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PAGE 23

JUNIOR OLYMPIAN PAGES 12-13

HOOKAH TREND

there for

EACH OTHER Over 12 years, juniors discover that friendship is in the little things

PHOTO BY MARISA WALTON

WRITTEN BY JULIA POE

Every year, on Jan. 8,

junior Dan Walker carefully hand makes a birthday card for fellow junior Jack Anderson. He begins each one the same way. To my very best friend... Jack keeps each letter on his bulletin board in his room. Varying levels of scrawling script cover the bright pieces of paper -- 12 cards to commemorate 12 years as best friends.

This is the story of a friendship that is both unlikely and typical. Jack is a varsity linebacker. Dan has Down’s Syndrome. Yet kindergarten recess turned these two boys into close friends. And close friends became brothers. And somehow, a shared sense of humor and dedication to supporting each other made a disability unimportant. This is the story of Jack and Dan.

STORY CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

Shawnee Mission East l 7500 Mission Road, PV KS, 66208 l December 16, 2013 l Issue 8 l www.smeharbinger.net


editorial.

No. 08

EDITORIAL The legacy of Nelson Mandela should be incorporated into more American history lessons.

The faces of Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. and Benjamin Franklin hang in classrooms all across America. They’ve earned their places in American classrooms with courage, ingenuity and leadership that bettered our country. The Harbinger believes that the time has come for another giant to hang among them: Nelson Mandela. The first black President of South Africa and lifelong civil rights leader died on Dec. 5 at the age of 95. It’s time for us to look beyond our borders and appreciate the importance of those that bring progress to our world, regardless of what country it came from. Present and future generations can look to him as the embodiment of what it means to fight tirelessly for peace. During his incarceration, Mandela refused to bend on his convictions. That is the type of courage that today’s world needs more of -the courage to know that the most important fight is for what is right. Mandela led his country to the end of Apartheid, a legal system of racial segregation in place in South Africa from 1948 to 1993. Stanford. edu says its aim was to ensure white domination over black and colored people. It separated the privileged whites from the black majority by allocating jobs, areas of living and restricting voting rights for blacks. He spent 27 years in prison for challenging Apartheid. Instead of calling for a bloody revolution and appealing to the anger and resent-

ment of the formerly-oppressed blacks, he preached forgiveness and unity for blacks and whites alike. “For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” Therein lies Mandela’s importance. Because of his achievement of a peaceful transition from an oppressive regime to a thriving democratic republic, and his belief in equal opportunity and freedom, every child should grow up knowing who he was and what he did for our world. Mandela’s death brought him back into the spotlight after spending the majority of his life in public service. CNN reported that 91 heads of state and tens of thousands of South Africans attended his memorial held in a 90,000-seat stadium in Johannesburg. His life transcended South African borders; he provided an example for people across the world to look to and attempt to imitate. President Obama said in a statement following his death that Mandela had been a great inspiration to him early in his career (CNN.com). His legacy belongs not only to South Africa. He belongs among George Washington and Martin Luther King Jr. in American classrooms. It’s high time we start to appreciate what happens elsewhere, because we are no longer simply part of one nation, we are part of a world that is rapidly unifying. It’s

EDITORIAL BOARD VOTES

for: 11 against: 0 absent: 0

THE HARBINGER STAFF 2013-2014 Co-Editors-In-Chief Andrew McKittrick Katie Knight Assistant Editors Morgan Krakow Sophie Tulp Head Copy Editor Sarah Berger Assistant Head Copy Editor Pauline Werner Art & Design Editor Miranda Gibbs News Section Editor Greta Nepstad News Page Designers Mike Thibodeau Spread Editors Phoebe Aguiar Caroline Kohring Features Page Designers Sydney Lowe Claire Whittaker Pauline Werner

Sarah Berger Sophie Tulp Katie Knight Morgan Twibell Pauline Werner Caroline Kohring Julia Poe Staff Writers Madison Hyatt Ellis Nepstad Michael Kraske Hannah Colemann Lauren Brown Photo Editors McKenzie Swanson Maddie Schoemann Assistant Photo Editors AnnaMarie Oakley Annie Savage Opinion Section Editor Morgan Twibell Opinion Page Designer Nellie Whittaker A&E Section Editor Leah Pack

Features Section Editor Maddie Hise

A&E Page Designer Audrey Danciger

Copy Editors Mike Thibodeau Clara Ma Andrew McKittrick Will Oakley Morgan Krakow

Sports Section Editor Will Oakley Sports Page Designers Tommy Sherk John Foster

Freelance Page Designers Georgia DuBois Staff Photographers Kathryn Jones Neely Atha Callie McPhail Kylie Relihan Annika Sink Taylor Anderson Katie Lamar Paloma Garcia Tessa Polaschek Abby Hans Scotty Burford Editorial Board Andrew McKittrick Katie Knight Morgan Krakow Sarah Berger Will Oakley Morgan Twibell Sophie Tulp Julia Poe Grace Heitmann Mike Thibodeau Pauline Werner Online Editors-in-Chief Grace Heitmann Julia Poe Head Copy Editor Susannah Mitchell Assistant Head Copy Editor Clara Ma Online Photo Editor Marisa Walton

Assistant Photo Editors Hailey Hughes Meghan Shirling News Editor Nellie Whittaker Homegrown Editor Maxx Lamb Opinion Editor Claire Sullivan A&E Editor Audrey Danciger Sports Section Editor John Foster Assistant Sports Editors Ellis Nepstad Will Oakley Video Editors Sophie Mitchell Annie Foster Podcast and Radio Editor Leah O’Connor Eastipedia Editor Maxx Lamb

Head Webmaster Jack Stevens Assistant Webmasters Jacob Milgrim Matthew Bruyere Live Broadcast Editors Jack Stevens Andrew McKittrick Anchors Sydney Lowe Will Oakley Maddie Hise Multimedia Staff Jack Stevens Sophie Mitchell Matthew Bruyere Annie Foster Social Media Jacob Milgrim Adviser Dow Tate

The Harbinger is a student run publication. Interactive Editors The contents and views Will Oakley are produced solely Mike Thibodeau Matthew Bruyere by the staff and do not represent the Shawnee Mission School District, East faculty or school administration.

Letters to the editor may be sent to room 521 or smeharbinger@gmail.com. Letters may be edited for clarity, length, libel and mechanics and accepted or rejected at the editors’ discretion.


A week in photos

F E I R B NEWS IN

Politicians disagree on new Farm Bill PHOTO BY KATIE LAMAR The student section cheers the girls’ varsity basketball game against Blue Valley North on Dec. 11. East lost 49 to 62.

PHOTO BY ANNA COOK The Chambers choir performs in the choir’s winter concert on Dec. 4

PHOTO BY MARISA WALTON During the Blue and Black basketball scrimmage on Dec. 2, junior Lucas Jones tries to dribble the ball past senior Matt Nestler.

PHOTO BY MCKENZIE SWANSON Associate principal Britton Heaney sprays “Lancer Cologne” on freshman Tommy Hise at the winter pep assembly on Dec. 3.

news. WRITTEN BY ELLIS NEPSTAD

ART BY GRETA NEPSTAD

A LOOK INSIDE...

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Republican and Democratic leaders on the House and Senate agriculture committees are debating over renewing the Farm Bill, which regulates farm production and prices of farm goods. Milk’s value is higher than it is currently sold for because the government supplies financial aid to farmers. With this aid, milk prices stay below five dollars. If the bill isn’t passed, then the government will be forced to buy milk for $20 more per 100 pounds than it is currently sold for. If the bill fails to pass then the nation’s farm policy will revert back to the 1949 farm bill when milk was at a price floor of roughly $38 per 100 pounds. This could cause the price of milk to double up to $7. The farm bill does not only revolve around dairy products -- food stamps are also part of the bill. Currently, the two parties can’t agree on how to handle cutting funding for food stamps. “On one side you have the Republicans who want to make sure farmers continue to get there subsidies, so milk doesn’t go up to eight dollars a gallon.” AP government teacher Ron Stallard said. “The problem they have is they want to cut the food stamp program to people who don’t qualify for government assistance.”

Lulu’s Thai restaurant, currently located at the Crossroads in Kansas City, Mo. could potentially be opening another restaurant in Westwood, KS. The owners -- who are Westwood residents -- are interested in opening a second location on 47th street next to the Velvet Cream Popcorn store. Forty seventh street is the same street Oklahoma Joe’s and the newly-opened Taco Republic are located on. The city of Westwood has multiple restaurant options, including First Watch, Oklahoma Joe’s, Houlihan’s and Taco Republic. However, currently Westwood has no restaurants that serve primarily Asian food. “It would help add variety to the restaurants around [Westwood] if Lulu’s moved in,” said sophomore Westwood resident Will Jaggers. “Right now there are no Chinese places.”

SMSD websites plan to undergo construction There are discussions of updating the Shawnee Mission School District (SMSD) websites, including the teacher web backpacks. The Shawnee Mission school websites have been talked about at the district level. The East website is administered and updated by principal John McKinney, Cris Pearson, McKinney’s assistant, and associate principal Jeremy Higgins. There are no firm plans to redo the web backpacks, but the vision is to have them looking similar to the district site. “The story is that they are going to update all the teacher web back packs to [look] more like the district site, with pictures and images,” principal McKinney said. The district first started talking about the plan to change the site about a year ago, and around six months ago the district and the building web pages were updated. “When they do [it], one day will be web backpack, the next day it will be that new and improved web page,” said McKinney.

FO OD

STAMPS a government-issued voucher given to those with low incomes, and can be exchanged for food

Food stamps make up a majority of the Farm Bill — 80% of the Bill is dedicated to them, and is one of the more controversial topics

8.05%

Thai restaurant looks at new location

U.S. Department of Agriculture

A breakdown of the 2008-2012 Farm Bill budget crop insurance

12.78% commodities

8.85% conservation

69.40% food stamps

1 in every seven people use food stamps in the U.S.

what food stamps don’t include alcohol

pet food vitamins


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Nutrition Transition news.

