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Harbinger the

1.72

Issue 1 Shawnee Mission East Prairie Village, KS Sept. 7, 2010

ABOVE 1.72 is East’s Challenge Index score, which is used to compare it to other schools on Newsweek’s “America’s Best High Schools” list. This number ranked East as the 938th “best” public high school in the nation.

An Inside Look

The number of AP/IB tests a school takes is widely used to judge its achievements and success

F

LoganHeley

or the first time ever a Shawnee Mission school made Newsweek’s “America’s Best High Schools” list. In fact, both East and Shawnee Mission South were named to the list this past summer. The list uses a ranking system wherein the number of Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge tests a school gives are taken and divided by the number of seniors in the graduating class that year. Any public school with a score of 1.000 or higher makes the list. East’s score last year was 1.718 and ranked 938th while South was 1,705th with a score of 1.025. The honor correlates with a recent rise in the number of AP exams taken by East students during the past three

What’s Inside

years. The number of “passed” exams has also been gradually improving since a dramatic drop in scores occurred in 2007. As more AP tests are being taken, students and staff members, including AP Calculus teacher Rick Royer, are wondering whether the greater stress placed on the AP exam is the right thing to do. Since 2007, the number of exams taken by East students has risen dramatically. Nearly 300 more tests were taken last year than in 2007. This jump coincides with a district policy requiring students in AP courses to take, but not “pass,” the AP exam to receive the AP designation on their transcript. District director of curriculum and instruction Betsy Regan said the district doesn’t believe a student has truly participated in an AP course until they have prepped and taken the AP exam.

“Is it nice that two of our schools are on [the Newsweek] list?” Regan said. “Absolutely, and I would celebrate that, and as you know, particularly in these challenging economic times and as families are searching for schools for their students to be able to use those competitive factors, it’s very nice for the district, but that’s not the reason we went into the policy change.” According to Leigh Anne Neal, associate superintendent for communications, the policy change was intended to ensure the rigor of the AP course. Neal said that the AP exam is a big part of the AP course and prepares students for tests they may see in college. Neal also said that while getting more students to take the test was the major aim of the policy, it was not the only one.

Continued on page 2

Head of the Pack

Exchange Students

Summer Roundup

Ice Cream Bonanza

Lancer Football

Students apply to college early

Q&A with the four new students

“What’d you do this summer?”

The summer’s hottest cold spots

Full coverage of the upcoming season

Page 3

Page 13

Page 16-17

Page 24-25

Page 28-29


02

NEWS

9 07 10

SLIGHTLY ADVANCING SCORES More AP tests taken at East and scores increase by small margin continued from page 1

Principal Karl Krawitz said that the only reason he was ever given for the district policy was to get a SMSD school on Newsweek’s “America’s Best High Schools” list. Jay Mathews, a columnist for the Washington Post and the developer of the Newsweek list, said he is happy to use the clout of Newsweek and people’s needing to be on the list to encourage them to do what he calls “the right thing.” “Anything they’re going to do to get on the list is going to be for the benefit of students at that school,” Mathews said. “There’s nothing they are going to do to hurt students since the more kids you have taking AP, the more kids you have that are likely to go to college.” Senior Lauren Stanley doesn’t agree with the district policy. She feels it isn’t fair for students to go through the rigors of an AP course, but not get credit for it because they didn’t take the AP exam. “People who don’t take the test have done just as much work as [those that do],” Stanley said. “Just because you don’t take the test doesn’t negate any of what you’ve done before.” Royer believes the policy is “self-serving” because of the district’s desires to have a school on the Newsweek list. On a personal level, he would like to see the policy scrapped. “I wish that I could teach Calculus the best way I think the students learn it and not worry about a particular evaluation at the end,” Royer said. Even so, Royer doesn’t think the policy is necessarily a bad one to have. He believes that having students cover the difficult AP material is good for them. One problem he makes a note of is that since East allows any student to enroll in AP courses and take the AP exam, the results East receives aren’t as high as schools that encourage only certain, higher-level students to take the AP exam. U.S. History AP teacher Vicki Arndt-Helgesen feels that an AP course is complete when the student takes the AP exam. “I think that [it] is really a good thing when students take that exam—kind of like a final blessing,” Arndt-Helgesen said. “To me, it’s a celebration.” While Arndt-Helgesen encourages all of her students to take the exam, she feels that if they have taken an AP course that follows the syllabus that AP has approved, the students should receive the AP designation on their transcript. AP exams are graded on a number scale—a one being the lowest score possible and a five being the highest. Many public universities give credit for fours and fives, and some accept threes. A three or higher is generally considered to be a “passing” score. In 2007, 72 percent of AP tests taken at East came back with a score of three or higher. The following year, the district policy mandating that students take the AP exam to get the AP designation on their transcript was put in place. In 2008, the percentage of passing scores went down to 58 percent. It then rose one percent in 2009 and last year was 65 percent. Even though East’s AP performance has improved in the last three years, it still lags behind two of the four other Shawnee Mission schools including South, the perennial leader in SMSD AP exam scores. In 2009, 82 percent of AP exams taken at South received a score of three, four or five. At West, that number was 67 percent. Dr. Krawitz believes the reason for East’s scores is because students don’t take the AP exams seriously enough because they don’t see any value in it, even though each exam costs $87. “They don’t want to get a four or five because they don’t want the credit,” Krawitz said. “Look at the socioeconomics of our [school]. Do people here necessarily worry about whether they can save money on a three-hour course? I don’t think so.” According to Mathews, East’s scores are slightly above the national average and what he would call “a very good

