons

PHOTO BY ELLEN FRIZZELL.

PHOTO BY MEGHAN BENSON.

be the cast of Sex and the City

Sarah Pavlu

Michael Payne

Michael Perez

>> Abba Goehausen, Kristen Reynolds, Jenny Howard, and Paige Kulenski “We’re all definitely best friends. That would be really, really fun to live in the City. I guess we’re like them because our dream is to live in NYC and just shop all the time and party like they do because they have so much fun on the show. But I don’t think that would ever happen,” Goehausen said.

SENIOR PORTRAITS 215


PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

appear on a Wheaties box

Tonya Pesch

Leah Pickett

>> Marcus Webb

“Being voted [mostly likely to appear on a Wheaties box] by the class was very nice. I guess everyone sees my hard work paying-off and I guess I can see that too, if they can.”

John Pistorius Arianna Plummer

Christina Poindexter Christopher Poplawski Sanne Postma Joseph Prinds Thomas Puckett

Samantha Pugh Noah Quillec Jonathan Reene Jamie Rees Taylor Renft

216 MAY


Kristen Reynolds Sean Reynolds

Dena Rice Perry Rieke

Susanna Riley David Riott

Laura Robertson Sean Robinson

Virginia Roche Dylan Rogers

SENIOR PORTRAITS 217


Christopher Roland Lacey Rooney Tyler Roste Jewel Rousseau Ansley Rowe

John Rowley Brandon Royle Anthony Rubaie Kathryn Rush Katherine Sachse

Nora Salle Amanda Sams Miles Sanderson Kathryn Schafer Margaret Schmidt

students express themselves in painting classes. MAKING A STATEMENT >> Art ALL IN THE DETAILS

>>

Below: Working in painting class, senior Colin Coit layers yellow oil paint on top of an abstract fabric pattern. “I’m just laying down the paint,” Coit said. “I’m really in the zone when I’m painting.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

CHOOSING A PALETTE

Above: Using a palette knife, senior Madison Blankenship applies paint to a canvas. “We had to draw what we see in the mirror,” Blankenship said. “I didn’t think I could do my reflection so I did my baby blanket.” Photo by Nichole Luby.

>> VIEW OF NATURE

>>

Above: In painting class, senior Annie McBee copies a leaf pattern from a piece of fabric. “I want to do interior design so working with patterns and colors is good practice,” McBee said. Photo by Nichole Luby.

218 MAY


the

Wh ere do sen i

ors g

lun

oo ut to

op en

mo st?

ch

the

lun

ch

py ram id

Panera Bread “I like it because it’s a healthier option for lunch and it’s nice to sit with my friends.”

Laura Robertson 12

Friends’ houses “Peoples’ houses are closer than restaurants so its a lot easier to get food and also its a lot cheaper. It’s also a lot lower stress. I usually bring lunch – I’m a pretty basic sandwich and chips kind of girl, but sometimes my friend’s mom makes us pizza or something.”

Kate Collison 12

Mr. Goodcents “I always get a five-dollar foot long with lots of meat.”

Miles Sanderson 12

Hen House “It’s a short distance away and I like their Chinese food.”

Will Snyder 12

Ryan Schmidt Daniel Sciara Anne Scrogham Lyndsey Seck Anna Seitz

Jacob Selby Jack Seward Wraye Sewell Margaret Shackelford Amanda Shapiro

Spencer Sherard Olivia Sieck Brian Simpson Kyle Sitomer Alex Sixta

SENIOR PORTRAITS 219


Patrick Sixta Heidi Skrukrud John Slaughter Christian Smith Gordon Smith

Louis Smith Patricia Smith David Smythe Matthew Snively George Snyder

PHOTOS BY MEGHAN BENSON.

William Snyder Jeffrey Soptic

be a sorority house mom Sarah Specker

David Spero

220 MAY

Johanna Cook

>>

“People may have voted for me because I’m usually pretty peppy and outgoing and maybe house moms are like that. I know that I definitely want to be in a sorority in college, but I probably don’t want to be a house mom.”


PERFECT PITCH

>>

Below: During choraliers, seniors Mallory Stevenson and Kate Collison sing ‘Ave Maria,’ which they performed in their Holiday concert. “I’ve sat next to Kate all four years,” Stevenson said. “I’m kind of sad that this will be the last year.” Photo by Alysabeth Albano.

>>

VOICES IN

HARMONY

Students prepare for on and off campus performances. BEATS AND BURRITOS

>>

GOING FOR THE GOLD

Above: During the fall Musical Review in the cafeteria, senior Paige C. Anderson sings, ‘Somewhere That’s Green’ from ‘Little Shop of Horrors.’ “A lot of people had really low expectations of [the Musical Review] because it was in the cafeteria,” Anderson said. “But it turned out really well and everyone I talked to just loved it. I had a lot of fun doing it, so to me that’s a success.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

>>

Left: On the choir Chipotle Tour, seniors Collin Myers orders food with fellow choir members. On the tour, the mens choir performed at elementary and middle schools and went to lunch at Chipotle afterwards. “We do it to show the younger kids that choir is a cool thing to be a part of,” Myers said. “[We] show them it’s a cool deal when they get to high school to be a part of it.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

Brittany Spickler Thanaphat Srisuwat Graeme Stanford Emmert Starkey Abby Stechmann

Austin Stehl Jonathan Stepp Marisa Stevens Mallory Stevenson Casey Stewart

Jonathan Stiefel Michael Sullivan Hilary Surface Clark Svet Andrew Sweeney

SENIOR PORTRAITS 221


Daniel Sweeney Stephanie Tharp Jesse Thomas Anthony Thompson Calvin Tidwell

Patricia Townsend Alexander Tracy Andrea Tudhope Ryan Tuschhoff Taylor Twibell

James Vandyke Jenee’ Vickers Devyn Vincent Audrey Wadood Kyle Waisner

Clark Waldon Jacob Walters Madeleine Weast Marcus Webb Andrea Webber

Curtis Wells Abby Weltner Harrison Wendlandt Erica Wheeler Danielle White

222 MAY


Lakisha Wiedenkeller Timothy Wolfe

WILD ABOUT >> ANIMALS

Jack Woltering Ross Wooten

Environmental Education students share their love of animals with local elementary schools.

LIZARD LESSON

Daniel Wydner Cameron Young

>>

Left: Holding a bearded dragon on his arm, senior Brandon Royle teaches Brookwood Elementary students about animals at the school’s Math and Science Night. The Environmental Education classes went to multiple science nights over the course of the year. “[My favorite part was] seeing all of the little kids,” Royle said. Photo by Lucy Faerber.

ALL EYES ON YOU

>>

Jonathan Zeiger Chad Zeller

Right: Senior Elizabeth McDonald tries to keep Aldo, the 23-year-old great horned owl, feeling calm at the Brookwood Science Night. “Since I’m a second-year student Mr. Lockard allows me to be with Aldo at big events like this. Aldo’s pretty cool because he’s so unique,” McDonald said. “It’s a fun way to spread a love for science.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

Patrick Ziller Katherine Zimmerman

TURTLE TALK

>>

Above: At Brookwood’s Science Night, senior Holly Glenn introduces the three pond turtles to elementary school students. “I was in charge of teaching the students about the pond turtles, but they were mostly interested in touching them,” Glenn said. “There were two bigger turtles and one tiny turtle and for some reason, everyone wanted to hold the tiny turtle.” Photo by Rachel English.

SENIOR PORTRAITS 223


LUNCH PATROL

A THRILLING ROUTINE

Below: During the October pep assembly, principal Karl Krawitz dances to ‘Thriller’ with cheerleaders, staff and Lancer Dancers. “For me to learn that...well, I have absolutely zero coordination, so it was really difficult,” Krawitz said. “I was glad that we were all there together. Everyone had the same reaction as me. They were laughing and poking fun at my style.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

>>

Far below: During first lunch duty, biology teacher Rubye Davis catches up on some work. “I like [this job] because the interaction with students is very positive,” Davis said. “I get to meet kids I’ve never met that I don’t have in class. The kids come back and forth and talk to you.” Photo by Nicole Luby

PLAYING ALONG

>>

Right: At the boys basketball state tournament at Emporia State, band director Kim Harrison plays the trumpet along with the pep band. Although the team ended up losing to Witchita Southeast, Harrison still enjoyed it. “The first half of that game was one of the best high school basketball games I’ve ever seen in my life,” Harrison said. “Both teams were hitting over fifty percent of their shots.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

BACK TO SCHOOL

>>

Far right: In the Introduction to Law class, John McKinney listens to a MADD presentation by Tricia Carcopa. “She talked about the teenage drinking problems and I was curious about what she had to say,” McKinney said. “It was extremely interesting.” Photo by Peter Bautz.

Kristin Anderson Steve Appier Terry Archer Vicki Arndt-Helgesen Julie Baker Laura Beachy

Peggy Bell Robert Bickers Jeannette Bonjour Marsha Boyer Debe Bramley Tim Burkindine

224 MAY


FACULTY

Kristin Carmody Jennifer Chaffee Michael Chaffee Sue Chipman John Comstock Carol Craig

Julie Curry Tom Defeo Rosa Detrixhe Sara Deubner Frederick Elliott Lili Englebrick

Brenda Fishman Ken Foley Nancy Fritz Crystal Frutchey Sharyn Gassmann Brian Gay

Barb Gianakon Deanna Griffey Marianne Harra Michelle Hayman Jamie Heller Susi Hogsett-Duncan

Ann Hunt Traci Jardes Barb Johnson Maureen Johnson James Kelly Patricia Kennedy

FACULTY PORTRAITS 225


Laurie Lamb Chris Larson Lisa Leslie Marla Lindsay Linda Longoria Laure Losey

Deeanna McClendon Janine McPhee Alexander Migliazzo Melanie Miller David Muhammad Rebecca Murphy

John Nickels Debbie Ogden Cole Ogdon Nick Paris Hannah Pence Morning Pruitt

226 MAY

>>

Katherine Kessler Bridget Kilpatrick-Brew Steve Klein Mary Kramer Shelby Krumm

BEYOND THE

>>

Far right: During the fall musical, choir teacher Ken Foley plays drums to accompany the singers and the piano. “Because it was just a musical review, there was no full orchestra, just a piano and I thought we could add some drums,” Foley said. “It was great. [The students] were sort of intrigued that I could actually play the drums.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Below: With the help of a student, environmental science teacher James Lockard takes the Sulcata tortoises out of their display case in the hallway. “We have to use the display cases right now because the greenhouse isn’t done,” Lockard said. “All of the animals are part of the Environmental Education classes. Photo by Peter Bautz.

JOB DESCRIPTION

DRUMS RECITAL

TAKING OUT TURTLES

Teachers explore beyond their typical roles.

>>

Right: At a Dance Club meeting, senior Michelle Braslavsky teaches Spanish teacher Rosa Detrixhe and geography and government teacher David Muhammad a new dance. “Music is universal,” Detrixhe. “It unites countries, develops friendships and lights up the spirit.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.

>>

DANCING DUO


Ron Puls Rick Rhoades Ermanno Ritschl Heather Royce Richard Royer Lucy Rupf

Angela Schieferecke Carol Schieszer Carolyn Seeley Priscilla Shelton Linda Sieck Ron Stallard

Eva Steiner Diane Stephens Lonnie Stephenson John Stoner Charles Sulzen Dow Tate

TEACHERS PUT THE PEP

IN PEP

>>

Brenda Tretbar Sheila Trewolla

ASSEMBLIES

Faculty members do their part to contribute to the fun of the SME pep assemblies. POWER TO THE PEOPLE

>>

Above left: Performing the YMCA dance with other administrators, Steve Loe and Jim Ricker shout out the lyrics to the crowd. “The headdress was actually from [senior] Nick Benge’s mom,” Loe said. “It brought back memories from when I was on the road with Motley Crew.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

Catherine Tubbesing Chip Ufford

LOVE OF LITERATURE

>> Athanasia Worley Jenny Yemm

Left: Rallying the students, English teacher Jeannette Bonjour marches into the first pep assembly with a copy of the ‘Building Vocabulary’ textbook. “Words are my favorite thing and should be yours too,” Bonjour said. “The students cheered for us and probably thought that we were silly.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

TEST THE TEACHER

>>

Right: At the March pep assembly, art teacher Jodie Schnakenberg tries to scrounge up an answer for the Family Feud competition. “I know after the fourth word, fire, I rang in before the question was over and yelled out ‘pets’ because that’s what I would save,” Schnakenberg said. “It was a right brain, left brain battle royale. The right brain totally won.” Photo by Rachel English.

FACULTY PORTRAITS 227


1

2

3

4

5

6

PHOMORE TYLER KAVANAUGH PLANNED TO PURSUE PROGRAMMING AS A CAREER. IN SPARE TIME, KAVANAUGH IDENTIFIED PROBLEMS T

S ON A LANYARD IN HER ROOM. • SOPHOMORE MARY JOYCE WORKED OUT THREE TIMES A WEEK AT A GYM WITH HER FRIENDS. SHE W 228 CLUBS


7

8

CLUBS

>>

THAT MADE COMPUTER PROGRAMS CONFUSING OR INEFFICIENT. AFTER IDENTIFYING THE PROBLEMS, HE TOOK NOTE OF T H “I went with ACIS on a 10-day trip to Switzerland, France, Germany, England and London. We took an underwater train that went under the English Channel.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 234

2 JONAS BIRKEL 9 >> guitar maker A HELPING HAND

>>

Above: Pushing leaves into a bag, freshmen Carolyn Welter and Hallie Beck volunteer to rake yards with the Coalition Club. The club had meetings scheduled every Thursday. “We always talk about the things we can do to help,” Beck said. “We go around volunteering and getting donations. [Club leader senior Jessie Light] always has something new to tell us.” Photo by Rachel English.

“I make guitars. I made my first one at the beginning of first semester. I took apart an old Ibanez and then I took electronic hardware and put it into the one I made.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 239

3 CHRISTOPHER HEADY 9 >> song writer “I write songs to play on guitar. I’ve written five full songs. My favorite one is this cheesy, happy song that I wrote after a really good day. It’s basically about living life and not pouting about everything.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 243

4 VALERIE FISHER 11 >> youth group member “I’m really involved in my youth group at Colonial Presbyterian Church. Every once in a while we do community service activities. We organized an Easter egg hunt for inner city kids and we delivered Easter baskets to about 100 homes.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 247

A CULTURAL EXCHANGE

>>

Above: During International Club, junior Amilia Winter helps exchange student senior Mariell Eikhovd prepare a presentation on Norway. Eikhovd was used to speaking to a big crowd, because presentations were a big part of her school in Norway. “I wasn’t really nervous because I’m used to it,” Eikhovd said. “Plus, by December, I was pretty confident about my English. I think International Club is great because people really want to get to know you.” Photo by Rachel English.

5 ATIEH SAMADI 9 >> frequent napper “After school every day I take an hour nap. I have a lot going on – swimming, dance and a ton of homework. I don’t get much sleep at night, so it helps to sleep a little during the day.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 256

6 COLE FEVOLD 11 >> squirrel collector “I have a weird collection of squirrel stuff. I went to a museum when I was eight and saw a stuffed squirrel and got freaked out by it. Ever since, my family thinks it’s funny to get me squirrel stuff. My favorite is this pine cone squirrel my aunt found at a flea market for my tenth birthday.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 258

7 BECCA CLAY 11 >> perpetually sick >>

Sitting in the hallway during the performance of the spring play Woyzeck, crew members junior Kelsey Summers and sophomore Ben Liu fill out a Sudoku puzzle. As the set crew chief, Liu didn’t have a job during the actual performance, so he and other crew members sat back stage. “We played cards and listened to music,” Liu said. “I learned a lot of random stuff about everyone. [Woyzeck] was an amazing experience. A lot of work went into it – many, many hours. I think I left school every night up until the show at 9 p.m. for probably two months.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

Above: Seniors Josh Allmayer and Leah Pickett pose for the class during their IB chemistry 2 Group 4 presentation. Allmayer and Pickett, along with senior Andrea Tudhope, worked together to create an experiment that tested the effect of caffeine on growth of mung beans. Part of the assignment required them to creatively present the results of the experiment. “We did a skit about two little mung beans that grew because they took caffeine pills,” Allmayer said. “I was a bean sprout taking heavy doses of caffeine, so I imitated a person on steroids, in denial about the negative long term effects of the drugs.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

THE FUN IS BACKSTAGE

‘THEY WERE BEST MUNG BEANS’

“I have no immune system. I’m sick like three months out of the year. I’ve had colds, pneumonia, the stomach flu, conjunctivitis and mono.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 264

8 KATE COLLISON 12 >> piano player “I like playing piano because it is a stress-reliever when I’m not competing. I can use it to unwind when I’m really stressed. I play in judged recitals. This year I got enough points to get a trophy.” SEE ALSO: PAGE 275

E M SO THAT IN THE FUTURE HE COULD WORK FROM THEIR MISTAKES. • JUNIOR MEGAN SULLIVAN HAD VISITED 48 OUT OF 50 S T

1 ABBY DUNN 9 >> ACIS traveler

A TES IN THE U.S. EVERY TIME SHE WENT SOMEWHERE DIFFERENT, SHE COLLECTED PINS. SULLIVAN HAD A TOTAL OF 75 PI

CLUBS DIVISION 229


>>

Below: (Left to right) First row: Catherine Barrera, Jessie Sykes, Jessie Jacobs, Lizzy McConnell, Samantha Benson. Second row: Katie Griffith, Andie Mitchell, Katie Crawford, Paige Cannady, Lauren Dodd, Molly Rappold, Heather Nelson. Third row: Reagan Jamieson, Nichole Hemmingsen, Kirsten Clark, Natalie Parsons, Sara Schenkelberg, Dana Hemmingsen, Libby Jandl, Alex Dressman. Fourth row: Coaches Jason Meyer, Jamie Kelly.

VARSITY

KEEPING UP TRADITION

>>

Above: Pumping her team up for their first game against SMS, senior Libby Jandl leads her team in the ‘biscuit-basket’ cheer. Jandl led this cheer and another with the defense before every game. “A lot of cheers have been traditions that players began in past years” Jandl said. “For defense, we do cheers together because we need to work well and communicate with each other. It gets us working as a team.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

REACHING THEIR GOALS ALL SOCCER TEAMS WORK TO BOND WITH OTHER TEAMMATES WHILE VARSITY GIRLS PREPARE FOR A STATE QUALIFICATION. C TEAM

JUNIOR VARSITY

Above: (Left to right) First row: Kaiha Harris Second row: Kiki Sykes, Andrea Velez, Jessica Harmon, Maggie Thomas, Courtney Schenkelberg, Haley Martin. Third row: Coach Skip Graham Stephanie Denton, Kylie Guess, Lanie Leek, Anna Marken, Molly Jennings, Madeline Sniezek.

>>

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Cate Birkenmeier, Kylee Brooks, Paige Martz, Caroline Marland. Second row: Becca Clay, Christa McKittrick, Hayley Bublitz, Amanda Chao, Bahar Barani, Megan Sullivan. Third row: Grace Fritts, Betsy Dee, Danielle Norton, Haley Dalgleish, Hannah Roste, Kara Hines, Elizabeth Colburn. Fourth row: Coaches Allyson Ecklund, Marla Lindsay.

>> traditional TAPE

with junior Sara Schenkelberg “We [varsity team] wear tape on our wrists for the games... Seniors wear blue tape, and underclassmen have white. People usually write words of wisdom, encouragement, motivation or remembrances to people they know who have passed away. [This year] I wrote down BBB for Bryan Barrow. We have our own roll of tape and retape before each game. Its just something we have as a bond.”

Natalie Parsons 12 “Before each game, we get into a huddle and say a chant that [SOPHOMORE] Emily Rappold made up. ONE PERSON LEADS IT EACH YEAR. Y 4/09 >> 4/14 >> 4/17 >> 4/18 >> 4/18 >> 4/21 >> 4/23 >> 4/27 >> 4/28 >> 4/30 >> 5/05 >> 5/07 5/12 >> 5/18 >> 5/29 >> 5/30 >> 3/30 >Leaven> 4/07 >> SMW >> 5/11 >>SMN Olathe St. Louis St. Louis St. Louis LawOlathe St. Olathe SMNW LawOlathe Mill RegionState State SMS 2-0

worth 9-0

___

240 MAY

South

Soccer Classic

Soccer Classic

Soccer Classic

___

___

___

___

rence Free State ___

East

Teresa’s

North

___

___

___

___

rence

Northwest

Valley

___

___

___

als

___

___

___

___


>>

3/26 Lawrence Free State 4:15 PM 3-4

>>

3/26 Lawrence Free State 6:00 PM 3-2

>>

>>

4/01 4/01 Olathe North- Olathe Northwest west 5:00 PM 6:30 PM 0-5 0-4

>>

4/07 Leavenworth 4:15 PM 3-2

>>

4/07 Leavenworth 6:00 PM 2-1

>> 4/14 SMS

>> 4/14 SMS

4:15 PM

>>

>>

4/21 Olathe South 5:00 PM

6:00 PM

4/23 >>SMW

4/21 Olathe East 6:30 PM

4:15 PM

4/23 >>SMW

6:00 PM

SWITCHING POSITIONS

JUNIOR VARSITY

>>

Below: Stepping away from her usual position, sophomore Kyra Slemp switches to catcher during a practice . “My main focus this year has been shortstop,” Slemp said. “I don’t catch full time, but whenever our other catchers need a break I’ll step back there.” Photo by Rachel English.

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Desi Hipps, Cara Shaw, Maribel Regalado. Second row: Lauren Adams, Julie Gilmore, Ereka Lindsay, Natalie Patton. Second row: Kim Conrads, Dana Meyer, Rebecca Callstrom, Kennedy Grimes, Amy Franklin. Third row: Coach Mike Keener.

VARSITY

>> NEW beginnings with senior Cari Chestnut

“This year the team is more relaxed and determined and fastpitch. We have four new freshmen this year who have really brought the team together. Our first game of the season, we were really nervous about the possibility of winning our first game. We did hit two home runs our first game. Although we lost that game, it gave us a lot of confidence for our next game. When we finally won our second game we stormed the field and just celebrated forever. It was our first win in two years, and as a team we were going to make sure it wouldnt be the last.”

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Ali Dees, Carly Haflich, Cari Chestnut, Lynza Halberstadt, Hannah Eggleston, Nikki Beasley. Second row: Kyra Slemp, Andrea Erickson, Meagan Dexter, Caroline Nick, Haley Fosnough-Biersmith, Shannon McGinley, Paige Gundelfinger. Third row: Manager Alex Conner, Coach Deon Slemp, Coach Kelli Kurle. Not pictured: Morgan Satterlee.

CATCH SLIDE PASS

ATTEMPTING TO BEAT RECORDS FROM PAST SEASONS, VARSITY AND JUNIOR VARSITY PLAYERS STRETCH FOR A STATE QUALIFICATION.

You start off by the leader saying biscuit really quiet and everyone else says basket. and it slowly increases. After FOUR times we stop and run on the field.”

>> 4/28 SMN

4:15 PM

>> 4/28 SMN

6:00 PM

>>

4/30 Olathe North 4:15 PM

>>

4/30 Olathe North 6:00 PM

5/05 >>SMNW

4:15 PM

5/05 >>SMNW

6:00 PM

>>

5/07 Lawrence 5:00 PM

>>

5/07 Lawrence 6:30 PM

>>

5/18 Regionals

5/29 >>State

5/29 >>State

CLUBS 241


>> PREP time

with senior Winn Clark and junior Jordan Pfeiffer

“On the bus rides to away games, it’s usually sophomores in front and upperclassmen in the back; the upperclassmen just always get in through the back door. It’s completely silent on the way to and from the game. We pretty much just listen to ipods. Coach wants it silent so that we can prepare. I think it’s good because it also helps us mentally focus and prepare for who we have to match up with.”

Jordan Pfieffer 11 “For the most part on the way to games some of us just talk about past games or what’s going to happen tonight. No one really does any homework or anything like that, except on the way to tournaments; we sometimes watch movies. We also may talk about team dinners or anything funny. We just try to keep it relaxed.” KEEP AWAY

Winn Clark 12

>>

Above: Attempting to block an opposing team’s player from stealing the ball, senior Jack Slaughter assists in an East v. North win. “There’s a drill that we do at the beginning of every practice where one player tries to keep the ball away from the other player,” Slaughter says. “Everyone is throwing elbows, and it makes us good at handling pressure.” Photo by Kit Andreson.

SOPHOMORE

BEST TIME

>>

Above: Trying to keep North players from interfering with his shot, sophomore Sean Cameron relies on his technique to make the points. “When I’m shooting the ball I try to keep my elbow in,” Cameron said. “I focus on the goal and follow through.” Photo by Rachel English. Right: (Left to Right) First row: Quan Brunt, Zach Colby, D. J. Burton, Dylan Becker, Connor Wilkins. Second row: Josh Mais, Teddy Fields, Nick Lucas, Zach Nass, Jack Thorpe, Connor Simpson. Third row: Coach Peppes.

Johnny Delgado 12 We pray before every game. Coach HAIR leads it, and we pray that no one gets hurt and that it will be a fun and fulfilling game. w

>> 12/05 SMS

66-53

242 MAY

12/12 >> SMW

61-45

>>

12/19 Olathe Northwest 60-48

>>

12/20 Lee Summit West 67-61

1/06 >>SMNW 45-58

1/09 >>SMW

42-57

>>

1/13 Lawrence 66-58

>>

1/16 Free State 66-55

>>

1/22 Blue Valley West 40-67

>>

1/23 Free State 54-47

>Wichita > 1/24

Heights 60-78

>> 2/03 SMN

56-47


Right: (Left to Right) First row: Christopher Heady, Evan Nichols, Henry Simpson, Brooks Tate, Jake Libeer, Billy Kirkpatrick. Second row: Tucker Clark, Logan Rose, Alex Schoegler, Matt Cantril, Reid Frye, Rhys Raglow, Adam Simmons. Third row: Adam Jones, Jack Fay, Sam Gilman, Ryan Seybert, Elliot Faerber, Logan Dalgleish, Christian Wiles, Keagan Jacobs. Fourth row: Coaches Ryan Hintz, Mike Drier.

FRESHMAN

AMAZING BEWILDERMENT

>>

Below: Seniors Gordon Smith, Bryan Parman and junior Jack Logan attempt to distract the opposing team during their sideline play by waving and shouting at the Lawrence player. “We try and make a lot of noise and try to get on the nerves of the other team,” Logan said. “We usually heckle their names or make fun of their school in some way that usually makes the administration mad.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

THIRD FROM THE TOP

THE TEAMS DEAL WITH DIFFERENT COACHING STYLES, INJURY AND ADVERSITY AT THE START OF THE 2008 SEASON.

JV, VARSITY

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Manager Samantha Bamford, Manager Libby Steinbock, Jordan Pfeiffer, Sam Kovzan, Manager Jacey Gorman, Manager Paige Ledbetter. Second row: Ryan Olander, Marcus Webb, Jackson Harter, Johnny Delgado, Scott Kennedy, Charlie Ludington, Anthony Scott, Kris Hertel. Third row: Chase Lucas, Robby Moriarty, Curran Darling, Sean Cameron, Blake Spencer, Jack Slaughter, George Brophy, Winn Clark, Kevin Hertel. Fourth row: Coaches Ryan Ottemeier, Shawn Hair, Todd McAtee.

we do it before each game. We kneel down hand in hand in a circle and end it with a “let’s get it done!” chant. Then eveRyone jumps around and goes to play.

>>

2/06 Olathe North 50-44

>>

2/10 Olathe South 54-55

2/13 >>SMNW 67-59

>>

2/17 Leavenworth 60-40

>> 2/20 SMN

48-36

>>

2/24 Olathe East 47-46

>> 2/27 SMS

56-39

>>

3/04 Sub-State Semifinals SMN 51-47

>>

3/06 Sub-State Finals Lawrence 53-52

>>

3/11 State Quarters Olathe East 53-51

>>

3/13 State Semi-finals Wichita Southeast 80-63

>>

3/14 State 3rd Place Game SMNW 53-51

CLUBS 243


FRESHMAN

SOPHOMORE

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Lilli Stalder, Madeline Sniezek, Carolyn Wolff, Maggie Thomas. Second row: Hallie Beck, Jade Delgado, Amanda Chao, Katie Crawford, Abby Dunn, Cara Shaw. Third row: Ashley Lewis, Molly Jennings, Tabor Jorns, Coach Mader, Kennedy Grimes, Grace Fritts, Emily Frye.

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Breana Gray. Second row: Manager Kelsey Chadd, Coach Chipman, Manager Ali Dees. Third row: Dejuanne Tucker, Micah Melia, Paige Martz, Kylee Brooks. Fourth row: Haley Fosnough-Biersmith, Kerri Ricketts, Jill Anderson, Emily Hofmeister, Allyse Hackler, Torry Spencer, Hannah Roste. Not pictured: Betsy Dee, Haley Fisher.

SILENT SKEPTICS

LADY LANCERS MAKE IT TO STATE DESPITE PREDICTIONS OF A WEAKER TEAM.

A RUNNING START

>>>>

As one of the five starting players, junior Allison Stevens runs onto the court at the start of her game while the stands cheer her on. “I always smile really big,” Stevens said, “and I can’t help but laugh when we slap everyone’s hands. Being excited really helps get the nerves out.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

Danielle Norton 9 The last practice, we had this competition called “Distraction.” It was J.V. v. varsity. We shot free-throws, and the other team tried to 12/08 >>SMNW 57-23

244 MAY

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12/11 Mill Valley 55-35

>> 12/15 SMS

52-39

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12/19 Blue Valley West 50-27

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12/20 Olathe Northwest 46-40

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1/12 Lawrence 63-55

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1/16 Free State 37-42

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1/20 Olathe South 44-59

1/23 >>SMN

64-53

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1/29 Highland Park 80-54

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1/30 Wichita Northwest 73-42


JV, VARSITY

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Danielle Norton, Sarah McKittrick, Manager Alex Connor, Caroline Dodd, Maddy Rich. Second row: Hannah Satterlee, Kyra Slemp, Caroline Nick, Libby Jandl, Lauren Dodd, Shannon McGinley, Molly Rappold. Third row: Hannah Gerwick, Logan Weckbaugh, Natalie Parsons, Christina Davis, Janna Graf, Allison Stephens, Haley Dalgleish, Elizabeth Ward. Fourth row: Coaches Kelli Kurle, Rick Rhodes, Jodi Schnakenberg.

>> CROWD SUPPORT

with Natalie Parsons 12, Hannah Saterlee 11 and Elizabeth Ward 10

“There was this one time when [senior] David DeGoler had a shoe, and he was pounding the bleachers while [the other team] shot free-throws. [I also like] when [the crowd] counts down the wrong time with like 15 seconds left. We appreciate when they support us.”

“We like it when the crowd gets into the girls games. When we have a bigger crowd, it’s most exciting and gets us pumped up. We really appreciate when people come and support us because girls sports are kind of undersupported, and we work really hard.”

“The crowd was a lot calmer than the boys games. And not a lot of fans come to support us. The girls games are pretty weak compared to the boys games though. Everyone should come out and support the girls just like they do at the boys games.”

Natalie Parsons 12

Hannah Saterlee 11

Elizabeth Ward 10

SEARCHING FOR PASSES

Above: Trying to pass the ball, junior Maddy Rich is blocked by a Shawnee Mission North varsity player. “When you get the ball,” Rich said, “you just kind of have to go with the flow.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

TIME TO SHOOT

Above: Stopping at the free throw line, junior Yanna Graff tries to earn the Lady Lancers an extra point. “[Free throws] are a good opportunity to get points since they’re free shots,” Graff said. “It helps the team out if you make them.” Photo by Lucy Faerber.