New federal laws will cause a change in food choices offered in the cafeteria next year WRITTEN BY CLAIRE WHITTAKER New meal requirements will be updated with stricter sodium, fat and sugar limits for the first time in over 15 years in effect for school lunches and breakfasts. Due to Michelle Obama’s Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act East and schools nationwide will have to comply with the new standards taking effect July 1 of this year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) made the standards from a set of recommendations the Institute of Medicine Panel created. The guidelines were last updated in 2010 from the old dietary standards, Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These new standards are different because they limit unhealthy content in foods for public schools. The past and present standards both emphasize the importance of whole grain in one’s diet. Along with offering only whole-grain rich wheat food, requirements include offering fat-free or low-fat, as well. The new meal standards also include servings of fruit and vegetables to be offered daily with school lunches. “Sometimes [in the past] we would laugh because catsup was considered a vegetable at one point,” Assistant Principal Jeff Storey said. In addition to including fruit and vegetable servings, the new standards will also result in more funding for lunches.

LANCER Voice

Lancers share opinions on their favorite cafeteria “junk food” items and what healthier alternative they would replace it with

NUTRITION FACTS

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KATHRYN JONES

For the first time in 30 years, meal funding provided for school lunches will go up six cents per school meal. According to the USDA website, this raise will be tied schools’ performances in serving improved meals, in an effort to encourage serving healthy meals. The Hunger Free Kids Act also calls for portion sizes to be determined by age rather than all children being served the same amount of food. This is to ensure correct amounts of food are being given to children with different caloric requirements. According to cafeteria manager Linda Bricker, the most impactful part of the standards at the school will be the reduction of trans fats, saturated fats and sodium allowed in items sold. The restrictions for fat, sugar and sodium will affect mostly what is considered à la carte snack items. USDA restrictions are already placed on main entrée items so the restrictions will mostly affect fries, pizza and chicken tenders at East. “They are actually going to try to get our pizza as a main item so that anybody can get it and it will just be sold up [in the front line],” Bricker said. It is currently unknown if the pizza will be allowed to be sold as a main entrée or will be eliminated completely.

LAURELL STEGELMAN I like chicken tenders the most. If I could change it to something healthier, I would say hummus and carrots.

SOPHOMORE

Bricker is currently unsure which specific items will be replaced next year, but if items such as chips currently sold do not follow the restrictions, a replacement item may be found to be sold instead. This could be as simple as swapping out chips for a lower-calorie option with less salt. This with affect food options for students to buy during lunch. “This would affect what I eat at lunch because every time that I forget my lunch, which is quite often, I order pizza because it is yummy and hot,” sophomore Bea Workman said. Along with meal standards going up in the cafeteria, improvements will have to be made to food sold outside the lunch lines in vending machines. All food sold in schools will have to contribute to what the USDA considers a healthy diet. The guidelines with fat and sodium limits will be in effect until around 4:00 or 5:00 p.m. during the school day. After-school events like football games will not be affected. The new standards will be gradually phased into food sold in the cafeteria. This will allow schools to make key changes gradually. They will start in 2014 and be complete in 2016.

A look at the sugar, fat and sodium content in one serving of three popular cafeteria items*

CHICKEN STRIPS

Total Fat: 17 g Sodium: 464 mg Sugars: 0.1 g

PIZZA (ONE SLICE)

Total Fat: 10 g Sodium: 720 mg Sugars: 4 g

FRENCH FRIES

Total Fat: 17 g Sodium: 246 mg Sugars: 0.4 g

sugars, unhealthy fats and sodium are components of food targeted by USDA standards that could affect the sale of pizza, fries and chicken strips in the cafeteria *based on generic serving sizes and nutrition facts from www.usda.gov and www.dominos.com

SERENA SUMMERS

CONNOR ALLEY

JUNIOR

SENIOR

I love the pizza. But my old school had, like, sub sandwiches, like at a Subway; a sub bar. I would like something like that, it’s pretty healthy.

I usually get the pizza and the fries. For a healthier option I would say they could do, like, carrots or something.


news.

Securing the School East reevaluates security policies in the wake of the one-year anniversary of the Sandy Hook Massacre WRITTEN BY MORGAN KRAKOW The shooting that killed 26 people including the shooter himself at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Conn., prompted school officials across the country to reevaluate their safety policy. A year after the massacre, districts like Shawnee Mission are still working on improvements to make schools completely secure. Principal John McKinney said that whenever a tragedy like Sandy Hook occurs, schools take a more in-depth look at their own school safety objectives, including East. “We look at everything that we’re doing and everything we need to be doing to keep our students safe, that’s our number one priority here.” McKinney said. According to McKinney, East has 38 doors leading to the outside. A chief security concern is the entrance and exit of students on the campus. “Not all of [the doors] are monitored at the same time, we just don’t have enough personnel to do that.” McKinney said. Campus police officer, David Parker, said that even though East is in a safe neighborhood, much like Sandy Hook Elementary. Parker and School Resource Officer, Joel Porter, mostly deal with the issue of complacency among the students. According to Parker, he could spend his entire day closing doors that have been propped open. “People need to realize that yeah we do live in a great community,” Parker said. “We do live in a safe community, we’re still not beyond reach of something tragic. People really need to pay attention to that.” Junior Becca Zeiger admitted that she doesn’t come to school fearful of violence or threat, but realizes that an intruder could come into school because so many students abuse open lunch policy at East. “Not just seniors go out, all grades go out, without getting in trouble at all.” Zeiger said. Students leaving for lunch and other safety concerns are frequently discussed by the Shawnee Mission School District board of education. Serving on the board, Donna Bysfield presides over Shawnee Mission East area proceedings and echoed McKinney’s concern about certain door issues. Bysfield offered some insight into how the district is working to improve this problem. “We’re looking at things like if some doors are propped,” Bysfield said. “They’d somehow flash in the se-

curity office or in the regular office so people knew that door was propped open.” Entrances and exits aren’t the only current concern for the East administration. They also worry about the amount of strangers, volunteers and visitors who enter and exit school via the front entrance throughout the day. Although the current procedure is for a visitor to sign in at the front desk and obtain a sticker showing that the office has knowledge of their presence on the campus, proposed improvements to this system are also in the works. McKinney said the school, the district and the school board are looking for a more comprehensive version of this current system. Bysfield explained that upon entering the building, a visitor would show their driver’s license or some other form of identification somewhere outside of the building. A system would then run their name and print out a card that gives them a pass to be on school property. “[We’ll able to] track when they come into the building and their purpose for coming in the building,” Principal McKinney said. “How long they were in the building and all that data I think will be helpful if we need it, we’ll have it.” He said much of this is all still under discussion without a real time frame for implementation. This idea and others were proposed at meetings that directly followed the Sandy Hook. The meetings were called In Defense of Our Schools. Associate superintendent Gillian Chapman attended these meetings that comprised of administrators from all over the county from private and public schools. “We looked at how we can best respond so that we can protect the occupants of our buildings.” Chapman said. Chapman explained that these meeting exemplified the city’s concern of school safety. The meetings included school safety officials and districts heads, and lasted at times, for hours on end. They researched new ways to keep schools safe and had discussions about the philosophy and manner in which school districts go about security. While improvements in screening

technology are in the works, both East safety officials and administrators stress that the ones who play the biggest role in keeping the school safe is the students and staff themselves. McKinney explained that this cooperation extends also, to safe code red and lock down drills. Administrators and officers alike expressed that the responsibility of cooperation during a lock down drill is of utmost importance. Lock downs are there to keep students safe and not to scare them, according to McKinney. When drills occur the administration likes to involve the Prairie Village Police Department so that officers and students would get a feel for what a real emergency might be like. “As unlikely as it may be we want to prepare nonetheless and that means making sure the building is secure and teachers have a plan” McKinney said. Chapman sees the district’s primary ideals about school safety as beneficial to everyone. She said that the proactive role Shawnee Mission frequently takes in reevaluating security is one of its most important attributes, and Sandy Hook gave them an opportunity to do more of that. “We’re looking and investigating about what happened at Sandy Hook and about what lessons can be learned and applied to all of our buildings.”

8 9 9 1 e c n i hootings S

School S

8

School mass shootings since 1998

information courtesy of ABCNews.com

20

Children died last year at Sandy Hook Elementary school in a mass shooting that killed 26

ART BY MIKE THIBODEAU


Reasons Why I Suck

opinion.