number.” He is also glad that East doesn’t restrict who can enroll in AP classes such as schools like Rockhurst High School. According to Greg Owsley, the math department head at Rockhurst, a student must receive an 87 percent or higher in Pre-AP math in order to take AP Calculus and similar restrictions are present in other subject areas. Owsley said the rationale for that policy is because allowing lower-end students into honors courses would take away resources from the higher-level students. “They deserve to have just as much attention for their sake,” Owsley said. “They may get a five on the test if I just threw a book at them, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t get something out of the class.” Owsley believes that school and district policies encouraging as many students as possible to take the AP exams aren’t there solely to benefit students. “The motive for [policies that encourage students to take the AP exam] is to make their school look better, to help [the student] get into college because they have AP on their transcripts,” Owsley said. “And AP likes that and will promote that because AP can make more money. Know what I mean? They’re getting more out of it and the students are getting something out of it by being more competitive on their transcript…that’s true. But they’re not necessarily learning more.” The district allows any student that wishes to enroll in an AP course because, according to Regan, every student should have the opportunity to take advantage of higher level classes such as AP and IB without having certain restrictions, such as a “cut score,” placed upon them. Last year, Royer changed his whole teaching philosophy in an effort to have his students do better on the AP exam. He disallowed the use of note sheets and calculators on tests, something he had previously allowed, in an effort to have students study more. He started giving take-home exams instead of worksheets and adjusted in-class tests to focus more on AP topics to prepare students to take the AP exam. His new methods served their purpose as nearly 43 percent of his students who took the exam passed compared to just over 11 percent the year before. Even though his students’ scores improved last year, Royer isn’t sold on the fact that his students know Calculus better. “It’s hard to write a test that really evaluates how well they understand what’s going on in Calculus, so they’ve got a handful of skills that they seem to emphasize and if the students are good at that, they’re going to score well, even if they aren’t necessarily understanding what they’re doing…” Royer said. According to Regan, the money students spend on AP exams returns to the district in ways where students wouldn’t necessarily see it such as training teachers and developing curriculum. “If we wanted to sit down and design college-level courses in Shawnee Mission, we could probably do it,” Regan said. “But, we’ve got another entity who can do that for us and that saves us a lot of money.” Dr. Krawitz thinks that AP exams don’t function as the subject report card they are supposed to. He also feels that testing has become entrenched in society, and not for the better. “People believe [standardized tests] at face value because it’s the only thing they’ve ever known,” Dr. Krawitz said. “…Testing in this country is big business. And those of us who understand it, understand what it’s being used for and unfortunately, you know, it prevails because it’s backed by money and people believe that… This is a game and you’re in the game. You’re playing the game.”

a breakdown of East’s RECENT RESULTS East students took

3.8

603

AP tests this spring 31 more than in ‘09

Was the average Chemistry score

AND

and the highest subject average

AP Test Policy Change: Points will no longer be deducted for questions answered wrong.

THE BIG THREE The core subjects with the most AP tests taken and the average scores in each

KEY:

= 2 AP tests

ENGLISH language & comp average : 3.4

98

EUROPEAN HIST. average: 2.8

86

CALCULUS BC average: 2.3

56


NEWS

issue 1

ahead of THE PACK

03

More high school seniors are completing their college applications early KevinSimpson

As his plane soared somewhere between Annapolis, Md. and Kansas City, senior Jack Harrigan made up his mind—he wanted to attend the United States Naval Academy. Harrigan had spent a week at the academy, and he had endured all the rigors that a typical student there goes through. He woke up at 5 a.m. each day. He performed exhausting amounts of push-ups and sit-ups and long runs. He took on the obstacle courses at the academy. And he loved every minute of it. “When I got back, I realized that I want to be challenged,” Harrigan said. “I don’t want to go to college and just skate through. It was exhausting, but once I got back, I just thought about how I wanted to go back and do it all over again.” Harrigan is one of the many high school seniors these days to have made up his mind at such an early date. According to a story in an August edition of the New York Times, high school seniors, including some of East’s own, are applying to colleges earlier than ever before. Counselor Laurie Carter has been at East for ten years, and she has seen the upward trend in admissions firsthand. She attributes this spike to the improving overall awareness of students toward the application process. “School [admissions] are getting more competitive,” Carter said. “The value of a college education has increased. People get it more so than they did in the past. There is a huge value in having a college diploma so that you can get a job.” Madison Loeb, an admissions representative at Kansas State University, feels that college applicants have become “smarter consumers,” leading to the increase in earlier admissions. “It seems like students are smarter about knowing what’s out there,” Loeb said. “They start searching around their sophomore or junior year, so by the time they get to their senior year, they want to get everything taken care of early.” Loeb sees a chain effect that pays

off for the student when they apply earlier. The sooner the applicants turns in their admissions, the sooner they can apply for housing and scholarships, which can help Loeb out on her end. “It makes it easier so we can make sure they have everything they need,” Loeb said. “We want students to get scholarships just like they do, so we can follow up and help them through the process with more time if they apply earlier.” Jessica Walters, a senior admissions counselor at the University of Kansas, says that she has seen a definite increase in phone calls and e-mails from potential applicants. She sees the trend as a sign that students not only want to figure out their future education as soon as possible, but also organize their future financial commitments. “Their parents are trying to figure out how much it’s going to cost, and they want to plan for it as soon as possible given the economy,” Walters said. Both KU and KSU have rolling admissions, so the schools can return a quicker decision to students that apply earlier. While Loeb sees no true drawbacks to an earlier application, Walters has seen cases in which the applicant could have dedicated more time to the process. “If a student applies early and rushes through their application, they might have some errors and it might not be as concise and neat as it could be,” Walters said. “I don’t want them to apply early just to apply early. That’s the only drawback.” While Carter said that determining whether a student is applying too early is judged on a case-by-case basis, she can see some of the ways the recent trend has benefited her personally. “We encourage the students to let us know [where they’re applying],” Carter said. “Last year, I wrote 34 recommendations. It takes awhile.” Senior Alissa Pollack already knows where she’s headed next fall. She attended a Junior Scholars

College Preparation Timeline

Program at Miami of Ohio this summer, and now, according to Pollack, her acceptance at the school will be a mere formality. “I applied in March for this program, and you go to school all summer and you take classes,” Pollack said. “If you meet all the requirements, you still have to apply but you knew that you get in by August 1. I already know that I got in.” Pollack filled out an entire college application to the school and sent it in, and she will get her letter in the mail on Dec. 22. By keeping a 3.5 grade point average during her sevenweek stay this summer, Pollack assured herself of a spot at the university in Oxford, Ohio. Unlike Pollack, Harrigan has just begun a lengthy application process to gain entry to the Naval Academy, which had a 10 percent acceptance rate last fall, according to US News. “It’s like getting into an Ivy League school, just as hard,” Harrigan said. Since his dad was in the Marine Corps for 21 years, including service in the first Gulf War, Harrigan was able to clear his first hurdle: a nomination from either the president, a congressman or another acceptable alternative - in this case a retired Marine. Now, he’s currently working on securing a congressional nomination to the academy in order to improve his chances of admission. Harrigan sees the benefits in applying to colleges at an earlier date, but he said it hasn’t softened the workload. “It kind of makes things easier that I don’t have to think about it anymore,” Harrigan said. “But right now, I’m not even working on homework. I’m working on writing to congressmen and trying to get letters of recom-

freshman sophomore junior Take challenging courses to build strong language, mathematics and critical thinking skills. Keep a record of academic and co-curricular achievements.