>>

>>

Above: During a rival game against Shawnee Mission North, sophomore Shannon McGinley looks to pass. By the end of the season, McGinley was the only freshman varsity starter. “ I don’t worry about myself losing the ball,” McGinley said. Photo by Lucy Faerber.

>>

GETTING THE BALL ROLLING

distract them from making baskets. The losing team had to do whatever the winning team MADE them. This year vARSIty made us do a dance in front of everyone.

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1/31 Washburn Rural 42-44

2/03 >>SMW

56-49

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2/06 Olathe North 65-52

2/11 >>SMNW 54-26

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2/16 Leavenworth 55-27

2/19 >>SMN

80-42

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2/23 Olathe East 53-39

>> 2/26 SMS

52-47

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3/05 Sub-state SemiFinals Leavenworth 56-24

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3/07 Sub-state Finals SMN 50-40

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3/12 State 1st Round Game SMW 52-59

CLUBS 245


BOYS

3/24 >> 3/26 >> 3/30 >> 4/01 >> 4/06 >> 4/07 >> 4/09 >> 4/11 >> 4/15 >> 4/16 >> 4/17 >> 4/20 >> 4/21 >> 4/24 >> 4/27 >> 4/28 >> 4/29 >> 4/30 >> 5/07 >> 5/16 >> SMN MaKC Aqui- Topeka SMS SMW SM BVNW SMNW St. PemSt.’s LawOlathe Blue RockSun- Region- State 12-3

ranatha 2-7

Christian 8-1

nas 7-1

HS

___

District

___

___

___

Invite

___

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James Academy ___

broke Hill ___

Mens Tennis Invite ___

rence HS

NW

Valley West

hurst

flower League

als

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Below: (Left to right) First row: Sam Amrein, Jason Bates, Perry Jackson, Max Chao, Cameron Robles, David Towster, Jake Lybarger, Christopher Heady. Second row: Austin English, Luis Rivera, Brooks Anthony, Robby Medhi, Michael Calvert, Reed Waldon, Takanori Sawaguchi, Chris Fotopoulos. Third row: Coach Sue Chipman, Jack Tretbar, Ross Guignon, Michael Hill, David Henderson, Kevin Simpson, Ian Wiseman, Spencer Jarrold, Chip Cantor. Fourth row: Stephen Surface, Jackson O’Gorman Bean, Michael Cray, Sam Carpenter, Peter Chow, Zach Nass, Ben Carlson, Andrew Ryan, Lawrence Weigel, Coach Jon Lane.

BOYS TENNIS

GIMME AN ‘ACE’

GIRLS TENNIS WINS STATE WHILE BOYS TENNIS PLAYERS WORK TO SEND PLAYERS TO THE CHAMPIONSHIP.

>> doubles

TROUBLE

with senior Ross Wooten “When playing doubles, we usually keep the same partner so you sometimes have certain signals with them. Once in a while when I play doubles with John Kurtz, we talk in Russian accents. Another fun thing we do is getting out of school for tournaments. It’s nice because I’d rather be playing tennis and hanging out with my friends than sitting in math class. We feel like it’s really important to support our other teammates in matches even when we’re not playing.”

ALL SYSTEMS GO

GIRLS TENNIS right: Before hitting a ball, senior >Gale > Above Harrington always makes sure to be constantly moving and on her toes. “This helps me be mentally ready,” Harrington says, “and it also helps me get in the game.” Photo by Kristin Barker. (Left to Right) First row: Anousha >Shirazi, > Right:Paige E. Anderson, Kennedy Burgess, Maddy Pigeon, Sammi Kelly, Caroline Wooldridge, Rachel English, Meara Smith, Eliza McCormick. Second row: Coach Debbie Ogden, Natalie Pierce, Lilli Stalder, Madeline Sniezek, Amanda Chao, Sally Schoenfeld, Sarah Driks, Elizabeth Tillhof, Andrea Erickson, Carolyn Welter, Ellen Stanziola, Coach Sue Chipman. Third row: Lauren Bleakley, Edie Cao, Madeline McMahill, Mollie Cooper, Corey Neidl, Kelsey Chadd, Sara Fisher, Molly Tidrick, Mackenzie Haugland, Meghan Spivak, Mimi Fotopoulos, Rachel Rice. Fourth row: Sally Holmes, Hannah Walter, Katy Richardson, Andrea Tudhope, Sarah Luby, Emma Cousineau, Dani Miller, Lilly Myers, Maggie Simmons, Michelle Richardson, Gale Harrington, Tucker Nelson. Fifth row: Nikki Reber, Kirstin Chadd, Torry Spencer, Caroline Dodd, Hannah Copeland, Maggie Fenton, Erin Tuttle, Kelly Gillespie, Jenna Kaufman, Lauren Reynolds, Mikela Miller, Ali Gibbin.

GIRLS

Ross Guignon 10 “There’s always a lot of times during the season where we get together to figure out who we’re trying to send to regionals. WE try and 9/04 9/09 9/10 >> Pem>>SMW >> SMN broke Hill 2-7

246 MAY

9-3

15-1

>> 9/15 Blue

Valley North 10-2

>> 9/18 Blue

Valley Northwest 16-0

9/20 >> Pem-

broke Hill Invite 3rd

9/23 >> Law-

rence 3-6

9/24 >>Olathe >> 9/26 SMS East 18-1

7-2

9/27 9/29 10/04 >> 10/06 >> 10/10 >> 10/18 >>SMSD >>SMNW >> 9/30 >> 10/02 >>SpringSt. SunBarstow RegionState Invite 39-1 1st

13-5

Thomas Aquinas Invite 1st

flower League 1st

field Invite 1st

2-4

als 1st

1st


BOYS

>BV >3/30 West

4/06 Olathe North and South

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4/13 >>SMNW

___

___

___

>> 4/20 SMS

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4/22 Washburn Rural Invitational ___

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>>

>>

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4/27 Topeka West

5/01 Hutchinson Invitational

5/11 Leavenworth

5/13 Lawrence

5/18 Regionals

___

___

___

___

___

5/26 >>State ___

BOYS GOLF

>>

Left: (Left to Right) First row: Zach Kasmiskie, Grant Kendall, Henry Simpson, Scott Humphrey, Conner Schrock, Will Snyder, Andrew Herst, Tucker Clark. Second row: Coach Tim Burkindine, Joe Lynch, Jeremy Young, Grant Burnside, Nick Lucas, John Morrison, Chase Lucas, Nic Hasselwander, Ian Boat, Coach Ermanno Ritschl.

A GREEN THUMB

THE BOYS AND GIRLS GOLF TEAMS WORK ON TRANSFERRING SKILLS FROM THE UPPERCLASSMEN TO THE YOUNGERCLASSMEN. GIRLS GOLF

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Aubrey Leiter, Gillian O’Connell, Megan Deay, Kristina Genton, Drew Auer, Clair Finke. Second row: Caitlin Benson, Valerie Fisher, Elizabeth Ward, Colleen Ireland, Sarah Genton, Caroline Sheridan, Erika Davee, Coach Ermanno Ritschl.

>> the CLAW

with senior Joe Lynch “If you misbehave or anything at practice, [Coach Tim Burkindine] gives you something called “the claw.” There’s no punishment or anything, he just comes up and grabs your arm. It actually kind of hurts. [It] really wakes us up and gets me back on my game. Our team isn’t uptight or anything. The claw is pretty occasional. I just seem to get it more than other guys. He’s had it for several years and its been dubbed ‘the claw’ for as long as I can remember.” DOWN AND DIRTY

off his club, freshman Jeremy Young prepares to >shoot > Right:ontoCleaning the muddy greene. “After every shot you have to clean off your golf clubs,” Young said. “When it’s muddy it get’s pretty tedious.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

GIRLS

plan out the season and what we hope it will be. [This year] we met twice before the season started at Starbucks, and we’ve met another three times since.”

>>

8/26 Washburn Rural 1st

>> 9/08 SME 2nd

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9/16 Free State 4th

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9/22 Notre Dame de Sion 6th

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9/25 Lawrence 7th

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10/01 Saint Theresa’s Academy 4th

>> 10/06 SMS 1st

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10/08 Olathe East 2nd

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10/13 Regionals 2nd

>> 10/20 State 6th

CLUBS 247


VARSITY

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Zach Amrein, Chris Hasselwander, Matt Hill, Aaron Kaufman, Collin Carter. Second row: Miles Sanderson, Dylan Becker, Chad Zeller, Brady Anderson, Scott Kennedy, Stewart Jensen. Third row: Alex Cox, Josh Kenney, Jeff Soptic, Casey Stewart, Gabe Miller. Third row: Coaches Kevin Winters, Tim Jarrell, Joel Smith. Not pictured: Jackson Harter.

C TEAM

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Larson Woolwine, Kyle Braddock, Adam Lowe. Second row: Jake Little, Noah Bertholf, Kurt Jensen, Chris Pinne, Jason Sabin. Third row: Billy Kirkpatrick, Brady Forbes, Matt Johnston, Sam Byers, Dylan Brett, Jeff Cole, Coach David Bates.

PRE-GAME REMINDER

>>

Left: Sophomore Jeff Cole tightens up his laces before the start of the April 7 game against Olathe East. “I try to prepare by keeping silent and thinking about what I need to do,” Cole said. “I have a plastic lancer band that I wear for every game, but I have to take it off right before [I play.] It reminds me of who and what I’m playing for.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Miles Sanderson 12 “After kids get their first hit, they get thrown in the [SME] pool. It was weird having 20 people throwing you in. I was a little upset. We had 4/02 SMW ___

248 MAY

>>

4/07 Olathe East 6-9

>> 04/10 SMS ___

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4/14 Olathe South ___

>> 4/16 SMS ___

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4/17 Saint James Academy ___

4/18 >>BVNW ___

>> 4/20 SMN ___

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4/21 Olathe Northwest ___

>> 4/24 SMN ___

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4/25 100 Inning Game ___

4/27 >>SMNW ___


PREGAME CHAT

>>

Far left: Prior to the start of their first game of the year against Olathe East, senior Josh Kinney and sophomore Teddy Fields joke about a baseball bat while standing in the dugout. Kinney played pitcher for the varsity team. “There’s a time and place between games to joke around,” Kinney said. “It helps us relax right before we go up to bat so we aren’t so tense and serious.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

COME TOGETHER

>>

Left: Listening to senior Chad Zeller, junior Scott Kennedy takes the captain’s advice to heart before stepping on the plate. “We look up to underclassmen,” Kennedy said, “but this year we all have roughly the same experience so we can really help each other out.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

RUNNING THEM HOME COMING OFF OF A STRONG PRE-SEASON TRAINING PROGRAM, BOYS BASEBALL PLAYERS ATTEMPT TO LIVE UP TO EXPECTATIONS.

JUNIOR VARSITY

>>

Left: (Left to right) First row: Timmy Ahern, Daniel Colebank, Krey Bradley, Brad Robson, Elliot Yohn, Jacob McGillicuddy. Second row: Will Severns, DJ Burton, Alex Healey, Anthony Scott, Joe Sernett, David Owens. Third row: Johnny Sheahan, Alex Pirotte, Teddy Fields, Brennan Burns, John Schrock, Stefan Weinrich, Jackson Brett.

joked about in on the way home on the bus. I was still wearing a baseball top and shorts when [the seniors] cut off the aisles in the locker room to get me.”

>>

>>

>>

>>

>>

4/28 Rockhurst

5/01 Olathe North

5/02 Bishop Ward

5/05 Free State

5/08 Leavenworth

___

___

___

___

___

5/09 >>SMW ___

>SMNW > 5/11

5/13 Lawrence

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5/15 Blue Valley

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5/18 Regionals

>>

___

___

___

___

5/30 >>State ___

CLUBS 249


PIGGY-BACK

READY STANCE

Below: Sophomore Carter Kerr sets up to wrestle his Olathe North opponent. After having his nose broken at eleven years old, he tries to protect it as much as possible. “Now during matches it gets popped and bumped,” Kerr said. “I usually get alot of bloody noses.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

>>

>>

Below: Sophomore Andy Ryan conditions for the wrestling season by carrying sophomore Sam Haddaway up the main floor staircase. “That’s just hardcore conditioning to get us in better shape,” Ryan said. “It helps us in the long run to have that edge over your opponent.” Photo by Rachel English.

>> WORKING off the pounds

with sophomore David Hill

“I had to lose like ten pounds in a week [to make my weight class]. Over winter break, we had practices every day, and JV and varsity were at separate times. Me doing both of the practices every day for a week [to lose weight] overwhelmed me. I ended up getting mono because of all that. My younger brothers were throwing me around because I had no energy left. When I wrestle, I don’t think of losing weight; I think of getting better. I want to be number one; I want to be the best in my weight class. It’s definitely worth it even if I have to go through all that pain.”

ROUGH AND TUMBLE BECAUSE OF INTENSIVE PRE-TRAINING FOR THE SEASON, WRESTLERS SURPASS EXPECTATIONS AND PLACE FOURTH AT LEAGUE.

ALL TEAMS

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Carter Kerr, Nathan McCloud, Pete Uhl, Caleb Pulliam, Cooper Hylton, Adam Levin, Brandon Davis, Jacob Darbyshire, Jake Kaufman, Chris Hasselwander, Brenton Rice. Second row: Manager Caroline Dellett, Peter Stout, Blaine Hill, Jack Hedrick, Dylan Brett, Greg Guthrie, David Hill, Jeff Rutherford, Andrew Ryan, Ian Exline, Blake Hill, Rhegg Delara, Chase Woofter, Nick Ecker, Manager Nikki Glaze. Third row: Manager Allison Wendorff, Manager Bailey Spickler, T.J. Hayde, Alex Keller, Ben Randolph, Alex Beahm, Mark Mergen, Brandon Royle, Christopher Welch, William Geddes, Sam Coen, Tanner Johnson, Ben Garten, Drew Richardson, Manager Eileen Gallagher, Manager Brittany Spickler. Fourth row: Daniel Jackson, Sam Hattaway, Cole Morgan, Jackson Brett, Alex Lamb, Gregory Welsh, Jim Frederick, Seth Berkbuegler, Aidan Robbins, Bobby Dettenwanger, Robert Jilka. Fifth row: Coaches Matt Smith, Chip Ufford, Jason Filbeck.

Lois Wetzel 11 “Before meets we say a team cheer. Usually varsity seniors lead it, but sometimes JV goes in the middle of the pool and does it too. THEN 12/06 >>Gardner Invite 8th

250 MAY

>>

12/13 Wellington Invite 2nd

12/20 >>Johnson County Classic 12th

1/07 >>Olathe North 2nd

>>

1/10 Rossville 2nd

>Bobcat > 1/17 Invite 19th

1/21 >>Olathe South 2nd

>>

1/22 Olathe NW 1st

1/31 >>SMN

Invite 2nd

>>

2/05 Osawatomia 2nd

2/06 >>SMSD Invite 2nd

>>

2/14 Sunflower League 4th

>>

2/21 Regionals 1st

2/28 >>State 19th


BOYS

>>

>>

12/06 Olathe East 2nd

12/12 >>Olathe

12/11 Olathe South 1st

Invite 1st

>> 12/15 SME 1st

1/15 >> SMS

>> 1/20 BVN

1st

1/23 >>SMNW

1st

>Topeka > 1/27

1st

Invite 1st

>>

2/07 Sunflower League 1st

2/21 >>State 3rd

FACING THOSE WAVES

>>

Below: (Left to Right) First row: Jonathan Granstaff, Michael Stolle, Jack Haverty, Morgan Denton, Patrick Riott, Ted Dubois, Oliver Dubois. Second row: Chad Allen, Ben Liu, Trent Richardson, Hayden Frey, Alex Bublitz, Connor Carollo, Patrick McGannon, Carlos Velasquez. Third row: Jack Walker, Jack Logan, Hunter Stevenson, Conor Twibell, Samuel Rider, Ray Finkle, Sam Logan. Fourth row: Joel Anderson, Collin Enger, Jacob Johnson, Gordon Green, Will Kenney, Andrew Hornung, Corbin Barnds, Nathan Simpson, Henry Foster. Fifth row: John Hart, Harper Coulson, Andrew Morrison, Logan Gage, Clay Finley, Kyle Sitomer, Coach Wonda Simchuk, Tom Lynch, Jacob McGillicuddy, Coach Wiley Wright, Sean Cedillo. Sixth row: Jeremy Steiner, Ben Carlson, Spencer Andresen, Clark Svet, Jack Sayler, Connor Schrock, Matt Beck, Coach Betsy Anderson, Adam Isenberg. Seventh row: John Rowley, Jon Reene, Thomas Puckett, Andrew Watkins, Matthew Snively, Spencer Sherard, Tim Madison. Right first row: Aidan Conley, Max Welker, Peter Frazell, Manager Elli Walker. Right second row: Droste Milledge, Managers Taylor Runion, Lexi Mische, Dana Sherard.

BOYS SWIM

THE VARSITY BOYS ATTEMPT A FIVE-TIME STATE TITLE WHILE GIRLS ATTEMPT A FIVE-TIME LEAGUE TITLE. >>

Below: (Left to Right) First row: Lilli Stalder, Hallie Beck, Dana Sherard, Bailey Borgmier, Allison Kirby, Taylor Runion, Claire Newman. Second row: Corey Neidl, Ariana Sherk, Kristin Anthonis, Shayla Parcels, Dylan Dunn, Caitlin Benson, Sam Nelson, Paige Ledbetter. Third row: Katy Richardson, Mary Longan, Sarah McKittrick, Emily Brandmeyer, Lauren Stanley, Megan Metz, Marston Fries. Fourth row: Lauren King, Julia Davis, Cassie Sterbenz, Molly Troutman, Sanne Postma, Ree Ae Jordan, Amy Sachse, Torry Spencer, Hannah Walter. Fifth row: Grace Gillaspie, Emily Ellenberger, Sarah Driks, Libby Wooldridge, Heloise Laffargue, Helen Dinkel, Atiyen Samadi, Elli Walker, Megan McGillicuddy, Stacy Coffyn. Sixth row: Emily Fuson, Cheyenne Watts, Samantha Bartow, Margo Brookfield, Katy Kettler, Hannah Gerwick, Jacey Gorman, Taylor Burkhead.

GIRLS SWIM

TOUCHING FOR TIME

>>

Above: Right after touching the wall to finish his 100 yard breaststroke race, senior Alex Bublitz looks up at the scoreboard to see his time. “You can usually tell if you are doing well during the race,” Bublitz said. “If you are beating the people next to you [during the race], then most likely you are doing really well. [Looking at the scoreboard] is just a reflex.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

GIRLS

during warm ups we usually all give each other wedgies in the pool. We’re all in separate groups of friends so swimming brings the team together.” 3/27 >>SMNW 1st

4/07 >> BVW ___

4/10 >>Olathe Invite ___

>Wichita > 4/11

Northwest ___

4/14 >>SMW ___

>>

4/16 St. Thomas Aquinas ___

>>

4/21 Free State ___

>> 4/25 SME

>> 5/02 SMS

___

___

>>

5/09 Sunflower League ___

>>

5/12 Freestate ___

5/23 >>State ___

CLUBS 251


>>

Below: (Left to right) First row: Grace Gillaspie, Alex Lavayen, Amanda Pierce, Lindy Blackman, Sam Benson, Luiza Neto, Madeline Goss, Elizabeth Beck. Second row: Andrea Zecy, Emily Ellenberger, Lexi Mische, Brooke Royle, Leia Swanson, Dara Slemp, Mckayla Smith. Third row: Chandra Swanson, Paige Kovarik, Makenzie Nesselhuf, Katy Kettler, Shayla Parcels, Nicole Luby, Sanne Postma. Not Pictured: Logan Mitchell

ALL TEAMS

>> unexpected HALT

with junior Brooke Royle and senior Elizabeth Beck “When I joined I had never done gymnastics before. Gymnastics is kind of an individual sport so you could work hard but chat when you wanted to. I had to quit halfway through the season because I had rowing going on too; I ended up choosing that.”

Brooke Royle 11

“I tore my ACL at the League meet. It was supposed to be a promising meet because I had a new vault to perform, and my floor routine was pretty good. One of the judges even said that I could have won state. It was sad because I wanted to do well and go out with a bang, but with my injury it was really hard. My leg is just now starting to feel better, so I’m hoping that I can get back on track.”

Elizabeth Beck 12 STRADDLES AND SPLITS

>>

Above: Enjoying the time with her teammates, junior Amanda Pierce takes a break after warming up with stretches. The team did straddles together and held them for long amounts of time to improve flexibility and their splits. “Splits are the most important because you end up using them for almost any event,” Pierce said. “Besides when you’re doing the vault, it comes in handy to be really flexible.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

GYMNASTS WORK TOGETHER TO CREATE A BALANCED TEAM.

BARS AND BEAMS

Duncan McHenry 11 “A workout that we do is called ‘speed makers.’ Basically the whole team is continuously running. You sprint 100 meters, then jog

>>

9/09 SME Quad

252 MAY

>SME > 9/16Tri

>>

9/20 SMN Invite

>>

9/23 Olathe East Quad

>>

10/01 Hawks Invite

>>

10/06 Lawrence AllAround

>>

10/08 SMW Quad

>SMNW > 10/15Tri

10/23 >>League

>Regionals > 10/28

>> 11/08 State


ALL TEAMS

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Anna Moritz, Lucy Lehoczky, Jake Belzer, Jason Pugh, Casey Hynes, Carolyn Welter, Abby Dunn, Emma Tyler, Amber Atha, Rachel Rice, Sophia Steckelberg, Carolyn Wolff, T.J. Hayde, Kelsey O’Rourke, Leia Swanson, Ben Williams, Carlos Velasquez, Calvin Handy, Philip Bever. Second row: Alyz Delgado, Hannah Satterlee, Maddy Rich, Morgan Christian, Caitlin Morley, Molly Kurtz, Madison Haverty, Ali Gibbin, Miranda Treas, Toni Aguiar, Lilly Myers, Chandra Swanson, Maurisa Valentine, Molly Cooper, Allie Marquis, Michael Garringer, Heather Athon, Lindsay Rooker, Emma Pennington, Caroline Woolridge. Third row: Rachel Kaskie, Audrey DiCarlo, Kelsey Kost, John Paul Rowe, Thanaphat Srisvwat, Brandon Royle, Joe Lewis, Oliver Dubois, Josh Cook, Mallory Kirby, Evan Tarry, Mason Philpott, Marcus Webb, Dale Smith, Megan Russell, Nora Kanally, Cassie Kerr, Makenzie Nesselhuf, Kirby Clements. Fourth row: Adam Simmons, John Horvath, Ben Randolph, Parker Russell, Andrew Dexter, Alex Keller, Sam Berry, Aaron Burgess, Anton Johnson, Alex Kaplan, Matt Hoffman, Joe Lowrey, Nathan Ross, Miguel Ruiz, Sean Cedillo, Henry Hoffman. Fifth row: Young Hou, Rhys Raglow, Nathan Are, Alison Stephens, Sara Griffith, Jordan Herring, Allison Burton, Nic White, Charlie Belko, Brooks Tate, Reed Slaughter, Frankie Miner, Tyler Germann, Allyse Hackler, Katie Darling, Hannah Gerwick, Will Webber, Morgan Denton. Sixth row: Griff Gans, Brandon Burch, Evan Nichols, Reid Frye, Preston Vaughn, Joel Anderson, Patrick Frazell, Mitch Daniel, Jeff Tate, Alec Bartholomew, Robert Martin, Patrick Riott, Eric Sieck, Jake Libeer, Jordan Dietrich, Tucker Styrkowicz, Jaquan Brunt. Seventh row: Thomas Read, Leah Chesbrough, Maddie Fenton, Adam Jones, Matt Gannon, Clayton Welsh, Andy Yeast, Tommy Rappold, Jack Fay, Tom Yeast, Alex Wilson, Jay Dankard, Jack Kovarik, Hanna Jane Stradinger, Graham Redelsheimer, Cole Turner. Eighth row: Blake Hill, Andrew Forbes, Carl Rodgers, Tyler Woltemath, Zach Clements, Keagan Jacobs, Jordan Elliott, Seth Kang, Mike Sullivan, Daniel Jackson, Jake McCoy, Rhegg Delara, Scott Cantril, Azad Nowzari, Duncan McHenry, Chris Clarke, Blaine Hill. Ninth row: Jonathan Stiefel, Zach Wooldridge, Connor Wilkins, Jay Lehoczky, Austin Stehl, Stephen Nichols, Grant Ellis, Tim Wendt, Clark Waldon, Alex Carver, Michael Payne, Brian Simpson, Alex Horvath, Brian Williamson, Riley Hoffman, Sam Hattaway, Curran Darling. Tenth row: Ryan McNeil, Kyle Engelken, Henry Curfman, Andrew Fischer, Elliot Faerber, Logan Dalgleish, George Brophy, Alfie Kass, Steve Mazzoni, Ryan Ash, Austin Miller, Jack Harrigan, Brett Miller, Ryan Seybert, Tony Christensen, Stephen Cook, Christian Wiles, Grant Stauffer.

TRACK RUNNERS OVERCOME WEATHER CONDITIONS TO TURN THE SPRING INTO A SUCCESSFUL SEASON.

GROUP EFFORT FINDING HIS FORM

>>

Far left: Running hard with pole in hand, junior Connor Creighton prepares to jump during a practice. “I enjoy pole vaulting because it’s a lot different from other events,” Creighton said. “The hardest part about it is mastering the form.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

TAKING A MINUTE

>>

Left: During a relaxing break, junior Will Carey anticipates the next work out. Usually while the team takes breaks, they lie down, avoid walking and stretch out. “When I finally get to sit down, I just feel really relieved.” Carey said. “I think about how I’m going to pace myself.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

100. You keep on doing it around and around the track. It’s the worst in really hot weather. It was one of the hardest work outs that we’ve ever done.”

>>

3/31 SME Quad Boys 1st Girls 1st

>>

4/04 SMS Relays No team score

>>

4/11 Blue Valley Relays ___

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4/16 Varsity District Meet ___

>>

>>

4/17 KU Relays

4/18 KU Relays

___

___

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4/24 Olathe NW Quad ___

>>

5/01 Aquinas Tournament ___

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5/08 SMN Relays ___

5/15 >>Varsity

League ___

>>

5/22 Regionals ___

5/29 >> State

Day 1 ___

5/30 >> State

Day 2 ___

CLUBS 253


GIRLS BOWL

1/15 >> SME

1902 1st

1/22 >> SME

2000 2nd

1/28 >>SMNW 1501 2nd

it >> howSTARTED

>>

2/03 Olathe Northwest 1960 1st

>> 2/05 SME

1803 3rd

>>

2/17 Free State 1952 2nd

>>

2/18 Olathe East 2018 1st

>>

2/21 Sunflower League 1737 10th

2/23 >>SMSD

>>

2/28 Regionals 1973 6th

1824 5th

GIRLS BOWLING

with senior Sean Robinson

“I bowled a lot when I was little. My mom got me into it, so before I even started school I would be down at the bowling alley hanging out. When I didn’t wrestle junior year I tried out for the bowling team. I ended up liking it so much that year that I decided to try out again [senior] year. I’ve been on varsity for both years. I thought that bowling was more fun [than wrestling], but if I could have I would have done both.”

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Ashley Guerricagoitia, Connor Weir, Kelsey McGonigle, Amanda Sams, Devyn Vincent, Clair Finke, Alli Dees. Second row: Coach Patti Kennedy, manager Lauren Raibble, manager Tina Poindexter, Hannah Vaughn, Colleen Ireland, Kathleen Ireland, Teresa Corazzin, Whitney Kraft, Coach Larry Kennedy.

BOYS BOWLING

>>

Left: (Left to Right) First row: Manager Tina Poindexter, William Patrick, Joe Lowrey, John Kurtz, Jeff Tate, Sean Robinson, Daniel Colebank, Manager Lauren Raibble. Second row: Coach Larry Kennedy, Pete Peterson, Johnny Sheahan, Reid Hintz, David Frizzell, Brennan Burns, Curtis Wells, Brady Anderson, Coach Patti Kennedy.

HAIL TO THEE

BOWLERS AND HERALDERS TAKE PART IN ACTIVITIES FUNDED BY EAST ADMINISTRATION.

HERALDERS >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Emily Brandmeyer, Michelle Braslavsky, Laura Darling. Second row: Mark Mergen, Tyisha McFarland, Lauren Gruenebaum, Jane Mahoney, Hannah Fink, Alex Carver. Not pictured: Kit Andresen.

BOYS BOWL

Calvin Tidwell 12 “At the first [CROQUET] meeting, [senior] Chad Allen could not follow club rules. He wore white New Balances and a ‘Canadian Tu

254 MAY

1/15 >> SME

2259 2nd

1/22 >> SME

2164 7th

1/28 >>SMNW 2053 3rd

>>

2/03 Olathe Northwest 2188 3rd

>> 2/05 SME 2163 2nd

>>

2/17 Free State 2251 3rd

>>

2/18 Olathe East 2231 2nd

>>

2/21 Sunflower League 2368 2nd

2/23 >>SMSD 2357 3rd

>>

2/28 Regionals 2494 3rd


>> building ROOTS

CROQUET

with senior Dora Kapros

“When I was eleven or twelve [senior Emre Agbas] got me and my little brother [Thomas] involved in just taking [martial arts] classes. I’ve really been doing it ever since. With school and everything, it has been hard to go to class as often as I’d want, but I’ve really tried to keep going and not give it up. With the club on Mondays and Wednesdays it has been a lot easier, but now that the club has been moved to Mr. Muhammad’s studio it has been harder to get all the way out there and practice.”

>>

Below: (Left to right) First row: Mallory Harrington, Jaeda Christensen, Whitney Kraft. Second row: Cheyenne Watts, Emre Agbas, Dora Kapros, Michelle Braslavsky, Amy Franklin. Third row: David Dechant, Taylor Harris, Tamas Kapros, David Muhammad, Jayson Williamson.

MARTIAL ARTS

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Charles Allen, John Logan, Jackson Harter, Brian Simpson, Samuel Logan. Second row: Stephen Nichols, Calvin Tidwell, Richard H. Coulson III, John Hart, Clayton Finley.

HITTING THE MARK

CROQUET, MARTIAL ARTS AND PING PONG CLUB, NEW IN THE 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR, SURPRISE THE SCHOOL WITH HIGH NUMBERS OF PARTICIPANTS.

PING PONG

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: John Francis, Holly Lafferty, Grant Morris, Rachel D’Autremont, Evie Marshall, Gaby Thompson, Hannah Copeland, Brooks Anthony, Spencer Jarrold, Kevin Simpson, Mallory Stevenson, Ross Guignon. Second row: Sally Schoenfeld, Alyx Delgado, Steven Shen, Connor Wilkins, Robert Enders, Amanda Privitera, Joe Craig, Jeff Lefko, Emily Bittiker, Peter Chow, Sanne Postma, Whitaker Sherk, Evan Myers. Third row: Nick Carothers, Jason Bates, Olivia Botts, Sara Schenkelberg, David Towster, Jacob Johnson, Logan Heley, Chris Melvin, Ben Jensen, Amilia Winter, Sam Logan, Andrew Goble, Sponsor Cole Ogdon. Fourth row: Jack Walker, Scott Kennedy, Cam Smith, Keshav Ramaswami, Tim Shedor, Zach Busey, David Beeder, Paul Wolff, Ian Boat, Matt Beck, Scott Rainen, Stephen Nichols, Harper Coulson, CC Creidenberg, Patrick McGannon.