Taking a look at personality traits outside the norm of a teenage girl

AN OPINION OF LAUREN BROWN

There aren’t a lot of people who will willingly talk about guys are deeper than their stereotype of being less emotional the things they want to change about themselves. We’ve been than girls suggests. Girls tend to constantly compare themtaught to always be ourselves and not beat ourselves up over selves to one another, but I feel like I can be my authentic self what other people think, but I believe it’s healthy to look at the with my guy friends and not have to worry about those things. weird (and sometimes unpopular) parts of your personality in Relating to the opposite gender more than my own isn’t order to come to terms with what makes you different. necessarily a reason why I suck, but my frustration with my Somehow, I’m not wired with the ability to “agree to dis- tomboyish nature lies in the fact that I love my girlfriends and agree” with my friends. I’m lucky that they love me even wish I could relate to them more. though I’m opinionated, but I get laughs and “oh-no-hereMy decision to join a sorority next fall frankly scares me. we-go”s in response to my attitude on things typical Johnson I’m not going to necessarily change who I am for the approval County white girls are supposed to like. of others’, but I think there’s a way to find a happy medium. I’d For those that are screaming “hipster!” in their heads right love to become a new variety of sorority girl: one who doesn’t now: simmer down. I have been known to drink Starbucks cof- wear monograms, but is totally down with wearing the Norts fee every once in a while and yes, I do own a pair of Uggs that I and oversized shirts sorority girls typically wear — only if I can wore religiously in middle school, so take it easy on the “indie” wear my Chacos with them. I’m sure I can find a group of girls labels please. that also listens to music no one has ever heard of and who If anything, I’ve adopted the label “the guilty cynic”; a lot of enjoy frequenting small coffee shops as much as I do. I can’t what my friends like just doesn’t do it for me: romance movies, share Greek letters with my guy friends, but I’m optimistic I girly topics of conversation and Christmas music, to name a can find a crowd that will cheer as loud as I will for the Huskers few. I wish I could change the critical lens with which I look at and actually know what a fumble is. these things with. This desire to change is less about wanting * * * to fit in and more about me wanting to enjoy these popular I truly wish I was the type of person who could listen to things like other people. Christmas music in October and eagerly count down the days * * * to Dec. 25. I like holidays like Thanksgiving and the Fourth of First off, I wish I could watch all 108 minutes of a Nicholas July moreso. Because gifts aren’t exchanged on these holidays, Sparks movie. I’d much rather enjoy half a in my observation, they tend to focus less on dozen episodes of the serial killer drama I get laughs and “ohmaterialism and more on spending time with “Dexter” on Netflix. I know my decision to no-here-we-go’s” in re- family. My best friend, who adores everything watch this instead of “Dear John” will re- sponse to my attitude on Christmas, will be the first to tell you I suck quire more brain function than staring at things typical Johnson because of this. Sorry, I’m just not a huge fan Channing Tatum. Even though Sparks’ or County white girls are of songs that repeat choruses about reindeers other chick flick films are unrealistic, I want supposed to like. and bells and snow. to be able to believe them. Maybe my skepI wish I could change this about myself. ticism with cinematic love has something Christmas is generally considered the most to do with the fact that my parents have been separated since popular season of the year and I feel like I miss out on that joy I was born. when I choose not to embrace the Christmas culture. I work I’ve become so cynical regarding relationships on the silver in a small candy store where constantly fudge cutting, ribbon screen that I’m usually able to predict the seemingly happy tying and dealing with customers can really take a toll on one’s ending before it even begins. Boy meets girl. Boy gets girl. Boy Christmas spirit, especially when all of this is done with “Jinand girl live happily ever after. gle Bells” on repeat. I know, I’m a Grinch. Bah humbug. I can get behind a rom-com with a strong female lead I can I know I can’t escape Christmas tunes in the winter months. relate to like Kat from “10 Things I Hate About You” or Sum- This year my feelings towards Christmas music are transitionmer from “500 Days of Summer.” The challenge is getting my ing from hatred to tolerance. The Choraliers started rehearsfriends to choose these films that are a little more catered to ing for the Holiday Concert back in October, and I survived. my quirky personality. I’m learning to love things like caroling with my family beI’m learning to compromise. If the plot of a love story has cause it’s a fun tradition, not because I actually enjoy “Frosty drama and depth besides some guy writing some girl every the Snowman.” day for a year -- oh wait, that could be multiple Sparks movies Don’t misunderstand me; I love other aspects of Christmas. -- I can sacrifice tuning in for one girl’s night. Sit me in front of My mom and I decorate our Christmas tree, not to the song “Silver Linings Playbook” and I promise to be attentive. See? “Deck the Halls,” but by traditionally watching “Wizard of Oz” I’m slowly changing my tune. while we hang ornaments. One of my favorite things of the * * * season is enjoying peppermint-flavored hot cocoa by our fireI get a hard time from people for being a “guy’s girl,” to place. This year I’m even attempting to do these things to the which I have to explain that my friendships with guys are sounds of my newly created Christmas music Pandora radio. simply that: friendships. It’s just that I would much rather talk If I continue to embrace more Christmas music like this about Nebraska Husker football than my favorite nail polish. you may even hear me humming along to “Santa Baby” this Heck, I can’t even remember the last time I had polish on my time next year. fingernails. * * * Guys are more apt to share my love of the outdoors, obAfter addressing the reasons why I suck, or put more lightscure bands and KU basketball. My unique tastes aren’t seen ly, the differences in my personality from the status quo, I’m as pretentious, but rather relatable to them. My crude and sar- challenging myself to let go of some of my dislikes. I know castic humor tends to go over better with a male audience. these are small changes, but if they lead me to be a little less I know I’m generalizing and being somewhat hypocriti- cynical I might ultimately understand the joy people get when cal, but I’ve realized most of my conversations with girls can talking about romance movies, sorority sisters and Christmas be fairly people-centered and materialistic. I’m realizing that music.

Above: Lauren frowns at the idea of having to watch the romantic comedy “27 Dresses”

Above&Below: Lauren struggles with the act of nail painting

Below: Lauren covers her ears as she is forced to listen to Christmas music on Pandora

PHOTOS BY ABBY HANS


opinion.

AN OPINION OF LEAH O’CONNOR Sitting by the window I hear the skid of tires on 75th street as the clock ticks on the wall. In just enough time to turn my head, I see a Mercedes going over one hundred miles per hour, as it slams into the car driving across Roe. The explosion of impact happened so fast that after the initial sound of the collision, all the tiny pieces of glass fell from the air like a silent, glittering rain. I will never, ever forget the sound of a car crash, and the life-changing effects it had on me. Ever since I can remember, the thought of driving was always something I looked forward to. Stepping into the driver’s seat was the epitome of growing up. I dreamed of the things that a car could bring: the ability to drive into the unknown in a night of adventure with my friends. Or exploring the vast world of suburbia to get McDonald’s dipped cones. As a kid that’s what I imagined, I always pictured driving as a wonderful thing. But what I didn’t think about was hearing the sound of screeching breaks outside my friend’s house as we witnessed a fatal car

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY NEELY ATHA

crash. It was just a mere hundred yards down the road. I didn’t think about a night I would find out that someone I knew, someone I interacted with, was killed in a car crash on the highway. You don’t think about things like that. You don’t think about that until you feel the impact those cars can have on people’s lives. And when I did, my life was changed forever. Unable to speak, my friend and I ran outside into the chaos on the sidewalk. The police sirens were blaring down the road. The intersection was scattered with the debris from the four cars hit in the wreck. Soon the distress began to ripple throughout the street, coating the air with a cold silence as we just stood there, shocked and numb. That’s all we could do. The seconds ticked by as I looked across the street, and saw one of my friends walking toward us down the sidewalk. He had been turning onto 75th at the time of the crash, coming to pick me up. It was then that I realized that if there was only a moment’s difference, he could have been the one in the car, as it split in half. That was the thing that has stuck

with me. The everlasting flashbacks of that horrifying noise. The thoughts of “What if it had been someone I knew?” Then, a month later, it was. “Houston St. John died in a car accident today.” My mind stopped. I couldn’t comprehend the words my friend was saying as I stood frozen. The minutes passed by. Finally, I got out a simple: “What?” as I saw my friends with tears in their eyes walking by. Then all the flashbacks began to come back. The screeching tires. The raining glass. Everything. I could imagine the whole thing. But this time it was different. This time it wasn’t a stranger, it was a friend. Someone I spent a good portion of my summer working with. I couldn’t just think of it as some crash, but the crash that killed Houston. Another wave of emotion hit me as the memories started coming back, the memories of how we first met during a production of “Les Misérables”. The memories of how I wished we had become better friends, talked more. So much was running through my

O’Connor peers through a shattered window, remembering the traumatizing sights she’s seen mind. Then came the final realization: he is gone, just like the person in the crash I witnessed less than a month before. For a long time I didn’t drive. At first I was actually scared, panicking even when I was a passenger. It was a constant thought that it would be me in that car. Me in that accident. Being in a car makes you vulnerable. You have to trust the people around you, but also realize that you are not untouchable. In a split second, another driver’s choice can take your life. But just as easily, your choice can take theirs. That gamble is the thing that honestly terrified me, to the point of not wanting to drive. But then I realized that I will always have to live in a world with cars. I will have to drive, and I can’t be afraid of that. When I finally started driving again, I was scared. My knuckles were white, and I was “that guy” going the exact speed limit. But I did it, and I will continue, knowing that it will help me. For now I know that stepping into the drivers seat really is the epitome of growing up.

CAR CRASH STATISTICS

3.3% increase in crash fatalities in 2012

MALES

are responsible for 70% of fatal crashes in 2012, alcohol-related crash fatalities rose

4.6% 405 Kansas had

fatal car crashes in 2012

information courtesy of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

After witnessing a fatal car crash and losing a friend in a wreck, sophomore’s perspective of driving and growing up has changed


opinion.