Take the PSAT for practice. The results will not be used for college admission. It is never too early to start researching colleges and universities. vVisit the counseling center for brochures or surf the Web and check out college home pages.

mendation. That’s really replaced my homework.” Pollack has enjoyed the relaxation that comes with knowing what the future holds. Other seniors haven’t quite made it that far in their college search. Senior Peter Bautz is currently working on applications for 10 different schools, and he estimates that the process, which he began nearly a month ago, has added up to around 20-24 hours of total work. Instead of lounging around before bedtime, Bautz works on supplements to each school’s application, along with essay writing for his common application. “It definitely changed my evening routine,” Bautz said. However, Bautz—who has a current top five of Harvard, Princeton, Amherst, Grinnell and Macalester—hopes that the work that he puts in now will pay off in the long run. “It’s probably going to stay stressful for the next couple of weeks, but I’m hoping to avoid major stress by not waiting until the last minute to submit everything,” Bautz said. “I’ve had the luxury of time to be able to sit down without being rushed to write in a week, as opposed to having two months to write a good essay.” Pollack is past the rigor of college applications, and she’s not looking back. “It takes so much stress off of senior year,” Pollack said. “Everyone’s worrying about where they’re going to apply, and I don’t have to think about it anymore.”

Look at colleges that you are interested in and evaluate the list on a regular basis. Register in a SAT and/or ACT prep class.

senior

Acquire all of the application papers needed for college admission. National Association for College Admissions Counseling


04 NEWS 09 07 10

D

IanWiseman

avid Muhammad walked into East two years ago as a ninth grade World Geography teacher. The first thing you’d have noticed about him was his style; he dressed like someone ready for a night on the town. Then you might have taken a look at his personality—how he performed above the calling of his title as a teacher, refusing to pass through the motions like an assembly line conveyor belt. Peel back the layers even further to find a man with a mission, a drive to “educate students about world atrocities.” You might even begin to question who David Muhammad was. David Muhammad was a teacher. School budget cutbacks forced Muhammad out of East at the end of last school year, though he remains in the district as a social studies teacher at Trailridge Middle School. Sophomore Brennan Williams felt his absence immediately. “I was devastated,” Williams said. “He made each of us feel important, brought us all together. Mr. Mu raised us up that way.” David Muhammad was a club sponsor. Coalition can be defined by its mission—to help those who cannot help themselves. This mission is what drives 50 or so kids to attend meetings every Thursday after school in room 202. It’s why they host 8-hour dance marathons and walk up Mission Road without shoes, draw up signs and scribble on sidewalks with chalk, book native speakers from Uganda and hold benefit concerts for sex trafficking; anything that will fund-raise money or aid. It’s also why Muhammad arrives home later on Thursdays. “As a Social Studies teacher I teach about current events all the time, and that’s one level—recognizing problems,” Muhammad said. “But in Coalition you actually try to do something about [those problems], which is why I want to be involved wherever I go.” Where is it that Muhammad goes? Not just to a seminar about a world conflict, but to the conflict itself. Muhammad, along with senior Emily Collins, this year’s head of Coalition, will fly to Kampala, Uganda on Dec. 17 for 13 days. They plan to work at St. Mary Kevin Orphanage, designed for kids who have lost at least one parent. For two weeks Collins will teach sewing, while Muhammad gives lessons in Karate. They both do. The idea for this trip arose after hearing former East stu-

dent Kaley Herman speak to Coalition about her time in Uganda. Collins and Muhammad made constant eye contact as Herman showed videos of the region she’d visited. Later that night Collins told her mother she was going to Africa. That was last October; they’ve been planning ever since. According to Collins, the trip to Uganda is just one example of how Muhammad does more than is required of him. “He feels a connection to the world and his eagerness shows,” Collins said. “It’s nice to have someone who not only provides the room and signs the papers, but is also one of the most enthusiastic people in the club.” David Muhammad was a motivator. After leaving East, Muhammad pledged to remain involved in Coalition. Not only that, he wanted to start his own Coalition at Trailridge. Muhammad’s speech quickens as he details his plans. First is promotion. He’ll jump on the announcements: “Come support something new!” he’ll tell them. Trailridge has an afterschool intramural program, so he’ll stop by and chat with the kids. First meeting kicks off tomorrow. He must inform students right away about Charity Water, Partners in Health, Change the Truth—clubs he learned about through East’s Coalition. Invisible Children arrives at Trailridge this November to raise awareness; he contacted them over the summer. But he hasn’t forgotten about East’s Coalition. He’ll have to remember to attend their Love146 benefit concert in the winter. Then he’s off to Uganda with Emily Collins. So much work to be done there. So much work to be done everywhere. “[At East] I didn’t have to do much more than...keep the kids on task and provide space,” Muhammad said. “They were self determined, asked questions; at Trailridge it might be different. I mean the kids are younger and less aware of world issues.” Williams, however, believes Muhammad will have little trouble recruiting for his new club. “He got me interested in Coalition in the first place. You see people in [Coalition meetings] you’d never expect to see, because he brings everyone.” Everywhere, David Muhammad was a role model. Collins stresses that Coalition members miss Muhammad and will feel the impact of his absence. However, she makes it clear that Coalition is by no means slowing its pace. After all, around 120 kids showed up to this year’s first meeting.

“Sure, it’ll be different,” Collins said. “Mr. Meara is the sponsor this year and is getting really excited. He’s another young, talented artistic person that Coalition needs. There’s different people all around but we’ll be able to build on the enthusiasm we already have.” Although Muhammad can no longer attend after-school meetings, he will be there to support dances, fundraisers and other events sponsored by Coalition. Events like Toms’ Walk: A Day Without Shoes, in which Coalition members walked to school without shoes as a demonstration. If you were to get up early enough on one bitterly cold morning in early April, you’d see a group of fifty or so teenagers roaming about Mission Road. Looking closer you could tell they were dressed in black with red X’s taped over their chests and back, holding signs, walking without shoes. One man might stick out to you, the ninth grade world geography teacher with the peculiar clothes, for you’d see this man zigzagging through the mob of kids like a gamma wave. He makes it his mission to talk to everyone. When the group reached East, you’d see the kids drop their signs and hug one another, some crying, a couple people’s feet bleeding. They are happy because they now know that pain, and that means they had accomplished something. This is Muhammad’s favorite memory. To him, it’s the essence of Coalition. “I don’t think I’ll ever forget that morning,” Muhammad said. Muhammad carries that memory wherever he goes, whether that’s to a Coalition meeting or Trailridge or the faraway turmoils of Uganda. He wishes every school could share a moment like that bitter April morning. The first school was East, the second will be Trailridge. Two down. “Mr. Mu has a different sense about him,” Williams said. “Every single thing we do is important to him; I mean he danced for all eight hours at that marathon.” Who was David Muhammad? During his time at East he was a ninth grade world geography teacher. He was a club sponsor. He was at East for only two years. But he was so much more. He was an advocate for those who could not advocate for themselves. A teacher, but one who taught much more than world geography. A friend. But why think in the past? The question should be who is David Muhammad, for though he has moved on to Trailridge students believe he is still very much a part of East, and his message will be taught here for years to come.