Tuxedo’– denim pants, denim shirt. This almost disqualified him from participation, but he had one saving grace: a republican elephant lapel pin.”

CLUBS 255


ADV. DEBATE

YEAR 2 DEBATE

>>

Left: (Left to Right) First row: Maeve O’Connor, Edie Cao, Wraye Sewell, Jenee Vickers. Second row: Tommy Gray, Margaret Schmidt, Ryan Fager, Kelly Greenfield, Lindsey Goins.

>>

Right: (Left to Right) First row: Steven Shen, Prarthana Dalal, Molly Caldwell. Second row: Peter Frazell, Ariana Sherk, Madison Haverty, Anna Bernard. Third row: Jesse Sharp, Jeff Lefko, Susie McClannahan, Cormac O’Connor.

TAKING A STAND

>>

Below: (Left to Right) First row: Sarah Sears, Emily Halter, Tara Raghuveer, Clair Finke. Second row: Andrew Mohn, Olivia Sullivan, Elizabeth McGranahan, Dana Leib. Third row: Scott Rainen, David Towster, Nick Carothers, Will Penner. Fourth row: Tommy Gray, Peter Chow, Owen Gray.

YEAR 3 DEBATE

DEBATERS, YEARS ONE THROUGH FOUR, COMPETE EVERY FALL WEEKEND FOR A CHANCE TO COMPETE AT STATE

NOVICE DEBATE

with senior Lindsey Goins

“This year the resolution was to basically increase incentives for alternate energy so if I was debating I would pick a certain word out of the resolution, define it and explain why the other side’s plan doesn’t meet that definition. A popular word this year was incentive. There was a lot of argument over whether a team’s plan should include positive or negative incentives so if their plan only included one type it was a chance for the other team to run topicality on the incentive they didn’t address.”

Above: (Left to right) First row: Anna Moritz, Elizabeth Mergen, Emma Sullivan, Atiyen Samadi. Second row: Michael Hill, Kerstin Amandola, Victoria Vaca, Stephanie Denton, Tyler Germann. Third row: Kate Sachse, Kathleen Ireland, Jordan Dietrich, Phoebe Unterman, Peter Bautz. Fourth row: Britini Argeropoulos, Mark Towster, Jordan Holsinger, Natalie Hine, Chris Carey, Federico Zepeda.

>>

>> PENGUIN talk

Ryan Fager 12 Every year we put all OF the trophies out on the table in the front of THE [DEBATE] room. We do it to show other students what

256 MAY


>>all CRACKED UP

NOVICE FORENSICS

with juniors Tara Raghuveer and Scott Rainen

“Once I was in a finals round during my first year [n forensics]. A lot of people put innuendo into their skits, but this one was kind of out of control. This boy performed a piece about a sausage vendor who enjoyed the occasional fuzzy pickle. It was awkward, but it ended up actually placing in competititon. I’m not sure, but he might have taken it to State.”

Tara Raghuveer 11

“The best category of forensics is a category called Dramatic Interpretation. At this one tournament, we made a bingo board, and we had all of these horrible categories like murder, death, rape, really anything bad that you can think of. So we all went and watched the performances, and everytime someone did a speech with one of the topics, you’d mark it off your board. We all almost got black-out, that’s how ridiculous it was. I was practically crying because I was laughing so hard by the end of it.

Scott Rainen 11

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Dana Leib, Emily Halter, Tara Raghuveer, Amy Esselman. Second row: Ali Ellerbeck, Edie Cao, Evan Myers, Emma Collins. Third row: Tommy Gray, Sarah Sears, Kinsey Cates. Fourth row: Paige C. Anderson, Kelly Sabates, Olivia Sullivan.

>>

ADV. FORENSICS

Left: (Left to Right) First row: Victoria Vaca, Maddy Biles, Anna Danciger, Emma Sullivan, Elizabeth Mergen. Second row: Peter Bautz, Mary Newman, Federico Zepeda, Adam Lowe, Michael S t o n e b a r g e r. Third row: Joseph Kashka, Scott Rainen, Wil Kenney, Chris Carey, Drake Winn.

BEST EFFORT

>>

Performing “Clue the Musical...” with freshman Will Kenney, freshman Chris Carry acts as the “Professor” during the forensics duo competition. “It’s based on the musical ‘Clue,’” Carry said. “We actually made it to finals [with it], and we’re really hoping to take it to state. It’s just a really fun piece.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

FORENSICS STUDENTS COMPETE IN COMEDIC AND TRAGIC EVENTS

COMEDIC RELIEF

we’ve accomplished. We actually have a huge traveling trophy that me and Cameron [Young] won two years ago at the Shawnee Mission South tournament.

CLUBS 257


A NEW START

>>

Right: Sophomore Polly Mytinger plays the role of Alice in her first frequent friday performance of Alice in Wonderland. “[Alice in Wonderland] was the thing that really got me into theatre,” Mytinger said. “I got to know the theatre kids who I hadn’t really known before [the frequent friday.] Photo by Meghan Benson.

MAKE ‘EM LAUGH

INVOLVED IN FREQUENT FRIDAYS, ANNUAL PLAYS AND MUSICALS, THESPIANS SUPPORT THE ARTS.

THESPIANS >>

Right: (Left to right) First row: Sarah King, Sara Cooper, Megan Mack, Jamie Rees, Megan Pavlu, Kat Jaeger, Polly Mytinger, Kylie Morrow, Dawn Selder, Tori Wrede, Hilary Surface, Sarah Pavlu. Second row: Isabelle Ciaramitaro, Kelsey Summers, Dani Hammond, Olivia Sieck, Natalie Hine, Annie Slaughter, Delaney Herman, Jack Dee, Wraye Sewell, Gillian O’Connell, Maureen Orth, Jack Hawkins. Third row: Jordan Davis, Cole Fevold, Duri Long, Emily Donovan, Ben Slater, Ian Exline, Sarah Evans, Hannah Copeland, Anne Haines, Alison Meagher-Manson. Fourth row: Jordan Holsinger, Ricky Latshaw, Morgan Myers, Grace Haun, Alec Hynes, Griffin McDonald, Jake Davidson, Alexa Fessler, Brice Roberts, Ansley Rowe, Ben Liu, Michael Grace, Nathan Klein.

>>

Below: (Left to right) First row: Maureen Orth, Sarah Pavlu, Kat Jaeger. Second row: Alec Hynes, Natalie Hine, Hannah Copeland, Jack Hawkins.

>>clubWIFE BEATER EXECS

with senior Christina Beynon “We have this thing that some of us do this thing called the wifebeater club. There’s a president, vice president, secretary, treasurer and a public relations person. Before shows, while we’re getting ready, we put [the wife beaters] on, and it helps us get pumped for the show. Each position is handed down from seniors to juniors the year before, and it’s a tradition that has been continued for a while. Each position has a funny knick-name or personality associated with it.”

Hannah Copeland 11 “[Every year] we kidnap the [THESPIAN] inductees on the day OF inititatION. Before the [initiation], we make all of the [thespians] sit in

258 MAY


ACADEMIC DECATHALON

>>

Far left: (Left to right) First row: Evan Myers, Emre Agbas, Elizabeth McDonald, Joe Deng. Second row: Meagan Dexter, Tara Raghuveer, Qi Chen, Lynza Halberstadt. Third row: Bryce Miller, Jackie Thompson, Spencer Brown, Michael Smythe, Andrea Brown.

>>

SCIENCE OLYMPIAD

Left: (Left to right) First row: David Smythe, Ben Donovan. Second row: Joe Deng, Patrick Schuele.

THE ACADEMIC DECATHALON AND SCIENCE OLYMPIAD TEAMS COMPETE AS SME’S SMARTEST BUNCH.

SME SMARTIES

PREPARING TO WIN

>>

Above: Studying for their academic decathalon competition [in Manhattan], senior David Smythe and senior Joe Deng read up on subjects that are often presented. “It’s fun getting a free trip to Manhattan,” Smythe said. “We give speeches, and we take our tests on one of the days we are there. The rest [of the days] we walk around [Kansas State University] campus.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

a circle on the stage of the little theatre. We call it the ‘dew’ circle, and every person gets a glass of Mountain Dew and tellS their favorite theatre moment.”

CLUBS 259


DOING THEIR PART

>>

Below: During the few weeks of the can drive, Student Council sponsor Brenda Fishman keeps busy by counting canned and boxed foods, as well as household items such as toilet paper and paper towels. “Items go to the Johnson County Christmas Bureau, which helps people in our community,” Fishman said. “Students can see where their donations go when they go to Olathe to help people pick from the contributions.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

SOPHOMORE

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Emi Snively, Kaitlyn Westhoff, Betsy Blessen, Meagan Dexter, Grace Boehm. Second row: Scott Watson, Chris Melving, Logan Heley, Robert Enders.

JUNIOR

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Holly Lafferty, Scott Kennedy, Amanda Privitera, Joe Craig. Second row: Harper Coulson, Tim Shedor, David Beeder, Ben Jensen.

THE DRIVING FORCE STUCO MEMBERS WORK TO MAKE THE 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR MORE ENJOYABLE WHILE PLANNING SCHOOL EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES.

Christa McKittrick 11 “When we count notes we call David Beeder the king of election committee because he always talks about how he’s a master

260 MAY


>>

Below: (Left to Right) First row: Mallory Stevenson, Amy Esselman. Second row: David Beeder, Qi Chen, Robert Enders.

FRESHMAN

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

>> MAKING yourself known

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Christa McKittrick, Carolyn Welter, Abbie Symes, Paige Kovarik. Second row: Molly Jennings, Danielle Norton, Tom Lynch, Emily Kulaga, Kate Kulaga.

with senior Paige Cornwell

“When we were having Wednesday meetings, I always sort of kept them in my mind and just made sure that I kept up with them because they were really important. Also, I would sometimes call in during our STUCO exec. hour and check in just to see what was going on and to let everyone know I was thinking of them. Whenever we had major events, sometimes I couldn’t go to all of them, but I always made sure to have a part in them. For example, I wasn’t well enough to go to the Homecoming dance, but I came for set-up, and I even brought doughnuts. I’m pretty sure I redeemed myself with those doughnuts.”

SENIOR

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Olivia Sieck, Jennifer Latshaw, Amy Esselman, Emily Mullett, Jessie Light. Second row: Grant Morris, Mallory Stevenson, Christina Beynon, Young Hou, Clark Waldon, David Spero.

>> bringing the GOODS

with junior Joe Craig

“Every Wednesday morning meeting, someone brings doughnuts. They divide it up and one StuCo person ends up bringing them every week. I got mine from Fluffy Fresh over on Johnson drive. There have been times when people forget and someone has to go and get them really fast. Most of the time people are responsible enough to remember, though, so there aren’t too many issues. There was a time for a while when people tried to bring stuff other than doughnuts, but the majority of kids rose up and decided that people should only bring doughnuts because they’re are far superior.”

EXEC. BOARD >>

Above: (Left to Right) Tommy Gray, Jennifer Latshaw, David Spero. Not pictured: Paige Cornwell.

votE counter. No one really knows if he actually is, but since he’s the committee chair of elections he’s in charge of counting the ballots.”

CLUBS 261


A LITTLE R AND R

>>

Left: Putting his feet up, junior Sam Logan edits his winter sports preview page for the sports section of the November 10th Hauberk. “I’ve got two guys in my section who are really good friends of mine,” Logan said, “and we have to work really hard together to get the page done.” Photo by Amanda Marland.

>>

Below: (Left to Right) First row: Anna Bernard, Annie Sgroi, Katie East, Mackenzie Wylie, Rachel Birkenmeier, Aubrey Leiter, Kennedy Burgess, Haley Martin, Sam Logan, Kevin Simpson. Second row: Griffin Bur, Kathleen Ireland, Daniel Stewart, Colleen Ireland, Maddy Bailey, Phoebe Unterman, Bernadette Myers, Elizabeth McGranahan, Michael Stolle, Conor Twibell. Third row: Sam Kovzan, CC Creidenberg, Cam Smith, Sarah McKittrick, Gail Stonebarger, Billy Kirkpatrick, Evan Nichols, Jack Howland, Camille Carro, Raina Weinberg, Grant Heinlein, Max Stitt. Fourth Row: Alex Lamb, Andrew Goble, Tim Shedor, Jeff Rutherford, Mac Tamblyn, Duncan McHenry, Andy Allen, Meg Shackelford, Taylor Haviland, Patrick Mayfield, Stephen Nichols, Tyler Roste, Logan Heley.

IN THE LENS

NEWSPAPER

>>

Above left: Senior Meghan Benson points her camera directly at senior Rachel English’s camera during a winter pep assembly. “All the photographers goof around a lot before anything happens [at assemblies],” Benson said. “We do that at pretty much any event we’re shooting, but we make sure to get serious as soon as we need to.” Photo by Rachel English.

CREAM OF THE CROP

>>

Above: Journalism students including senior Paige Cornwell receive National Scholastic Press Association awards at a conference in St. Louis, Missouri. “I won Excellence in News Writing,” Cornwell said. “I had been to two conventions before but hadn’t won anything my sophomore year. It was nice to think that I may have improved since I won an award this year.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

TATER’S LITTLE TOTS

THE HARBINGER AND HAUBERK STAFFS WORK TO PRODUCE AWARD-WINNING PUBLICATIONS.

>>

be PREPARED

YEARBOOK

with sophomore Billy Kirkpatrick

“Newspaper kids have to take journalism one before joining staff. There were definitely some times when [the journalism one class] was stressful, and sometimes it was my hardest class. Once I turned in a paper that I thought was really good, and [teacher Dow Tate gave the] rough draft about 40 percent. [It’s tough when] you spend like two hours on something and think its really good and then get an F. At first, I was pretty discouraged when I got that [paper] back, but looking back, it really helped a lot to become a better writer [on Newspaper staff].”

>>

Above: (Left to Right) First row: Amanda Marland, Sam Bolanovich, Kristin Barker, Emma Collins, Alexandria Norton, Andrea Tudhope, Rachel English, Emilie Block. Second row: Hannah Walter, Emily Brandmeyer, Kit Andreson, Andie Mitchell, Leah Pickett, Maureen Orth, Alysabeth Albano, Elizabeth McCormick, John Francis. Third row: Andrea Zecy, Alissa Pollack, Chandra Swanson, Sydney Henley, Anna Petrow, Nicole Luby, Lauren Bleakley, Emily Collins, Katie East, Mallory Stevenson, Lucy Faerber. Fourth row: Peter Bautz, Maggie Simmons, Caroline Miller, Gaby Thompson, Whitaker Sherk, Ellen Frizzell, Meghan Benson, Jordan Dietrich, Advisor Dow Tate.

Caroline Miller 11 “One time when some of the guys were trying to create an ad for the soccer scarves, they set up a backdrop and ended up

262 MAY


SPREADING CHEER

SHARE AND PEP CLUB WORK TO MAKE DIFFERENCES IN THE SCHOOL AND THE COMMUNITY. SHARE CHAIRS

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Young Hou, Clair Finke, Emily Halter, Lauren Dodd, Annie Sgroi, Prarthana Dalal, Phoebe Unterman, Megan McGillicuddy, Stacy Coffyn, Jessie Sykes, Hannah Satterlee, Becca Clay, Margaret Brill, Caitlin Morley, Sarah Pavlu, Alyssa Johnson, Hanna Cosgrove, Rachel English, Amanda Privitera, Jennifer Latshaw, Emma Fritts, Hannah Mallen, Kate Sachse. Second row: Sally Schoenfeld, Elizabeth McDonald, Ariana Sherk, Lauren Bleakley, Maddy Bailey, Caroline Sheridan, Alyx Delgado, Mary Galvin, Olivia Botts, Carly Haflich, Emily Brandmeyer, Lindsey Goins, Kelly Greenfield, Grace Martin, Megan Klugman, Alexi Brown, Hannah Fink, Maureen Orth, Lauren Bowles, Mallory Kirby, Paige Kuklenski, Mallory Stevenson. Third row: Caitlin Benson, Cari Chestnut, Catherine Barrera, Maddy Rich, Erika Davee, Tucker Nelson, Stewart Jensen, Hannah Gerwick, Meg Shackelford, Chelsea Olson, Stephanie Tharp, Ellen Frizzell, Kate Schafer, Allie Fields, Sydney Henley, Jessica Jacobs, Megan Sullivan, Alison Stephens, Daivd DeGoler. Fourth row: Xuan Qin, Emma Collins, Kate Collison, Samantha Benson, Haley Dalgleish, Hannah Lang, Tina Poindexter, Kristin Barker, Sam Bolanovich, Anna Leek, Janna Graf, Ben Macnamera, Amanda Marland, Jessica Hammond, Joe Lynch, Clark Waldon, Laura Darling, Sara Schenkelberg, Lindsey Sauls, Taylor Twibell, Abba Goehausen, Amilia Winter, Bryan Parman, Hannah Copeland, Annie Bennett.

PEP EXECS

>>

>>

Right: (Left to right) First row: Kyle Sitomer. Second row: Abby Weltner, Lucy O’Connor, Jenny Howard, Cara Heneger, Amy Esselman..

Left: (Left to right) First row: Emily Mullett, Lyndsey Seck, Gina LeGrotte, Amy Esselman, Hanna Cosgrove, Emma Collins, Maddy Rich, Hannah Satterlee. Second row: Kristen Shedor, Erin Reynolds, Young Hou, Allie Marquis, Jessica Jacob, Christina Davis, Jessica Hammond, Janna Graf, Ben Jensen, Stewart Jensen. Third row: Nick Paris, Jade Delgado, Hallie Beck, Katie Darling, Mackenzie Wylie, Hayley Bublitz, Kelly Sabates, Michael Stolle, Jacob Johnson, Tyler McKelvey. Fourth row: Bailey Spickler, Tori Holt, Kiki Sykes, Lilly Myers, Laura Darling, Andrew Sweeney, CC Creidenberg, Cam Smith, Brian Simpson, Kevin Simpson.

taking off their shirts and doing all these poses. [PICTURES] like that usually stay up in the journalism room, so it’s funny to see them every day.”

CLUBS 263


>>

MOCK TRIAL

Below: (Left to right) First row: Emily Halter, Clair Finke, Emma Sullivan. Second row: Sarah Sears, Olivia Sullivan, David Towster, Steven Shen.

YIG

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Tara Raghuveer, Emily Halter, Dana Leib. Second row: Victoria Vaca, Nick Carothers, Lindsey Goins, Elizabeth McGranahan, Olivia Sullivan. Third row: Matt Lavoie, Jesse Sharp, Tommy Gray, Jeff Lefko, Chris Carey.

LINK CREW

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Grace Gillaspie, Tara Raghuveer, Emily Halter, Mallory Kirby, Clair Finke, Holly Lafferty, Tara Mason, Sally Schoenfeld, Amy Esselman, Jennifer Latshaw, Amanda Privitera, Sarah Pavlu, Kat Jaeger, Olivia Sieck, Jamie Rees. Second row: Joe Deng, David Towster, Rachel D’Autremont, Evie Marshall, Jessie Sykes, Alyx Delgado, Ryan Olander, Cam Smith, Mary Galvin, Margaret Brill, Olivia Botts, Becca Clay, Tina Poindexter, Whitaker Sherk, Kiley Lawrence, John Francis. Third row: Steven Shen, Kelly Sabates, Caitlin Benson, Allie Fields, Sydney Henley, Hannah Lang, Hannah Fink, Regan Jamieson, Jacob Johnson, Logan Heley, Anthony McGregor, Ellen Frizzell, Jessica Jacob, Emily Bittiker, Gaby Thompson, Emma Fritts, Sarah Are, Adele Daniel, Elizabeth Piper, Zack Busey. Fourth row: Jack Walker, Drake Myers, Andrew Sweeney, Christina Davis, Paul Wolff, Peter Chow, Chad Zeller, Harper Coulson, Jack Mehoff, Kevin Simpson, Sam Logan, Clay Finley, Alison Stephens, Amilia Winter, Janna Graf, Hannah Copeland, Melissa McGregor, Ben Jensen, Ian Boat, Logan Gage, Michael Calvert, David Beeder, Parker Heying.

LEADERS OF THE PACK STUDENTS MAKE REAL WORLD DECISIONS IN THE YOUTH IN GOVERNMENT AND MOCK TRIAL CLUBS WHILE LINK CREW AIDS FRESHMEN TO TRANSITION INTO HIGH SCHOOL.

Taylor Harris 12 “A lot of time, [PHILOSOPHY] discussions will come back to politics. Politics are really based around philosophy, so it’s almost impossible

264 MAY


>>

Junior Brice Roberts discusses solipsism with the rest of the philosophy club in room 518. “We start with a broad topic that’s usually brought up by one of the co-presidents, and then we basically have a conversation about it,” Roberts said. “Sometimes we talk about things that are really, really specific, but sometimes we’ll stay broad and go into philosophical subjects just like solipsism.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

A WAY OF LIFE

PHILOSOPHY AND GRAPHIC NOVEL CLUB MEMBERS EXPLORE WORK OF THEIR FAVORITE ARTISTS DURING WEEKLY MEETINGS.

Below: (Left to right) First row: Elizabeth Locke, Jaeda Christensen, Laila Radwan, Megan Mack. Second row: Skyy Ross, Angelica White, Melissa Gregg, Andrea Wickstrom. Third row: Max Chao, Cory Jennett, David Dechant, Blake Firner.

>>

SAY WHAT?

GRAPHIC NOVEL

PHILOSOPHY >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Michelle Braslavsky, Evan Myers, Joe Deng. Second row: Taylor Harris, Natalie Hine, Tara Raghuveer. Third row: Andrea Brown, Brice Roberts, John Troup, Sarah Sears.

to separate the two. We usually end up discussing abortion or gay marriage or something along those lines. the dicussions can get pretty intense.”

CLUBS 265


MAKING THEIR MARKS GERMAN CLUB AND INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS CREATE THEIR OWN SHAWNEE MISSION EAST NICHES WITHIN THE CHAOS OF THE SCHOOL DAYS. IB JUNIORS

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Emre Agbas, Alexandra Ellerbeck, Savannah Duby, Edie Cao, Sam Benson, Amelia Murphy. Second row: Jessie Light, Alexandria Norton, Kate Sachse, Libby Jandl, Bernadette Myers, Andrea Webber, Gale Harrington. Third row: Xuan Qin, Heinzen Lo, Young Hou, Kate Collison, Jordan Holsinger, Leah Pickett, Paige C. Anderson, Sally Holmes. Fourth row: Michael Magstadt, Josh Allmayer, Winn Clark, Natalie Hofmeister, Christopher Poplawski, Michael Smythe, Andrea Tudhope.

Above: (Left to right) First row: Anna Webber, Joe Deng, Steven Shen, Tara Raghuveer, Dana Leib, Sarah Evans, Allison Roebuck. Second row: Kati Klehm, David Towster, Jordan Dietrich, Natalie Hine, Adele Daniel, Phoebe Unterman. Third row: Leia Swanson, Alex Dahlgren, Chandra Swanson, Jason Bates, Sam Buchanan, Qi Chen, Peter Chow. Fourth row: Evan Myers, Madeleine Pinne, Bridget Bergin, Jack Walker, Drake Myers, John Troupe, Brice Roberts.

>>

IB SENIORS

>> their favorite GERMAN MUNCHIES

with juniors Qi Chen and Holly Lafferty

“The food [at German meetings] is great. My favorite was kinder, this chocolate that’s like kit-kats. It means children in German. It’s funny because it’s like we’re eating children.””

“I never say anything in German club because I’m afraid I’ll speak English. But I like the German food a lot like pastries and Haribo gummy bears. I love those Haribo gummy bears.”

Qi Chen 11

Holly Lafferty 11

GERMAN CLUB

‘ACCIO’ BIOFUELS!

>>

Above: Dressed in Harry Potter garb, including an ‘Order of the Phoenix’ t-shirt, senior Sam Benson prepares to give her Group 4 presentation. “We connected [our topic] biofuels to the theme of Harry Potter,” Benson said. “Fossil fuels were labeled the Slytherines because they’re evil.” Photo by Rachel English.

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

>> >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Holly Lafferty, Sanne Postma, Edie Cao, Sally Holmes. Second row: Collin Hoefer, Se-Hyun Kang, Michael Smythe, Qi Chen, Andrea Brown, Brice Roberts.

Left: Sitting in Statistics class, junior Natalie Hine copies notes from the board. Hine’s class consisted of many IB students who took the required class in order to earn their IB diplomas. “The course work [in IB] is rigorous, and the homework is time consuming,” Hine said, “but the community is really what makes IB a special program.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.

John troup 12 “Every week in [MS. BRENDA] Fishman’s [IB HISTORY] class we have a party. I leave my karaoke machine at school, so people bring food and plan out

266 MAY


INTERACT

>> group SERVICE with junior Leia Swanson

“Interact is an IB club that helps us get service hours for CAS, a component we have to do to get our IB diplomas. I get to help the community and bond with the other IB kids. We have gone to the OIC Warehouse to help make school supply kits for kids in Iraq. We did it to support Operation Iraqi Children. We also went to El Centro, a day care center, and played with kids. We played duck duck goose.”

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Savannah Duby, Dana Leib, Edie Cao, Joe Deng, Kati Klehm, Samantha Benson, Andrea Webber. Second row: Leia Swanson, Emre Agbas, Alexandra Ellerbeck, Sally Holmes, Andrea Tudhope, Paige C. Anderson, Tara Raghuveer, Kate Collison, Amelia Murphy, Sarah Evans. Third row: Xuan Qin, Chandra Swanson, Alex Dahlgren, Anna Webber, Natalie Hine, Jason Bates, Steven Shen, David Towster, Evan Myers, Kate Sachse. Fourth row: Christopher Poplawski, John Troup, Drake Myers, Sam Buchanan, Jack Walker, Qi Chen, Michael Smythe, Leah Pickett, Gale Harrington, Natalie Hofmeister.

ROBOTICS

CATEGORIES

>>

FINDING NEW WAYS INTERACT, ROBOTICS AND CATEGORIES STUDENTS FIND WAYS TO MAKE NEW STRIDES IN THEIR CLUBS.

CELEBRATING THEIR VICTORY

Above: Grasping the categories trophy, senior Joseph Marx celebrates over winning the league championship. “We always had a bit of a head for trivia,” Marx said. “In the final game, there were probably three questions on Shakespeare and two or three on Roman or Latin related stuff, and those are two of my best ‘knowledge pools.’” Photo by Peter Bautz.

>>

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Heidi Kaiser, Laurel Adams, Emma Schulte, Mr. Brian Gay. Second row: Carter Above: (Left to right) First row: Dana Leib, Adele Daniel, Elizabeth McDonald. Second row: Stolberg, Daniel Gritz, Ariel Muthyala, Tyler Cecil, John Opsahl, Hayden O’Gorman. Third row: Spencer Davis, Daniel Gritz, Peter Bautz, Nick Carothers, Joseph Marx. Third row: Christopher Poplawski, Michael Nikolas Colom, Qi Chen, Kyle Engelken, John Troup, Nathan Klein. Smythe, Brice Roberts, Mr. Nick Paris.

what we want to do that week. Usually they’re on Fridays or Wednesdays, and there’s always a lot of dancing. Techno is definitely our favorite.”

CLUBS 267


>>

DECA

BPA

>>

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Tara Mason, Eileen Gallagher, Laura Brown, Paul Wolff. Second row: Kate Schafer, Hannah Eggleston, Amanda Massey, Kristina Grandon. Above Right: (Left to right) First row: Abby Weltner, Allie Marquis, Taylor Twibell, Kristin Barker, Amanda Marland, Jenny Howard, Abba Goehausen, Paige Kuklinski, Madison Blankenship. Second row: Lyndsey Seck, Anne Berry, Kit Andresen, Lucy O’Connor, Tucker Nelson, Laura Brown, Anna Leek, Brian Simpson, Nick Benge, Bryan Parman. Third row: Stuart Jones, Thomas Puckett, Kyle Sitomer, David DeGoler, Chad Zeller, Mitchell Jennings, Andrew LaPrade, Justin Krivena, Chad Allen.

MARKETING 2

Left: (Left to right) First row: Stuart Jonesi, Allie Marquis, Anne Berry, Hannah Gerwick, Rachel D’Autremont, Mary Kate McCandless, Megan Sullivan, Becca Clay, Rosie Bellinger, Hannah Satterlee, Ellie Kessinger, Abby Weltner, Maygan White, Taylor Twibell, Maddy Bailey, Alyx Delgado, Amanda Marland, Kristin Barker, Chad Allen, Kyle Sitomer, Madison Blankenship. Second row: Kit Andresen, Tucker Nelson, Brandon Burch, Tommy Rappold, Zach Amrein, Maddy Rich, Grace Martin, Mary Galvin, Kylie Wheeler, Allison Kirby, Sarah Hemer, Maggie Townsend, Hannah Lang, Margaret Brill, David DeGoler, Abba Goehausen, Jenny Howard, Mitchell Jennings, Nick Benge. Third row: Laura Brown, Brad Robson, Ryan Olander, Amanda Privitera, Sally Schoenfeld, Caitlin Morley, Mallory Kirby, Lauren Reynolds, Lauren Bleakley, Sam Carpenter, Adam Levin, Jake Gifford, Collin Carter, Jackson Harter, Bryan Parman, Andrew LaPrade Brian Simpson. Fourth row: Lucy O’Connor, Scott Kennedy, Lyndsey Seck, Anna Leek, Tess Duncan, Molly Tidrick, Catie Herst, Alison Stephens, Ali Brewer, Stephanie Hilsabeck, Beck Johnson, Evan Herstowski, Luis Rivera, Chad Zeller, Clay Finley, Thomas Puckett, Justin Krivena.

MAKE THAT MONEY DECA, MARKETING AND BPA STUDENTS WORK TO KEEP JOBS, CREATE PRODUCTS AND COMPETE IN MARKETING COMPETITIONS.

MARKETING 1 >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Hannah Gerwick, Rachel D’Autremont, Mary Kate McCandless, Megan Sullivan, Becca Clay, Rosie Bellinger, Hannah Satterlee, Ellie Kessinger, Maygan White, Maddy Bailey, Alyx Delgado. Second row: Brandon Burch, Tommy Rappold, Zach Amrein, Maddy Rich, Grace Martin, Mary Galvin, Kylie Wheeler, Allison Kirby, Sarah Hemer, Maggie Townsend, Hannah Lang, Margaret Brill. Third row: Ryan Olander, Amanda Privitera, Sally Schoenfeld, Caitlin Morley, Mallory Kirby, Lauren Reynolds, Lauren Bleakley, Sam Carpenter, Adam Levin, Jake Gifford, Collin Carter, Jackson Harter, Bryan Parman. Fourth row: Kyle Sitomer, Scott Kennedy, Tess Duncan, Molly Tidrick, Catie Herst, Alison Stephens, Ali Brewer, Stephanie Hilsabeck, Beck Johnson, Evan Herstowski, Luis Rivera, Chad Zeller, Clay Finley.

ALLISON KIRBY 11 “We always watch THE SHOW THE apprentice on Mondays. IT really shows good marketing strategies and how to sell in the whole world.