STRIVING FOR

POLITICAL NEUTRALITY Political correctness shouldn’t be so closely examined in society

AN OPINION OF SYDNEY LOWE PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ANNIKA SINK Freedom of speech has never failed to be a source of controversy. Arguably one of the best gifts granted to us, the emotional destruction that comes with free speech is alarming. Not only is respect forgotten, but ignorance combined with the freedom to say whatever one wants fuels a misunderstanding of the expectation to be somewhat politically correct. It is important to keep in mind that everyone is a human, so there is an obligation to treat them justly, but at the same time what is considered offensive has recently become a little ridiculous. The phrase “political correctness” is one of those ideas that can mean whatever one chooses. Some people think of it as the requirement to bottle up opinions and live in denial of what they actually think; others see it as more of a social expectation. Political correctness is just a way of saying that despite what one’s personal opinion might be on a specific subject, our generation demands respect to be given to any group of people who have done nothing to be treated any differently. That being said, as with many things, social media has in several instances exaggerated this and caused people to jump on the bandwagon and read too far into things that were never intended to be disrespectful. In 2007 in Sydney, Australia it was deemed derogatory to women and frightening to children to mimic Santa’s laugh and say “Ho Ho Ho” because it was similar to the slang word for prostitute. I highly doubt that the creator of Santa’s laugh was actually trying to leave an underlying message about an Australian prostitute. Oversensitivity seems to be an increasing problem. It has become almost trendy to be very self righteous about issues of little importance, and read way too far into things. Many see it as moving forward and being liberal to be overly concerned, but really it just creates overblown drama. The interesting thing about our world is that there are so many people who rest on both extremes of acting on political correctness. In our country alone, you could find people who are so

racist and derogatory towards women, gays and any other group you could think of; these people are so far from politically and socially correct. Then, there are also people who get Cookie Monster taken off of Sesame Street because he encourages child obesity. As can be expected with our generation, access to social media has heightened the desire to move both towards extreme political correctness, and towards publishing thoughts that are extreme in the opposite way. Freedom of speech has always been one of those things that can be very bad when abused, and access to direct publication like Twitter or Facebook does not help that. The fine line comes with the difference between taking something out of context and creating controversy over it. With the Santa thing, and the moms getting rid of a childhood icon like Cookie Monster, political correctness is taken too far. Let’s be honest, who really cares? On the other hand, fifty years after the end of the civil rights movement it is expected that people would be courteous to people of color, but that is far from what happens. Of course, there is a happy medium. Forcing people to walk on eggshells in fear of saying anything that could possibly be taken out context isn’t a good way to live, but neither is deciding that freedom of speech puts any individual on a pedestal above anyone else. Since there are so many discrepancies, it is hard to group everyone and say that society should be more or less politically correct. I would say that in order to fit my definition of politically correct, anyone speaking negatively out of ignorance should, as cliché as it is, put themselves in the shoes of whoever they are bashing. Likewise, people who run to Twitter dissecting everything that was intended to be harmless could take a look at the world and realize that treating everything so seriously is creating a world that none of us want to be a part of. Being politically correct means treating people and situations in a way that will progress our society, not hurt it.

some

POLITICALLY

INCORRECT

MOVIES and PHRASES “AIRPLANE”

One example from this film is when two black men have a conversation incomprehensible to the flight attendant until someone else offers to translate, explaining, “I speak jive.”

“CADDYSHACK”

This film combines many moments of both racial and religious political incorrectness with Enough non-PC moments mixed with revolting jokes to satisfy anyone’s inner slob.

“RULE OF THUMB” This originates from the old English dictum that a husband could not beat his wife or children with any stick wider than his thumb.

“PET OWNER”

It is becoming less acceptable to ‘own’ animals, pet owners have been transformed into ‘pet guardians’. information courtesy of today.com and languagemonitor.com


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LITTLE THINGS CONTINUED FROM COVER

When they met in kindergarten, Jack and Dan walked to Brookwood Elementary every morning with arms slung around each other’s shoulders, steps matching each other in length and speed. Even when Jack grew to be five inches taller than Dan by the end of elementary school, they still posed for pictures with arms around each other, despite the awkward height difference. In kindergarten, Jack tied Dan’s shoes and cut up his school lunches in the cafeteria for him. He didn’t quite understand Dan’s disability, but he understood that Dan was his best friend. If he needed help with something, it was Jack’s job to provide that. That’s what best friends did. Dan’s growth slowed, and he could no longer keep up with the baseball, basketball and soccer teams that he had played on since kindergarten. But when Dan joined a Challenger’s team for kids with disabilities, Jack joined with him, acting as Dan’s “buddy” by helping him round bases and make baskets. That was Jack’s place. Dan often forgot to bring home his gym clothes on the weekend, so Jack took them home and washed them himself. He was there for 12 consecutive birthday dinners. When middle school bullies attempted to antagonize Dan, Jack was the first to defend him. “I’m not his mentor, really, or even like a big brother figure,” Jack said. “We’re equal and we’re friends — extremely close friends. We’re always there for each other.” * * * Jack was shaken awake at 2 a.m. by his mom, Michelle Anderson, on a cold November night at the end of eighth grade. Groggy and half-asleep, it took him several moments to understand her frenzied words. The Walkers’ Westwood house had burned down. Only the garage was left standing. Dan’s home, his cat, dog and tortoise, his sense of security -- everything that he had was consumed in the blaze.

Over the course of 12 years, two juniors found small moments of great friendship more powerful than disability

Jack didn’t speak when he first saw Dan. He couldn’t find the right words. Instead, he handed him a slate gray Northface, children’s extra large -- one size too small for Jack, a perfect fit for Dan. Three years later, it’s still the only coat Dan will use in the winter. “Jack and I like to be there for each other,” Dan said. “After [the fire] he would just come and pick me up and we would play football. We didn’t talk about it. We were just guys for each other.” What Dan needed the most in the chaos of losing his home was Jack. He needed someone to play football with on Tuesday nights and to joke around with after school. It took time, but Jack was patient. He learned to focus on little moments spent laughing at lunch, moments when Dan’s face split open with a smile and he seemed to forget. Even when Dan didn’t want to talk, Jack pretended that everything was normal. And eventually, it was. * * * The next three years were filled with change. Dan moved away from Jack, into a new neighborhood. They entered high school together, where Jack found a place among the varsity football and wrestling teams. Sports and classes kept the boys apart, but little moments continued to bring them together. The summer before junior year was a laidback summer for Dan and Jack; a summer without fire, without fear. Jack would throw a rod in the back of his car and take Dan fishing in the pond behind Tomahawk Creek. Dan loved it. He baited his line and waited patiently until, finally, the lake exploded in a flurry of ripples. A fish flailed at the end of his rod. Jack laughed as Dan excitedly reeled in the small fish, proud of his four-inch catch. There was one problem. Dan refused to hold it. No matter what, he wouldn’t touch the flopping fish. Like always, the boys

Jack and Dan pose for PHOTOS COURTESY OF a picture after catching DAVID ANDERSON a fish

compromised. Jack held the fish and leaned into Dan, whose eyes were squeezed shut in a wide smile as they posed for a picture. Then they lowered the catch back into the lake and let it swim away. With another line trailing in the water, Jack was comfortable. Dan was always there for him; managing his teams, cheering at his wrestling tournaments, helping to blow out the candles on his birthday cake. Dan was the person Jack wanted beside him. * * * Three months later, Jack and Dan sat together as the bus rumbled back to East after the desperation pass victory over Olathe Northwest. The team was chanting Dan’s name, over and over, as they celebrated their third win of the year. “Dan — the — man. Dan — the — man.” Junior year was Jack and Dan’s first season on the varsity football team -- Jack as a linebacker, Dan as a manager. This was Jack’s home. His team was a collection of his closest friends, and naturally he wanted Dan on the sidelines with him. “Dan keeps everything real for the players,” Michelle said. “Sometimes they’ll be really edgy and nervous for a big game, and they’ll look over and Dan will have gotten a chili dog and have it all over his face and just be grinning. He makes them laugh, and that’s most important.” Dan’s presence became a necessity to Jack and his teammates. He had to be there at practices and games. Jack felt nervous and uncomfortable on the field without knowing he could glance to the sidelines for an encouraging grin from his best friend. Knowing this, Dan made sure to be on the field for every practice and game. On Thanksgiving Day, Michelle dropped by football practice at East and noticed Dan’s younger sister, Abby, in the stands. “Of course he’s here,” Abby said, watching her brother as he high fived a

Anderson and Walker (“Super Dan”) Halloween 2007.

player on the sidelines. “Where else would he be?” * * * This is a story about small moments. A story of 12 years spent fishing. Of 12 years spent trick-or-treating and playing basketball and laughing when Dan’s dog ate his pizza. “I think, when it comes to Dan, you can’t pick out favorite moments, because it’s all in the little things,” Jack’s dad David Anderson said. “They have been such constants in each others’ lives, and it is such a natural friendship. It’s hard to pin down a favorite moment because there are so many of them.” There are all the times Jack took Dan out to dinner after football games. Boy Scouts in elementary school and Challenger’s tournaments in middle school. The time that Jack rearranged his schedule to have fourth hour weights with Dan, and the days they spent working together at McGonigle’s Meat Market. And that is what Dan has taught Jack. That little moments are what hold the fabric of his friendship with Dan together. That little moments are what matter. Dan has taught him how to live with joy. How to find meaning in every day and to be grateful for what he is given. He has taught him to dance at football practice and laugh at bad knock knock jokes. Dan has given Jack birthday cards and unrelenting support and pride in having a best friend whom he knows he will never lose. “Dan is just always smiling, he’s always laughing,” Jack said. “He’s taught me to want to be more like him. He lives every day with so much happiness and so much life. I think that’s what’s special about Dan.”