Transitioning toTrailridge

Differences Muhammad faces starting Coalition at a middle school and how he will adjust

More LOW-INCOME students

The club will focus on spreading awareness rather than raising money.

Higher ethnic DIVERSITY

Goal

New school same

Former East teacher David Muhammad brings Coalition to Trailridge Middle School Muhammad discusses plans for Coalition with Trailridge middle schoolers

SamanthaBartow

I think this will make more of the kids more compassionate about global matters. At East, the diversity is limited and some of the kids were not as concerned about life outside of Prairie Village.

David Muhammad

Lack of SPORTS TEAMS

There are less after school activities for students to be involved in, so more will attend Coalition meetings.

Inability to DRIVE

Middle school kids can’t drive home from school after meetings or to events. This could cause less students to be able to participate.


NEWS

A NEW REGIME CarolineCreidenberg

Black leather boots and a flowing jean skirt, topped with a Lancer blue Pep Club Exec shirt, walks down the main hallway. Destination: Pep Assembly. For years, art teacher Jodie Schnakenberg has been attending pep assemblies, but this year things are a little different. Schnakenberg is now a part of the pep assembly. Organizing, planning, and doing. Last year government teacher, Nick Paris, stepped down as Pep Club sponsor and two new sponsors took his place, Schnakenberg and science teacher Jennifer Davis. This year they plan to make Pep Club stricter, more organized and more involved. “Revamp” is what Schnakenberg is planning on doing to Pep Club this year. She and Davis want to make pep assemblies, and just

Dressed as district rivals, seniors Cooper Toombs, Mark Mergen, Zach Colby and Kevin Simpson surround sophomore Ali Felman before she’s rescued by the mascot at the Aug. 26 pep assembly.

issue 1

New pep club sponsors revamp the club in hopes of more participation and student involvement

Pep Club in general, more entertaining and interactive. “This year we are getting involved,” senior Pep Club vice president Cameron Smith said. “And having skits and getting the whole student body involved too.” Sophomore Pep Club class representative Addie Anthony said that she thinks the pep assemblies will be more fun. After the first pep assembly Anthony thought they had already improved greatly. “Everyone participated and we were a lot more peppier than last year,” Anthony said. She thinks it could still be a lot more organized, but that they will get there. For the past three years Smith has been on the exec board for pep club and said this year by far he has the most responsibility. Part of this is because the meetings are mandatory this year. According to Schnakenberg, if someone is consistently missing meetings they will be kicked off. “If you’re not available to be in Pep Club, that doesn’t mean you necessarily can’t participate, but in terms of being an exec we need you present,” Schnakenberg said.

The meetings will also be more organized this year. Anthony feels that they are getting more stuff done at meetings this year than in the past. At the beginning of the meetings the execs go over the past events they held and find ways to improve them for next time. There is an agenda and as Davis reads it off, students brain storm ideas to make events doable and fun. Pep Club is not always fun and games though, their job for the Lancer Day Parade is to clean up the candy from the streets after the parade. While small things such as picking up candy have been added to Pep Club’s jobs, Anthony feels there is also a big difference in the involvement of underclassmen this year. “I actually feel like I’m helping plan the pep assemblies this year,” Anthony said. In years past, senior presidents and Vice Presidents were the ones coming up with the ideas and planning the events. This year, because of the organized meetings, students of all grade levels and positions are contributing. Sophomore class representative, Ali Felman, talked about how the junior seating at the pep assembly wasn’t good and senior Lizzy Ward brought up issues about Lancer Day Parade. According to Smith new things such as having set group of people attend sports games and maybe even a spirit stick will be happening this year. Skits will be done at pep

LEADING LANCERS LindseyHartnett

the

JuliaDavis

There was a hush over the crowd; no one knew what would come next. Principal Karl Krawitz and the administration had just finished their rock tribute to KISS as sophomore Ali Felman walked timidly into the center of the gym for the year’s first pep assembly. Four boys clad in the orange, red, yellow and green of the other Shawnee Mission high schools menacingly walked toward her. They knocked her books to the ground and started pushing her. And then, out of nowhere, a figure appeared. Wearing a silver suit and helmet, with a black covers across the eyes and a blue belt with a big letter “E” in the center, the figure approached the boys and took them out one by one. The Lancer mascot had arrived. For years now, East has been without a mascot. There have been the kids who adorned cheap plastic armor from U.S. Toy, or those that brought homemade shields and swords in spirit, but for the first time in 10 years, East has a legitimate mascot. Senior Logan Heley headed the idea for the costume. He first came up with the plan of getting a Lancer suit during his sophomore year, but only put it into motion last year. “I felt that our school was lacking the high level of spirit I thought it could attain,” Heley said. Senior Alex Rorie also played a role in the process of getting the costume. Hoping to be the mascot of the University of Missouri next year, Rorie spoke with athletic director Jim Ricker last year about getting a mascot at East in order to get some experience before the collegiate level. While the idea hadn’t fully matured yet, Heley also approached Ricker with a plan. With the athletic director’s assistance, the Gridiron and All-Sports Booster Clubs donated the funds necessary to help

05

finance the project. Scollon Productions, a well-known mascot company responsible for the University of Kansas Jayhawk and Kansas City Chief’s KC Wolf, designed and manufactured the mascot. “I really think it will be a great addition,” Ricker said. “It will just add to the spirit of what’s going on.” The mascot’s job at games will be to get the crowd pumped up; “rabble-rouse” as Heley puts it. “They will hopefully work with the cheerleaders and maybe the drill team to perform some stunts and some choreographed things,” Heley said. Six people will share the responsibility and honor of being the face behind the mask. The general feeling between the group is mostly excitement. “It’s a lot of eyes. Constantly, no matter what’s happening on the field, someone will be looking at you,” a sophomore who Pep Club requested not be named said. One of the main goals that pep club has for the mascot is to be more involved than just football and basketball. “I’m hoping that it won’t just go to sporting events but also other events in the community and other events that are happening at the school,” Heley said. “I hope it represents our school well to the people living around us.” So far, the Pep Club is planning on having the mascot show up to all the home boys soccer, volleyball and football games. They are taking it one season at a time for now. So far, the mascot has received a positive response from the student body and staff, and expectations are high. “I think the mascot will really bring together a lot of the spirit and symbolism of what the Lancers are,” Rorie said. “The high school togetherness, and also all the energy.”