268 MAY


FCA, CLUB 121 AND THE JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE MEET TO SHARE COMMON INTERESTS AND ACHIEVE THEIR GROUP GOALS.

CLUB 121

Below: (Left to right) First row: Dr. Athanasia Worley, Heidi Kaiser, Jaeda Christensen, Whitney Kraft, Sally Holmes. Second row: Spencer Brown, Peter Bautz, Bridget Bergin, Elizabeth Piper, Joseph Marx, Caroline Miller.

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LATIN CLUB

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Tori Holt, Morgan Christian, Kelsey Summers, Alexa Schnieders. Second row: Gaby Thompson, Lois Wetzel, Laura Scott, Holland Barling. Third row: Audrey DiCarlo, Emily Bittiker, Megan McGillicuddy, Veronica Kerr, Erika Davee. Fourth row: Meghan Dickinson, Gage Grimes, David Crane, Stephen Cook, Grant Stauffer, Mr. Jason Filbeck.

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ALL TOGETHER NOW

Left: (Left to right) First row: Morgan Christian, Haley Martin, Caroline Dodd, Holland Barling, Lauren Dodd, Brooks Anthony. Second row: Shannon McGinley, Emma Pennington, Emily Frye, Caroline Nick, Meghan Spivak, Regan Jamieson, Laura Darling, Brady Anderson. Third row: Blake Spencer, Grant Morris, Stephen Cook, Hanna Jane Stradinger, Sarah McKittrick, Alison Stephens, Christina Davis, Haley Dalgleish, Aaron Kaufman.

FCA Bill [RANCIC, A CIGAR BUSINESS OWNER] won the first season of THE SHOW, and he was definitely the best at it. He was probably the class favorite.�

CLUBS 269


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Below: (Left to right) First row: Jennifer Latshaw, Jonathan Dawson, Elizabeth McDonald, Kati Klehm, Alexa Schnieders, Sarah Pavlu, Lauren Bowles. Second row: Andrew Sweeney, Annie Sgroi, Dora Kapros, Gillian O’Connell, Gaby Thompson, Sally Holmes, Hannah Fink. Third row: Anna Bernard, Kate Collison, Grace Haun, Andrea Brown, John Troup, Michael Smythe.

FNHS

FRENCH CLUB

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Elizabeth McDonald, Sarah Pavlu, Alexa Schnieders, Gaby Thompson. Second row: Lauren Bowles, Hannah Fink, Sally Holmes, Andrea Brown. Third row: Christopher Poplawski, Kate Sachse, Kate Collison, Michael Smythe.

NAHS

CULTURE SHOCK NAHS, FNHS and French Club STUDENTS delve into cultural and political aspects of the world.

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Emma Collins, Tommy Gray, Carly Haflich, Jennifer Latshaw, Amy Esselman, Emily Mullett, Rachel English. Second row: Regan Jamieson, Leah Pickett, Andrea Tudhope, Gaby Thompson, Patrick Barry, Meghan Benson, Lauren Bowles. Third row: Hannah Copeland, Ellen Frizzell, Clark Waldon, Kelly Sabates, Allie Fields, Mr. Adam Finkelston.

>> making it a HABIT

with sophomore Gillian O’Connell and and junior Alexa Schnieders

“[In French club] you learn to speak French casually instead of in a classroom environment. It helps you learn how people really speak. There were some people who were really, really fluent, so it’s interesting to hear how well they talk and how fast they are.”

Gillian O’Connell 10

“We attempt to speak French and hang out, and people who have been to France before bring pictures to share their experiences. It sparks discussions about cathedrals and sights that people want to see. [The club] helps a lot with pronunciation.”

Alexa Schnieders 11

SAM BUCHANAN 11 “FOR [SPANISH NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY] THIS YEAR, WE WORK WITH A GROUP CALLED POSADA DEL SOL. THE GROUP IS SIMILAR TO THE RONALD MCDONALD

270 MAY


NHS >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Maureen Orth, Alexi Brown, Leah Pickett, Jenee Vickers, Susie Riley, Wraye Sewell, Sarah Pavlu, Alyssa Jonson, Amy Esselman, Carly Haflich, Kelly Greenfield, Emily Brandmeyer, Sam Bolanovich, Andie Mitchell, Cara Heneger, Samantha Benson, Elizabeth McDonald, Cari Chestnut, Ariel Litwer, Laura Robertson, Jennifer Latshaw, Michelle Braslavsky, Cameron Young. Second row: Maddy Rich, Libby Jandl, Xuan Qin, Olivia Sieck, Kelsey Carothers, Andrea Tudhope, Andrea Webber, Sally Holmes, Young Hou, Edie Cao, Paige C. Anderson, Gale Harrington, Alexandria Norton, Tucker Nelson, Tommy Gray, Annie McBee, Lyndsey Seck, Ellen Frizzell, Lauren Gruenebaum, Taylor Harris, Kristin Barker, Megan Alley, Paige Kuklenski. Third row: Kristen Reynolds, Jenny Howard, Christina Davis, Logan Kline, Alicia Fisher, Laura Allen, Andrea Brown, Grace Haun, Kate Sachse, Bernadette Myers, Hannah Eggleston, Lynza Halberstadt, Daniel Cox, Jessie Light, Kate Collison, Maeve O’Connor, David Riott, Mike Sullivan, Jordan Holsinger. Fourth row: Laura Darling, Andrew Sweeney, Josh Allmayer, Owen Gray, Matthew Snively, Landon McDonald, Daniel Sweeney, Logan Gage, Winn Clark, John Hart, Brian Simpson, Mitchell Jennings, Stephen Nichols, John Kurtz, Jacob Hamilton, Natalie Hofmeister, Scott Humphrey, Austin Stehl, Kyle Sitomer, Joe Lynch, Ryan Fager.

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Far left: (Left to right) First row: Maureen Orth, Alexi Brown, Owen Gray, Paige C. Anderson. Middle left: (Left to right) First row: Michelle Braslavsky, Tara Raghuveer, Lynza Halberstadt. Second row: Tommy Gray, Taylor Harris, Jordan Holsinger, Leah Pickett.

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NHS OFFICERS

SNHS OFFICERS

ALL HONORS

NAHS OFFICERS

Left: (Left to right) First row: Patrick Barry, Meghan Benson, Lauren Bowles.

SNHS, NHS and NAHS officers help to lead theIR clubs throughout the school year.

SNHS

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Chandra Swanson, Tara Raghuveer, Clair Finke, Joe Deng, Susie Riley, Wraye Sewell, Alyssa Jonson, Samantha Benson, Dana Leib, Bernadette Myers. Second row: Lauren Dodd, Leia Swanson, Young Hou, Laura Scott, Emma Fritts, Michelle Braslavsky, Anna Petrow, Caitlin Benson, Alexandria Norton, Leah Pickett, Gale Harrington, Paige C. Anderson. Third row: Veronica Kerr, Catie Herst, Kristen Reynolds, Maddy Rich, Libby Jandl, Haley Dalgleish, Jordan Holsinger, Taylor Harris, Laura Allen, Lynza Halberstadt, Charlie Bernard, Will Snyder, Maria Juarez. Fourth row: Andrea Tudhope, Leah Chesbrough, Annie Bennett, Lyndsey Seck, Jane Mahoney, Sam Bolanovich, Tommy Gray, Grace Martin, Clark Waldon, Kelly Greenfield, Sam Buchanan, Natalie Hofmeister, Jack Walker, Drake Myers.

HOUSE, BUT THE KIDS SPEAK SPANISH. WE ALSO DID A LOT OF GROUP BONDING THIS YEAR WHERE WE WENT TO PEOPLES’ HOUSES AND WATCHED SPANISH MOVIES.”

CLUBS 271


COALITION

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Hiba Akhtar, Casey Hynes, Kate Kulaga, Nathalie Solger, Courtney Schenkelberg, Toni Aguiar, Jennifer Latshaw, Jessie Sykes, Sarah Are, Jessie Light, Anna Petrow, Samantha Pugh, Emily Mullett, Lauren Bowles, Dana Leib. Second row: Grant Morris, Tommy Gray, Lilly Myers, Holly Lafferty, Paul Wolff, Sarah King, Isabelle Ciaramitaro, Abbie Symes, Kiki Sykes, Ashton Adams, Amanda Privitera, Lindsey Sauls, Meghan Benson, Kaitlin Woodson, Emily Kerr, Carolyn Welter. Third row: Emily Kulaga, Tess Duncan, Kat Jaeger, Xuan Qin, Natalie Patton, Becca Brownlee, Emily Collins, Kate Schafer, Hannah Eggleston, Logan Heley, Andrew Goble, Ellen Frizzell, Jason Bates, Ben Jensen, Emily Bates. Fourth row: Tyler Germann, Andrea Brown, Caroline Barnett, Elena Hardy, Kelly Sabates, Rebecca Callstrom, Aaron Kaufman, Christina Davis, Steve Mazzoni, David Beeder, Joey Sernett, Nathan Are, Chris Hasselwander, Ryan Middleton, Julia Davis.

DANCE CLUB

>> earning their CREDIT with juniors Caitlin Benson and Olivia Botts

“I went three times to get extra credit for Spanish. It was fun because Senora [Rosa] Detrixhe was really energetic and fun; she danced and sang a lot with us. Occasionally [I] would step on someone’s foot and everyone would make a big deal of it, but we were just being silly.”

Caitlin Benson 11 “The one time I went, I got extra credit for Spanish. [Senior] Michelle Braslavsky was teaching us lots of really cool dances. [Junior] Alyx Delgado and I did the salsa; the steps were difficult but once we got the hang of it, it was fine.”

Olivia Botts 11

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Emily Halter, Tara Raghuveer, Clair Finke, Olivia Botts, Becca Clay. Second row: Michelle Braslavsky, Gaby Thompson, Caitlin Benson, Michael Calvert, Hannah Copeland. Third row: Sydney Henley, Ian Boat, Janna Graf, Ben Jensen.

STAND STRONG

COALITION CLUB WORKS TO RAISE MONEY FOR VARIOUS CHARITIES WHILE DANCE CLUB EXPLORES THE JOY OF DANCE.

NATHALIE SOLGER 9 “[FOR COALITION] WE USUALLY WATCH A FILM AT THE BEGINNING OF EVERY MEETING, WHEN WE WATCHED THE FILM ABOUT THE LOVE 146

272 MAY


NEW OUTLOOK

SWING CLUB MEMBERS IMPRESS CLASSMATES WITH ORIGINAL MOVES WHILE INTERNATIONAL CLUB FINDS NEW WAYS TO EXPLORE THE GLOBE.

INTERNATIONAL CLUB

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Thanaphat Srisuwat, Holly Lafferty, Paul Wolff, Steven Shen, Emma Sullivan, Gaby Thompson, Hannah Fink, Evan Myers. Second row: Kelsey McGonigle, David Towster, Joe Deng, Shelbi Wade, Mariel Eikhovd, Emily Bittiker, Adeeqa Nazir, Sanne Postma, Ian Boat. Third row: Adam Isenberg, Maik Iakish, Michelle Braslavsky, Andrea Brown, Alex Rorie, Se-Hyun Kang, Dale Smith, Janna Graf, Amilia Winter, Ben Jensen.

SWING CLUB

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Kristen Shedor, Patrick Barry, Savannah Duby, Melanie Leng, Joseph Marx, Emma Schulte. Second row: Cameron Robles, Andrea Wickstrom, Chenshan Zhou, Laura Allen, Virginia Roche, Delaney Herman, Nathan Klein. Third row: Nikolas Colom, Joseph Kashka, David Dechant, Susie McClanahan, Emmett Starkey, Kyle Engelken.

A FLYING ACT

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Left: While performing at a winter pep assembly, sophomore Emma Schulte swings through the air with her partner. Both practiced the move leading up to the assembly. “I learned how to swing dance through the club after I saw the members perform last year,” Schulte said. “A lot of the steps have to be learned through experience.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.

ORGANIZATION, WE WATCHED THE FOUNDER OF THE GROUP TALK ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES OF GOING INTO BROTHELS AND UNCOVERING WHAT WAS BASICALLY SEX SLAVERY.”

CLUBS 273


>>

CONCERT CHOIR

Left: (Left to right) First row: Andrea Velez, Chelsea Clark, Meara Smith, Taylor Crane, Emily Lindeman, Anna Moritz, Jeanene Lawrence, Kristen Shedor, Devery North, Mallory Harrington, Elizabeth Mergen, Camille Breckenridge. Second row: Maggie Thomas, Kiki Sykes, Abby Moore, Christiana Reene, Tori Holt, Morgan Satterlee, Emily Tuttle, Kylie Guess, Maddie Sullivan, Kaitlyn Pattison, Heather Hartong, Jill Saxton, Shannon Tuttle, Elli Walker. Third row: Lauren Adams, Meghan Spivak, Ellie Jones, Sarah Johnston, Katie Keohan, Grayson McGuire, Michael Hill, Kyle Braddock, Kurtis Blunt, Kurt Jensen, Katie Crawford, Lanie Leek, Madeleine Wolford, Camille Goehausen, Natalie Pierce, Molly Howland, Molly Jennings. Fourth row: Kerstin Amandola, Kelly Gillespie, Jenna Davis, Abbie Davis, Noah Bertholf, Luke Morgan, Brooks Tate, Nelson Costello, Chris Carey, Oliver Johnson, Gage Cameron, Adam Jones, Jennifer Horan, Sophia Hitchcock, Mary Longan, Gillian Long, Kellyn Harrison, Amy Bonds.

MEN’S CHOIR

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Tanner Williams, Andrew Dexter, John Aldrich, Jacob Rudolph, Thomas Loudon, Zach Colby, John Francis, Cooper Toombs. Second row: Miles Sanderson, Matt Creidenberg, John Kurtz, Noah Quillac, Jeremy Steiner, Peter Young, Chris Melvin, Jack Dee, John Meyer, David Frizzell, Alex West. Third row: Josh Barlow, Patrick Mayfield, Will Carey, Jack Brugger, Collin Myers, Preston Norman, Jonathan Zeiger, Ross Wooten, Ryan Dinyer, Perry Rieke, Vince Parsons, Timothy Madison. Fourth row: John Dollar, Brady Anderson, Andrew Sweeney, Micah Patterson, Alex Rorie, David Frizzell, Josh Kinney, Grant Stauffer, Graham Stevenson, Russ Helder, Braden Edwards, Riley Hoffman.

LEADING WITH GUSTO

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Right: During a chambers practice, teacher Ken Foley directs the singers to keep them together. “With the top [chambers] singers, they learn quicker, better and have to be more dedicated than an average choir student.” Foley said. “The commitment has to be greater.” Photo by Emily Brandmeyer.

PASSION AND BONDS

>>

Far right: During a women’s choir practice, sophomore Shelbi Wade sings from the ‘Swing Choir Series’ book. “Everyone is pretty passionate about singing [in our women’s choir],” Wade said. “We mostly have a pretty good choir, and I’ve bonded with a lot of the other members.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

Lydia Shackelford 10 “I think the music Mr. Foley has picked shows what kind of music he’s into. He’s done a really great job at unifying us.

274 MAY


>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Amanda Hodges, Emy Blake, Samantha Benson, Deseree Bruce, Kat Jaeger, Evie Marshall, Whitney Kraft, Tina Poindexter, Kelsey Carothers, Paige E. Anderson, Amanda Sams, Kiley Lawrence, Ashley Guerricagoitia, Hanna Cosgrove, Stacy Coffyn, Megan McGillicuddy, Carly Haflich, Lindsey Goins, Ariel Litwer. Second row: Sarah Sears, Keelia Corcoran, Jewel Roussos, Heather Glaze, Tori Wrede, Holly Glynn, Chelsea Hall, Cari Chestnut, Maureen Orth, Ali Fisher, Alexi Brown, Laura Darling, Taylor Renft, Laura Robertson, Laura Kaufman, Anna Seitz, Johanna Cook, Lauren Raibble, Jenny Howard, Abba Goehausen, Desi Hipps, Samantha Pugh, Callie McGuire. Third row: Mallory Stevenson, Sarah Are, Ally McCarthy, Kate Collison, Alexa Fessler, Kaitlin Woodson, Anne Haines, Stephanie Chadd, Sydney Henley, Katie Bartow, Jacqueline Crain, Marielle Eikhovd, Kaley Herman, Legna Cedillo, Paige Cannady, Mary Tanner, Annie Bennett, Lois Wetzel, Johanna Hild, Jane Mahoney, Paige C. Anderson, Jessica Hammond, Ellen Frizzell, Erin Tuttle, Heidi Skrukrud. Fourth row: Ashton Adams, Christina Beynon, Blake Firner, Rocky Hill, Jonathan Stepp, Cooper Toombs, Beck Johnson, Chad Allen, Scott Humphrey, Alex West, Ross Wooten, John Meyer, Collin Myers, Jack Dee, Stewart Jensen, Brian Aitken, Miles Sanderson, David Hobart, Jake Parelman, Jacob Rudolph, Cody Rutledge, John Aldrich, Gretchen Hummel, Kristina Grandon. Fifth row: Ryan Dinyer, Josh Kinney, Mason McGinley, John Troup, Kaevan Tavakolinia, Reed Cody, Harper Coulson, Jesse Thomas, David Frizzell, John Hart, Kyle Sitomer, Ben Jensen, Sam Barker, Alex Rorie, Matthew Mueller, Micah Patterson, Jonathan Bernard, Jonathan Moss, Charlie Long, William Carey, Jack Brugger, Colin Hayes, Noah Quillec, Tanner Williams, Andrew Sweeney.

WOMEN’S CHOIR

CHAMBERS >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Legna Cedillo, Sarah Are, Ashton Adams, Katie Bartow, Maureen Orth, Paige E. Anderson, Lois Wetzel, Callie McGuire, Ashley Guerricagoitia, Paige C. Anderson, Jane Mahoney, Samantha Pugh. Second row: Reed Cody, Harper Coulson, Sam Barker, Collin Myers, Johnathan Stepp, Ross Wooten, Chad Allen, Granville Hare, Brian Aitken, Andrew Sweeney, Noah Quillec.

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CHORALIERS

Left: (Left to right) First row: Megan Pavlu, Lizzie Roach, Emily Welter, Taylor Odell, Emma Marston, Meghan Morris, Natalie Bender, Molly Kurtz, Betsy Blessen, Chloe Fishgrund, Caroline Marland, Rachel Gangwere, Mikaela Remer-Phifer. Second row: Olivia Mansfield, Melissa Gregg, Valerie Nutt, Lydia Shackelford, Micheala Mathiesen, Jennifer Gray, Kelsey Chadd, Samantha Pugh, Emma Tyler, Kathryn Richardson, Lakisha Wiedenkeller, Nicole Prenevost, Hayley Bublitz. Third row: Celeste Rinner, Natalie Parker, Dylan Dunn, Lindsey Hartnett, Callie Hennig, Mary Joyce, Julie Chalfant, Meagan Dexter, Lauren Stanley, Elizabeth Dee, Olivia Lynch, Kirstin Chadd, Katie Darling, Kelly Allen. Fourth row: Christina Schocke, Rebecca Callstrom, Kirsten Heath, Grace Boehm, Maggie McGilley, Raina Weinberg, Emily Fuson, Paige Swanson, Haley Fisher, Morgan Holm, Elise Kuklenski, Alicia Reyna, Ashley Adams, Olivia Harlan, Samantha Bartow, Abigail Leek, Emily Collins, CJ Hicks. Not Pictured: Maddie Gaughan, Shelbi Wade, Araceli Villanueva, Haley Stewart.

HIT THE HIGH NOTE

CHOIR CLASSES DELIVER AWARD-WINNING PERFORMANCES AROUND THE NATION.

He’s really explored our range. He’s stretched us to see what we can do. He especially broadened our horizons with pop-type songs.”

CLUBS 275


SYMPHONIC

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Above: (Left to right) First row: Angela Clem, Cari Chestnut, Laura Scott, Allison Roebuck, Emily Mullett, Heather Athon, Chelsea Olson. Second row: John Rowe, Madeleine Bavley, Erica Brandli, Alyssa Johnson, Samantha Rebein, Laura Allen. Third row: Emilia Snively, Matt LaVoie, Lauren Gillespie, Mackenzie Burroff, Jonathan Dawson, Jessie Light, Regan Jamieson, Allie Fields, Oliver DuBois, Jamie Rees. Fourth row: Peter Chao, Emily Goering, Weston Halberstadt, David Smythe, Andrea Brown, Brice Roberts, Rebecca Callstrom, Chris Roland, Nathan Simpson, Matthew Snively. Fifth row: Claire Freeman, Carly Haflich, Hunter Stevenson, Aden Eilts, Greg Tracy, Natalie Hofmeister, Katherine Zimmerman, Spencer Brown, Owen Gray, Joe Deng.

BETWEEN THE LINES

ORCHESTRA MEMBERS PERFECT MUSICAL PIECES FOR REGIONAL AND STATE COMPETITIONS.

>> picking PIECES with junior Weston Halberstadt and senior Jamie Rees

“Orchestra plays really good music. Not very many people come to our concerts, though. Mr. [Jon] Lane picks really diverse music from different cultures, time periods and countries. Most of the time it’s pretty difficult, but it’s fun to work on, especially when we turn it into something special.”

Weston Halberstadt 11

Jamie Rees 12

CHAMBER Above: (Left to right) First row: Shayla Parcels, Heather Nelson, Nick Carothers, Kati Klehm. Second row: Charlie McGraw, Andrew North, Clark Svet, Cory Jennett.

>>

“Mr. [Jon] Lane really challenges us as players and an ensemble. He also likes to take risks with the pieces he chooses for us; he doesn’t choose pieces that he thinks will be just easy for us. He uses pieces that he thinks will make us want to work well. He constantly puts the challenge out there to play better.”

Rebecca Callstrum 10 “Every day in orchestra, Mr. [JON] Lane uses the same jokes over and over again, and they’re not funny! We try to tell him that

276 MAY


>>

SHOWTIME

Left: During a performance, junior Allie Fields plays one of orchestra’s winter pieces on the violin. Although she enjoyed playing with the strings orchestra, she preferred playing her harp with the full orchestra. “The only time I get nervous is when I play harp because that’s individual,” Fields said. “Violin is in a group, though, so I don’t really get nervous.” Photo by Andrea Zecy.

CONCERT

>>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Patrick Riggin, Jean Orr, Kennedy Burgess, Wendy Monarres, Mallory Fisher, Jake Tretbar, Evan Westhoff. Second row: Kate Kulaga, Emma Cousineau, Emily Kulaga, Kristin Anthonis, Bahar Barani, Megan Metz, Jacob Yedo, Katherine House, Maddy Pigeon. Third row: Grant Kendall, Sam Sudekum, Luke Holsinger, Julia Davis, Ian Wiseman, Kevin Ash, Kelly Kuhn.

he needs new jokes, but he thinks he’s funny. THEY’RE PRETTY UNEXPECTED. we’ll be in the middle of a piece, and he’ll sometimes stop us and just make a joke.”

CLUBS 277


>>

Below: (Left to right) First row: Aveek Dhar, Tyler Germann, Jacob Lybarger, Nick White, Bailey Borgmeier, Ramiro Florex. Second row: Kellyn Harrison, Andrew Long, Alex Keller, Ryan Sullivan, Nora Kanally, Isabelle Huyett, ReeAe Jordan, Kristin Anthonis, Heather Glaze, Bailey Spickler. Third row: Alex Crane, Nathan Are, Emily Bates, Trent Richardson, Richard Diaz, Loren Jamieson, Maxwell Welker, Robert Enders, Graham Redelsheimer, Hayden O’Gorman, Collin Enger. Fourth row: William Geddes, Spencer Davis, Sam Rider, Russell Philpott, Christopher Lanza, Rebecca Brownlee, Kristin Shedor, James Rosa, Nathan McCloud, Elena Hardy, Keagan Jacobs. Fifth row: Kim Harrison, Ray DeMarchie, John Horvath, Burke Smith, Ryan Waisner, Ted DuBois, Andrew Fisher, Sean Cedillo, Elizabeth Rodgers, Larson Woolwine, Jacob Williams, Melissa Watzkie.

CONCERT

SYMPHONIC >>

Above: (Left to right) First row: Connor Callahan, Matt Chalk, Laurel Adams, Lucas Throckmorton, Veronica Lang. Second row: Leah Pickett, Micah Melia, Jacey Gorman, Brittany Spickler, Adele Daniel, Michael Calvert, Prarthana Dalal, Daniel Colebank, Daniella Mata, Tyler Cecil, Michelle Braslavsky. Third row: Rebecca Thrasher, Bridget Bergin, Joseph Marx, Jacob Hamilton, Dale Smith, Thomas Yeast, Connor Creighton, Tim Larrabee, Emily Hofmeister, David Riott. Fourth row: Elizabeth McDonald, Grace Junk, Joseph Kashka, Alison Dees, Andrew Yeast, Carl Skrukrud, Chase Ensz, Hannah Vaughn, Emmett Starkey, Spencer Low, Cameron Robles, John Opsahl, Hsiang-Tung Hung, Christopher Lanza, Collin Hoefer. Fifth row: Kim Harrison, Virginia Roach, Andrew Goble, Andrew Lykens, Pat Sixta, Ariel Muthyala, Paul Wolff, Brian Rogers, David Beeder.

Andrew Lykens 12 “Every year at band camp the drumline goes to eat at Don Chilitos, and every underclassmen has to eat ten sopopias. It’s just a tradtion

278 MAY


BANDED TOGETHER

BAND MEMBERS SPEND HOURS PERFECTING THEIR PERFORMANCES FOR GAME DAYS. PUTTING YOUR RIGHT FOOT FORWARD

>>

Marching in front of the school, sophomore Emily Hofmeister plays the sax at one of the school’s home football games. While performing on the field at half time, all band members focused on staying in correct line formation. “Sometimes it’s kind of confusing because you have to stay on the right foot at the right time,” Hofmeister said. “You also have to think about the music and what you’re doing.” Photo by Andie Mitchell.

>>half-time SHOW

with sophomore Graham Redelsheimer and junior Michael Calvert

“It’s fun when we [band members] get to the football games because you get in free, same with basketball games. You usually get nervous at the first game, but after that it’s fine. I like listening to the drumline. It’s also neat when the cheerleaders dance along with us. We practice the music during the summer and work on getting the formations for marching band. It takes lots of practice.

“My favorite thing [about band] is the people you get to hang out with [during games]. You get to know your section really well so when you perform at games it’s like you’re sitting with friends. [Performing at games] is probably one of the best things I get to do, but I never really get nervous before a big performance. You’re playing with a lot of people, so it’s easier to play just like you’ve practiced.”

Graham Redelsheimer 10

Michael Calvert 11

that some seniors started a couple years back and has been passed down. I had to do it, and [seniors] made the juniors and sophomores do it this year.”

CLUBS 279


INDEX A Abreu, Alexxus 196 Adams, Ashley 158, 237, 275 Adams, Ashton 176, 272, 275 Adams, Claudia 158 Adams, Laurel 158, 267 Adams, Lauren 140, 232, 241 Adams, Shayna 140 Adams, Stephen 158 Agbas, Emre 70, 71, 75, 196, 255, 259, 266, 267 Agee, Lindsey 176 Aguiar, Toni 4, 14, 23, 140, 234, 253, 272 Ahern, Timmy 106, 249 Ahern, Timothy 158 Aitken, Brian 14, 176, 234, 275 Akhtar, Hiba 140, 272, 474 Albano, Alysabeth 14, 158, 234, 262, 280, 467 Aldrich, John 159, 274 Aliber, Julian 159 Aliber, Julie 25, 233 Allen, Andy 2, 81, 90, 196, 262, 282, 433, 465, 469, 474, 489 Allen, Caitlin 176 Allen, Chad 48, 70, 208, 251, 255, 268, 275, 283, 422 Allen, Charles 196, 255 Allen, Kelly 159, 275 Allen, Laura , 81, 135, 196, 271, 273, 276, 282, 283, 356, 369, 425, 429, 431, 439 Allen, Maggie 43, 140 Alley, Megan 50, 51, 197, 236, 271, 284, 411 Allmayer, Josh 197, 229, 266, 271 Amandola, Kerstin 140, 256 Amrein, Sam 52, 159, 239, 246 Amrein, Zach 109, 248, 268 Amrein, Zachary 176 Anderson, Brady 83, 97, 197, 248, 254, 269, 274, 284, 288, 289 Anderson, Chloe 42, 159 Anderson, Betsy 251 Anderson, Evan 197, 280, 284 Anderson, Hannah 197, 285 468 INDEX

Anderson, Jill 159, 244 Anderson, Joel 141, 230, 251, 253 Anderson, Kristin 224 Anderson, Paige 117, 289, 302 Anderson, Paige C. 286, 287 Anderson, Paige e. 80 Anderson, Paige E 197 Anderson, Paige E. 275, 287 Andresen, Kit 12, 85, 106, 113, 113, 113, 112, 112, 135, 132, 197, 203, 242, 254, 259, 262, 268, 386, 288, 467 Andresen, Spencer 50, 141, 234, 251 Anthonis, Kristin 141, 251, 277 Anthony, Brooks 120, 121, 177, 231, 246, 255, 269 Anzawi, Nora 159 Anzawi, Rhonda 141 Appier, Steve 47, 224 Aquinas, Thomas 246, 251 Archer, Terry 224 Are, Nathan 2, 10, 11, 22, 141, 253, 272 Are, Sarah , 22, 177, 264, 272, 275 Argeropoulos, Britini 256 Arndt-Helgesen, Vicki 224 Arnold, Andrew 177, 234 Arnold, Blake 177 Arnold, Corey 197 Arnold, Rachel 159 Arri, Andrew 159 Arruda, Melina 141 Arts, Martial 70 Ash, Kevin 141, 234, 277 Ashley, Ryan 197 Ash, Ryan 159, 234, 253 Atchison, Emily 197, 235, 288, 356, 423 Atha, Amber 159, 253 Athon, Heather 177, 234, 253, 276 Auer, Drew 33, 61, 159, 247 Austin, Keelin 177, 190 Avalos, Marlio 159 Avalos, Nora 197

B Backs, Stefania 141

Bailey, Maddy 234, 262, 263, 268, 465 Bailey, Madison 177 Baker, Julie 224 Baker, Lauren 141 Baldwin, Alec 64 Baldwin, David 197 Ballard, Dustin 177, 238, 458 Bamford, Samantha 159, 243 Bands, Big 79 Barahana, Joe 128 Barahona, Joe 177, 231 Barajas, Valery 177 Barani, Bahar 141, 240, 277 Barker, Kristin 196, 289, 41, 48, 65, 86, 119, 197, 230, 236, 246, 263, 268, 271, 289, 290, 386, 467 Barker, Sam 197, 275, 290, 291, 292, 293, 411 Barling, Holland 177, 269 Barlow, Josh 44, 112, 197, 234, 274, 290, 292 Barnds, Corbin 141, 251 Barnes, Brook 159, 234 Barnes, Nicholas 197 Barnes, Trenton 52, 141, 234 Barnett, Caroline 159, 272 Barnhill, Spencer 177, 238 Barrera, Alex 141, 234 Barrera, Catherine 119, 197, 240, 263, 433 Barrera, Kelsey 177 Barres, Trenton 234 Barrow, Bryan 177, 238, 240, 458 Barry, Patrick 125, 177, 186, 270, 271, 273 Bartholomew, Alec 230, 253 Bartow, Katie 34, 41, 43, 90, 197, 236, 275, 290, 291, 293 Bartow, Samantha 41, 159, 160, 237, 251, 275 Bates, David 248 Bates, Emily 4, 141, 234, 272 Bates, Jason 120, 121, 177, 246, 255, 266, 267, 272 Batson, David 197 Bauer, Mary 198, 451 Bautz, Peter 2, 32, 34, 37, 81, 159, 224, 226, 256, 257, 262, 267, 269, 467, 489 Bavley, Madeleine 159, 276 Beachy, Laura 224 Beaham, Tricia 15 Beahm, Alex 230, 250 Beahm, Alexander 141 Beal, Joey 433 Beasley, Andrew 141 Beasley, Nicole 159 Beasley, Nikki 127, 139, 241 Beck, Elizabeth 19, 198, 199, 235, 252 Becker, David 109 Becker, Dylan 159, 242, 248 Becker, Joseph 159 Beck, Hallie 141, 229, 244, 251, 263 Beck, Matt 251, 255 Bedingfield, Natasha 398


ND

Berry, Samuel 159 Bertholf, Noah 141, 230, 248 Bever, Kathryne 159 Bever, Philip 141, 234, 253 Beynon, Christina 39, 198, 258, 261, 295, 302 Bickers, Robert 17, 224 Biggerstaff, Kyle 141 Biles, Maddy 257 Biles, Madeleine 141 Bird, Timmy 177 Birkel, Jonas 141, 229, 239 Birkel, Marlena 177 Birkenmeier, Cate 237, 240 Birkenmeier, Catherine 159 Birkenmeier, Rachel 198, 262, 296, 302, 465 Bittiker, Emily 41, 48, 178, 234, 255, 264, 269,

Blunt, Jonathan 141 Boat, Ian 136, 137, 178, 247, 255, 264, 272, 273 Boehm, Grace 36, 160, 260, 275 Bojorquez, Miguel 141 Bolanovich, Sam 1, 30, 57, 124, 125, 198, 252, 253, 262, 263, 271, 298, 467 Bonds, Amy 141 Bonjour, Jeannette 224, 227 Booton, Jack 198, 239, 300, 301 Borchers, August 178 Borgmier, Bailey 160, 237, 251 Born, Steven 198, 302 Botts, Olivia 178, 234, 255, 263, 264, 272 Bowles, Lauren 6, 198, 199, 263, 270, 271, 272, 299

P LASTIC, AND SENT ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT RECYCLABLE IN KANSAS CITY TO HER GRANDPARENTS IN ST. LOUIS.