Jack and Dan at a Challenger baseball game


spread. Senior Noah Denny* blows “sex on the beach”-flavored tobacco smoke through his lips, slowly, rhythmically. He’s sunk into a red plush chair; upbeat Middle Eastern music pumps in the background. There’s conversation and chaos all around him, but he doesn’t hear. He’s in the middle of a Kansas City area hookah bar, and he’s completely relaxed. Smoking hookah satisfies him. It’s better than just staying at home and hanging out in his basement. It takes his mind off of the constant stress from school and sports. Underage teens across the country seem to be following Denny’s lead. In early November, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) released a study on high school students and tobacco usage. Hookah usage is on the rise. Within a year, the number of teenaged hookah smokers increased from 4.1 percent to 5.4 percent. According to the CDC, “hookahs — sometimes called water pipes — are used to smoke specially-made tobacco that is available in a variety of flavors (e.g., apple, mint, cherry, chocolate).” This tobacco is placed in a bowl, heated by charcoal and breathed in through a mouthpiece that is typically shared between smokers. The legal age for smoking tobacco is 18 for the United States. According to Denny, this new wave of hookah smokers have come about recently, especially to those in the East community. Denny says that while high school students have been drinking and smoking marijuana for years, he thinks hookah is the next big thing for teenagers. “I don’t think anyone really [knew what hookah was a couple years ago]...,” Denny said. “This year people just started discovering it and really liking it so a lot of people have gone [to hookah bars].” Junior Rebecka Tucker* has recently joined the hookah trend as well. She thinks that smoking hookah is an alternative to ‘worse’ drugs like marijuana, and is easier to access than other illegal recreations, particularly alcohol. Since tobacco purchase is legal when you turn 18, some seniors in high school are old enough to purchase those products -- including things they can smoke in a hookah -- and give it to their younger peers. “[Tobacco for hookah is] easier to get than maybe alcohol, and it really just is a fun thing to do,” Tucker said. “More and more people talk about it and it just spreads around. And it’s the “new” cool thing to do. Once someone notices

something that hasn’t ever been seen, they will want to actually do it and try it more.” Tucker was introduced to hookah her sophomore year when she saw her older brother doing it. She became so intrigued with it that her brother, who is of age, bought her a hookah of her own for her next birthday present. Now, whenever she needs shisha — the flavored tobacco — for her hookah, she turns to her older brother for help. To senior Nicole Robinson, the appeal of smoking hookah isn’t the lightheaded rush. For her, more than anything, hookah bars are opportunities for socialization that isn’t just sitting in someone’s house like usual. “It’s really more of a social thing,” Robinson said. “It’s not really like ‘oh, I wanna get a buzz,’ it’s more like ‘oh, let’s just hang out.’” Robinson says hookah bars are becoming a more popular social scene as the number of students who go to them increases. Denny says that while there are certain hookah bars around the KC area that are notorious for letting minors in, the majority of hookah bars are difficult for underaged kids to get into. Most of his friends find one or two bars and stick to them. According to Denny, to get into one hookah bar teens may just need to know the owner personally, who will make an exception for you and your underaged friends. Vickers says her standby hookah bar doesn’t card at all. A local hookah bar who Robinson and Tucker claim has a reputation for allowing minors in their doors, claims that they always check IDs at the door. According to School Resource Officer Joel Porter, these hookah bars are lenient on who they allow inside for the sake of making profits. He says that the reality is that underaged students bring in a steady amount of revenue for these businesses. Porter has never discovered a minor at a hookah bar, as there are none specifically in Prairie Village and students tend to go to the ones in Kansas City, Mo. However, he has talked with students who have told him about going inside. “[It’s easy for minors to get into hookah bars] probably because of the same reason it’s easy to go into a convenient store and buy cigarettes or, in a lot of places, being able to go in and purchase

It’s the “new” cool thing to do. -junior Rebecca Tucker

alcohol as a minor,” Porter said. “People who run businesses want profits, and some do that with integrity and some don’t.” In addition to legal issues, Dr. Abby Loch from Johnson County Pediatrics says that health issues can come as a result of smoking hookah as well. She says the most common misconception hookah smokers seem to have is the idea that hookah is less dangerous or less harmful to the body than other things, particularly cigarettes. The CDC says hookah tobacco does have nicotine, and is “at least as toxic as cigarette smoke.” Hookah smokers may even take in more smoke than with cigarettes due to the deep inhalation, frequent puffing and greater amount of time spent smoking. In fact, they say that a typical one-hour-long hookah smoking session involves inhaling 100-200 times the volume of smoke inhaled from a single cigarette. In addition to the dangers from the smoke, Loch says that oral and upper respiratory infections can be passed on by sharing a mouthpiece. Also, carbon monoxide from the heated coals is breathed in constantly. And all of these effects, according to Loch, have worse consequences when it is minors who smoke it. “If you’re starting at a younger age, then you’re obviously going to be exposed to it for a lot longer, and being chronically exposed to things like carbonmonoxide and the chemicals within tobacco [can be harmful],” Loch said. “[When you smoke hookah at a young age], everyone is developing, their lungs are developing. So the longer you’re exposed to it, just like cigarettes, you’re more prone to things later on like oral cancer and lung cancer and bladder cancer and those types of things.” Even with these health threats and legality issues, the numbers show that teenage hookah usage is growing. As the number of underage cigarette smokers declines — from 15.8 percent to 14 percent in the past year — hookah usage is still on the rise. Teens like Tucker, Robinson and Denny see the social benefits clearer than the health and legal risks, and this generation of students is contributing to that 5.4 percent of minors who are part of the hookah craze. *names changed to protect identity

[Health] effects have worse consequences when it’s minors who smoke it.

spread.

TAKING a HIT

WRITTEN BY KATIE KNIGHT PHOTO BY ANNIE SAVAGE

Hookah trend appeals to high school students

Parts of a Hookah coal tobacco

bowl foil

plate

stem

purge valve grommets

hose

water jar


spread. Senior Noah Denny* blows “sex on the beach”-flavored tobacco smoke through his lips, slowly, rhythmically. He’s sunk into a red plush chair; upbeat Middle Eastern music pumps in the background. There’s conversation and chaos all around him, but he doesn’t hear. He’s in the middle of a Kansas City area hookah bar, and he’s completely relaxed. Smoking hookah satisfies him. It’s better than just staying at home and hanging out in his basement. It takes his mind off of the constant stress from school and sports. Underage teens across the country seem to be following Denny’s lead. In early November, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) released a study on high school students and tobacco usage. Hookah usage is on the rise. Within a year, the number of teenaged hookah smokers increased from 4.1 percent to 5.4 percent. According to the CDC, “hookahs — sometimes called water pipes — are used to smoke specially-made tobacco that is available in a variety of flavors (e.g., apple, mint, cherry, chocolate).” This tobacco is placed in a bowl, heated by charcoal and breathed in through a mouthpiece that is typically shared between smokers. The legal age for smoking tobacco is 18 for the United States. According to Denny, this new wave of hookah smokers have come about recently, especially to those in the East community. Denny says that while high school students have been drinking and smoking marijuana for years, he thinks hookah is the next big thing for teenagers. “I don’t think anyone really [knew what hookah was a couple years ago]...,” Denny said. “This year people just started discovering it and really liking it so a lot of people have gone [to hookah bars].” Junior Rebecka Tucker* has recently joined the hookah trend as well. She thinks that smoking hookah is an alternative to ‘worse’ drugs like marijuana, and is easier to access than other illegal recreations, particularly alcohol. Since tobacco purchase is legal when you turn 18, some seniors in high school are old enough to purchase those products -- including things they can smoke in a hookah -- and give it to their younger peers. “[Tobacco for hookah is] easier to get than maybe alcohol, and it really just is a fun thing to do,” Tucker said. “More and more people talk about it and it just spreads around. And it’s the “new” cool thing to do. Once someone notices

something that hasn’t ever been seen, they will want to actually do it and try it more.” Tucker was introduced to hookah her sophomore year when she saw her older brother doing it. She became so intrigued with it that her brother, who is of age, bought her a hookah of her own for her next birthday present. Now, whenever she needs shisha — the flavored tobacco — for her hookah, she turns to her older brother for help. To senior Nicole Robinson, the appeal of smoking hookah isn’t the lightheaded rush. For her, more than anything, hookah bars are opportunities for socialization that isn’t just sitting in someone’s house like usual. “It’s really more of a social thing,” Robinson said. “It’s not really like ‘oh, I wanna get a buzz,’ it’s more like ‘oh, let’s just hang out.’” Robinson says hookah bars are becoming a more popular social scene as the number of students who go to them increases. Denny says that while there are certain hookah bars around the KC area that are notorious for letting minors in, the majority of hookah bars are difficult for underaged kids to get into. Most of his friends find one or two bars and stick to them. According to Denny, to get into one hookah bar teens may just need to know the owner personally, who will make an exception for you and your underaged friends. Vickers says her standby hookah bar doesn’t card at all. A local hookah bar who Robinson and Tucker claim has a reputation for allowing minors in their doors, claims that they always check IDs at the door. According to School Resource Officer Joel Porter, these hookah bars are lenient on who they allow inside for the sake of making profits. He says that the reality is that underaged students bring in a steady amount of revenue for these businesses. Porter has never discovered a minor at a hookah bar, as there are none specifically in Prairie Village and students tend to go to the ones in Kansas City, Mo. However, he has talked with students who have told him about going inside. “[It’s easy for minors to get into hookah bars] probably because of the same reason it’s easy to go into a convenient store and buy cigarettes or, in a lot of places, being able to go in and purchase

It’s the “new” cool thing to do. -junior Rebecca Tucker

alcohol as a minor,” Porter said. “People who run businesses want profits, and some do that with integrity and some don’t.” In addition to legal issues, Dr. Abby Loch from Johnson County Pediatrics says that health issues can come as a result of smoking hookah as well. She says the most common misconception hookah smokers seem to have is the idea that hookah is less dangerous or less harmful to the body than other things, particularly cigarettes. The CDC says hookah tobacco does have nicotine, and is “at least as toxic as cigarette smoke.” Hookah smokers may even take in more smoke than with cigarettes due to the deep inhalation, frequent puffing and greater amount of time spent smoking. In fact, they say that a typical one-hour-long hookah smoking session involves inhaling 100-200 times the volume of smoke inhaled from a single cigarette. In addition to the dangers from the smoke, Loch says that oral and upper respiratory infections can be passed on by sharing a mouthpiece. Also, carbon monoxide from the heated coals is breathed in constantly. And all of these effects, according to Loch, have worse consequences when it is minors who smoke it. “If you’re starting at a younger age, then you’re obviously going to be exposed to it for a lot longer, and being chronically exposed to things like carbonmonoxide and the chemicals within tobacco [can be harmful],” Loch said. “[When you smoke hookah at a young age], everyone is developing, their lungs are developing. So the longer you’re exposed to it, just like cigarettes, you’re more prone to things later on like oral cancer and lung cancer and bladder cancer and those types of things.” Even with these health threats and legality issues, the numbers show that teenage hookah usage is growing. As the number of underage cigarette smokers declines — from 15.8 percent to 14 percent in the past year — hookah usage is still on the rise. Teens like Tucker, Robinson and Denny see the social benefits clearer than the health and legal risks, and this generation of students is contributing to that 5.4 percent of minors who are part of the hookah craze. *names changed to protect identity

[Health] effects have worse consequences when it’s minors who smoke it.

spread.