assemblies and points might be given out to grades when they attend games. Senior Pep Club president Caroline Doerr said she thinks the sponsors are a great mix and really balance each other out. Smith and Anthony both said Schnakenberg is the creative one and Davis is the organized one. “She [Davis] is the very left brain to this operation and I’m kind of the real right brain,” Schnakenberg said. During the meetings, Davis would be the one reading the agenda and writing down ideas, while Schnakenberg would chime in with ideas and thoughts. When Davis explained how they were supposed to pick up candy on the streets after the parade, students explained they had sports and Schnakenberg threw out an idea. “You’re going to be walking back up anyways, if you see a Laffy Taffy why not just pick it up,” Schnakenberg said. “It won’t kill ya.” Pep Club agreed the first pep assembly was a success except for the organization. Also awkward transition periods were an issue. They only had two weeks to prepare and believe that with a longer timing period, the assemblies will be even better. “I hope we start this chain, to get people really proud of being at this school and I’m really proud of the kids who are still here and I think they can re-energize the school,” Schnakenberg said.

After nearly a decade-long hiatus, the Lancer mascot returns with high hopes

During Lancer Launch on Aug. 12, the Lancer mascot makes its inaugural sprint across the gymnasium floor. Tryouts were held on Aug. 26 to find a few spirited students to fill the costume of the still-nameless Lancer.

TomiCaldwell


NEWS 06 09 07 10

News Briefs Taking a peek at East’s upcoming events MorganChristian

5

the week in photos GrantHeinlein

Freshman Ellen St. Clair peers through the crowd during the Freshmen Orientation Day.

EdenSchoofs

Choir teacher Ken Foley directs Chambers at the Lancer Launch.

college AUDITIONS&NIGHT

in the area,” Martin said. Another distinctive aspect of the play is that it will b e presented as nine fast-paced episodes, instead of the usual three acts. This is characteristic of Expressionist plays. Martin also plans on utilizing many different sound effects, as has been done in previous productions of Machinal. Students who try out must prepare a one-minute dramatic monologue and

LindseyHartnett

East swimmers lure in cars to their fundraising car wash.

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Sat. September18 Sun. September 19 Mon. September 20

fallplay

Fri. September 17

tion at 11401 Lamar Avenue from 7-9 p.m. Parents are welcome to attend. Junior Jakob Yedo plans on going “I want to be a biomechanical engineer,” Yedo said. “This will be a good way for me to find out about some opportunities for myself.” Smith thinks of the night as a networking opportunity. “I try to get my students to got to it because...the more contacts you make, the better off you are,” Smith said.

Thurs. September 16

Computer-aided design teacher Mr. Jason Smith likens Black and Veatch’s College Night to a meet and greet between high school students and construction industry professionals. “They open it up for students to come in and talk with people[...]that are engineers, architects, and designers,” Smith said. “It’s a good way to get everyone together.” The meeting is hosted by the Explorer Post, a Black and Veatch program for students aged 14-19 who are interested in math, science and engineering. It will take place at the company’s corporate loca-

Wed. September 15

It’s certainly not “Footloose.” “Machinal” is based on the story of Ruth Snyder, the first woman to receive capital punishment in the state of New York in the 20th century. Snyder was executed by an electric chair for murdering her husband. Student director Grace Martin thinks the drama’s mature subject matter presents a unique opportunity. “This isn’t really something that is being performed at any other high schools

Mon. September 12

Sun. September 12

Sat. September 11

McClannahan said. “I was drinking juice with my rice…and apparently it’s weird to drink juice at breakfast.” This is only one of the many cultural differences between South Korea and America that McClannahan plans to talk about at the International Club’s meeting after school on Wednesday, Sept. 8 in the library. She hopes to hear interesting stories from other students as well. “I like meeting people from other cultures and being able to talk about our different experiences,” McClannahan said. “It doesn’t matter who you are, people should come to International Club if they’re interested.”

Fri. September 10

international club meeting 8

Thurs. September 9

Tues. September 7

There are two ways East students choose to spend their summer vacations: in Kansas, or on vacation. Senior Susie McClannahan opted for the more exotic choice. McClannahan spent seven weeks of her summer studying the Korean language in Seoul, South Korea, through the National Security Language Initiative for Youth program. She stayed with a host family who spoke limited English, but she was able to learn about the culture through their actions. “One day, my host mom was laughing at me at breakfast, and I couldn’t figure out why,”

show up earlier than their scheduled audition times. “No matter if you make it or not, it’s a good experience to audition,” Martin said. “The only way you’ll definitely not get a part in the play is if you don’t audition.”

GrantHeinlein

Freshman Leila Seabaugh laughs as her classmates toss tape balls during Link Crew classroom activities.

GraceSnyder

Parent walks through the sophomore hall during Back to School Night.


OPINION issue 1

07

ARBITRARY PLACEMENT Shawnee Mission School District should allow its students AP designation without being forced to take the AP test

One hundred forty-five International Baccalaureate, honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses available. 1,613 AP tests administered in 2009. 198 students named AP Scholars the same year. The Shawnee Mission School District flaunts the increasing number of its students that are participating in these college-level exams. Of course, that’s because we’re being forced to. District policy states that a student enrolled in an AP course must take the corresponding exam in May to receive the AP designation on his or her transcript. This policy puts emphasis in the wrong place: on gaining a credential rather than on understanding class material. If the district were genuine about the philosophy of the AP program, it wouldn’t need a requirement like this to get more kids to take AP classes and tests. Students simply would, because they would be excited about the academic opportunities the program has to offer. What we need is a change in attitude—course participation and higher scores will follow. One way to start fixing this enthusiasm gap is by adopting a different policy, one that brings attention to AP’s opportunities for higher-level learning, rather than its opportunities to beef up a transcript. If students received the AP designation simply for passing their AP classes, our problem would be fixed. Right now, though, students are essentially paying to receive the AP designation. For $85 they can bubble in their names and have “European History” changed to “European History AP.” Not only The majority opinion of the does this defeat the purpose of taking an Harbinger Editorial Board for against absent AP course, but it’s also unfair to those students who can’t afford to take the test. They are unable to receive any recognition for their deci-

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sion to challenge themselves. Furthermore, AP test scores are not used in calculating grades or GPA’s. Their only significance comes in the role they play in determining college scholarships, credit hours and course placement. And taking the test is a great way for students to exhibit their knowledge to universities. However, the current policy has nothing to do with preparing students to be successful at college. They can get the AP designation without any understanding of the material at all—no matter whether they pass or fail their classes, or get ones or a fives on their exams. The proposed change, however, will put our focus back on gaining an understanding of the curriculum and, if we so choose, proving that understanding to colleges and universities. Admissions officers will still have the choice of where to place students based on their letter grades and test scores. Though it might help if they focused more on the former than the latter. It seems the school district cares more about rankings, numbers, and appearances more than meeting the AP curriculum. The students of Shawnee Mission East want to truly understand their course material so they will be better prepared for college, and decreasing the focus on AP tests will allow that to happen.