SEX ON FIRE

“Kings of Leon weren’t well known before, but are now since that song. Their sound is unique, not generic. They’re hard to understand, but they’re still awesome.”

JUST DANCE

“I like it because it makes me feel happy because of the beat. The first time I heard it was when my boyfriend and I were driving back from lunch in my car singing.”

Cole Turner 10

YOU DON’T KNOW ME

“It’s a song by Ben Folds with Regina Spektor. It has a fun beat and lifts up my mood. It’s a chill, easy-listening and fun song. I’ll never get tired of it.”

Claire Fallone 12

I’M ON A BOAT

“It’s a really funny song that was on [Saturday Night Live]. It’s a parody of rap songs and is sung by some SNL guys and T-Pain. I always laugh so hard because it’s so random and entertaining.”

Emma Marston 10

JAI HO

“It’s a really catchy song. It’s from Slumdog Millionaire, and I really liked that movie. It really captures the theme from the movie. I like that it’s in multiple languages, and it’s very uplifting.”

Sam Rider 9

Students describe the songs from this past school year that have been at the

TOP OF THEIR

CHARTS

Catie Herst 11 BIRTHDAY BUDDIES

>>

Left: At an elementary school, senior Charlie Ludington converses with students. Seniors Anna Leek and Meg Shackelford lead this project, going to area elementary schools and celebrating students’ birthdays. “We ate lunch with them, gave them a free book, and talked with them,” Ludington said. “It was fun talking to them, and they danced for us once.” Photo by Andy Allen.

WORK IT OUT >>

Right: Before a swim practice, Varsity swimmer freshman Lilli Stalder uses a medicine ball for step-ups. Every day, the team warmed up by jogging, running stairs, and doing ab workouts. “My favorite warm-up is probably the ab workouts,” Stalder said. “You can skip some of the workouts, and they’re not as hard as other exercises.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

JU

N IOR KATI KLEHM’S FAMILY RECYCLED CANS, BOTTLES , A

Beeder, David , 78, 95, 177, 234, 255, 261, 264, 272 Belko, Charlie 141, 230, 253 Belko, Kathleen 177 Bellinger, Rosie 268 Bell, Peggy 16, 224 Belmont, Jean 311 Belzer, Jacob 141 Belzer, Jake 15, 234, 253 Bender, Natalie 159, 175, 275 Benge, Nick 128, 198, 227, 268, 294, 489 Bennett, Annie 102, 177, 194, 234, 235, 263, 271, 275 Benson, Caitlin 177, 247, 251, 263, 264, 271, 272 Benson, Meghan 26, 38, 39, 56, 85, 104, 112,

IN 2008, 32.5% OF ALL WASTE WAS RECYCLED IN THE UNITED STATES, A 100% INCREASE DURING THE PAST DECAD E . 125, 127, 129, 131, 135, 294, 227, 258, 262, 265, 270, 271, 272, 294, 457, 467, 470, 474, 479 Benson, Samantha 18, 46, 118, 198, 205, 240, 251, 252, 263, 266, 267, 271, 296, 297 Benton, Melissa 198 Benyon, Christina 94 Bergin, Bridget , 177, 266, 269 Berkbuegler, Seth 250 Bernard, Anna 159, 256, 262, 270, 465 Bernard, Charlie 177, 271 Bernard, Jonathan 177, 234, 275 Berry, Anne ,198, 268, 295, 302, 386, 484 Berry, Sam 239, 253

273 Blackman, Lindy 18, 158, 237, 252 Blake, Emilia 178 Blake, Kaley 141 Blake, William 362, 431, 435 Blankenship, Barbara 198 Blankenship, Madison 218, 268, 297 Bleakley, Lauren 2, 9, 15, 37, 54, 55, 102, 106, 120, 122, 138, 178, 230, 246, 253, 262, 263, 274, 467 Blessen, Betsy 233, 260, 275 Blessen, Elizabeth 159 Block, Emilie 159, 262, 467 Blomeyer, Parker 296

Boyd, Courtney 160 Boyer, Marsha 224 Braddock, Kyle 230, 248 Braden, Sarah 160 Bradford, Steven 178 Bradley, Helen 160 Bradley, Krey 45, 109, 160, 231, 249 Bramley, Debe 22, 224 Brandli, Erica 178, 276 Brandmeyer, Emily 32, 301, 40, 55, 63, 251, 254, 262, 263, 271, 274, 301, 467 Brandt, Carley 38 Brandt, Hiding 38 Braslavsky, Michelle 79, 199, 226, 254, 255, INDEX 469


265, 271, 272, 273, 300 Breckenridge, Camille 34, 41, 141 Brett, Dylan 141, 230, 248, 250 Brett, Jackson 160, 231, 249, 250 Brewer, Alexandria 199 Brewer, Ali 268, 456 Brill, Margaret 91, 176, 178, 182, 237, 263, 264, 268 Brookfield, Margo 251 Brooks, Kylee 160, 240, 244 Brophy, George 160, 231, 243, 253 Brown, Alexi 101, 199, 235, 263, 271, 302, 304 Brown, Andrea 31, 199, 259, 265, 266, 270, 271, 272, 273, 276, 304, 305 Brown, Laura 199, 268, 275, 305, 306 Brownlee, Adam 142

Buchanan, Kat 234 Buchanan, Katherine 142 Buchanan, Sam 178, 266, 267, 270, 271 Buck, Kyle 199, 302 Burch, Brandon 178, 253, 268 Burgess, Aaron 142, 234, 253 Burgess, Kennedy 135, 142, 246, 262, 274, 277, 465 Bur, Griffin 178, 262, 465 Burkhead, Taylor 178, 234, 251 Burkindine, Tim 224 Burns, Brennan 160, 231, 249, 254 Burnside, Grant 122, 137, 247 Burrell, Michael 142 Burroff, Mackenzie 160, 276 Burroughs, Baleigh 178

Callstrom, Rebecca 22, 160, 241, 272, 275, 276, 277 Calvert, Michael 2, 120, 179, 246, 264, 272 Cameron, Gage 129, 230 Cameron, Sean 161, 231, 242, 243 Cameron, William 142 Camp, Anthony 179 Cannady, Paige 119, 196, 200, 240 Cantor, Chip 246, 306, 307 Cantor, Louis 200 Cantril, Matt 243 Cantril, Matthew 142 Cantril, Scott 179, 253 Cao, Edie 246, 256, 257, 266, 267, 271, 274, 308

IT’S IN THE BAG

THE 2009 “STIMULUS PACKAGE,” $787 BILLION WENT TO TAX CUTS, UNEMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION, HEALTHCARE, INFRASTRUCTURE, ENERG

Students share objects that they like to keep in their backpack.

IPOD

“My iPod is in my backpack 24/7. Any chance I get I listen to it: during passing period or when I’m reading in class. It helps me concentrate.”

TIN OF TEA

“I have this empty tin that had tea in it but it’s been in my backpack since the beginning of the year. I kept it because it makes a cool noise when it hits against things.”

Brook Barnes 10

Alexandra Ferlas 11

CELL PHONE

“I keep a cell phone in my bag because I like that it’s always handy to use. During school, I use it to check the time and text my friends.

Molly Jennings 10

STORE BRAND GROCERIES AND CUTTING DOWN ON EATING OUT. HE ALSO CANCELED THE TRADITIONAL FRESHMAN TRIP THIS SUMMER. Brownlee, Becca 148, 272 Brownlee, Rebecca 142 Brown, Natalie 178 Brown, Spencer 34, 67, 75, 160, 259, 269, 276 Bruce, Deseree 138, 199, 433 Brugger, Jack 199, 238, 239, 274, 275 Brunk, Bertil 458 Brunk, Ulla 458 Brunt, Jaquan 160, 253 Brunt, Quan 238, 242, 460 Bryant, Ian 199 Brzozowski, Peter 199, 308, 309, 411 Bublitz, Alex 107, 199, 251, 307, 422 Bublitz, Hayley 160, 240, 263, 275 470 INDEX

Burton, Allison 31, 160, 234, 253 Burton, David 160 Busey, Zach 21, 42, 72, 179, 255, 264 Buskirk, Emma Van 232 Byers, Samuel 142, 248

C Caldwell, Molly 160, 234, 256 Callahan, Connor 179

Cao, Olivia 122, 124 Cao, Yidi 200 Cappello, Brian 41 Capps, Elizabeth 161 Carcopa, Tricia 224 Carey, Chris 111, 142 144, 234, 256, 257, 264 Carey, William 179, 234, 253, 274, 275 Carlson, Ben 106, 179, 246, 251, 489 Carlson, Jordan 179 Carmody, Kristin 71, 225 Carollo, Connor 142, 230, 251 Carothers, Kelsey 200, 271, 275, 308 Carothers, Nick 179, 234, 255, 256, 264, 267, 276


Carpenter, Sam 107, 238, 246, 268 Carpenter, Samuel 179 Carr, John 88 Carro, Camille 262 Carrol, Bishop 233 Carry, Chris 257 Carter, Collin 231, 248, 268 Carter, Michelle 200 Carver, Alex 231, 253, 254 Carver, Alexander 161 Carver, Devin 142 Cates, Kinsey 179, 234, 257 Cauthon, Katelynn 179 Cecil, Tyler 86, 87, 161, 267 Cedillo, Legna 40, 41, 196, 200, 275, 310 Cedillo, Sean 142, 234, 251, 253

GY, AND VARIED RESEARCH . GEOGRA P H >>

Far left: Symbols of The United States and Mexico join together in the south ramp with spatters of color growing each day. Senior Laedan Galicia focused his AP Concentration on the mural with symbols of each country colliding into one large piece. “They are very different symbols but they’re also similar,” Galicia said. “I wanted to show that the cultures really aren’t that different. I’m showing people how to understand each other and my heritage and background, who I really am.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

WARM-UP CONVERSATIONS

>>

Left: At a track practice, junior Beck Johnson laughs with teammates as they stretch. Track members warm-up together, then separate to do specific exercises for different events. “I run hurdles, so we have to do a lot of extra stretching,” Johnson said. “When hurdling, you’re picking your legs up really high and stretching them out, so you have to be really flexible.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

“I keep my price chopper card with me because it’s attached to my keys. I keep it there in case I need to get something at the store.”

Zane Haith 9

TH

PRICE CHOPPER CARD

N D GOVERNMENT TEACHER JOHN NICKELS ADJUSTED T O YA

CULTURAL CONNECTION

E ECONOMIC DOWNTURN BY BUYING

Central, Joe 233 Chadd, Kelsey 161, 244, 246, 274, 275 Chadd, Kirstin 9, 161, 246, 274, 275 Chadd, Stephanie 200, 275, 309 Chaffee, Jennifer 16, 225 Chaffee, Michael 15, 225 Chalfant, Julie 102, 161, 235, 275 Chalk, Matthew 2, 79, 179 Chalk, Mitch 230 Chaney, Elizabeth 142 Chaney, Rachel 179 Chao, Amanda 142, 240, 244, 246, 274 Chao, Max 200, 234, 246, 265, 302 Chao, Olivia 200, 302, 306, 312, 313 Chao, Peter 276

Charles, Emily 179 Chase, Kristine 411 Cheerleaders, Varsity 446 Chen, Qi 75, 86, 87, 179, 259, 261, 266, 267 Chertoff, Will 73, 114, 121, 132, 179, 234, 466 Chesbrough, Leah 14, 115, 179, 234, 253, 271 Chestnut, Cari 127, 241, 263, 271, 276, 310, 311 Chestnut, Carrie 135 Chestnut, Linda 200 Chipman, Sue 8, 121, 225, 274 Choi, Simon 142 Chomicky, Sean 142 Chow, Peter 120, 121, 179, 246, 255, 256, 264, 266 Christensen, Anthony 161 Christensen, Jaeda 161, 255, 265, 269 Christensen, Tony 253 Christian, Morgan 142, 234, 253, 269 Ciaramitaro, Isabelle 142, 258, 272 Citrea, Auntie 352 Clark, Ben 239 Clark, Chelsea 142 Clarke, Chris 179, 231, 253 Clark, Griffin 136, 142 Clark, Kirsten 10, 14, 58, 119, 161, 234, 235, 240 Clark, Nicholas 179 Clark, Tucker 142, 243, 247 Clark, Winn 46, 200, 242, 243, 266, 271, 313 Classic, Louis Soccer 240 Clay, Becca 194, 229, 237, 240, 263, 264, 268, 272 Clay, Rebecca 179 Clem, Angela 161, 164, 276 Clements, Kirby 161, 253 Clements, Zach 179, 253, 480 Cloud, Elizabeth 142 Club, Coalition 22, 229 Club, Dance 226 Club, Dante 116, 117 Club, Environmental 70, 71 Club, Hydrogen Car 87 Club, International 229 Club, Robotics 81, 87 Club, Swing 81 Club, The Coalition 22 Cochran, Briana 161, 232 Cody, Reed 200, 275, 314, 322 Coen, Sam 200, 234, 250 Coen, Samuel 200 Coffin, Trent 200, 314, 315, 411 Coffyn, Stacy 179, 251, 263, 275 Coit, Colin 21, 27, 92, 200, 218, 411 Colbert, Nicholas 479 Colburn, Elizabeth 158, 161, 240 Colby, Zach 29, 161, 239, 242, 274 Colebank, Daniel 161, 239, 249, 254 Cole, Jeff 142, 230, 248

Cole, Rob 132, 239 Collingwood, Alex 38, 128, 129, 201 Collins, Andrew 161 Collins, Emily 33, 31, 36, 42, 57, 69, 84, 92, 111, 115, 137, 161, 262, 272, 275, 466, 489 Collins, Emma 12, 26, 41, 64, 124, 201, 212, 257, 262, 263, 270, 302, 315, 316, 466 Collins, Madelyn 142 Collins, Marianne 201, 317 Collison, Kate 219, 221, 229, 263, 266, 267, 270, 271, 318, 390, 411 Colom, Niko 87 Colom, Nikolas 267, 273 Comstock, John 225 Conley, Aidan 142, 251 Conley, Devin 113, 201, 422, 451 Conner, Alexandra 201 Connor, Alex 241, 245 Conrad, Keegan 179 Conrads, Kim 162, 241 Cook, Johanna 1, 42, 102, 201, 220, 235, 290, 320, 332, 411 Cook, Josh 142, 234, 253 Cook, Sarah 142, 235 Cook, Stephen 142, 253, 269 Cooney, Matt 201, 318, 319, 356 Cooper, Mollie 142, 236, 246, 274 Cooper, Molly 31, 253 Cooper, Sara 143, 258 Copeland, Hannah 180, 194, 246, 255, 258, 263, 264, 270, 272, 274 Corcoran, Keelia 180, 235, 275 Cornwell, Carl 180 Cornwell, Paige 56, 125, 201, 208, 261, 262, 320, 322, 439, 465 Cosgrove, Hanna 101, 201, 263, 321, 476 Costello, Nelson 143 Coulson, Harper 48, 70, 71, 98, 108, 176, 182, 234, 251, 255, 260, 264, 275 Coulter, Kiersty 201, 480 Country, Cross 15 Cousineau, Emma 143, 246, 274, 277 Cox, Alex 72, 180, 248 Cox, Daniel 201, 271, 320, 321 Cox, Katie 106, 162, 235 Craig, Carol 225 Craig, Joe 176, 180, 239, 255, 260, 261 Crain, Jacqueline 490 Crandall, Dylan 180 Crane, Alexander 143 Crane, Cameron 143 Crane, David 161, 180, 269 Crane, Taylor 143 Crawford, Katie 14, 143, 148, 234, 240, 244 Cray, Michael 28, 239, 246, 282, 323, 366 Cray, Thomas 201 Creidenberg, CC 465 Creidenberg, Jan 162 INDEX 471


Creidenberg, Matt 72, 180, 274 Creighton, Connor 114, 115, 180, 253 Crew, Link 21, 148 Crooks, Rebecca 162, 490 Crossroads, The 100 Cunningham, Anna 143 Curfman, Henry 143, 253 Curry, Julie 225 Curtis, Andrew 201

D Dahlgren, Alex 180, 232, 233, 266, 267 Dahlgren, Leyann 143, 233 Dahr, Aveek 239 Dalal, Prarthana 162, 256, 263 Dalgleish, Haley 63, 180, 240, 245, 263, 269, 271, 473 Dalgleish, Logan 143, 243, 253 Dancers, Lancer 95, 224, 235, 422, 445 Danciger, Anna 232, 257 Danciger, Evelyn 143 Daniel, Adele 54, 180, 187, 264, 266, 267 Daniel, Mitch 239, 253 Dankard, Jay 253 Danner, Sydney 25, 201, 233, 324 Dannov, Patricia 143 Darbyshire, Jacob 250 Darling, Curran 1, 44, 45, 76, 201, 230, 231, 243, 253, 324, 325 Darling, Katie 162, 253, 263, 275 Darling, Laura 201, 214, 254, 263, 269, 271, 326, 380 D’Autremont, Rachel 180, 255, 264, 268 Davee, Erika 32, 33, 180, 263, 269 David, Jonathan 421 Davidson, Jake 180, 186, 258 Davila, Celestina 201, 356 Davis, Abigail 25, 143 Davis, Brandon 143, 250 Davis, Christina 201, 245, 263, 264, 269, 271, 272, 325, 326, 433 Davis, Jenna 143 Davis, Jordan 258 Davis, Julia 148, 251, 272, 277 Davis, Rubye 224 Davis, Spencer 143, 267 Dawson, Jonathan , 162, 168, 270, 276 Dayal, Jai 180 Dayal, Vimla 201, 302 Day, Lancer 36, 37 Day, Mole , 46 Dayton, Erik 180 Deay, Megan , 180, 247 472 INDEX

Debey, Rusty 231 Dechant, David 70, 162, 165, 255, 265, 273 Dee, Betsy 234, 240, 244 Dee, Elizabeth 162, 275 Dee, Jack 41, 120, 162, 258, 274, 275 Dees, Ali , 82, 241, 244 Dees, Alison 162 Defeo, Tom 225 DeGoler, Daivd 50, 196, 202, 231, 245, 263, 267, 327 Delara, Rhegg 115, 238, 250, 253 Delgado, Alyx 14, 27, 115, 180, 234, 255, 263, 264, 268, 272 Delgado, Jade 143, 244, 263 Delgado, Johnny 106, 202, 243, 327 Delich, Marjorie 162 Dellett, Caroline 234 Deng, Joe 75, 79, 181, 234, 259, 264, 265, 266, 267, 271, 273, 276 Denton, Morgan 143, 251, 253 Denton, Stephanie 143, 256 Detrixhe, Rosa 225, 226, 272, 458 Dettenwanger, Bobby 88, 231, 250 Dettenwanger, Robert 162 Deubner, Sara 225 Devries, Jacob 162 Dexter, Andrew 253, 274 Dexter, Meagan 36, 42, 127, 162, 234, 241, 259, 260, 275 Dhar, Aveek 162 Diaz, Andres 181 Diaz, Richard 144 Diaz, Richie 129 DiCarlo, Audrey 144, 234, 253, 269 DiCarlo, Paige 144, 234 Dickinson, Eric 202, 433 Dickinson, Meghan 144, 232, 269 Diehl, Katherine 162, 235 Dietrich, Jordan 8, 15, 33, 47, 62, 72, 78, 88, 98, 113, 119, 135, 234, 253, 256, 262, 266, 466 Dinkel, Helen 100, 144, 251 Dinyer, Ryan 202, 274, 275, 299, 302, 483 Djiko, Nik 231 Djiko, Nikolas 162 Dobson, Beverly 144 Dodd, Caroline 8, 144, 245, 246, 269, 274 Dodd, Lauren , 119, 181, 240, 245, 263, 269, 271 Dods, John 144, 239 Doerr, Caroline 162, 234, 235 Doerr, Kirk 181 Dollar, John 181, 274 Dolliver, Mac 101 Dolliver, McNeil 162 Dominguez, Pablo 162 Donahue, Alexa 181, 484 Donnelly, Wyatt 144 Donovan, Benjamin 74, 202, 258, 259, 326,

327, 451 Donovan, Emily 144, 258 Dover, Logan 202, 328 Dowis, Scott 25, 233 Dressman, Alexandrea 144, 240 Drier, Mike 243 Driks, Sarah 144, 246, 251, 274 Drovetta, Laura 232 DuBois, Oliver 162, 251, 253, 276 Dubois, Ted 251 Dubois, Theodore 181 Duby, Savannah 60, 70, 71, 116, 117, 138, 202, 210, 266, 267, 273, 356 Ducrocq, Chloe 144 Dulohery, Brendan 144 Duncan, Tess 234, 237, 268, 272 Duncan, Thomas 55, 202 Dunn, Abby 144, 229, 234, 244, 253 Dunn, Dylan 162, 251, 275 Duvall, Rachel 102, 162, 235

E Earley, Hannah 42, 162, 232 East, Katie 7, 25, 38, 57, 81, 83, 88, 102, 108, 113, 119, 162, 262, 465, 466 East, Olathe 29, 76, 83, 230, 233, 239, 240, 241, 243, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 251, 252, 254 East, Shawnee Mission 17, 54, 60, 70, 109, 121 East, Wichita 16 Ecker, Nick 144, 230, 250 Editors, Yearbook 457 Edmonds, Mark 162 Edwards, Braden 274 Edwards, Jake 144, 239 Edwards, Jamieson 181 Eggleston, Elizabeth 144 Eggleston, Hannah 95, 126, 202, 234, 241, 268, 271, 272, 328 Eggleston, Libby 232 Eikhovd, Mariell 202, 229, 273, 328 Eilenberger, Doni 181 Eilts, Aden 202, 276, 329, 433 Eimer, Jordan 144, 151, 230 Elementary, Highlands 356 Elementary, Tomahawk 460 Ellenberger, Emily 162, 251, 252 Ellerbeck, Alexandra 202, 266, 267, 329, 356 Ellerbeck, Ali 30, 31, 213, 257 Elliott, Frederick 225 Elliott, Jordan 14, 202, 234, 253, 330


F Faerber, Elliot 44 Faerber, Anna 203 Faerber, Elliot 34, 59, 144, 230, 243, 253 Faerber, Lucy 223, 334, 38, 56, 63, 69, 70, 93, 244, 262, 290, 332, 334, 467 Fager, Ryan 203, 257, 271

Fevold, Cole 181, 229, 258 Fields, Alexandra 181 Fields, Allie 95, 103, 235, 263, 264, 270, 276, 277 Fields, Teddy 242, 249 Fields, Theodore 163 Filbeck, Jason 181, 231, 250, 269 Finke, Clair , 180, 182, 247, 256, 263, 264, 271, 272 Finkelston, Adam 125, 270 Fink, Hannah 10, 200, 202, 203, 254, 263, 270, 273 Finkle, Ray 251 Finley, Clay 70, 99, 182, 251, 255, 264, 268 Firner, Blake 203, 265 Fischer, Andrew 145, 253 Fischer, Kristen 50, 163, 236 Fischer, Lauren 163, 236 Fischgrund, Chloe 163

PAYED APPROXIMATELY $40 AT THE PUMP TO FILL THE TANK OF HER 1996 FORD TAURUS; IN APRIL, IT COST HER ABOUT $22. YOUNG MAN...

SURE SUPPORT

Left: At the February 9th counter-protest to anti-gay members of Westboro Baptist Church, senior Patrick Mayfield dresses up as a member of the 1970s disco group The Village People. Hundreds of people from the community, East, and neighboring schools gave their support for love and respect. “It was sweet to see the community come together and go against something so wrong,” Mayfield said. “We thought we’d take something grim and have fun with it.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

>> Right: At a girl’s varsity basketball game,

team members juniors Maddy Rich and Haley Dalgleish cheer on their teammates. “I know when I play and I mess up, [the girls on the bench] always tell me it’s ok and it makes me feel better,” Rich said. “We are all so close.” Photo by Patrick Mayfield.

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL

“I didn’t like it because it definitely didn’t meet my expectations. I expected it to be good, but it was a disaster. It didn’t make any sense. I thought it was literally about the earth standing still, but it turned out to be about some alien guy coming to Earth.”

Mackenzie Haugland 11

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE

“I didn’t like Slumdog Millionare because it just seemed kind of random. I didn’t see what the point of it was, and the characters seemed really stereotypical. I thought the soundtrack was pretty cool, though.”

HE

FAULTY FLICKS

Students share the worst movies they saw this year.

ON

Eymann, Erika 203 Eymann, Rikki 1, 90, 200, 333

>>

B EGINNING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR, JUNIOR KAITLIN WO O D S

Ellis, Grant 139, 162, 231, 253 Ellwood, Eric 202, 330 Enderson, Rachel 144 Enders, Robert 34, 37, 79, 95, 162, 164, 239, 255, 260, 261, 483 Engelhardt, Derek 203, 356, 456 Engelken, Kyle 87, 165, 253, 267, 273 Engelken, Lauren 181 Enger, Collin 163, 238, 251 Englebrick, Lili 225 Engleken, Lauren English, Austin 140, 144, 230, 246, 476 English, Rachel 1, 2, 9, 12, 20, 22, 27, 29, 35, 43, 44, 46, 52, 59, 67, 68, 70, 88, 90, 96, 99, 111, 113, 122, 126, 127, 128, 129, 131, 135, 140, 148, 199, 200, 211, 224,

Griffin Bur 11

WATCHMEN “It was just stupid. “The story didn’t go with the original, in the books. The characters were too violent, so it definitely wasn’t appropriate for children. I felt like it was a waste of my money. I could have spent those ten dollars on something useful.”

Griffin Bur 11

IN SEPTEMBER 2008, GAS PRICES PEAKED AT $4.10 PER GALLON, LATER DROPPING TO $1.60 PER GALLON IN JANUARY 2009. AT T 227, 229, 235, 236, 241, 242, 246, 250, 262, 263, 270, 274, 331, 332, 356, 457, 467, 489, 490 Ensz, Hunter 66 Epstein, Lauren 55, 181 Erickson, Andrea 127, 144, 241, 246, 274 Erickson, Lauren 181 Ernst, Erik 112, 113, 203, 332, 333, 356 Esberg, Jack 163 Esry, Ashley 203, 408 Esselman, Amy 39, 203, 257, 261, 263, 264, 270, 271, 333 Evans, Sarah 104, 181, 258, 266, 267 Evinger, Brandon 163 Exline, Ian 163, 239, 250, 258

Fair, Zachary 80, 181 Falk, Henry 144, 234 Fallone, Claire 203, 469 Fancolly, Jesse 181 Farley, Chris 100 Fay, Jack 145, 234, 243, 253 Fay, Katie 97, 181, 234 Fenton, Maddie 253 Fenton, Maggie 8, 145, 246, 274 Ferguson, Erica 203, 356 Ferguson, Joel 203, 335, 356 Ferguson, Seth 145 Ferlas, Alexandra 102, 181, 235 Ferrell, Will 100 Fessler, Alexa 31, 203, 258

Fisher, Alicia 204, 271, 398 Fisher, Haley 163, 244, 275 Fisher, Mallory 135, 145, 277 Fisher, Sam 182, 231 Fisher, Sara 182, 246, 274 Fisher, Valerie 96, 182, 229 Fisher, Will 204, 234, 336, 411 Fishgrund, Chloe 7, 275 Fishman, Brenda 225, 260 Fitzgerald, Scott 64 Flatts, Rascal 318, 319 Fleming, Lukas 145 Flemming, Jake 4, 182, 231 Fletcher, Blair 14, 204, 234, 336, 337, 433 Fletcher, Melanie 145 INDEX 473


Fletcher, Miranda 204 Fogopoulos, Mimi 274 Foley, Ken 48, 71, 225, 226, 274 Foley, Taylor 145 Foley, Zach 204, 231, 302 Forbes, Andrew , 182, 253 Forbes, Brady 145, 230, 248 Forest, Wake 205 Fosnough-Biersmith, Haley 127, 241, 244 Foster, Henry 14, 234, 480 Foster, Michael 231 Fotopoulos, Chris 120, 121, 204 246, 302, 337, 338 Fotopoulos, Mimi 8, 145, 236, 246 Fox, Chris 231 Francis, John 57, 113, 129, 135, 182, 255, 262, 264, 274, 466 Franklin, Amy 145, 234, 241, 255 Franklin, Daniel 204

Fritts, Emma 182, 234, 263, 264, 271 Fritts, Grace 106, 234, 240, 244 Fritz, Nancy 225 Frizzell, David 81, 82, 164, 274, 275 Frizzell, Ellen 28, 42, 43, 113, 131, 164, 204, 221, 232, 239, 336, 411, 264, 270, 271, 272, 280, 336, 411, 457, 467, 483 Frutchey, Crystal 225 Fryder, Charlie 238 Frye, Emily 44, 145, 236, 244, 269 Fry, Emily 479 Frye, Reid 14, 145, 234, 243, 253 Funk, Chris 230 Furstner, Haley 145 Fuson, Emily 42, 132, 164, 172, 232, 251, 275

Gallagher, Eileen 268 Galvin, George 164, 231 Galvin, Mary 182, 194, 263, 264, 268 Ganapini, Kaitlyn 164, 476 Gangwere, Rachel 182, 275 Gannon, Matt 144, 230, 253 Gans, Griff 115, 231, 253 Garringer, Michael 145, 253 Garten, Ben 250 Garten, Benjamin 145 Gasaway, Hannah 36, 204, 340 Gassmann, Sharyn 225 Gaughan, Madeline 164 Gaughan, Maggie 275 Gaughn, Maddie 232 Gay, Brian 225, 267 Geddes, William 145, 230, 250 Genton, Kristina 32, 182, 247 Genton, Sarah 21, 33, 164

STUDENTS LOOKED FORWARD TO MOVIES IN 2009 SUCH AS “HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE”, “X-MEN ORIG I N

OUT EARLY

DAUNTING DONATION

“During the winter, I hated it when we didn’t get out. But now towards the end of school, I like that we get out early. I like it better that we didn’t have school days in the winter. I like getting out early more.”