TAKING a HIT

WRITTEN BY KATIE KNIGHT PHOTO BY ANNIE SAVAGE

Hookah trend appeals to high school students

Parts of a Hookah coal tobacco

bowl foil

plate

stem

purge valve grommets

hose

water jar


features.

Freshman Eva Tucker spends her free time working on aerial silks and lyra after previously competing in gymnastics

PHOTO BY KATIE LAMAR ART BY GRACE HEITMANN

WRITTEN BY PHOEBE AGIUAR PHOTOS COURTESY OF EVA TUCKER Freshman Eva Tucker doesn’t always get to go to football games and hang out with her friends. Instead of being involved in sports like tennis, which her two younger sisters play, Tucker works with aerial silks and lyra, the name for skills done with an aerial hoop. “The practices usually run till 9:30 so I have to do homework pretty late or like football games, I can’t go to those, Tucker said. “So I have to give it up. In the long run it’s worth it.” Both silks and lyra mix acrobatics, dance and gymnastics. Silks are aerial acrobatics that are preformed using a long silk fabric to preform tricks that involved wrapping one’s body in the air. Lyra is an aerial hoop that performers use to preform acrobatics above the ground. None of her friends do, understand or know what these aerial skills are, they call what Tucker practices “her stuff”. She is more flexible and stronger, enough to beat boys at arm wrestling. The only time Eva’s friends have been exposed to her acrobatic skills was her birthday. She took a group of her friends to her studio and they took a beginner class. A Groupon her mom had for a beginning aerials skills class was what got Tucker hooked. With a 10 year gymnastics base, aerial acrobatics immediately appealed to Tucker.

She quit gymnastics to focus on silks and lyra. Within two years, Tucker moved from the beginner level one, to what she is now, a level five, the highest level. She has two practices a week for the aerial skills. On top of that, she is also taking dance and conditioning classes to add to her performance. Tucker devotes all of this time to preparing skills so she is able to preform with her studio. To do this, she has to learn at least 10 separate moves that she can put together seamlessly and make them fit to a four minute song. It takes weeks, even months, to put together a full routine for a show. “Once I get the moves down, then you figure out transitions, smooth ways to get to each one, to each move, and then you fit it to the music,” Tucker said. Tucker learns personal routines that only she will use in performances. She has been building a repertoire of skills, like hanging from her toes, for the past few years. Adding more and more complex moves, including her own signature skill: Pantz. “One day I was wearing these zebra striped hammer pants and went up on the lyra and did this splits move and other girls said, ‘Hey I like your pants, and my instructor named it pants and that’s my signature move,” Tucker said.

So you want to be a flyer? This fall she preformed for three nights in the Fringe Festival, an arts festival in Kansas City. Tucker’s former company, Quixotic, was the only show to sell out and the show sold out all three nights. “Her last big performance was at the Fringe Fest,” Tucker’s mom, Kristen Tucker. “That was hard work, they prepared for six months.” It’s not always easy for Tucker to want to go to practice or to a performance. “Sometime she does go through hard times that she doesn’t want to go,” Tucker’s mom said. “I know that once she gets there she likes it. ” Even when its hard for Tucker, she continues to sacrifice so that she can go farther with her acrobatic skills. “She could do something where she is preforming for work,” instructor Jennifer Proshaska said. Tucker wants to continue her work with silks and lyra, improving and adding to her skills. She hopes to eventually become an instructor. “Sometimes I feel like I shouldn’t give up those [school events] for what I’m doing but I know it will make me better if keep doing it, Tucker said. “I have gotten a lot stronger and more fit from doing this.”

Are you bored, in need of CAS hours or a gift for your sibling? Maybe a class in aerials skills will work. Check out these nearby places that offer classes in aerial skills and lyra. Voler — Thiefs of Flight Pricing: Single classes range from $10 to $25 Location: South of Sixth and Central Ave. in downtown Kansas City, Kan. Classes: Offers classes on ariel skills, lyra, trapeze, acroyoga and ballet. Quixotic School of Performing Arts Pricing: Single classes range from $10 to $25 Location: On Broadway Blvd. in Kansas City, Mo. Classes: Offers classes on ariel skills, lyra, trapeze and dance.


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FOR A SPEEDY RESOLUTION

Truman Tickets Law

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Licensed in Missouri and Kansas.


a&e.

SANTA’Ssecret shopping•guide A guide to the perfect holiday gifts WRITTEN BY TOMMY SHERK ART BY SARAH COOK

MOM DAD

&

Though parents can be in your life a little too much, you should still thank them for it. You and your siblings could all pitch in and buy them a Brookstone foot massager. Not only will it relieve their stress, it’ll massage them into incapacitation! They won’t be thinking about you when they’re in foot massage heaven.

BR

OT

R HE

What does a brother, young or old, love to do? Prank their family. So, this year go browse Party Warehouse’s large selection of gag gifts including fake doggy doodoo, handshake tasers and whoopee cushions. However, make sure he doesn’t prank you, or your gift will backfire.

SIST

ER

What is a inexpensive, one-sizefits-all gift that’s impossible to offend your sister? One-size-fits-all Lululemon headbands or socks. Not only is Lululemon apparel ‘in style’, it’s a good enough gift to make your sister happy enough to leave you alone!

D

FRIEN

Now that Kansas City has some decent sports teams, one can buy a Chiefs t-shirt without it being a gag gift. Whether they are diehard fans or new supporters, sports team apparel is always a good gift to give to a friend. Kansas Sampler carries all sorts of clothing and accessories for most local sports teams. A scarf, gloves or hat would be perfect for those cold outdoor games.

HER

TEAC

If you’re giving a gift to a teacher, you’re going to look like a teacher’s pet. So, instead of being ridiculed by your peers, why not let the gift benefit the rest of the class? Topsy’s popcorn is the perfect gift that can satisfy everyone with it’s multiple types of popcorn, not to mention subliminally edging your teacher to raise your grade a few points. If for some unfortunate reason, you must get a gift for someone who you prefer not Y EM to call a friend, you might N E not know what to get them at all. The gift should seem sweet and innocent, but carry an undertone of your malice. Go to Brookside Toy and Science and select a box from their various candied insects. You could get a larva lollipop or some chilli pepper crickets, depending on your level of hatred.

NGER STRA

Whether it be for a relative who you haven’t talked to in years, or your mom’s friend’s sister’s son, getting a gift for a stranger is easy. All you must do is find something universally liked, such as Starbucks. A Starbucks giftcard is a good choice because the unfamiliar recipient can choose whatever they want.


a&e.

With finals coming up, The Harbinger provides some quick fixes to your finals week woes WRITTEN BY SUSANNAH MITCHELL

ART BY MIRANDA GIBBS

FRANTIC CRAMMING BLOWING IT OFF

INSOMNIA Sleep is a long-lost summer dream. You can’t remember the last time you got more than five hours in one night, and you’ve become a walking corpse. Staying up late studying and reviewing has become the new normal. Even when you try to go to sleep, thoughts of how much more you have to do plague your mind.

It’s a couple weeks before finals. Your parents have started asking you what your studying plan is, and the topic of finals has started weaseling its way into your lunch conversations. But finals seem so far away; there’s no reason to trouble yourself with studying so far in advance. For now, it’s “Gossip Girl” time.

OVERWHELMED Oh, no. Finals are in a week, and you’ve only just started studying. Starting earlier would have been a good idea, but who has time for that? Now, every second of your free time is consumed with textbooks and flashcards. And once you finish reviewing one subject, there’s still about six more to slog through. When you’re not studying, you’re probably hyperventilating. It’s official: finals are upon us.

Assess how much you need to study for each final, and create a schedule. Does EHAP require more time than Chem? Consider how much studying you’ll need to do in advance.

Over 4,200 crash course videos on every subject ever taught in high school.

It's the day of the final. If you haven't studied all of your materials by now, there's no hope for you. Inconsequential facts and dates pop out at you, and you're convinced you have to memorize all of them. When your teacher says to put everything away, it kills you a little. Reluctantly shoving your folder and pencil in your bag, you recite mnemonic devices under your breath one last time before it’s all over.

Budget out your time. Make sure you’re not spending too long on one subject, and realize that some subjects don’t require as much stressing.

Create your own flashcards, and use three different modes to study on your phone.

After so much studying and hard work, this is it. You’re about to take the final, and there’s nothing left that you can do. If there’s a good time to start crying, it’s probably right now.

GIVING UP Set up a sleep schedule. Both for your body and your mind, try to get at least six hours of sleep a night, and use your afternoons for studying. You’ll have plenty of time for friends and Christmas movies after finals. Plus: your brain functions better when you get enough sleep, so you’ll probably do better on your finals.

Over 100 high school math formulas from algebra to calculus.

Make sure you know what you need to know. Chances are that you won’t be tested over minute details. It’s best to do a quick review the night before the final, and be sure you’re adequately prepared.

Study guides for literature, Shakespeare, poetry, etc. to get you through your English final.

Pass or fail, there’s no turning back now. It’s time to accept your fate, because you’re as ready as you’ll ever be.