Harbinger

Letters to the editor should be sent to room 521 or smeharbinger.net@gmail. com. Letters may be edited for clarity, length, libel and mechanics and accepted or rejected at the editor’s discretion.

the

a publication of shawnee mission east high school 7500 Mission Road, Prairie Village, KS 66208

Assistant Photo

Sept. 7, 2010 Editor issue 1, vol. 52

Paige Hess Editorial Board Andrew Goble Annie Sgroi Corbin Barnds Logan Heley Kevin Simpson Jennifer Rorie Jack Howland Evan Nichols Kat Buchanan Bob Martin Morgan Christian Photographers Katie East Grant Kendall Anna Marken Sammi Kelley Samantha Bartow Claire Wahrer Tomi Caldwell Grace Snyder Riley Meurer Marissa Horwitz Kaitlyn Stewart

Ads/Circulation Manager Jennifer Rorie Staff Artist Alex Goldman Online Editors Logan Heley Pat McGannon Online Assistant Editor Maggie Simmons Online Copy Editors Kennedy Burgess Lilly Myers Online Photo Editor Lindsey Hartnett Multimedia Editor Maggie Simmons Convergence Editor Bob Martin Homegrown Editor Nathan Walker Podcast/Blog Editor Jeff Cole Video Editor Alex Lamb

Videographers Thomas Allen Nathan Walker Andrew Simpson Live Broadcast Editor Jeff Cole Live Broadcast Producers Thomas Allen Tom Lynch Anchors Andrew Simpson Jeff Cole Chloe Stradinger Corbin Barnds Kevin Simpson Nathan Walker Paige Hess PR Representative Chloe Stradinger Online Staff Writers Andrew Simpson Online Photographer Nathan Simpson Adviser Dow Tate

Eden Schoofs  Editors-In-Chief Spread Editors Freelance Page Editors Andrew Goble Lilly Myers Christa McKittrick Annie Sgroi Toni Aguiar Copy Editors Assistant Editors Features Editor Evan Nichols Kat Buchanan Sarah McKittrick Andrew Goble Evan Nichols Features Page Editors Annie Sgroi Head Copy Editor Chloe Stradinger Kevin Simpson Kevin Simpson  Haley Martin Kat Buchanan Art and Design Editor Alysabeth Albano Jack Howland Emma Pennington A&E Editor Morgan Christian News Editor Aubrey Leiter Anne Willman Jack Howland A&E Page Editors Logan Heley  News Page Editors Kennedy Burgess Bob Martin Morgan Christian Tom Lynch Matt Gannon Editorial Editor Sports Editor Chris Heady Katy Westhoff Corbin Barnds Staff Writers Opinion Editor Sports Page Editors Grant Kendall Raina Weinberg Matt Gannon Alex Lamb Opinion Page Editors Freelance Page Editors Chris Heady Ian Wiseman Christa McKittrick Julia Davis Emily Kerr Photo Editors Zoe Brian Mixed Editor Grant Heinlein Caroline Creidenberg Anne Willman Dan Stewart  The Harbinger is a student run publication. The contents and views are produced solely by the staff and do not represent the Shawnee Mission School District, East faculty, or school administration.


08

OPINION 12 07 09 0710 10

Junior believes today’s sports pros play for the

Love of the Business I don’t remember a lot of my childhood. With great thanks to three concussions, and multiple hits to the an opinion of Christopher Heady noggin during various activities, I can’t extract much. The earliest memory that I can recall is sitting in the nose-bleed section of a Chiefs versus Jaguars game and thinking how phenomenal the entire thing was. Here were 22 grown men, duking it out on a 100 yard battlefield and laying their bodies on the line, all for an undying passion for sport; or so I thought. Since that experience, the mantra of professional sports in my mind has been all about the winning, all about being the best in the league for bragging rights and giving everything you’ve got for a simple win. But I’ve witnessed events in the past six months that have contradicted my childhood vision of professional sports. On shows at pre-season training camps, players demand trades and playing the free agency field to switch onto teams and just join up with their buddies to dominate; these are two of the many things that make me realize how wrong I was about pro sports. Nowadays it’s all about the money. All about the politics. Its all about how to make the most money, not about who can get the most wins. I’ve realized that pro sports isn’t what I had always hoped it would be. Professional sports is all business, and I don’t like it. I’ve played a variety of sports in my day. I pretended to be Michael Phelps in the pool, Alfonso Soriano with the bat, and LeBron James on the court. I played soccer with orange pulp in my teeth on Saturday mornings, and have watched every NBA game on Christmas Day since I can remember. I have seven editions of Madden, and more baseball cards than you could ever imagine. As a kid I always wanted to be a pro athlete. Like every other little kid, I started playing sports for the love of the game, and that’s why I still play today. I don’t run 10-in-60’s for this school so that I can get paid more. It never crossed my mind until recently that sports may be something like a business. But honestly, what would happen if pro athletes got paid as much as say a lawyer? Or a teacher? How many players would stay in the league?

Pros’ Fiascos

1

Heady examines the top egos in professional sports

Two letters. One player. Infinite ego. Of the entire sports world, this is the sports star that would have a reality show. T.O. is the only person in the universe that can go out on his front lawn, do crunches, get asked questions by reporters and still be able to cry in a press conference a week later about his quarterback since he obviously didn’t get enough attention that week. Terrell Owens gets the tool-of-the-year award. Congrats T.O. Two years running. See you next year.

It seems like the older I get, the more selfish and greedy the players get. Darrelle Revis is arguably the best corner-back in the NFL. He’s also one of the most selfish and greedy players that I’ve ever seen or heard of. Because of his ego, he is currently in a holdout with the New York Jets. Revis is due for $1 million for this next season, but since he thinks that he is God’s gift to the game, he wants to be paid $162 million more. At the moment, he has no job and isn’t any kind of role model for

The most recent egotistical jerk on the list this year is a newcomer. Formerly known as the King, this basketball star became the villain of practically the entire world this July by turning his back on the entire state of Ohio. You love him, it’s LeBron James. Yes, James may be the two-time MVP, but don’t let that phase you. He had an entire hour on ESPN dedicated to his decision on where he is going to play next fall, and after a nail-biting four minutes, he shocked absolutely no one but by leaving his team, the Cavs. Great role model Bron!