SNOW DAYS

IT’S NOT MY VAULT

TIE

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Above: At the annual blood drive, seniors Jenee Vickers, Sarah Pavlu and Wraye Sewell relax at the refreshment table. The donation experiece was a scary one for Pavlu. “I really dislike needles and hospitals so I was crying the entire time,” Pavlu said. “I almost passed out at the snack table, they had to put me on a gurney,”.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

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Left: At a Junior Varsity meet, junior Leia Swanson performs a vault. Swanson is an all-around gymnast, participating in vault, bars, beams and floor. “The hardest part of the vault is getting my steps right to have enough time to get over the vault,” Swanson said. “But when I’m done, it’s a big feeling of accomplishment for me.” Photo by Andy Allen.

Ariana Sherk 10

“I was mad when we didn’t have a snow day, but now it means more summer. I would prefer having a snow day because it’s a good break from school. It’s exciting when you find out you get a snow day.”

Hiba Akhter 9

“I’m fine with not having snow days because we get to get out if school earlier. Fourth quarter is the longest quarter, so it’s better that it gets shortened. Getting days off in the winter or summer doesn’t really matter to me because on days off in the winter, I can go sledding, and in the summer, I can go play outside.”

Gage Grimes 11

P L AY THE VIOLA AND TROMBONE, LOOKED FORWARD TO ‘THE SOLOIST,’ AN INSPIRATIONAL FILM STARRING ROBERT DOWNEY Franklin, James 182 Frazell, Patrick 145, 253 Frazell, Peter 52, 230, 238, 251, 256 Frederick, James 204 Frederick, Jim 231, 250, 302 Freeman, Claire 182, 234, 276 Freestate, Lawrence 280 Fresh, Fluffy 261 Frey, Hayden 164, 251 Frey, Whitney 433 Friedel, Peter 39 Fries, Marston 132, 145, 251 Fritts, Alice 145 474 INDEX

G Gaeddert, David 204, 239, 338 Gage, Logan 204, 251, 264, 271, 280, 338, 342, 422 Gaiman, Neil 87 Galacia, Laeden 131 Galicia, Laedan 204, 239, 339, 470

Gentry, Michael 145, 230 Germann, Tyler 145, 234, 253, 256, 272 Gerwick, Hannah 52, 60, 182, 245, 251, 253, 263, 268 Giabbai, Jared 183 Gianakon, Barb 225 Gibbin, Ali , 253, 274 Gibbin, Alice 145 Gibbs, Duncan 87, 164, 239 Gifford, Jake 231, 268 Giles, Lisa Gillaspie, Grace 18, 30, 183, 251, 252, 264 Gillespie, Kellie 274

W OLVERINE”, JUNIOR DAVID CRANE, WHO USED T O

Students vote for having more snow days or having more summer

S:

SNOW DAY V. EXTRA SUMMER


Gillespie, Kelly 145, 236, 246 Gillespie, Lauren 164, 276 Gillespi, Grace 18 Gilman, Sam 145, 230, 243 Gilmore, Julie 241 Glaze, Heather 164, 275 Glenn, Holly 223, 343 Gloe, Benjamin 128, 204, 231, 341, 342 Glynn, Holly 204, 234, 342, 356 Goble, Andrew 79, 164, 238, 255, 262, 272, 465 Goehausen, Abba 40, 41, 90, 215, 236, 263, 268, 275, 322, 360, 444 Goehausen, Abigail 343 Goehausen, Camille 91, 145, 233 Goering, Emily 164, 276 Goins, Lindsey 196, 205, 256, 263, 264, 275, 316, 343 Gonzalez, Patricia 145 Goode, Ariana 483 Gorman, Jacey 31, 133, 205, 243, 251, 302, 344, 345 Goss, Madeline 18, 164, 252 Goulding, Spencer 145 Grace, Michael 205, 258 Graf, Janna 183, 245, 263, 264, 272, 273 Grandon, Kristina 183, 268, 275, 484 Granstaff, Jonathan 145, 234, 251 Grant, Amelia 164 Grantham, Aubrey 181, 183 Graybill, Sean 129, 183 Gray, Breana 63, 164, 244, 463 Gray, Jennifer 34, 50, 101, 164, 237, 275 Gray, Owen 117, 205, 208, 256, 271, 276, 344 Gray, Tommy 38, 58, 110, 205, 256, 257, 261, 264, 270, 271, 272, 345, 439 Green, Andrew 146 Greene, Jake 20, 183 Greenfield, Cole 164 Greenfield, Kelly 42, 205, 256, 263, 271, 316, 346, 347 Green, Gordon , 79, 183, 239, 251 Gregg, Melissa 164, 265, 275 Griffey, Deanna 225 Griffith, Carly 164 Griffith, Katie 160, 240 Griffith, Sara 146, 234, 253 Grimes, Gage 183, 269, 474 Grimes, Kennedy 52, 63, 146, 232, 241, 244 Gritz, Daniel 5, 81, 87, 205, 267 Gross, Paxton 92, 205, 348, 349, 411 Gruenebaum, Lauren 205, 254, 271, 302, 349, 454 Guerricagoitia, Ashley 183, 275 Guess, Kylie 146, 240 Guignon, Pierre 183 Guignon, Ross 120, 121, 165, 255 Gundelfinger, Paige 127, 165, 241 Gunya, Charles 183

Gunya, Ellyn 146 Guthrie, Greg 113, 205, 231, 250, 356 Gyamfi, Joshua 146

H Hackler, Allyse 244, 253 Hackworth, Lauren 183 Haddaway, Sam 250 Haflich, Carly 38, 54, 126, 127, 241, 263, 270, 271, 275, 276, 316, 348 Haflich, Carolyn 205 Haghighat, Nelly 31 Hahn, Yong 183 Haines, Anne 60, 205, 258, 348, 356 Hair, Shawn 7, 76, 243 Haith, Zane 239 Halberstadt, Lynza 122, 127, 205, 234, 241, 259, 271, 348 Halberstadt, Weston 183, 276 Halderman, Grant 165, 231 Hall, Chelsea 205, 349 Hallquist, Jacob 165 Hallquist, Matt 205, 455 Halsey, Jordan 205, 351, 411 Halter, Emily 183, 234, 256, 257, 263, 264, 272, 480 Hamilton, Gage 146 Hamilton, Jacob 206, 271 Hammond, Danielle 165, 258 Hammond, Jessica 206, 263 Hammond, Kailey 165 Handy, Calvin 146, 234, 253 Hansford, Hayley 25, 146, 233 Harbison, James 165 Harbison, Teresa 183 Hardy, Elena 146, 272 Hare, Granville 206, 275, 350, 351, 356 Harken, Mark 139, 146, 234 Harlan, Olivia 160, 165, 237, 275 Harmon, Jessica 146, 240 Harold, Zachary 206, 422 Harra, Marianne 225 Harrigan, Jack 165, 231, 253 Harrington, Gale 206, 213, 246, 266, 267, 271, 274, 350 Harrington, Mallory 146, 255 Harris, Jordan 146 Harris, Kaiha 165 Harrison, Kellyn 146 Harrison, Kim 79, 224 Harris, Shane 206, 352, 353 Harris, Taylor 31, 206, 255, 265, 271, 302, 353, 417, 454

Harris, Toyrena 165 Harter, Jackson 76, 183, 243, 248, 255, 268 Hart, John 34, 43, 70, 99, 117, 206, 251, 255, 271, 275, 280, 282, 322, 354, 422 Hart, Michael 165 Hartnett, Lindsey 96, 165, 275 Hartong, Heather 146 Hasselwander, Chris 14, 206, 234, 248, 250, 272, 355 Hasselwander, Nic 137, 206, 234, 247, 355 Hattaway, Sam 165, 234, 250, 253 Haugland, Mackenzie 183, 246, 274, 473 Haun, Grace 104, 206, 258, 270, 271, 354 Haverty, Jack 146, 230, 251 Haverty, Madison 165, 234, 253, 256 Haviland, Taylor 14, 56, 112, 183, 234, 262, 465 Hawkins, Jack 183, 258 Hayden, Caleb 146 Hayes, Colin 200, 206 Hayett, Isabelle 234 Hayman, Michelle 225 Haynes, Anna 183 Haynes, Annie 234 Heady, Christopher 146, 229, 243, 246 Healey, Alex 249 Heath, Kirsten 275 Heckey, Jake 146, 239 Hedrick, Jack 239, 250 Heidmann, Logan 165 Heinlein, Grant 165, 262, 465 Helder, Russ 274 Helder, Russell 165 Heley, Logan 35, 120, 165, 239, 255, 260, 262, 264, 272, 465 Heller, Jamie 225 Hemer, Sarah 183, 237, 268 Hemmingsen, Dana 119, 206, 240, 433 Hemmingsen, Nichole 139, 206, 240, 433 Henderson, David 120, 121 Hendry, Isaac 146, 230 Heneger, Cara 207, 263, 271, 302, 354, 355 Heneger, Samuel 146, 230 Henley, Robert 234 Henley, Sydney 11, 47, 54, 72, 75, 87, 90, 104, 117, 125, 183, 234, 262, 263, 264, 272, 275, 466 Henley, Trey 144, 476 Hennig, Callie 275 Henry, Kelsey 60, 95, 207, 356 Herman, Celia 48, 183 Herman, Delaney 258, 273 Herman, Kaley 184, 275 Hernandez, Elizabeth 184 Hernandez, Omar 463 Herring, Jordan 166, 234, 253 Herst, Andrew 136, 146, 239, 247 Herst, Catherine 184 Herst, Catie 268, 271, 469 INDEX 475


Herstowski, Evan 184, 268 Hertel, Kevin 45, 184, 231, 243 Hertel, Kris 45, 184, 231, 243 Heying, Parker 3, 72, 184, 264 Hicks, Cj 166, 275 Higbee, Todd 166 Higgins, Jeremy 230, 231 Hild, Johanna 122, 184, 275 Hill, Blaine 146, 230, 250, 253 Hill, Blake 146, 230, 250, 253 Hill, David 88, 166, 231, 246, 250 Hill, Matt 109, 207, 248, 360, 361 Hill, Michael 120, 146, 246, 256 Hill, Park 232 Hill, Pembroke 13, 48, 246 Hill, Rocky 184, 231, 275 Hilsabeck, Stephanie 207, 268 Hine, Natalie 95, 104, 184, 256, 258, 265, 266, 267 Hines, Kara 146, 240 Hintz, Reid 82, 122, 207, 357, 358, 359, 433 Hintz, Ryan 243 Hipps, Desi 241 Hitchcock, Sophia 146, 235 Hobart, David 54, 69, 128, 129, 207, 275, 360, 411 Hodes, Annalise 207, 411 Hodos, Joseph 166 Hoefer, Collin 184, 266 Hoefgen, Sheaffer 146 Hoffman, Henry 146, 253 Hoffman, Matthew 166, 253 Hoffman, Riley 166, 231, 253, 274

Hofmeister, Emily 234, 244 Hofmeister, Natalie , 135, 207, 266, 267, 271, 276, 358, 359, 390, 451 Hogsett-Duncan, Susi 225 Hogue, Megan 166 Hollingsworth, Erica 92, 207 Holly, Lonna 147 Holmes, Sally 13, 46, 47, 246, 266, 267, 269, 270, 271, 456 Holmes, Sarah 207, 274 Holm, Morgan 166, 275 Holsinger, Jordan 55, 81, 208, 256, 258, 266, 271, 360, 489 Holsinger, Luke 21, 30, 143, 147, 277 Holt, Tori 263, 269 Holt, Victoria 147 Hooker, John 125 Hoover, Todd 208 Horan, Jennifer 147, 148 Hornung, Andrew 147, 230, 251 Horrell, Katherine 208 Horrell, Katie 350 Horvath, Alex 253 Horvath, Alexander 208 Horvath, John 147, 253 Horwitz, Marissa 237, 480 Hotchkiss, Charles 166 Hotchkiss, Charlie 234 House, Katherine 147, 277 Hou, Young 208, 253, 261, 263, 266, 271 Howard, Jenny 50, 208, 215, 236, 263, 268, 271, 275, 360, 361 Howell, Audrey 184, 460

Howland, Jack 147, 230, 262, 465 Howland, Molly 147 Hummel, Gretchen 184, 275 Humphrey, Scott 208, 247, 271, 362 Humphry, Scott 137 Hung, Candy 101 Hung, Hsiang-Tung 166 Hunt, Ann 225 Hunter, Allison 166, 237 Hunzecker, Spencer 231 Hunzeker, Austin 184 Hunzeker, Spencer 166 Huyett, Ian 208, 433 Huyett, Isabelle 53, 166 Hylton, Cooper 230, 250 Hynes, Alec 95, 104, 208, 258 Hynes, Casey 147, 253, 272

I Iakish, Maik 273 Ireland, Colleen 184, 262, 465 Ireland, Kathleen 21, 184, 256, 262, 465 Irvine, April 166 Isenberg, Adam 166, 238, 251, 273

SWIMMER MICHAEL PHELPS WON EIGHT GOLD MEDALS AT THE BEIJING SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS R E C

FAVORITE TRENDS

Students share their

BELTS

“The 80s belt style is coming back. It’s easy to accessorize with them when you don’t want to wear just a t-shirt and jeans. For dress and skirts it adds an hourglass frame to skinny girls and more balance and flatter small waists for curvy girls.”

Kaitlyn Ganapini

SPERRYS

“I bought them because everyone else had them. They’re really comfortable, and I can wear them anytime and anywhere. I know they won’t wear out easily because they’re good quality.”

Austin English 9

MOCCASINS

“I bought moccasins because I saw other people wearing them. They are Bear Paw and have fur lining, and I’ll probably wear them all the time. They’re really comfortable and are probably the best shoes I’ve ever had.”

Sean Reynolds 12

SCARVES

“I like to wear scarves because they add color to my outfits. They’re fun and I can accent whatever I’m wearing. I wear fun pattern scarves with plain shirts and plain bright colorful scarves with dark shirts.”

Lauren Riley 11

from this year

CONVERSE

“I wear my converses a lot because they’re not too expensive. I don’t wear skater clothes but my style goes with the layered back look of converse. I started wearing them a lot when I got to high school.”

Trey Henley 9

BRIGHT COLORS

“I like bright colors because they make you stand out. I wore a lot of bight colored tops, with jeans mostly. I like bright-colored accessories like headbands with cute bows.”

Lizzie Roach 11

’S BONG-SMOKING PICTURE SCANDAL BECAUSE SO MUCH IS EXPTECTED OF HIM, AND BELIEVED IT WAS A STUPID DECISION. 476 INDEX

LPS

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Below: During the Choraliers choir trip to Nashville, Tennessee, seniors Callie McGuire and Hanna Cosgrove line dance at the Wildhorse Saloon, a restaurant and dance club. Choir members learned the dance then sat down to a Western meal. “It was a really fun restaurant, and that day was one of the best days there,” McGuire said. “We got to shop and wander around Nashville and the Country Music Hall of Fame.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

O R D OF 7. SOPHOMORE ALI MEYER WAS DISSAPOINTED BY P H E

I WALKED THE LINE


J Jackson, Daniel 250, 253 Jackson, Mary 125, 208 Jackson, Meghan 148, 232 Jackson, Michael 51 Jackson, Perry 166, 239, 246 Jacob, Jessie 54, 55, 118, 181, 184, 263, 264 Jacobs, Keagan 148, 243, 253 Jacobson, Jennifer 208, 362, 363 Jacobson, Zach 239 Jaeger, Kat 11, 184, 258, 264, 272 James, Danielle 139, 184 James, Joshua 178 Jamieson, Loren 166, 238, 239 Jamieson, Regan 38, 208, 234, 240, 264, 269, 270, 276, 364 Jandl, Libby 63, 208, 240, 245, 266, 271, 290, 332, 363, 400, 411 Jardes, Traci 225 Jarrell, Tim 248 Jarrold, Spencer 120, 239, 246, 255 Jennett, Cory 166, 265, 276 Jennings, Mitchell , 208, 239, 268, 271, 364, 366, 483 Jennings, Molly 31, 148, 240, 244, 261 Jensen, Ben 15, 23, 54, 55, 58, 67, 71, 184, 187, 234, 255, 260, 263, 264, 272, 273, 275 Jensen, Kurt 148, 230, 231, 248 Jensen, Stewart 91, 184, 231, 248, 263, 275 Jieh, Jennifer 208 Jilka, Robert 250 Johnson, Anne 84, 85 Johnson, Anton 148, 253 Johnson, Ashley 184 Johnson, Barb 225 Johnson, Beck 48, 52, 184, 231, 268, 275, 470 Johnson, Betsey 92 Johnson, Brad 166, 231 Johnson, Dalton 43 Johnson, Danny 451 Johnson, Jacob 129, 184, 251, 255, 263, 264 Johnson, Kellie 148, 235 Johnson, Kendall 451 Johnson, Matt 234 Johnson, Maureen 225 Johnson, Oliver 148 Johnson, Scott 208, 280, 365 Johnson, Tanner 89, 184, 250 Johnston, Hannah 2, 208, 234, 365, 451 Johnston, Matt 148, 248 Johnston, Sarah 148, 232, 234 Jolitz, Kelsey 209, 411

Jones, Abigail 148 Jones, Adam 148, 243, 253 Jones, Amanda 148 Jones, Andi 209, 364, 365 Jones, Ellie 148, 234 Jones, Mandy 232 Jones, Natalee 209 Jones, Sarah 119 Jones, Stuart 95, 209, 239, 268, 366, 367 Jonson, Alyssa 38, 91, 209, 234, 263, 271, 276, 366, 367, 490 Jordan, Ree Ae 251 Jorns, Tabor 148, 232, 244 Joyce, Mary 50, 166, 275 Juarez, Maria 271 Junk, Grace 166

K Kafka, Franz 117 Kaiser, Heidi 148, 267, 269 Kaiser, Ian 148, 234 Kanally, Nora 166, 253 Kang, Se-Hyun 185, 266, 273 Kang, Seth 234, 253 Kaplan, Alex 166, 234, 253 Kaplan, Benjamin 185 Kapros, Dora 209, 255, 270, 356, 417 Kapros, Tamas , 255 Karro, Camille 205, 209, 332, 368, 369, 451, 465 Kashka, Joseph 166, 234, 257, 273 Kaskie, Rachel 14, 234, 253 Kasmiskie, Zach 148, 247 Kass, Alfie 84, 85, 185, 253 Kaufman, Aaron 108, 209, 248, 269, 272, 366 Kaufman, Jake 167, 231, 250 Kaufman, Jenna 167, 246, 274 Kaufman, Laura 102, 209, 302, 369 Kavanaugh, Tyler 167 Keefer, Grace 148 Keenr, Mike 127 Keller, Alex 167, 234, 250, 253 Kelley, Daniel 209, 368, 371 Kelley, Sam 61 Kelly, Coach 29 Kelly, James 225 Kelly, Jamie 119, 239, 240, 459 Kelly, Samantha 61, 167, 246, 274 Kendall, Grant 137, 148, 234, 247, 277 Kennedy, Patricia 225 Kennedy, Scott 76, 185, 243, 248, 249, 255, 260, 268 Kenney, Josh 248

Kenney, Will 111, 148, 234, 251, 257 Keohan, Katherine 149 Kerns, Kyle 167 Kerr, Carter 89, 250 Kerr, Cassie 165, 167, 253 Kerr, Emily 14, 59, 143, 148, 149, 234, 272 Kerr, Veronica 185, 269, 271 Kessinger, Ellie 185, 236, 268 Kessler, Katherine 226 Kester, Chloe 185 Kettler, Katy 185, 251, 252 Kiehl, Hilary 209, 372 Kilpatrick-Brew, Bridget 226 Kimmel, Robert 209 Kim, Michael 209 King, Lauren 167, 233, 251 King, Sarah 52, 149, 258, 272 Kinney, Josh 109, 210, 234, 249, 274, 275, 370 Kirby, Allison 132, 185, 251, 268 Kirby, Mallory 14, 185, 234, 253, 263, 264, 268 Kirk, Jarrett 210, 302 Kirkpatrick, Billy 243, 248, 262, 465 Kirkpatrick, Kelsey 186 Kirkpatrick, William 149 Klehm, Kati 186, 266, 267, 270, 276 Klein, Nathan 87, 210, 258, 267, 273, 370 Klein, Steve 226 Kline, Logan 210, 271, 310, 372, 373, 451 Kline, Nathan 280 Klugman, Megan 1, 182, 186, 263 Knight, Tyler 129, 149, 230 Knipper, Spencer 411 Knops, Ryan 149 Kohnle, Kendall 167, 237 Kost, Kelsey 167, 234, 253 Kostrow, Dina 210 Koukol, Andrew 210, 372 Kovarik, Jack 149, 239, 253 Kovarik, Paige 149, 252, 261 Kovzan, Sam 76, 186, 243, 262, 465 Kraft, Whitney 82, 210, 254, 255, 269, 275, 280, 374 Kramer, Mary 226 Krawitz, Karl 6, 12, 13, 50, 224, 479 Kreka, Vilma 149 Krivena, Justin 29, 51, 210, 239, 268 Krumm, Shelby 226 Kuhn, Kelly 149, 277 Kuklenski, Elise 167, 233, 275 Kuklenski, Paige ,210, 233, 263, 268, 271, 322, 360, 373 Kulaga, Emily 149, 261, 272, 277 Kulaga, Kate 149, 261, 272, 277 Kurle, Kelli 233, 245 Kurtz-Enko, Daniel 149 Kurtz, John 95, 100, 120, 210, 234, 246, 271, 274, 302, 374 INDEX 477


Kurtzman, Ashley 186, 236 Kurtz, Molly 167, 234, 253, 275 Kurz, Bryan 167, 234

L Laffargue, Heloise 149, 251 Lafferty, Holly 36, 54, 186, 234, 255, 260, 264, 266, 272, 273 Lage, Austin 234 Laing, Sierra 149 Lamb, Alex 149, 250, 262, 465 Lamberson, Rebecca 210, 375, 433 Lamb, Laurie 226 Lancers, Lady 63, 245 Lane, Jon 21, 30, 135, 246, 276 Lang, Carmen 34, 167 Lang, Emily 149 Lang, Hannah 186, 263, 264, 268 Lang, Teddy 149, 230 Lang, Veronica 210, 378, 379 Lanza, Christopher 167 LaPrade, Andrew 239, 268, 451 Larrabee, Tim 211, 375, 376, 411 Larson, Chris 226 Latshaw, Jennifer 36, 38, 58, 211, 261, 263, 264, 270, 271, 272, 302, 377, 439 Latshaw, Ricky 167, 258 Lavayen, Alex 149, 234, 252 Lavender, Jesse 460 Lavender, Katie 460 LaVoie, Matt 53, 97, 211, 264, 276, 302 Lawrence, Jeanene 149 Lawrence, Kiley 48, 81, 84, 97, 186, 264, 275 Leach, Allyson 123, 211, 302, 303 Ledbetter, Paige 132, 211, 243, 251, 378 Lee, John 149, 230 Lee, Justin 149 Leek, Abigail 51, 59, 160, 168, 236, 275 Leek, Anna , 90, 91, 211, 236, 263, 268, 290, 379, 388, 469 Leek, Lanie 236, 240 Leek, Mary 149 Lefko, Jeff 168, 255, 256, 264 LeGrotte, Gina 38, 95, 211, 263, 378, 380 Lehoczky, Jay 14, 186, 234, 253 Lehoczky, Lucy 149, 234, 253 Lehrbaum, Elliot 211 Leib, Dana 110, 186, 187, 256, 257, 264, 266, 267, 271, 272 Leiter, Aubrey 32, 33, 168, 247, 262, 465 Lemos, Ashley 25, 149, 232 Lengle, David 460 478 INDEX

Leng, Melanie 168, 273 Lenth, Barry 232 LePichon, Sarah 116, 117 Leslie, Lisa 226 Less’Ard-Spring, Jordan 149 Levin, Adam 186, 250, 268, 458 Levota, Brian 168 Lewis, Ashley 149, 244 Lewis, Holley 168 Lewis, Joe 106, 115, 149, 230, 253 Libeer, Jake 149, 230, 243, 253 Light, Jessie 22, 39, 134, 135, 211, 229, 261, 266, 271, 272, 276, 379, 489 Lindeman, Emily 149 Lindsay, Ereka 241 Lindsay, Marla 226, 240 Lindsey, Joanie 211, 326 Little, Jake 150, 157, 239, 248 Litwer, Ariel 212, 271, 381 Liu, Ben 168, 229, 251, 258 Livingood, Gilbert 150 Lockard, James 226 Locke, Elizabeth 265 Lockheart, Arias 209, 231 Loe, Steve 227 Logan, Jack 70, 71, 98, 186, 243, 255 Logan, Sam 99, 176, 186, 234, 251, 255, 262, 264, 465 Lo, Heinzen 21, 212, 266 Long, Andrew 150 Longan, Mary 150, 251 Long, Charlie 213, 380 Long, Duri 104, 150, 258 Long, Gillian 150, 235 Longoria, Linda 226 Loos, Shelby 168 Lopes, Rick 239 Lopez, Pedro 356 Lopez, Rebeca 168 Losey, Laure 226 Loudon, Thomas 94, 274 Lowe, Adam 150, 230, 248, 257 Lowrey, Joe 168, 231, 253, 254 Low, Spencer 186 Lozania-Florez, Edgar 463 Luby, Nicole 6, 380, 10, 19, 25, 36, 79, 89, 127, 139, 186, 218, 224, 252, 262, 380, 467 Luby, Sarah 2, 8, 212, 246, 274, 380, 381 Lucas, Chase 44, 77, 107, 137, 212, 243, 247, 382, 383 Lucas, Nick 44, 122, 137, 168, 242, 247 Ludington, Charlie 29, 76, 212, 239, 243, 383, 451, 469 Luenz, Sean 150, 239 Luther, John 180, 187 Lybarger, Jake 168, 234, 246 Lykens, Andrew 212, 384, 385, 451 Lynch, Joe 136, 137, 212, 247, 263, 271, 384, 386, 451

Lynch, Olivia 106, 168, 235, 275 Lynch, Tom 58, 150, 158, 251, 261 Lynn, Garrett 168

M Mack, Megan 187, 258, 265 Macnamera, Ben 263 Mader, Coach 244 Madison, Tim 168, 234, 251, 274 Magalski, Madison 187 Magstadt, Michael , 212, 266 Mahoney, Jane 14, 43, 54, 212, 234, 254, 271, 275, 301, 385 Mahon, Molly 180, 187 Mais, Josh 169, 231, 242 Maldonado, Yesenia 150 Mallen, Hannah 187, 236, 263 Mallory, Johannah 187 Mansfield, Olivia 27, 66, 169, 275 Marken, Anna 150, 232, 240 Marland, Amanda , 56, 160, 182, 212, 236, 262, 263, 268, 385, 386, 467 Marland, Caroline 169, 240, 275 Marquis, Allie 14, 15, 51, 206, 234, 253, 263, 268, 302, 387, 388 Marshall, Evie 43, 187, 237, 255, 264, 275 Marston, Emma 169, 237, 275, 469 Martinez, Daniel 169 Martinez, Jesus Lopez 186 Martin, Grace 150, 182, 187, 263, 268, 271 Martin, Haley 150, 234, 240, 262, 269, 465 Martin, Miles 231 Martin, Robert 169, 253 Martz, Paige 169, 240, 244 Marx, Joseph 187, 267, 269, 273 Mason, Deon 150 Mason, Joshua 213 Mason, Tara 213, 264, 268, 411 Massey, Amanda 187, 268 Masson, Keara 150, 157 Mata, Daniella 187 Mathiesen, Micheala 169, 275 Maton, Louisa 234 Mavai, Michaela 150 Maxwell, Geoffrey 187 Mayfield, Emily 22, 115, 234 Mayfield, Patrick 14, 67, 95, 213, 234, 262, 274, 302, 388, 390, 465, 473 Mazzetti, Sophia 150 Mazzoni, Steve 213, 253, 272, 388, 389, 422 McAtee, Todd 243 McBee, Annie 218, 271, 322, 388


ME

McKelvey, Tyler 113, 188, 263 McKinney, John 224 McKittrick, Christa 14, 150, 234, 240, 261 McKittrick, Melissa 14, 132, 205, 213, 234, 390, 393 McKittrick, Sarah 132, 169, 245, 251, 262, 269, 465 McMahill, Madeline 150, 246, 274 McNamara, Drew 27, 188, 466, 467 McNeil, Ryan 253 McPhee, Janine 226 Meagher-Manson, Alison 213, 258, 394, 456 Meara, Jennifer 102, 213, 235, 297, 394, 411 Medhi, Robby 169, 246 Medina, Brittany 213, 356 Medley, Individual 98, 99 Mehlstaub, Louis 188 Mehoff, Jack 264 Meinking, Cody 188

Miller, Christopher 188 Miller, Dani 181, 188, 246, 274 Miller, Gabe 109, 188, 231, 248 Miller, Lauren 169 Miller, Melanie 226 Miller, Mickela 151, 274 Miner, Frank 151, 230, 253 Mische, Lexi 188, 235, 251, 252 Mische, Tiffany 18 Mitchell, Andie 50, 89, 110, 119, 196, 200, 240, 386, 395, 271, 395, 411, 467, 484 Mitchell, Elijah 151 Mitchell, Logan 169, 252 Moedritzer, Matt 28, 214, 239, 397, 451 Mohn, Andrew 10, 188, 256 Monarres, Jesuha 188 Monarres, Wendy 151, 277 Moore, Abigail 151 Moore, Charles 188

RICAN HIP HOP ARTIST GORILLA ZOE’S SINGLE “LOST”, A RAP SONG FEATURING LIL’ WAYNE THAT HE LISTENED TO ALL SUMMER.

SAVING PENNIES

Students feel the effects of the economic downturn.

FRUIT

WORK

“My family has become more money conscious. We try to conserve energy to eliminate unneccessary spending. We think about things before we spend.”

“I work at Abercrombie & Fitch, and the company can’t afford to give us enough hours. People aren’t buying because of the economy, but I want them to spend more that so I can have hours and make money, too.”

Emily Fry 9

Nicholas Colbert 12

“The price of fruit has gone up, so I can’t always have the fruits I want. But my mom tries to keep buying fruit because it’s healthy.”

ENERGY

Kiki Sykes 9

PEPPY PRINCIPAL

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Left: At the December pep assembly, new principal Karl Krawitz pumps up the students by setting an example with his own enthusiasm. Krawitz brought back old traditions like cheers and hallway performances in order to bring more energy to the student body. “I truly believe that energy is what it should be all about,” Krawitz said. “I’m excited because this is what I do, getting the student body commmitted to helping out the SME environment. Every year my goal is to fire the students up.” Photo by Meghan Benson.