An all-in-one translator that any and all language students should have on hand.


a&e.

Out of the

and into

Ashes

Scott Cooper’s down-and-dirty revenge film is depressingly familiar and only propped up by amazing actors.

WRITTEN BY MIRANDA GIBBS

There’s a difference between films showing the problems in our society, and actually getting a message across. In spite of its breathtakingly sincere depiction of worn-down American lives, “Out of the Furnace,” written and directed by Scott Cooper, ends up being a highly predictable, fatalist revenge story. One that is only held together only by extraordinary actors doing the best they can with mediocre characters. Taking place over several years, “Out of the Furnace” chronicles the life of blue-collar worker Russell Baze (Christian Bale) in the dead-end town of Braddock, Pennsylvania. When he’s not working at the steel mill, or doing hard time for a bad-luck crime, he’s mourning over the loss of his true love (Zoe Saldana). That is, when he’s not rescuing his brother Rodney (Casey Affleck), a bitter war veteran who’s got a bad temper and most likely a case of PTSD. Not to mention Rodney’s gambling problems and a large debt owed to the local loan-shark, Petty (Willem Dafoe). Rodney finds himself drawn into the bareknuckle fighting scene where the money is little, but the pain is reliably dulling. Unfortunately, he’s too proud to give up the fight when there’s a bet on the line, getting himself even further in debt. Chasing big money, he coerces Petty into getting him in with the high-stakes fighting in New Jersey. This also means entangling himself in the dealings of the notorious drug lord and fight promoter, Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson). “One last fight” ends up being a poor decision that ties basically every character in an endless cycle of revenge that’s like a wheel stuck in the mud -- it moves fast, kicks up a lot of muck and doesn’t really go anywhere. Let’s start positive: Cooper deserves some credit, visually. He’s in his element with the lucidly colorless environment of the town, and fosters a sense of a place isolated from the rest of the world. But there’s no amount of smoke or grit that can turn the thinly disguised workingclass cliches into a bleeding-heart allegory of

SKIP IT

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMAGE.NET

economic hopelessness and obsoletion. The film limps along, distracted by smokefilled sunsets and pale silhouettes. It tries to shock us with cross-cut editing between moments -- the gutting of a freshly-killed deer beside human brutality; the making of steel alongside the cooking of heroin -- that should work, but with characters so underdeveloped, they are unable to resonate. It’s a fine line, and unfortunately, only works when the human being is a richer character than the deer. Clearly aiming for the 1970’s grit of the film “The Deer Hunter,” “Out of the Furnace” instead feels as lost as its cliched and emotionally-constipated main character. Characters like Russell and DeGroat are written with gardenvariety, one-dimensional laziness that gives the characters an overall effect of being placeholders in a painfully generic story. Elements that should gracefully pull us into the correct time frame -- the War on Terror, the depression of 2008 and the rise of Obama -- are slapped onto this story like bumper stickers. You certainly can’t deny the passion of the cast in this film. A cast that gives performances that belong in a less ambiguous, deeper film. Christian Bale is known for playing closed-off characters, and Russell is no exception. He brings to the role a captivating stillness, both saving and complementing the written character of a man who constantly strives to do right, but suffers the blows of fate time and time again. Woody Harrelson is the best villain you can find, giving an amazing, almost feral performance as DeGroat. He clearly bulked up for the role, making his size effectively terrifying, to say the least. Casey Affleck is truly one of the most original actors in American film. His high voice and lanky body contrast his macho character in a great way. The volatile vulnerability he brings to his confes-

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sions of what he’s seen in the war give us hints as to what this movie could have been if it knew its purpose. Zoe Saldana, though perpetually in generic girlfriend mode, brings out a powerfully fragile Bale in their reunion. Even other small roles played by the likes of Forest Whitaker and Sam Shepard may be incredibly onenote, but are performed earnestly. Clearly “Out of the Furnace” was made with the noblest of intentions, but we all know what furnace these intentions tend to lead to. And, unfortunately, this film loses itself in its attempts to imitate gritty art-house drama, and ultimately suffers the harsh blows of poor writing and predictability.

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sports.

WRITTEN BY JOHN FOSTER

BOYS’ SWIMMING

SPORT

The boys’ swim and dive team started the season with what coach Wiley Wright says is the largest and best group of swimmers that Boys’ Basketball he has experienced during his 27 years coaching at East. And upperclassmen swimmers have recognized the talent possessed by the incoming freshGirls’ Basketball man at practice, as well. “We have an unbelievable freshman class this year,” senior Peter Milledge said. “It’s going to be fun to see what they do in the pool this year and hopeBoys’ Swimming fully help us out at state.” Freshman Ian Longan was the first freshman to qualify for state this year. He swam in the 100 butterfly in the first meet against Olathe East on Dec. 5 with a time of 56.93, qualifying by 1.18 seconds. Wrestling As of Dec. 11, other freshmen such as Hayden Linscott, Bennett and Christian Hense and Joe McGuire have consideration time for state in several events, meaning that they have a chance to swim at state. If there are open Bowling lanes after each person who qualified is placed, swimmers with a consideration time are added. With the loss of Troy DeMoss, Chris Watkins, David Martinez, Alec Crampton and Jackson Granstaff from last year, the team will be losing around 150 points from state. “Last year we had a decent amount of guys that did really well at state,” junior Mitch Kerr said. “This year we have a bunch of guys that, point wise, may not match up to last year’s guys, but when totaled up, because we have so much more depth, will be a lot better.” The team won the Sunflower League title for the tenth year in a row last year and placed second at state. The League meet will be on Feb. 8 and state will be on Feb. 21 and 22. “We really want to take home another league title which would be 11 in a row for us,” Milledge said. “And of course we’re excited for state this year because we have such a great team, so we’re hoping to bring back the state title.”

OPPONENT Harrisonville

DATE 12/20/13

LOCATION SM East

Tournament Lawrence FS SM North

12/21/13 1/7/14 1/10/14

Avila SM East SM East

SM Northwest

1/11/13

SM Northwest

SM South

1/16/14

SM South

BV Classic

12/21/13

BV Classic

Seaman

1/11/14

Seaman

SM South

1/9/14

College Lanes

Leavenworth

1/14/14

College Lanes

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

PHOTO BY MARISA WALTON INSTAGRAM OF THE WEEK

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

mitchtyler1

Ian Longan

PHOTO BY JOHN FOSTER

TWEET OF THE WEEK Q: How have practices been going this year? A: They’re pretty good, they’re kind of long, though. Varsity is three hours and it’s pretty hard work. Q: How do you expect yourself to improve over the season? A: I expect to drop more time in butterfly and in the backstroke too. I plan to go to swim practice as much as I can, and do everthing I can to get faster. Q: What are your goals for the season? A: I kind of want to get the state cut in backstroke as well as butterfly and just drop time.

FOOTBALL

EAST LANCERS

21 28

DERBY PANTHERS

SOCCER

EAST LANCERS

0

1

BV NORTHWEST HUSKIES

GIRLS’ BBALL

@LancerBoysBBall

Thanks for the awesome support from @classof16bball. SME soph’s go into OT against SMW. 4

RETWEETS

12

FAVORITES

The sophomore Basketball Team played SMW this past week and the game went into overtime. Along to support them was a huge gang of sophomore boys dressed in beach gear to support their friends.

EAST LANCERS

55 58

138 likes Gonna miss the GoonSquad this year. @ treyhob thanks for everything, coach.

NORTH INDIANS

Trey Hobson, the defensive backs coach of the football team this year, poses with his players at the end of the year football banquet. Hobson called him and his players the “GoonSquad.”

EAST LANCERS

62 49

BV NORTH MUSTANGS


sports.

DISHING UP

SUCCESS East swim coach Colby Dischinger makes an impact on kids both in and out of the water

PHOTO BY KYLIE RELLIHAN

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL KRASKE

A

ssistant swim coach Colby Dischinger and ju- help them reach their goals, exactly what Coach House nior swimmer Patrick Hornung have a tradi- did to Dischinger. He wants to inspire his swimmers. tion. Every time they do a good set at practice “The fact that I have old swimmers coming back to or someone on the team swims especially well at a meet, me from years ago saying ‘remember you said this to me they will do the same celebration that Miguel Tejada and and it changed me’ is why I coach,” Dischinger said. “That Eric Hosmer do for the Royals. makes it all worth it.” At the District Championship meet on Dec. 7, HorCoaching has played an important role in Dischnung had just swam a his best time in the 100 freestyle inger’s life. When he first became a gym teacher at at 49.7 seconds. He walked over to Dischinger; starting Overland Park Elementary, he didn’t like his students’ with their arms spread out, they bring them together and attitudes. He didn’t like their lack of effort and their bad then pop their hands together, then back to the original sportsmanship. He had kids that would purposely forget position like a bomb had exploded. He was happy for their tennis shoes so they wouldn’t have to participate in Hornung — he had pushed himself just like Dischinger gym class that day. According to Dischinger, that menhad taught him. tality has changed. In his past three years being a gym Dischinger always tries to push his swimmers to the coach at Overland Park Elementary, he has changed kids’ next level. He constantly urges the JV swimmers to stay attitudes. Those same kids that didn’t want to play always for varsity practice so they’ll get better. He pushes swim- play now. mers to keep going when they want to stop. According to Last quarter alone, he had six students improve 20 Dischinger, he is showing them that they can go beyond laps in the “beep test” — a test where you run laps and where they thought they could go. This was something have to beat the sound of the beep in order to keep going. Greg House, Dischinger’s coach He runs alongside these kids, yelling when he swam for Blue Valley words of motivation like, “You can do it” North, always did. or “Come on, keep going”. “I try to set little Dischinger uses several methThis “never give up” mentality Dischfires under them,” ods to push his swimmers. He tries inger uses is the same that coach House Dischinger said. to get under their skin. He’ll make would use. It’s also the same mentality up that a certain swimmer said he uses with his swimmers at East. something about how they were Dischinger started swimming his better, and how they were going to freshman year of high school at Blue beat them in a set or a race. Although the swimmer knows Valley North (BVN). He didn’t start swimming because he’s kidding, it pushes them to go further. he liked it or because he thought he’d be good, but rather “I try to set little fires under them,” Dischinger said. “I to get in shape for basketball season. He had heard about like to just ruffle their feathers a little, and kind of open up the swim coach at Blue Valley North at the time — how their eyes and make them believe that this goal is attain- he changed kids’ lives — always reminding them to stay able and anyone can win in any given race.” calm and push through the difficult times. After realizing Dischinger remembers how Coach House changed he was a talented swimmer, Dischinger decided not to his life, and he coaches for that reason. He wants to push play basketball and to swim instead. He found success in kids to boundaries they don’t think they can reach, and swimming quickly, and decided to pursue it for the rest