2

young athletes. He obviously isn’t playing the game of football for a profession because he loves it—he’s in it for the green. This is just one instance of how players always want more money, and always want more attention. I feel like half of pro players strive to be on MTV Cribs rather than be on ESPN or gold in their teeth rather than a championship ring on their finger. Sports is a business. I have to keep reminding myself of this day in and day out. I just don’t want to accept it. Why is the third string quarterback the #1 selling jersey for the Denver Broncos? Why did LeBron James leave the Cavs? Because sports is a business. Players like Tim Tebow, LeBron James and Alex Rodriguez bring in bank just by the name on the back of the jersey. And the name on the back of the jersey brings in money for the name on the front of the jersey. It’s as simple as that. Though they have shown their talents on-field, they are celebrities in the public eye and because of that, people want to see them because they are “famous.” It’s almost like the players are the product, and the team is the company. I play basketball at East and I don’t get paid a cent. In the two years I have been at this school, I haven’t seen one player quit because they don’t get paid enough, they don’t get thrown the ball enough, or they don’t get enough playing time. Why can’t professional players do the same? Why can’t they find their roots? LeBron James leaving the Cavs for the Heat in July this summer was a business move. He had an opportunity to play with a better organization, and possibly get a NBA ring, so he took it. He gets more money from the Heat and Cavs, he gets to play with better players and his friends, who wouldn’t take that job? KatieEast It’s just like if you are working at one law firm, and you get offered to go to a better law firm, would you do it? You’d be kidding yourself if you said no. Sports is a business. The discovery of happiness I acquired when I watched the Chiefs Jaguars game long ago isn’t what I thought it was cracked up to be. Sports is a business. But I’m not near ready to accept it.

3 Let’s face it, baseball has become a sport of who can get away with the most HGH and who can score the most steroids, not runs. The popper of this movement to destroy America’s pastime is none-other than our favorite A-Rod. The baseball monster has hit over 600 home-runs now, and he even took the time to stall three weeks before hitting his 600th. Though he is a great player, his ego is bigger than his steroid infested arms.


OPINION issue 1

09

LESSONS

FROM A LIAR Senior reflects on a bad habit from her past To be honest, I can’t say I got much out of my time in middle school. I came out of the experience having only learned one thing. No, I didn’t happen to an opinion of Raina Weinberg learn anything about literature after reading “I Know What You Did Last Summer” in English class, and I certainly didn’t gain any self confidence from my painfully awkward communications class. What I did learn, to my eighth grade social studies teacher’s dismay, was how to lie. The lies originally sprung from my lack of work ethic, or as my mom would say, my “utter laziness.” I would also like to make a call out to my good old friend “stress.” That’s always a good emotion to blame my lies on. I can honestly say—as honest as a liar can be—that I tricked myself into feeling stressed. The one page group project due on Anne Frank was not, nor will it ever be stressful but somehow, I managed to forgo the whole thing. At home, I was always assaulted with my dad’s nagging question, “Is your homework done?” I casually glanced at my unopened backpack... “Of Course!” It was too easy. So, pretending I had done my homework, I would proceed to waltz into school the next day with blank worksheets, or as I liked to say, “homework I did all night and forgot at home.” At the time, it seemed brilliantly crafty to pretend that it was the teacher who lost my worksheet. Now, I know how incredibly wrong I was. Every lie begins small. Some may say small lies are harmless but for me, every lie I have told ended up hurting me in the long run. They were always white lies or larger lies that escalated and turned out bad. I’d like to call those the whoppers. They all took something away. Channeling my optimism, I believe that I gained something from these experiences, paying no attention to the fact that I usually got in trouble. The White Lie It wasn’t long before I realized that the JFK paper due before spring break was easily the lowest thing on my priority list. Being in eighth grade, the items that came before my paper ranged from who the winner of American Idol would be to what Aeropostale polo I would wear with my new Birkenstocks. Turn in date quickly approached and I had yet to crack

Meter Lie-O-

A stretch of the truth

Okay so maybe you weren’t actually driving 100 mph... but it sure makes a better speeding story. Props to you for creativity. Often just a minor switch of Can make the “teller” seem far less dull than they actually are.

The little white lie

Pants on fire

open my 12 page biography, on JFK, from the children’s section of the library, on JFK. As all my classmates passed up their thick essays, I glanced around the room, making sure my teacher doesn’t notice that mine is missing from the stack. Two weeks later, the last day of spring break, I received a call from no other than my social studies teacher. Before I knew what was happening, I was telling her that I had turned it in and could not believe she had lost it. The whole guilt thing seemed to work like a charm. The next day, I came into school, prepared to do what I thought would be impossible. Safely tucked away in my backpack was my two page, double spaced, 16 pt. font paper, not to mention I had thrown it together at 10 the night before. I was told to sort through papers and try to find my “missing” report. The next part happened faster than I can remember and in the end, I was walking out of my social studies class wearing a smirk and being profusely apologized to by my teacher. I had done it. Before you turn on me, I do have a conscience, and even more, the goody-goody type of conscience that tends to set in immediately after I do something that I feel rotten for. Lesson Learned From this, I found that I shouldn’t be such a jerk. I had no reason to procrastinate on this project and even more, no reason to lie about it. To redeem my negative feelings, I gave an immense amount of effort to every project assigned for the rest of the year. Ultimately, I realized that the whole situation could have been easily avoided had I done the required work. For a time, I kept a clean lie-free streak. Then, under the pressure of stress, I reverted to old habits. The Whopper The way I saw it, I had three options; throw myself down my flight of stairs and hope to score a trip to the emergency room, slash all four of my parents tires, or, the worst option of all, tell the truth. Visions of chaos erupted around me when my mom uttered three vile words my junior year- “parent/

“The Little White Lie” “I once told my neighbors that I would watch their dogs for the weekend. I didn’t check on them once. They didn’t die.”

Liar liar, you’ve told a fib and now you are in too deep. Maybe convincing your little brother he is adopted from CzechoslavaMortal Sin kia wasn’t such You either lack a a good idea moral compass or could after all.

be a pathological liar. Time to shake this habit for ‘lie”fe.