NI

C PEREZ’S SONG OF THE YEAR WA S A

McBride, Benjamin 150 McCandless, Mary Kate 187, 237, 268 McCarthy, Ally 280, 322, 389 McCarthy, Alyssa 213 McChristy, Skyler 169 McClannahan, Susie 106, 111, 169, 256, 273 McClendon, Deeanna 226 McClenny, Elle 150, 235 McCloud, Nathan 230, 250 McConnell, Lizzy 119, 150, 232, 240 McCormick, Eliza 43, 60, 61, 150, 226, 236, 246, 262, 266, 273, 274, 467 McCoy, Jake 150, 230, 253 McCrary, Chloe 150 McDonald, Elizabeth 78, 213, 223, 259, 263, 267, 270, 271, 302, 391, 396, 397 McDonald, Griffin 258 McDonald, Landon 116, 117, 213, 271, 392, 393 McFarland, Max 101, 187, 254

HE 2009 GRAMY AWARDS “SONG OF THE YEAR” WENT TO “VIVA LA VIDA” BY ALTERNATIVE ROCK BAND COLDPLAY. FRESHMAN DO M I McGannon, Patrick 99, 169, 251, 255 McGilley, Maggie 169, 237, 275 McGillicuddy, Jacob 169, 231, 249, 251 McGillicuddy, Megan 132, 186, 251, 263, 269, 275 McGinley, Mason 213, 231 McGinley, Shannon 127, 150, 233, 241, 245, 269 McGonigle, Kelsey 187, 273 McGrain, Nick 230, 231 McGranahan, Elizabeth 188, 256, 262, 264, 465 McGraw, Charlie 188, 276 McGregor, Anthony 264 McGregor, Melissa 264 McGuire, Callie 2, 48, 213, 236, 275, 301, 411, 476 McGuire, Grayson 41, 150 McHenry, Duncan 55, 188, 252, 253, 262, 465

Melia, Micah 164, 169, 234, 244 Melvin, Chris 59, 158, 238, 255, 274 Melving, Chris 260 Melvin, John 169 Mergen, Elizabeth 150, 256, 257 Mergen, Mark 169, 250, 254, 460 Metz, Megan 150, 234, 251, 277 Meurer, Riley 96, 169 Meyer, Alison 169 Meyer, Dana 188, 241 Meyer, Jason 238, 240 Meyer, John 169, 274, 275 Middleton, Madeline 169 Middleton, Ryan 213, 272, 395, 411 Migliazzo, Alexander 226 Milledge, Droste 150, 230, 251 Miller, Austin 110, 169, 231, 253 Miller, Brett 94, 169, 231, 253 Miller, Bryce 259 Miller, Caroline 169, 234, 262, 269, 466, 467

Moore, David 176 Moran, Teresa 214, 356 Morgan, Adrienne 140, 151 Morgan, Cole 231, 250 Morgan, Kathryn 151 Morgan, Lucas 151 Morgan, Nicholas 161, 169 Moriarty, Joe 45, 214, 231, 396, 411 Moriarty, Robby 45, 169, 230, 231, 243 Moritz, Anna 151, 253, 256 Morley, Caitlin 188, 253, 263, 268 Morris, Emily 169 Morris, Grant 122, 129, 214, 255, 261, 269, 272, 396 Morris, Meghan 275 Morrison, Andrew 251 Morrison, John 170, 247 Morrow, Kylie 104, 188, 258 Morton, Louisa 188, 488 Moskowitz, Alex 170 INDEX 479


Moss, Jonathan 188 Mueller, Matthew 188, 275 Muffin, Ally 389 Muhammad, David 16, 70, 71, 226, 255 Mullett, Emily 23, 101, 125, 135, 214, 261, 263, 270, 272, 276, 396 Munns, Alex 188 Murphy, Amelia 34, 47, 214, 266, 267 Murphy, Rebecca 226 Muthyala, Ariel 214, 267 Myers, Bernadette 56, 116, 117, 214, 262, 266, 271, 398, 399, 465 Myers, Collin 214, 221, 274, 275, 356, 397 Myers, Drake 188, 264, 266, 267, 271 Myers, Evan 180, 255, 257, 259, 265, 266, 267, 273 Myers, Lilly 151, 246, 253, 263, 272, 274 Myers, Morgan 214, 258, 302 Mytinger, Polly 170, 258

Nelson, Ean 170 Nelson, Heather 119, 170, 175, 237, 240, 276 Nelson, Howard IV 151 Nelson, Samantha 170 Nelson, Tucker 52, 64, 214, 246, 263, 268, 271, 274, 331, 398, 399 Nelson, Tyler 151, 230 Nemechek, Megan 188 Nesselhuf, Makenzie 151, 236, 252, 253 Neto, Luiza 252 Newell, Lauren 59, 170, 237 Newman, Anders 188 Newman, Claire 151, 251 Newman, Joe 55, 188 Newman, Mary 151, 257 Nichols, Alex 151 Nichols, Evan 15, 57, 151, 234, 243, 253, 262, 465 Nichols, Stephen 56, 57, 91, 117, 214, 253, 255, 262, 271, 282, 322, 398, 465 Nick, Caroline 126, 151, 241, 245, 269 Nickels, John 226 Niedl, Corey 274 Norman, Preston 170, 239, 274 North, Andrew 170, 276

Norton, Danielle , 140, 152, 240, 245, 261 Nowzari, Azad 189, 253 Nutt, Valerie 170, 275

O O’Brien, Darci 214, 400, 401 O’Brien, Jack 170, 231 O’Connell, Gillian 26, 170, 247, 258, 270 O’Connor, Christina 215, 390, 402, 403 O’Connor, Cormac 7, 170, 256 O’Connor, Lucy 106, 203, 215, 263, 268, 356, 400, 402, 403 O’Connor, Maeve 256, 271 Odell, Taylor 170, 275 Ogden, Coach 274 Ogden, Debbie 226 Ogdon, Cole 226 O’Gorman, Hayden 152, 267 Olander, Ryan 115, 189, 231, 243, 264, 268

TWILIGHT, A BESTSELLING VAMPIRE-ROMANCE NOVEL BY STEPHENIE MEYER, WAS ADAPTED INTO A FILM AND GROSSED $70.6 MILL I O N

COULDA, WOULDA, SHOULDA

Students discuss the classes and activities they wish they would have been involved in this year.

TRACK

“I’m kind of bummed I didn’t do track. If I would have done track, I would have been more in shape. I would have done pole vaulting because it’s the best, and you don’t have to do anything.”

BUNCH OF BANDS

“I wish I would have competed in Bunch of Bands because I’m in an alternative rock band. We would have done it just for fun though, not for winning, because we like performing.”

Henry Foster 10

Nathalie Solger 9

“If I would have been involved in theater, I wouldn’t concentrate as much on what others think. I don’t have a problem talking in front of people, but I would be more confident being myself.”

“I wish I would have taken harder classes because I’ll regret having taken easy classes. It was annoying because my teachers assigned busy work. I got it done, but I felt like I wasted my time.”

Emily Halter 11

Zach Clements 11

THEATER

HARDER CLASSES

STUCO

“StuCo seems like a lot of fun, and they get free doughnuts on Wednesdays. I would have liked to be in StuCo because I’d feel more involved with the school. Plus, it looks good on college apps.”

Marissa Horwitz 11

AUTOTECH

“If I would have taken AutoTech I wouldn’t look like an idiot because I don’t know about cars. If I would have taken it, then I would know stuff about my own car and maybe be able to fix it.”

Kiersty Coulter 12

CHRISTMAS, SOPHOMORE CELESTE RINNER RECEIVED A LIFE-SIZE CUTOUT OF EDWARD CULLEN, WHCH SHE KEEPS IN HER ROOM

N Nass, Megan 102, 170, 235 Nass, Zach 31, 167, 242, 246 Nazir, Adeeqa 273 Neely, Justin 214 Neidl, Corey 170, 246, 251 480 INDEX

North, Devery 139, 152, 236 North, Olathe 13, 45, 230, 232, 233, 238, 239, 240, 241, 243, 245, 247, 249, 250 North, Shawnee Mission 29, 43, 45, 245 Northwest, Olathe 63, 240, 241, 242, 244, 248, 254 Northwest, Shawnee Mission 106, 113 Northwest, Wichita 244 Norton, Alexandria 17, 31, 51, 61, 100, 214, 262, 266, 271, 290, 332, 400, 401, 411, 457, 466

OR

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Below: Using an orbital sander, junior Carl Rodgers smooths his cabinet. Rogers enjoyed having a lower-stress class. “It [cabinetry] gives me something to do,” he said. “It’s a class where I don’t have to worry a lot about a grade.” Photo by Alissa Pollack.

Olivarez, Jesus 152, 230 Oliver, Ellen 152 Olsen, Chelsea 131 Olson, Alex 215, 356, 454 Olson, Ashley 152, 235 Olson, Chelsea 122, 135, 215, 263, 276, 402 Olson, Michael 215, 302 Olson, William 170 O’Neill, Kelly 231 Opsahl, John 86, 87, 234, 267 O’Rourke, Kelsey 152, 234, 253

I N I TS OPENING WEEKEND OF NOVEMBER 21, 200 8. F

CONCENTRATING ON CABINETRY


Orpin, Josh 170, 231 Orr, Jean 152, 277 Orth, Maureen 11, 42, 57, 68, 86, 100, 105, 111, 117, 125, 137, 215, 258, 262, 263, 271, 275, 403, 411, 466 Osborne, Jeremy 139, 170 Osborne, Ryan 189 Ottemeier, Ryan 243 Owens, David 94, 231, 249 Owens, Tyler 29, 215, 239

P Panthers, Prairie-Elementary School 411 Papineau, Chad 239 Papineau, William 170 Parade, Lancer Day 140 Parcels, Shayla 170, 237, 251, 252, 276 Parelman, Jake 34, 49, 52, 189, 483 Paris, Nick 226, 263, 267 Parker, Natalie 170, 275 Parkinson, Andrew 129 Parman, Bryan 90, 196, 215, 243, 263, 268, 405 Parsons, Natalie 63, 119, 211, 215, 241, 245, 404, 411 Parsons, Vince 170, 274 Patterson, Micah 234, 275 Pattison, Kaitlyn 140, 152, 235 Patton, Natalie 152, 241, 272 Pavlu, Megan 170, 258, 275 Pavlu, Sarah 38, 91, 214, 215, 258, 263, 264, 270, 271, 474 Payne, Michael 215, 239, 253, 407 Pence, Hannah 226 Penner, Will 73, 110, 189, 234, 256 Pennington, Emma , 152, 232, 253, 269 Peppes, Coach 242 Perez, Dominic 152 Perez, Laura 170 Perez, Michael 89, 215 Pesch, Tawni 433 Pesch, Tonya 216, 404, 405, 408 Peterson, Eric 170 Peterson, Jack 121 Peterson, Margaret 189, 235 Petrow, Anna 2, 9, 12, 18, 21, 22, 30, 31, 34, 36, 37, 40, 41, 46, 57, 69, 85, 114, 115, 120, 121, 129, 131, 133, 140, 187, 224, 226, 232, 233, 237, 238, 240, 248, 257, 262, 271, 272, 467, 469, 470, 473, 483, 489, 490 Pfeiffer, Jordan 76, 189, 242, 243 Philpott, Mason 231, 253 Pickett, Leah 6, 13, 117, 126, 135, 216, 229,

262, 266, 267, 270, 271, 302, 304, 406, 466 Piepenbring, Anna 189 Pierce, Amanda 189, 237, 252 Pierce, Natalie 80, 152, 236, 246, 274 Pierret, Ashley 152 Pigeon, Maddy 135, 246, 274, 277 Pinne, Chris 152, 230, 248 Pinne, Madeleine 189, 266 Piper, Elizabeth 189, 234, 264, 269 Pirotte, Alex 94, 170, 231, 249 Pistorius, John 216 Pistorius, Paul 406, 407, 451 Place, Alexander 189 Plummer, Arianna 216 Poindexter, Tina 216, 263, 264, 433 Pollack, Alissa , 43, 98, 108, 109, 116, 126, 137, 139, 144, 262, 467, 480 Poplawski, Chris 56, 71, 204, 266, 267, 270, 408 Poppie, Sophia 152 Postma, Sanne , 95, 97, 216, 251, 252, 255, 266, 273, 409, 410 Powell, Sylvester 82 Prade, Andrew La 210 Prenevost, Nicole 20, 189, 275 Preno, Loretta 4 Prinds, Joseph 216 Privitera, Amanda 58, 189, 234, 255, 260, 263, 264, 268, 272 Pruitt, Morning 226 Pruneau, Chandler 21, 140, 152 Puckett, Austin 190 Puckett, Thomas 216, 251, 268, 410, 422 Pugh, Jason 152, 253 Pugh, Samantha 22, 216, 272, 275 Pulliam, Caleb 250 Puls, Ron 227 Purdy, William 152

Q Qin, Xuan 21, 22, 75, 263, 266, 267, 271, 272 Quillec, Hannah 4, 187, 190 Quillec, Noah 216, 239, 274, 275

R Radwan, Laila 152, 265 Raghuveer, Tara 26, 61, 100, 180, 182, 190, 234, 256, 257, 259, 264, 265, 266, 267,

271, 272 Raglow, Rhys 152, 243, 253 Raibble, Lauren 190, 275 Rainen, Scott 122, 128, 190, 255, 256, 257 Ramaswami, Keshav 170, 255 Randolph, Ben 152, 230, 250, 253 Rappold, Molly 2, 63, 171, 240, 241, 245 Rappold, Tommy 190, 231, 253, 268 Read, Thomas 171, 253 Rea-Holloway, Rebecca 138, 190 Rebein, Samantha 131, 190, 276 Reber, Nikki 2, 8, 181, 246, 274, 490 Redelsheimer, Graham 171, 253 Reece, Jamie 171 Reed, Brittany 152 Reed, Ricky 171 Reed, Thomas 239 Reene, Christiana 152, 234 Reene, John 122 Reene, Jon 99, 251, 408, 422 Reene, Jonathan 216 Rees, Jamie 216, 258, 264, 276, 410, 411 Regalado, Maribel 241 Regaldo, Maribel 152 Reineke, Andrew 171 Remer-Phifer, Mikaela 171, 275 Renft, Taylor 216, 235, 411, 412 Resseguie, Tracy 48 Reyes, Maria 190 Reyna, Alicia 171, 275 Reynolds, Erin 152, 263 Reynolds, Kristen 200, 215, 217, 236, 237, 271, 451 Reynolds, Lauren 37, 190, 246, 268, 274 Reynolds, Sean 217, 302, 414, 476 Rhoades, Rick 227 Rhodes, Rick 245 Rice, Brenton 250 Rice, Connor 190 Rice, Demi 152 Rice, Dena 139, 217 Rice, Rachel 4, 171, 246, 253, 274 Richardson, Drew 250 Richardson, Katy 8, 171, 246, 251, 274, 275 Richardson, Michelle 172, 246, 274 Richardson, Trent 152, 230, 251 Rich, Maddy 10, 14, 190, 234, 245, 253, 263, 268, 271, 473 Ricker, Jim 12, 119, 227 Ricketts, Kerri 172, 244 Rider, Samuel 152, 251, 469 Ridgway, Louis 153, 239 Rieke, Perry 128, 217, 274, 412, 413 Riggin, Patrick 153, 277 Riley, Ellen 336 Riley, Lauren 190, 476 Riley, Lyndsey 190, 489 Riley, Susie 217, 236, 271, 413, 447 Ring, Keegan 36, 38 Rinner, Celeste 161, 172, 275 Riott, David 217, 271, 451 INDEX 481


Riott, Kristin 70 Riott, Patrick 251, 253 Ritschl, Ermanno 137, 227 Rivera, Luis 190, 246, 268 Rivers, Cara 104, 191 Roach, Lizzie 191, 275, 476 Roach, Phillip 191 Robbins, Aidan 153, 250 Roberson, Cody 172 Roberson, Connor 172 Roberts, Brice 60, 94, 134, 187, 191, 258, 265, 266, 267, 276 Robertson, Laura 217, 219, 271, 377, 413 Robinson, Gregory 153 Robinson, Jenny 119 Robinson, Sean 82, 217, 254, 414 Robles, Cameron 67, 78, 120, 191, 246, 273 Robson, Brad 191, 249, 268 Roche, Virginia 217, 273, 280 Rodgers, Carl 66, 114, 253, 480 Rodgers, Elizabeth 153, 235 Roebuck, Allison 122, 134, 191, 234, 266, 276 Rogers, Brian 37, 72, 73, 79, 191 Rogers, Dylan 4, 217 Rogers, Elizabeth 79 Roland, Chris 218, 276, 302 Rooker, Lindsay 191, 234, 253 Rooney, Lacey 218 Rooney, Wayne 73 Roque, Milly 191, 463 Rorie, Alex 41, 48, 165, 273, 274, 275 Rosa, James 172 Rose, Logan 230, 243 Rosenstock, Ashly 172 Ross, Allison 153 Ross, Cydney Ross, Nathan 153, 239, 253 Ross, Skyy 265 Roste, Hannah 158, 172, 240, 244 Roste, Tyler 1, 4, 12, 24, 29, 36, 42, 121, 123, 218, 227, 229, 243, 411, 414 Rousseau, Jewel 218 Rowe, Ansley 218, 258, 411, 415 Rowe, John 14, 191, 234, 253, 276 Rowley, John 52, 55, 218, 251, 415, 422, 451 Royce, Heather 227 Royer, Richard 227 Royle, Brandon 14, 81, 88, 218, 223, 234, 250, 253, 416 Royle, Brooke 18, 191, 252 Rubaie, Tony 101, 218, 416, 433 Rudolph, Jacob 107, 172, 274, 275 Ruiz, Miguel 153, 253 Runion, Taylor 138, 153, 235, 251 Rupf, Lucy 227 Rural, Washburn 233, 247 Rush, Kathryn 218, 302, 416, 417 Russell, Megan 191, 237, 253 Russell, Parker 253 482 INDEX

Rutherford, Jeff 89, 191, 250, 262, 465 Rutledge, Cody 44, 52, 191, 231, 275 Ryan, Andrew 172, 231, 246, 250

S Sabates, Kelly 110, 191, 257, 263, 264, 270, 272 Sabin, Jason 153, 248 Sachse, Amy 154, 251 Sachse, Kate 1, 81, 116, 218, 256, 263, 266, 267, 270, 271, 417 Salle, Nora 130, 131, 218 Samadi, Atieh 229 Samadi, Atiyen 154, 251, 256 Sams, Amanda 218 Sanderson, Miles 218, 219, 248, 274, 275, 420 Santana, Carlos 125, 199 Saterlee, Morgan 151 Satterlee, Hannah 14, 191, 234, 245, 253, 263, 268 Satterlee, Morgan 154, 234, 241 Sauls, Lindsey 25, 191, 232, 233, 263, 272 Savage, Caroline 154, 236 Savage, Chris 234 Savage, Christopher 154 Sawaguchi, Takanori 154, 239, 246 Saxton, Jill 154, 236 Sayler, Jack 52, 154, 230, 251 Schafer, Kate 263, 268, 272, 418, 419 Schafer, Kathryn 218 Schenkelberg, Courtney 154, 240, 272 Schenkelberg, Sara 35, 119, 191, 240, 255, 263 Schieferecke, Angela 227 Schieszer, Carol 227 Schmidt, Casey 66, 154 Schmidt, Margaret 208, 218, 256, 302, 316, 419 Schmidt, Ryan 219, 256, 419, 451 Schnakenberg, Jodie 245, 227 Schnieders, Alexa 191, 269, 270 Schocke, Christina 172, 275 Schoegler, Alex 154, 243 Schoenfeld, Sally 5, 191, 246, 255, 263, 264, 268 Schoenfield, Sally 274 School, Briarwood Elementary 302 School, Brookwood Elementary 303 School, Corinth Elementary 319 School, Mission Valley Middle 119 School, Olathe East High 13 School, Prairie Elementary 411 School, Somerset Elementary 433 School, Tomahawk Elementary 442 Schrock, Conner 154, 247

Schrock, Connor 251 Schrock, John 45, 172, 231, 249 Schuck, Mikael 154 Schuele, Patrick , 259 Schulte, Emma 165, 172, 267, 273 Schumacher, Faye 172 Schwartze, Kareen 191, 233 Schwartz, Kareen 24 Sciara, Daniel 219 Scott, Anthony 172, 243, 249 Scott, Laura 191, 269, 271, 276 Scrogham, Anne 125, 191, 219 Sears, Sarah , 191, 256, 257, 264, 265, 275 Seck, Lyndsey 60, 95, 219, 263, 268, 271, 326, 420, 421, 433 Sedorcek, Sarah 192 Seeley, Carolyn 227 Seick, Olivia 302 Seitz, Anna 219, 235, 411, 421 Seitz, Jacob 154, 239 Selby, Jacob 219, 302 Selder, Dawn 192, 258 Seligson, Adam 172 Seniors, Belinder Elementary School 455 Seniors, Dive 422 Seniors, Football 335 Seniors, IB 423 Seniors, Highlands’ 356 Seniors, Soccer 432 Seniors, Westwood View 451 Sernett, Joe 192, 249, 272 Severeid, Ryan 192 Severns, Will 231, 249 Severns, William 173 Severson, Nate 458 Seward, Jack 219, 424, 425 Sewell, Wraye 196, 219, 256, 258, 271, 474 Sewing, During 157 Seybert, Ryan 154, 230, 243, 253 Sgroi, Annie 173, 262, 263, 270, 465 Shackelford, Lydia 173, 237, 275, 332 Shackelford, Meg 92, 219, 262, 263, 290, 334, 424, 469 Shaffer, Kelsey 192 Shakelford, Lydia 234 Shalom, Village 200 Shapiro, Amenda 219, 428, 429 SHARE 426 Sharmacharya, Payal 234 Sharmacharya, Rituparna 173 Sharp, Jesse 173, 256, 264, 490 Shatto, Brandon 154 Shaw, Cara 126, 154, 234, 241, 244 Sheahan, Johnny 83, 173, 249, 254 Shedar, Kristen 232 Shedor, Kristen 154, 263, 273 Shedor, Tim 137, 192, 255, 260, 262, 459, 461, 465 Shelton, Priscilla 227


263, 264, 465 Simpson, Nathan 98, 173, 251, 276 Singers, Chamber 311 Siordia, Priscilla 192 Sirna, Jacob 173 Sitomer, Kyle 219, 251, 263, 268, 271, 275, 422, 427 Sixta, Alex 219, 302, 388, 429 Sixta, Pat 199, 302, 388, 429 Skrukrud, Carl 139 Skrukrud, Heidi 220 Slater, Benjamin 173 Slaughter, Annie 192, 258 Slaughter, Jack 77, 203, 242, 243, 428 Slaughter, Reed 155, 230, 253 Slemp, Deon 241 Slemp, Dara 192, 237, 252 Slemp, Dion 127 Slemp, Kyra 127, 140, 155, 241, 245 Slemp, Sarah 60

Smith, Mckayla 252 Smith, Meara 155, 246, 274 Smith, Patricia 220 Smith, Tricia 411 Smythe, David 220, 259, 276 Smythe, Michael , 74, 187, 259, 266, 267, 270 Sniezek, Madeline 155, 240, 244, 246, 274 Snively, Emilia 173, 260, 276 Snively, Matthew 2, 220, 251, 271, 276, 422, 430 Snyder, George 220, 430, 431 Snyder, Grace 155 Snyder, Will 42, 137, 219, 247, 271, 431, 451 Sock, Jack 121 Solger, Nathalie 155, 272, 480 Soltys, Scott 155 Soptic, Jeff 108, 211, 248, 430 Southeast, Wichita 76 South, Mission 112, 113 South, Olathe 233, 238, 240, 241, 243, 244,

Students discuss their favorite memories of the school year.

THAT MOMENT

EF

E FF LEFKO PLAYED BASEBALL IN MIDDLE SCHOOL, AND WOULD HAVE PLAYED IN HIGH SCHOOL HAD HE NOT HURT HIS KNEE. EJ ASSASSIN

STATE GOLF

“My best moment was getting to go to state for golf. I didn’t think we were going to make it but everyone played well so it was very exciting. I can’t wait till next year.”

“Playing assassin has to be the best part about school. There are about fifty-eight seniors involved and the winner gets two hundred dollars. I plan on winning.”

Caroline Sheridan 11

Mitchell Jennings 12

STUCO EXEC BOARD “When I found out I made the Student Council Exec Board, it was very exciting, because all my hard work paid off. I’m very excited for next year.”

Robert Enders 10

S >>TAR-STUDDED SESSION

Right: On the Choraliers’ Choir Trip to Nashville, Tennesse senior Ryan Dinyer, junior Jake Parelman, and senior Ross Wooten record with country singer Sheryl Crow. This opportunity was made possible by Shelle Jensen, an East mother and friend of Crow. “Sheryl Crow was more real than we thought she would be,” Dinyer said. “She actually seemed really glad to be there.” Photo by Ellen Frizzell.

CARVING OUT PRINTS

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E ATING THE TAMPA BAY RAYS 4-1. SOPHOM O R

Shen, Hao-Cheng 192 Shen, Steven 255, 256, 264, 266, 267, 273 Sherard, Dana 96, 132, 173, 251 Sherard, Spencer 98, 219, 251, 376, 411, 422, 425 Sheridan, Caroline 32, 81, 93, 190, 263, 483 Sherk, Ariana 122, 173, 234, 251, 256, 263, 474 Sherk, Whitaker 6, 8, 29, 45, 58, 76, 83, 101, 102, 114, 132, 192, 234, 255, 262, 264, 466 Shirazi, Anousha 173, 246, 274 Shoenfeld, Sally 5 Shrock, Conor 137 Sieck, Eric 154, 230, 253 Sieck, Linda 227 Sieck, Olivia 139, 219, 258, 261, 264, 271, 426, 427 Silvestro, Lizzie Di 232 Simchuck, Wanda 7

Left: During her Art Foundations class, sophomore Ariana Goode works on a project. “My favorite thing we did was when we cut rubber tiles with knives and made prints,” Goode said. “It was fun carving them out.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

AT THE 104TH BASEBALL WORLD SERIES IN 2008, THE PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES WON THEIR FIRST CHAMPIONSHIP SINCE 198 0, D Simmons, Adam 14, 144, 234, 243, 253 Simmons, Dennis 173 Simmons, Dillion 112 Simmons, Dillon 411 Simmons, John 154 Simmons, Maggie 173, 246, 262, 274, 466, 467 Simpson, Andrew 155 Simpson, Brian 14, 15, 51, 206, 219, 234, 253, 255, 263, 268, 271, 282, 418 Simpson, Connor 242 Simpson, Henry 137, 155, 243, 247, 251 Simpson, Kevin , 173, 239, 246, 255, 262,

Slemps, Deon 127 Smith, Burke 234 Smith, Cam 173, 238, 255, 262, 263, 264, 465 Smith, Christian 220, 356 Smith, Dale 192, 234, 253, 273 Smith, David 173 Smith, Gordon 220, 243, 430 Smith, Joel 248 Smith, Kevin 192 Smith, Khadijah 84, 85 Smith, Louis 220 Smith, Marlena 100, 155, 232

248, 250, 251 South, Shawnee Mission 38, 39, 45, 112, 113, 119, 187, 257 Specker, Sarah 27, 220, 234, 432, 433, 434, 451 Spencer, Blake 139, 192, 243, 269 Spencer, Kathleen 173 Spencer, Torry 132, 244, 246, 251, 274 Spero, David 39, 220, 261, 434, 439 Spickler, Bailey 89, 173, 250, 263 Spickler, Brittany 221 Spivak, Meghan 155, 235, 246, 269, 274 Srisuwat, Thanaphat 221, 273 INDEX 483


STUDENTS FOLLOWED MANY TRENDS IN 2009, INCLUDING GRAPHIC TEES, COLOR E D PA

“I thought it was good for her that she wanted to keep the babies. It’s awesome that she had eight. But If it were me, I would be terrified. I mean, how could you take care of eight children? But I guess I don’t think it’s impossible.”

Kristina Grandon 11

SOMALIAN PIRATES

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Above: Dressed as an 80s workout girl, senior Anne Berry waits by the senior float. This was Berry’s first time participating on a float. “It was fun to be a part of it, and shout “Senior, senior!” with everyone,” Berry said. “I liked seeing people I know standing on the side.” Photo by Kit Andresen.

NEWSMAKERS

Kristina Grandon 11

MEXICAN DRUG WARS

“My friends and I went to Playa del Carmen over spring break, and the stuff made us nervous. It didn’t affect our trip and we didn’t see anything out of the ordinary, but it was disrturbing that Americans supplied weapons to the drug cartels.”

Alexa Donahue 11

R E BETSY BLESSEN OFTEN WORE HER PURPLE SKINNY JEANS FROM FOREVER 21. Srisvwat, Thanaphat 253 Stahl, Clara 80 Stalder, Lilli 9, 155, 236, 244, 246, 251, 274, 469 Stallard, Ron 227 Stanford, Graeme 221, 435, 451 Stanley, Emily 155 Stanley, Lauren 168, 173, 251, 275 Stanton, Jim 302 Stanton, Kassie 302 Stanziola, Ellen 37, 97, 192, 246, 274 Starkey, Emmett 60, 61, 79, 81, 122, 221, 273 State, Free 230, 238, 242, 244, 247, 251 State, Lawrence Free 45, 127, 240, 241 Stauffer, Grant 115, 192, 234, 253, 269, 274 Stechmann, Abby 221, 435 Steckelberg, Sophia 155, 253 Stehl, Austin 221, 253, 271, 436 Steifel, Jonathan 302 Steinbock, Alexander 192 Steinbock, Elizabeth 173 Steinbock, Libby 7, 243 Stein, Dylan 155 Steiner, Eva 227 Steiner, Jeremy 251, 274 Steinmetz, Anthony 192 Steinmetz, Joseph 155 Stephens, Alison 36, 178, 192, 244, 245, 253, 263, 264, 268, 269 Stephens, Diane 227 Stephenson, Lonnie 227 Stepp, Jonathan 221, 234, 275, 436 Sterbenz, Cassie 234, 251 Sterbenz, Catherine 155 Stevens, Marisa 130, 131, 221, 451 Stevenson, Graham 10, 173, 274 Stevenson, Hunter 95, 98, 99, 134, 192, 251, 276 Stevenson, Mallory 19, 25, 38, 75, 109, 196, 221, 236, 255, 261, 262, 263, 316, 346, 484 INDEX

MO

PARADE NEWBIE

“Pirates sure have come a long way. I was astonished that pirates had made a comeback after centuries off the open seas. You don’t really expect pirates to show up in modern cultures. I don’t think it was classy to hold the guy captive.”