COLBY DISCHINGER, SWIM COACH

of high school. When Dischinger and his fellow BVN swimmers would get into the pool at a meet, they would always have a winning mindset. They would tell themselves they were going to win, and try to intimidate opponents with this confidence. This confident mind set he had was something that Coach House taught him, and is something that helped him succeed. Not only did BVN win state all four years he was there, but Dischinger was also voted Kansas City Star swimmer of the year his senior year. Dischinger was the boys’ and girls’ assistant swim coach for four years at BVN. One day during his last year coaching at BVN, he emailed Wright. Dischinger knew him from swimming against him in high school. Not when Wright was in high school, but when he coached for East and Dischinger swam for BVN. He was interested in coaching at East, and got the job as Assistant coach. His first two years he did it completely for free, as a volunteer. This is Dischinger’s first year getting paid as a coach for East. “He came in my freshman year and everyone immediately respected him,” Hornung said. “He had an amazing career swimming for Blue Valley North so we respected that right away”. Dischinger’s main goal as a coach is to win State. He says by pushing and motivating his swimmers, it could happen. “Who was in the NCAA Final Four in 2002?,” Dischinger asks his swimmers. Nobody replies. “Exactly,” Dischinger says. “Nobody remembers the losers. You’ve got to write your own legacy this year.”


CHALKING itUPto HARD WORK

sports. sports.

LEVEL 10 FRESHMAN GYMNAST DEDICATES HERSELF TO THE SPORT

WRITTEN BY SARAH BERGER PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITNEY RINEY

She coats her hands with a good dusting of chalk, which will help ensure she won’t fall off the uneven bars. Her feet won’t touch the ground for the next 30 seconds while she’s jumping and gliding from bar to bar. Spinning in a full circle around the bar three times will give freshman Maddie Kampschroeder the right amount of momentum for her release: a double aerial with a full twist. Maddie tosses her straight and stiff body in a full circle twice through the air as she descends to the ground. Within seconds, her feet are back on the ground again. She firmly sticks her landing, like she does almost every time. For now, this release is Maddie’s favorite trick she can perform, but she’s learning new ones every day. Gymnastics is her passion. Maddie is a level 10 gymnast, the highest level a gymnast can reach in the U.S. Junior Olympics program. Four days a week, Maddie leaves school at the end of sixth hour to go train. She rides in a carpool for the 45-minute drive to Kearney, Mo. so she can condition and practice for four hours at Fusion gym. Her Saturdays are spent training from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Gymnastics started for Maddie 13 years ago when she was one year old in a baby-parent gymnastics class at Emerald City Gym. Her dad, Daryl Kampschroeder, was a gymnast in the eighties and taught gymnastics classes for 15 years.

“[Gymnastics] was what I knew,” Daryl said. “It was just kind of a natural thing [to get her started].” Each year Maddie grew in age the difficulty of her skills increased too. A back hand spring led to a back tuck which turned into a layout. Practicing with all her spare time improved her bent legs and wobbly landings and turned them into polished routines with pointed, straight legs and perfect landings. “Practice and practice,” Maddie said. “You just have to keep doing it until you get it right.” Maddie’s new skills also enabled her to move up levels. The Junior Olympics gymnastics program is divided into 10 levels that girls move up by age and or skill level. “She was probably nine or 10 when she turned out better than I ever was,” Daryl said. “It’s been cool to see her do stuff I never got to do or was able to do.” In competitive gymnastics, a gymnast can take two tracks: the elite program leading to the Olympics, or the Junior Olympics program leading to a college scholarship. Up until two years ago, Maddie was on the elite track, but decided to change directions. The intensive training schedule, only going to school for three hours combined with her two broken feet were what caused Maddie to reevaluate her future in gymnastics. Even though she was no longer on the elite track, Maddie still continued with her training, just

at a less demanding pace. Her competition schedule also remained the same. January marks the beginning of competition season for Maddie every year. Last year she competed in 11 meets and invitations, including the national championship. This year she is set to compete in eight so far. During competitions, she will launch herself off the vault. She will flip her body into side aerials on the balance beam, prance on the floor and spin around the uneven bars. “I love competing on floor because you can express yourself, and I love tumbling,” Maddie said. Maddie’s competitions are filled with hugs, catching up with long distance friends and meeting Olympic gymnasts like Gabby Douglas and Shawn Johnson. Competitions are scored out of 40 points, 10 points for each event. Judges watch over each event, deducting points for any wobbles or shaky landings. For example, a fall is a five tenths deduction. “It deducts really fast if you fall,” Maddie said. “It’s really hard [to get a perfect score].” The highest score Kampschroeder has ever received was a 37.6 at regionals last year. As soon as her score was tallied and revealed, Maddie was bubbling with excitement. While she was jumping up and down and clapping her chalk-coated hands, she was not only celebrating her highest score. Maddie was also celebrating her first qualification for the Ju-

nior Olympic National Competition. At the national championship in Minneapolis, she placed 51st all-around in level 10. A rolled ankle during warm-ups and a fall on floor were Maddie’s main reasons for her deductions. “It’s just such a hard competition,” Maddie said. “Everyone from across the nation is there.” Competing at nationals also helped her get closer to another one of her long-term goals: a college gymnastics scholarship. In Minneapolis, college scouts from almost every gymnastics program in the country watched Maddie compete. Although she has not made any commitments to any schools, she has been meeting with representatives from schools like the University of Missouri and Louisiana State University that come to visit her gym. Her favorite school is Oklahoma University. Walking through the campus marked with large, classical brick buildings, Maddie felt comfortable at the school. This unofficial visit and the accepting coaches put OU up on her list of hopefuls. For now, she is focusing to continue on qualifying for nationals every year, what she hopes will be the key to a college scholarship. College will mark the continuation of her gymnastics career and her passion.

Maddie’s EVENTS gymnasts THE VAULT isrunwhere full-speed to-

wards the vault table and flip over it. Maddie’s vault is a Yurchenko layout full, meaning as she flips over the vault she does a full twist.

two bars that are three THE UNEVEN are to four feet apart, that go back and BARS gymnasts forth between. Maddie’s

dismount is a full twisting double layout. This means she does two full flips in a straight position with a 360 degree twist.

THE BEAM is a four inch piece of wood

that gymnasts tumble, turn and flip on. Maddie’s dismount is a back layout double twist. This means she does a flip in a straight position with two full twists.

THE FLOOR exercise is an event in which gym-

nasts show off their graceful dance skills as well as their tumbling moves. Maddie is currently working on a layout triple twist, a flip in a straight position with three full twists.


photo essay.

R U O H G U O R TH

As the semester winds down we reminisce on the good and bad times in the Lancer community. Through it all, The Harbinger photographers have captured every great moment. Looking forward to next year, here’s a look at some of the best photos of the semester by month.

LENSES

August

PHOTO BY ABBY HANS

PHOTO BY ANNIE SAVAGE

Date Taken

29

PHOTO BY TESSA POLASCHECK

September 26

PHOTO BY TAYLOR ANDERSON

PHOTO BY MADDIE SCHOEMANN

MORP was a 5th quarter after party, following the substate football game. Junior Becca Zeiger dances with her friends, and celebrates the team’s win.

20

Date Taken

October

The Shawnee Mission East soccer team won regionals. Senior Kamran Tavokolinia celebrates along with his entire team.

PHOTO BY MCKENZIE SWANSON

24

A t the fall pep assembly, the football team performed a dance in front of the school. The dance ended with senior Dominique Atkinson twerking for the crowd.

Senior Danya Issawi and junior Kate Mitchell perform a duet to “Don’t Stop Believing” for the Lip Dub, a school-wide project.

A group of senior boys, including Ben Wickey, Tommy Larson and Spencer Jones, run with the cross country team on their annual long run, stretching from Shawnee Mission East across Prairie Village.

Student Body President and senior Morgan Twibell cheers for Lancer Day pep rally. Twibell was dressed as George Washington to go along with the “USA” theme.

Chemistry 1 and Chemistry 2 students celebrated Mole Day at 6:02 a.m. Juniors Will Oakley and Pauline Werner cheer as the celebration begins.

23

Date Taken

31

November

26

Date Taken

December2

Senior Jay Anderson, along with senior Mark Darling and junior Mike Thibodeau, perform a dance to bring more attention to the SME bowling team.

Date Taken

3

30

Senior Ryan Carter celebrates his touchdown at the state football championship. East ultimately lost to Derby 29-21.

The basketball team kicked off the season with the annual Blue and Black Scrimmage, where Sophomore Joey Wentz went against fellow sophomore Mark Ward.

PHOTO BY MADDIE SCHOEMANN

PHOTO BY ANNAMARIE OAKLEY

PHOTO BY MCKENZIE SWANSON

PHOTO BY MARISA WALTON


Issue 8 from the 2013 - 2014 Harbinger