N TS, AND CONVERSE TENNIS SHOES. SOP H O

OCTOMOM

437, 466, 489 Stevens, Samuel 155 Stewart, Casey 221, 248 Stewart, Daniel 173, 262, 465 Stewart, Haley 235, 275 Stewart, Kaitlyn 173 Stiefel, Jonathan 221, 253 Stitt, Max 106, 112, 113, 262, 465 Stockton, Joseph 155 Stolberg, Abigail 155 Stolberg, Carter 155, 267 Stolle, Michael 98, 192, 251, 262, 263, 465 Stonebarger, Gail 58, 106, 128, 173, 233, 262, 465 Stonebarger, Michael 155, 230, 257 Stonner, John 45, 227, 231 Stoops, Meagan 173, 237 Stout, Peter 239, 250 Stradinger, Hanna Jane 10, 14, 106, 173, 234, 253, 269 Sturm, Megan 155 Styrkowicz, Tucker 155, 239, 253 Sudekum, Samuel 155, 277 Suki, Yorkies 349 Sullivan, Emma 155, 256, 257, 264, 273 Sullivan, Maddie 155, 235 Sullivan, Megan 119, 192, 234, 240, 263, 268 Sullivan, Mike 14, 38, 39, 221, 234, 253, 271, 438 Sullivan, Olivia 110, 192, 256, 257, 264 Sulzen, Charles 227 Summers, Kelsey 192, 229, 258, 269 Sundberg, Stephen 155 Surface, Drew 120, 239 Surface, Hilary 221, 258, 438, 439 Surface, Stephen 155, 246 Svet, Clark 221, 251, 276, 280, 422, 438 Swanson, Anna 138, 192, 234 Swanson, Chandra 16, 51, 57, 108, 110, 119, 127, 193, 252, 253, 262, 266, 267, 271,

466 Swanson, Leia 193, 252, 253, 266, 267, 271, 474 Swanson, Paige 173, 275 Sweeney, Andrew 41, 48, 120, 121, 221, 263, 264, 270, 271, 274, 275, 439 Sweeney, Dan 108, 222, 271, 440, 441 Sweet, Max 113 Swim and Dive, Senior Girls 421 Swim, Lancer 422 Swim, Senior Girls 422 Swope, Ali 14, 155, 234 Sykes, Jessie 10, 11, 119, 193, 234, 240, 263, 264, 272 Sykes, Kiki 23, 156, 234, 240, 263, 272, 479 Symes, Abbie 156, 261, 272 Szczygiel, Alexandra 193

T Talavera, Monica 25, 193, 232, 233 Tamblyn, Mac 72, 193, 262, 465 Tankard, James 156, 230 Tanner, Mary 193, 275 Tarry, Evan 156, 253 Tate, Brooks 156, 230, 243, 253 Tate, Dow 227, 262, 465, 466, 467 Tate, Jeff 173, 253, 254 Tavakolinia, Kaevan 46, 52, 193, 275 Taylor, James 417 Team, Drill 57 Teixeira, Gil 239 Tennis, Senior Girls 420 Tharp, Stephanie 222, 263, 386, 387, 440 Thomas, Jesse 125, 222, 356 Thomas, Kirby 119 Thomas, Maggie 140, 235, 240, 244 Thomas, Margaret 156 Thompson, Anthony 222 Thompson, Audrey 174 Thompson, Daniel 53, 193 Thompson, Gaby 23, 48, 57, 70, 85, 96, 121, 193, 255, 262, 264, 269, 270, 272, 273, 466 Thompson, Jackie 259 Thomson, Samuel 156 Thorpe, Jack 174, 242 Thrasher, Rebecca 174 Throckmorton, Lucas 174, 238 Thrutchley, Joshua 178, 194 Tidrick, Molly 42, 194, 246, 268, 274 Tidwell, Calvin 222, 231, 255, 411, 440 Tillhof, Elizabeth 194, 246, 274 Toombs, Cooper 238, 274, 275


Tour, Chipotle 48 Townsend, Maggie 50, 94, 194, 268 Townsend, Patricia 222, 433, 444, 445 Towster, David 120, 194, 246, 255, 256, 264, 266, 267, 273 Towster, Mark 20, 156, 239, 256 Tracy, Alexander 222 Tracy, Greg 30, 31, 167, 239, 276 Travers, Isaac 156 Treas, Miranda 156, 253 Tretbar, Brenda 16, 227 Tretbar, Jack 156, 246, 277 Trewolla, Sheila 227 Trewolla, Shelly 7 Trip, Choraliers’ Choir 483 Tripp, Lauren 174 Troup, John 87, 194, 265, 266, 267, 270, 275 Troutman, Molly 36, 133, 156, 251 Trout, Sadie 194 Tubbesing, Catherine 227 Tucker, Dejuanne 168, 174, 244 Tudhope, Andrea 6, 36, 54, 420, 433, 441, 262, 266, 267, 270, 271, 274, 420, 433, 441, 456, 457, 466 Turner, Cole 115, 174, 239, 253, 469 Turner, Jane 31, 156 Turner, Joe 194, 234 Turner, Natalie 194 Tuschhoff, Ryan 222, 231, 442, 443 Tuttle, Emily 156 Tuttle, Erin 194, 246, 274, 275 Tuttle, Shannon 156 Twibell, Conor 174, 251, 262, 465 Twibell, Taylor 211, 222, 236, 263, 268, 411, 443, 444 Tyler, Emma 97, 174, 253, 275

U Ufford, Chip 172, 227, 250, 460 Uhl, Pete 194, 250 Unterman, Phoebe 1, 194, 234, 256, 262, 263, 266, 465 Updyke, Brandon 172

V Vaca, Victoria 143, 156, 256, 257, 264 Valentine, Maurisa 174, 253

Vanbuskirk, Emma 156 Vandergriff, Gabby 81, 156 Vandyke, James 222 Van Nice, Kimberly 17 Varner, History Estill 203 Vaughn, Hannah 194 Vaughn, Preston 156, 230, 253 Velasquez-Gomez, Carlos 156, 251, 253 Velez, Andrea 232, 240 Vickers, Jenee 6, 222, 256, 271, 446, 447, 474 Villanueva, Araceli 194, 275 Vincent, Devyn 222, 447

W Wade, Shelbi 20, 174, 273, 275 Wadood, Audrey 222, 302, 448, 456, 457 Wagner, Emilie 156 Waisner, Kyle 222, 302, 448 Waisner, Ryan 174 Waldon, Clark 34, 38, 39, 222, 253, 261, 263, 270, 271, 302, 448 Waldon, Reed 174, 246 Walkenhorst, Una 61, 174 Walker, Elli 231, 251 Walker, Jack 47, 98, 194, 251, 255, 264, 266, 267, 271 Walker, Mary 156 Wallis, Mike 454 Walter, Hannah 52, 117, 126, 132, 174, 246, 251, 262, 274, 466 Walters, Jacob 222, 302 Ward, Catherine 175 Ward, Elizabeth 32, 174, 245 Ward, Lindsay 33 Wassmer, Nick 72, 195, 234 Watkins, Andrew 5, 98, 99, 174, 251 Watkins, Kathryn 174 Watson, Riley 174 Watson, Sam 95 Watson, Scott 36, 174, 234, 260 Watts, Cheyenne 156, 251, 255 Waugh, Hope 174 Weast, Madeleine 124, 125, 222, 449 Weaver, Madison 195 Webber, Andrea 47, 135, 222, 266, 267, 390, 391, 433, 449 Webber, Anna 54, 195, 266, 267 Webber, Will 115, 156, 230, 253 Webb, Marcus 45, 76, 216, 222, 231, 243, 253, 280, 302 Weckbaugh, Logan 21, 25, 174, 233, 245 Weigel, Lawrence 246 Weinberg, Raina 174, 262, 275, 465

Weinrich, Stefan 195, 231, 249 Weir, Connor 174 Wekesser, Grant 156 Welch, Christopher 250 Welch, Nathan 174, 239 Welker, Max 251 Wells, Curtis 222, 302, 450, 451 Welsh, Clayton 156, 230, 253 Welsh, Gregory 195, 231, 250 Welter, Carolyn 9, 36, 156, 157, 229, 246, 253, 261, 272, 274 Welter, Emily 36, 102, 174, 235, 275 Weltner, Abby 34, 203, 222, 236, 263, 268, 290, 450, 452 Wendlandt, Harrison 36, 92, 222, 411 Wendler, Sadie 195 Wendorff, Allison 175 Wendt, Tim 231, 253 West, Alex 175, 274, 275 West, Avery 97, 178, 195 West, Blue Valley 17 Westhoff, Evan 156, 277 Westhoff, Kaitlyn 36, 175, 260 West, Shawnee Mission 16, 45, 135 Wetzel, Lois 48, 195, 234, 269, 275 Wheeler, Erica 222 Wheeler, Kylie 195, 268 White, Angelica 144, 156, 265 White, Danielle 93, 222 White, Kaylee 175 White, Maygan 195, 236, 268 White, Nic 253 White, Russell 175 Whitham, Adrienne 125, 195 Wickersham, Andrew 92, 175 Wickstrom, Andrea 175, 265, 273 Wiedenkeller, Lakisha 223, 275, 411, 452 Wiles, Christian 156, 230, 243, 253 Wilkins, Connor 76, 175, 238, 242, 253, 255 Williams, Ben 230, 253 Williams, Brent 239 Williams, Brooks 458 Williams, Jacob 157 Williams, James 195 Williamson, Brian 175, 231, 253 Williamson, Jayson 255 Williamson, Robert 195 Williams, Samantha 157 Williams, Tanner 175, 234, 274, 275 Williams, W 157 Wilson, Alex 195, 231, 253 Wilson, Amy 138, 175 Wilson, Jordan 157 Wilson, Sarah 148, 157 Winlaw, Cody 42, 195 Winn, Drake 167, 257 Winter, Amilia , 131, 176, 182, 195, 229, 255, 263, 264, 273 Winter, Joshua 157, 239 INDEX 485


Y Yaffe, Emma 106 Yaqubian, Ali , 97, 195 Yeast, Andy 231, 253 Yeast, Tom 231, 253 Yedo, Jakob 157, 230, 277 Yemm, Jenny 227 Yohn, Elliott 195, 249 Youngberg, Emily 411 Young, Cameron 223, 271, 453 Young, Jeremy 137, 157, 238, 247 Young, Peter 274 Young, Willie 231

486 INDEX

Z

Zecy, Andrea 2, 18, 67, 85, 108, 109, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 136, 139, 157, 167, 175, 234, 249, 252, 262, 277, 467, 199 Zeiger, David 109, 157, 230 Zeiger, Jonathon 199, 223, 231, 274, 302, 453 Zeller, Chad 203, 223, 230, 231, 248, 249, 264, 268, 454 Zepeda, Federico 157, 256, 257 Zhou, Chenshan 175, 273 Ziller, Patrick 223 Zimmerman, Katherine 223, 276

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT

THE ‘09 SME YEARBOOK

THERE ARE 38 MEMBERS ON THE 2008- 2009 HAUBERK STAFF THE “SEE ALSO” THEME WAS GOING TO BE NAMED “UNSEEN” THE HAUBERK STAFF SPENT 15 STRAIGHT HOURS TO FINISH THE YEARBOOK FOR FINAL DUE DATE

>>

COLOPHON

Wiseman, Ian 157, 246, 277 Wittbrodt, Adam 322, 323 Witt, Trey 4 W, Micah 274 Wolfe, Timothy 223 Wolff, Carolyn 157, 236, 244, 253 Wolff, Paul , 195, 255, 264, 268, 272, 273 Wolford, Madeleine 157 Wolf, Taylor 24, 25, 157, 233 Woltemath, Tracy 157, 232 Woltemath, Tyler 42, 44, 195, 231, 253 Woltering, Jack 223, 450 Woltering, Reed 112 Wooderson, Mason 80 Wood, Samuel 175 Woodson, Kaitlin 195, 272, 275 Woofter, Chase , 175, 231, 250 Wooldridge, Caroline 157, 246, 253, 274 Wooldridge, Darby 113, 175 Wooldridge, Elizabeth 157 Wooldridge, Libby 232, 251 Wooldridge, Zach 175, 231, 253 Woolwine, Larson 157, 234, 248 Wooten, Ross 223, 234, 246, 274, 275, 450, 483 Worley, Athanasia 227, 269 Wrede, Tori 195, 258 Wydner, Daniel 223, 411 Wydner, Tori 195, 489 Wylie, Mackenzie 15, 21, 36, 50, 52, 115, 120, 195, 262, 263, 465 Wysong, Tyler 195


S

EE ALSO >> Our theme this year is “See Also.” We spent the entire summer of 2008 throwing around different theme names and we remained undecided for quite a while. But we were sure of one thing – the idea. We wanted to cover the sides of students that know one knows about. We wanted to bring attention to the hidden lives and allow students to learn about their peers and get an insight into what their lives are really like. After tossing around many different phrases and words that embraced our theme, we finally settled on “See Also” with the help of our staff at the Gloria Shields Journalism Camp in Dallas over the summer. Using Adobe InDesign CS3, we were able to achieve one of our biggest goals for this year: to modernize our designs and create spreads like never before. We found inspiration from magazines including ‘Swindle,’ ‘GQ’ and ‘Vapors,’ and decided that we wanted to simplify our spreads and adapt a style more like what one would find in a magazine. We wanted bold use of type, specifically in headlines, to draw attention to the pages, rather than just relying once again solely on dominant photos. We wanted to use white space more effectively, not jam-packing the pages but still achieving great coverage. Our desire to renovate our designs stemmed from our goal to make our book different than all of the years before it. We wanted to refer the readers to a side of design that we have never featured in our yearbook before – a sort of ‘see also’ for designs and layouts. We would like to first and foremost thank our sales representative John Kelley and our customer service representative Jolene Christy. John was always just a phone-call or text message away when we needed him the most. He helped us remain calm in times of high anxiety and stress. Jolene, too, was rarely unable to answer questions and was always able to assist us in our every need. Without John’s patient and understanding attitude and Jolene’s ability to talk us through difficulties and pull strings at the Walsworth plant, this book would not have been what it has come to be. Working with both John and Jolene has been a great pleasure, and we hope that editors to come get the chance to grow closer to them and receive their kindness and support as we did. Another example of our drastic design renovations was our new profiles in the portraits section. We featured eight students in detail, covering both their normal, known life, and their hidden life and the activities they were involved in outside of school. We decided to feature these students on fold-out tabs, introducing something very new to the SME yearbook, and presenting the readers with an opportunity to interact with the book, and hopefully bring them to pay more close attention to the many different parts of our book. We owe a special thank you to Rob Meyer at the District Print Shop, for getting us the best deal for printing these, and for remaining patient as we worked out the kinks in design and layout. Thanks also goes out to our staff. We could not have done any of this without each and every one of you. The individual contributions as well as the group effort involved in creating spreads really made this book what it is today. Thanks to those of you who suffered through many late nights with us, not only for working hard to help us meet our deadlines, but also for keeping a positive attitude and maintaining

a light-hearted atmosphere in the journalism room. We have enjoyed working with each and every one of you this year. A special, insincere thank you goes out to the Harbinger staff for very unwillingly sharing their food on deadline nights. Especially to you, Michael Stolle. But honestly, we appreciate the life that you bring to the journalism room every other Wednesday night. Working in the journalism room would not be the same without your staff and your strange music. Our many late afternoons and nights would not have been possible without the cooperation of DeBe Bramley, Bill Boley and Laura Beachy. When Mr. Tate was not able to stay late, your willingness to stick around while we frantically finished as much as we could before it was time to go helped our designs achieve the look for which we were aiming. We would like to specially thank custodian Sam Miller for not only being understanding when we needed to stay later than expected, but also for patiently cleaning the journalism room, which we safely consider the dirtiest, messiest room in the school. Thank you for your hard work and your patience throughout this year. Some people that we’d like to thank most of all are our parents. Not only did you pull through at the very end, staying up at the school with us into the early morning hours, but you also supported us along the way. We never would have been able to finish this book without your love and support. We appreciate all that you do for us. Thank you for being so understanding when we had to give up family time to work on this book, and thank you most of all for being a part of our lives. Lastly, we would like to thank our adviser, Chester Dow Tate. We have grown incredibly close to you for the past three years. Your high standards have pushed us forward and have helped us to create pages and feature pictures that we may never have found otherwise. We appreciate all of the help and advice you have given us, not only this year, but for the past three years. Getting to know you as both an adviser and a person has been wonderful. You are an unforgettable influence in everyone’s lives, especially ours. Thank you, Tate. The 490 pages of this book were the product of nearly a years worth of work by the writers, photographers and designers of the Hauberk staff. We print our pages on Libery Matte Paper. We used Poynter Gothic Text for our body copy and captions. For headlines and sidebars, we used many different styles of the fonts Escrow, Titling Gothic FB and Giorgio. The dominant colors we featured on the spreads of our book were eye-dropped from dominant and secondary photos, and adjusted slightly to fit with all of the photos and design elements. Using Macintosh computers and laptops, we designed our spreads using Adobe InDesign CS3, and edited photographs using Adobe Photoshop CS3. The staff photographers used Nikon equipment. We created certified PDFs using the program Enfocus Instant PDF and uploading them online through Walsworth’s Yearbook Connect website. The books were printed at the Walsworth plant in Marceline, Missouri.

Andrea Tudhope Alexandria Norton

Co-Editors-in-Chief INDEX 487


SEE

I NG GOATS SINCE SHE W

>>

A S YOUNG. SHE WON A NEW YORK STATE MATCH FOR SHOWMEN, DURING WHICH SHE H

O SEE THE STEPS TO CREATING A FAMILY. • JUNIOR LOUISA MORTON HAD BEEN SHOW

A year has passed. A book is coming to a close. Through these pages, we have learned more about our friends, our enemies and our acquaintances. But we must carry it on. We have learned to delve into people’s lives, experiences and memories. It is within this realm that we find reality. Not a surface reality, but a concrete reality consisting of layers. We have discovered that there exists a boardgame fanatic behind the varsity basketball jersey. We have discovered that there exists an aspiring fashion designer underneath daily apparel consisting of hand-me-downs. We have discovered that there exists a novelist behind the sun glasses and the tan face. We have discovered that there exists an inner child underneath sophisticated clothing and heels. Learning about our peers is not enough. We must remember that upon reaching beyond the surface into peoples’ lives we will find a true reality, and a true representation of character and life. And we must remember to reach into our own lives to discover our own realities and establish our own truths. SEE ALSO

488 THEME

>> OPENING SPREAD, pg. 3


THE BEGINNING OF THE END

>>

Below: (Left to right) Senior cheerleaders link arms during the Halloween pep assembly before joining in on the school song. “When we do the school song, we’re all really out of breath,” senior Mallory Stevenson said. “For me, [my heart is] always like pounding. but it’s really fun to watch all of the seniors get into it.” Photo by Rachel English. • Playing the part of a mole in the October 23 mol day celebation game “whack-a-mol,” senior Jordan Holsinger tries to avoid being hit by eager classmates. “As a whack-a-mole, my job was to pop up sporadically out of a hole and allow participants in the game to whack me with a blow-up hammer,” Holsinger said. There’s an acrade game you can find in your average Chucky Cheeese – that’s what a mole looks like.” Photo by Anna Petrow. • Junior Ben Carlson prepares for an upcoming match by practicing against fellow team members. “Playing with each other helps [Coach Sue] Chipman to see where we fit on the ladder and helps us to get ready for games,” Carlson said. “The most important thing about the serve is to have a good ball toss; as long as it’s right above you, not too far left or right, it’s good.” Photo by Anna Petrow. • Doing an interview for the Hauberk Online, sophomore Emily Collins questions Vaughn English (‘08) on his American Idol audition. “He was wearing his costume that he wore when he sang ‘Banana Man.’” Collins said. “He actually sang [the song] to me, and he was so loud that a teacher came out in the hall and yelled at us.” Photo by Andy Allen. • Setting up Coalition posters with senior Jessie Light in the hallways, junior Anna Petrow attempts to heighten awareness for a benefit concert taking place later that week. “Our club had a bunch of pins to raise awareness [for the concert], and we got a giant version of our canvas pin that would really draw attention,” Petrow said. “We were laughing because it was really hard to hang up; we had to flag down some really tall guy in the hall to help us.” Photo by Peter Bautz. Far Below: Copying the celebrity basketball star Lebron James, SME seniors throw flour into the air at the start of the Shawnee Mission Northwest rival basketball game. “At the very beginning of all the games is when we do it, and it gets everyone really pumped up,” senior Nick Benge said. “Most of the time, it was just a couple people that threw it up, but at the Northwest game, everyone did. We weren’t allowed to do it anymore because it made the court slippery.” Photo by Anna Petrow.

>>

ALSO

HAD TO POINT OUT THE ANATOMY, KNOW THE SCORE CARDS AND SHOW THE GOATS PROPERLY. • JUNIOR TORI WYDNER W

. • JUNIOR LYNDSEY RILEY WAS A FAN OF THE MOVIE, “MARLEY AND ME.” SHE SAW IT THREE TIMES BECAUSE SHE LIKED CLOSING SPREAD 489


IGH SCHOO

L SPIRIT.

MUCH SCHOO PIONSHIPS AND UMMER BEFORE

STATE CHAM LANCER DAYS,

FRANCE IN THE S

E MADE THREE H S . IX S E G A E C IN ES S DESIGNED DRESS S K O O R C A C C E B E YEARS OF 0 5 O S L A E SOPHOMORE R E S RSARY

SECOND H OUTFITS BY HER

HER JUNIOR YEA

R. SHE ATTENDE

D SCHOOL

AT A SCHOOL IN TH

FR

>>

HAD TO SPEAK IN

0TH SME LANCERS’ 5

OF BELGIUM AND

ANNIVE

E NORTH BORDER

ENCH. •

FEEDING THE FIRE

>>

Above: Creating an iron sunflower complete with an eye, heart and the letter U, sophomore Jesse Sharp takes advantage of the materials and tools offered to him in auto technology class. “I was kind of thinking about doing something circular like the sun,” Sharp said. “The fact that a circle never begins or ends helped me make up my mind to do the project.” Photo by Max Stitt.

A MEMORABLE YEAR

>>

Left: (Top to bottom) Drill team members wait in the bleachers to perform their WPA pep assembly dance routine, dressed in skeletal hoodies and matching face make-up. “We decided to wear them because it was theme of the dance,” senior Alexi Brown said. “The costumes helped a lot when we wore them because it helped us get into the character. The audience loved it since they hadn’t seen them before, and they really set us apart at nationals.” Photo by Anna Petrow. • Creating Franklin Center posters, senior Alyssa Jonson supports the projects efforts to bring the holidays to needy families. “I really enjoyed [the project] because the [children’s] mom was so appreciative of it,” Jonson said. “She was a single mother raising two children on her own, and they wouldn’t have had Christmas without us being there.” Photo by Rachel English. • Preparing for the girls tennis car wash, junior Nikki Reber paints a poster to attract the attention of passing cars. All members of the team participated in order to make money for the season. “It was fun to do,” Reber said. “I always like doing activities with sports teams, and this was the perfect bonding opportunity.” Photo by Lauren Bleakley.

490 CLOSING PAGE

DUNKIRK

RAIN VISITED

JACQUELINE C L YEAR. • JUNIOR


08

K 20 ER UB HA

E SM

JUNIOR CAITLIN BENSON•FRESHMAN CALVIN HANDY•JUNIOR KIRK DOERR•SOPHOMORE JAMES MULL-ADKINS•FRESHMAN VILMA KREKA•FRESHMAN JACOB MCCOY•SOPHOMORE DREW PARK•SENIOR ANSLEY ROWE•SOPHOMORE ANDREW RYAN•JUNIOR KELSEY SHAFFER•FRESHMAN ABIGAIL STOLBERG•EVAN TEMCHIN•SOPHOMORE JOHN THORPE•SENIOR NICHOLLE BETOW•JUNIOR ANTHONY CAMP•JUNIOR SCARLETT COOLEY•SENIOR REED CODY•JUNIOR JAI DAYAL•SOPHOMORE CHASE ENSZ•FRESHMAN SARAH DRIKS•SOPHOMORE FREDERICK KERR•FRESHMAN MEGAN LARRABEE•SENIOR KILARY KIEHL•SOPHOMORE TIRRELL MOORE•FRESHMAN MEGAN METZ•SOHPOMORE JOHN STILES•JUNIOR LEXI MISCHE•SOPHOMORE PAIGE MARTZ•JUNIOR COREY SCINTO•FRESHMAN ERIC SIECK•JUNIOR NOLAN SCHMIDT•FRESHMAN CHRISTOPHER SAVAGE.•SENIOR TAYLOR RENFT•JUNIOR DANA LEIB•SOPHOMORE STEVEN LEESE•FRESHMAN HEATHER HARTONG•SOPHOMORE TODD HIGBEE•SOPHOMORE MEGAN HOGUE•JUNIOR GRIFFIN BUR•SOPHOMORE SEAN CAMERON•FRESHMAN SEAN CEDILLO•JUNIOR CARLEIGH CLENDENIN•FRESHMAN MADELYN COLLINS•JUNIOR SCARLETT COOLEY•SENIOR ROBERT KIMMEL•FRESHMAN ALEXANDRIA LAVAYEN•SOPHOMORE IAN STEVENIN•FRESHMAN MEGAN STURM•FRESHMAN MEARA SMITH•JUNIOR KELSEY KIRKPATRICK•SENIOR REBECCA LAMBERSON•SOPHOMORE BRYAN KURZ•FRESHMAN LARSON WOOLWINE•SOPHOMORE HAYDEN FREY•SENIOR JOEY BEAL•FRESHMAN ANDREI GELATT•JUNIOR AUSTIN PUCKETT•FRESHMAN ALICE FRITTS•JUNIOR ALYSSA JOLITZ•SENIOR ERIC DICKINSON•JUNIOR KINSEY CATES•FRESHMAN EMILY KULAGA•JUNIOR LEXI MISCHE•SOPHOMORE RITUPAMA SHARMACHARYA•FRESHMAN EMMA VANBUSKIRK•SENIOR ALEX TRACY•FRESHMAN DANIEL KURTZ-ENKO•JUNIOR DANIELLE GOLD•SOPHOMORE ALLYSE HACKLER•SOPHOMORE CHANG IN HAHN•FRESHMAN IAN KAISER•JUNIOR BENJAMIN KAPLAN•JUNIOR LAUREN RAIBBLE•FRESHMAN ANA ROJAS•SENIOR DANIEL SCIARA•SOPHOMORE ANOUSHA SHIRAZI•SOPHOMORE EMMA TYLER•SENIOR MARGARET SCHMIDT•FRESHMAN JACOB MCCOY•JUNIOR JAKE GREENE•FRESHMAN PAIGE DICARLO•FRESHMAN JACK FAY•SENIOR LOGAN GAGE•FRESHMAN VILMA KREKA•SOPHOMORE VALERIE NUTT•FRESHMAN WILLIAM PURDY•SOPHOMORE

S

ER

NC

LA

E

TH

51

ST

ED

IT

IO

N

9 00 –2

RESHMAN ISABELLE CIARAMITARO TRIED TO WATCH THE NEWS EVERY NIGHT TO STAY INFORMED ABOUT THE WORLD. CIARAMITARO SPEC

LONE RANGER

>>

Above: During summer boys soccer try-outs, sophomore Zach Colby runs ahead of the group during the beep test. “I had to run from line to line to catch up with the bea,” Colby said. “Everyone has to go through it for tryouts. It’s the most dreaded part – no one likes it.” Photo by Kristin Barker.

SERIOUS HABITS

>>

Below: Hitting a cross-court shot, freshman Maggie Fenton plays at one of the first varsity meets of the season. Fenton started playing tennis in sixth grade and had become very serious about it. “Before every meet I eat two strawberry Nutri-grain bars,” Fenton said. “It’s probably just in my mind, but I feel like it gives me energy.” Photo by Tyler Roste.

FRAZZLE DAZZLE LETTER-TRANSFERRING Above: Using a letter-transfer process, senior Ariel Litwer creates letters to put on shopping bags for a paper self-portrait for Design class. “It was fun but it was hard because all we were allowed to use was Elmer’s glue and paper and that’s not something we’ve done since elementary school,” Litwer said. Photo by Rachel English.

>>

>>

Above: Ratting her hair for the spring play ‘Woyzeck,’ junior Sarah Evans prepares to play the grandmother in the play. After preparing their make-up and costumes, the cast members gathered together and made distorted positions to get ready for the show. “The creepy voice I did made my voice a little scratchy,” Evans said, “so I practiced it over and over again before the show.” Photo by Sam Bolanovich.

EGULARLY SINCE HE WAS ONLY FIVE YEARS OLD. HE ENJOYED SPENDING EXTRA TIME WITH HIS DAD. THEY HUNTED IN TEXAS AND KAN FINISHING OFF THE YEAR

>>

Far above: (Left to right) Freshman Danielle Norton plays a teamwork game on her first day of school. Photo by Tyler Roste. • Painting Xs on people’s faces, senior Lauren Bowles participates in diversity week. Photo by Kristin Barker. • Junior Kelly Sabates practices for her forensics tournament. Photo by Rachel English. • Excited about the girls basketball substate win, senior David Degoler and junior Margaret Brill celebrate victory for the SME girls varsity basketball team. Photo by Andie Mitchell. • Senior Margaret Schmidt blows pencil dust off of her drawing. Photo by Sam Bolanovich. • On the senior float on Lancer Day, senior Megan Alley is dressed in her 70s attire. Photo by Peter Bautz. • Striking an pose after missing her second serve, junior Hannah Copeland goofs off at tennis practice. Photo by Rachel English. • During Environmental Education, senior Jack Brugger teaches a lesson about recycling to his class. Photo by Lauren Bleakley. • During the fall musical review, senior Katie Bartow acts as Adelaide from the musical ‘Guys and Dolls.’ Photo by Kristin Barker. • Painting, senior Laura Robertson perfects her art. Photo by Rachel English.

LANCERS WE WILL ALWAYS BE

cover: (Left to right) At the March 13 varsity boys state basketball game against Wichita Southeast, senior Marcus Webb tries to pump up the crowd. The student crowd was wilder than ever because the >team > Backhadn’t made it to state in three years. “The crowd’s reaction was unbelievable,” Webb said. “It was probably the loudest I’ve ever heard in in the four years I’ve been here. It gets our adrenaline running. After the game, it felt as if we were brothers because we put it all out there together, and we have gotten to know each other all season.” Photo by Rachel English. • At the same game, the state semi-finals game, seniors Paige Kuklenski and Libby Jandl nervously watch the team play. After a game of both mistakes and success, the team lost 63-80. “Right after the half court shot, I was starting to get nervous because we’d been down the whole game,” Kuklenski said. “But I still thought they could pull away and win in the second half. I had faith in them and I definitely thought they had the capability to come back.” Photo by Rachel English. • Decorating the Prairie Village Shopping Center on Lancer Day, senior Andrew Sweeney sets up the balloon arch. Sweeney, a Pep Exec, got involved in Pep Club because of his positive attitude and because he enjoyed decorating and setting up for events. “At Lancer Day, it was cool to set up everything and then see it afterwards,” Sweeney said. “At first, the weather was kind of bad – cold and cloudy. We didn’t know if it was going to be canceled or not, but it ended up being really nice outside.” Photo by Kristin Barker. • During his Art Foundations class, freshman Andrew Simmons perfects his project. The students were assigned to make ceramic birdhouses. “I just freehanded it before I started it, but most people planned their birdhouse out to make sure the structure stayed up,” Simmons said. “I ended up having to start over on that piece because I accidentally let it dry up, but it was pretty easy to redo.” Photo by Eliza McCormick.


CIFICALLY WANTED TO STAY

UP

D AT

E D ABOUT CONFLICTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND DARFUR. • JUNIOR TIM BIRD H A D B

2008-2009

E EN

H U NTING WITH HIS DAD


Yearbook 2008-2009  

SING YOUR HEART OUT STARTING OFF THE YEAR SENIOR SPIRIT – 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 8 Below: Singing the school song at the end of her final pep assembl...

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