-Sophomore Brennan Williams

SamanthaBartow

teacher conferences.” Gulp. A lie that I told had spiraled into a life of its own. Fast-forwarding to a year and a half later, the lie was in the back of my mind; it had become a part of my life that I didn’t even notice anymore. Sophomore year, feeling trapped and stretched to the limit, I took my second semester report card and scanned it onto Microsoft Paint. It was too easy. Within 20 minutes, my C’s and D’s were transformed into A’s and B’s. This continued for a year. It was the nag in the back of my mind and led to more stress than I could have imagined. Returning to reality, I knew I didn’t have any desire to wear a lime green cast on my arm that would inevitably have profanity written on it within the first days of getting it and I certainly did not want to be responsible for paying to get replacement tires. I was left with one terrifying option: honesty. I paced around my living room for what felt like hours until, in an outburst of tears, I told my parents everything. The lie, the details, and how bad I had felt. In that moment, a weight that I had unknowingly been carrying fell away and I felt light. Lesson Learned This lie taught me something about myself. I had avoided, denied and pretended that there was no issue—almost to the extent of sabotaging myself. Once the lie was out, my relief was immense. Everyone involved felt better about knowing the truth and I was able to turn things around. Since my time as a liar, I have told the occasional tall tale, but nothing harmful. There is nothing good about lying nor should it ever be used to get out of self-created problems. Now, after I’ve said that I lie, and told my stories, I leave it to you. Maybe this entire column was created at the BS factory, or perhaps, I really have changed. I suppose you’ll never know.

“Stretch of truth” “Pants On Fire” “I told people that I was going to the Hamptons for a month to avoid seeing them. I truthfully only went for a week and pretended that I was still out of town.” -Senior Dan Stewart

“Mortal Sin”

“I spread a rumor that Dan Stewart had swine flu last year. It got all around the school and even circulated to the nurse. It caused some discomforted parents.”

“Last year I told my math class that I was getting expelled and Dr. S immediately insisted on calling the office and defending me. I was not getting expelled at all.”

-Senior Katie East

-Senior Chris Melvin


FEATURES

10

09 07 10

AnneWillman

Surrounding sophomore Annie Sullivan are walls covered in hundreds of autographs. In black Sharpie, names of famous comedians are visible— Steve Carell, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. Newspaper clippings clothe each wall. Some are framed and others are taped. History has been made in this little room, famous people have touched these walls, it is the green room backstage. “I was overwhelmed walking in, nothing seemed real,” Sullivan said. Backstage Sullivan is standing. She is in one of the most prestigious comedy clubs in the country—Second City. Sullivan had an ambition two years ago that she would be able to travel to Chicago to learn from some of the top instructors. The dream of becoming a comedian started when she first encountered her love for comedy. Sullivan started acting at a young age. In fourth grade, her mother, Missy Sullivan, signed her up for improv classes at The Culture House and Coterie where she learned techniques, participated in acting exercises and performed in front of audiences. Sullivan found that after taking classes that she enjoyed the spontaneous feeling of improv. Missy said, “Seeing, Annie up on stage makes me feel very proud because she is up there for who she is and not who she is at home.” At home Sullivan exerts a different attitude when cleaning her room or doing her chores. On stage she comes alive, she is a completely different person. She is free to say what comes to her mind and free to be loud. “Ever since I was a little kid, I would stay up late to watch Saturday Night Live,” Sullivan said. “I became interested every time I turned it on.” She would stay up each Saturday

evening to see which sketch would be acted out and who would be performing. As she sat in front of the television each Saturday she wondered: How do these people get onto SNL? Sullivan searched the Internet and found the answer—Second City. Scrolling down the page Second City web site, Sullivan looked It was amazing to be at the long list of classes she could able to stand where attend. the famous comedians “I was excited as Annie about get to stand. Second City,” Missy Sullivan said. Sophomore Annie Sullivan “So many legendary comedians are

from there.” Many comedians stand on the expansive stage at Second City, the lights beating down on them, and soon they are discovered. A chance to go to Second City means following in the footsteps of past comedians. After first discovering that classes were offered at Second City, Sullivan’s drive to attend Second City did not halt. Sullivan began doing odd jobs to earn enough money to pay tuition. Sullivan did everything from lawn mowing to taking out her neighbors’ garbage. Sullivan also spent many hours baby sitting and doing any job that was available. Once her hard work was completed and she had earned enough money, it was time. Sullivan’s dream was finally going to come true; she would be able to train at Second City for two weeks. When Sullivan arrived at Second City nothing seemed real to her—the building, the instructors, the people, nothing. Sullivan had waited long enough to make her entrance. She had worked to make it possible. She was ready to take on her dream and embrace

the environment of Second City. “I was nervous in a way. I thought that I might not be funny enough or no one would laugh at my jokes,” Sullivan said. Sullivan soon learned that being at Second City should not change the way she performed. Everyone was there to learn and to share with others what they all had in common— comedy. Sullivan attended classes in improv, sketch writing and stand up. Each class was taught by a different instructor. “My improv teacher, Jason Ball, told us that doing an improv does not mean doing mistakes but making new discoveries,” Sullivan said. “That really stuck with me and I will remember that.” At the end of the two weeks of instruction each of the students performed in a “showcase”. There, Sullivan had an opportunity to have three sketches, which she had written, performed. She also was a part of five improvs. Not only did Sullivan get to perform, she had the opportunity to perform on the actual Second City stage. “It was amazing to be able to stand where the famous comedians get to stand,” Sullivan said. “A huge revelation was that I shouldn’t care if people think I am funny or not.” Sullivan is backstage; she walks in a circle frantically. She second-guesses herself. She asks herself: What are my lines? Oh no, I forgot my lines. She is overwhelmed by nervousness. On stage, Sullivan waits. She is ready to deliver her lines. Everything fades, her doubts float away and her confidence begins to boost. She is prepared to do her job— make people laugh. Sullivan begins her lines: “Hi, hello, Pizza hut? Do you deliver? My wife is having a baby.”

illustration by Chloe Stradinger

second city

Sophomore Annie Sullivan attended a two-week camp this summer at the famous comedy club Second City

B

the city’s

top

4

1 alumni 2

A look at the Second City’s famous alumni

Tina Fey, 1996 “Saturday Night Live,” “Baby Mama,” “Date Night”

Steve Carell, 1989 “The Office,” “Get Smart,” “Evan Almighty”

3 4

Adam McKay, 1995 Writer of: “Step Brothers,” “Talledega Nights” and “Anchorman”

Chris Farley, 1989 “Tommy Boy,” “Beverly Hills Ninja,” “Billy Madison” www.secondcity.com


FEATURES

issue 1

Scouting it out Freshman devotes summer to Boy Scouts JenniferRorie

Freshman Hayden Wylie was finally 14 years-old, just old enough to go. Thousands of other scouts had hiked the mountain trails at Philmont Scout Ranch. It sounded fun when they talked about it; challenging, but fun. It would be the chance of a lifetime. He had been in Boy Scouts all his life and dedicates hours and days each month to it. What was there to lose hopping on the 14-hour train ride that would lead him into the Rocky

there’s a

badge for that

a look at unusual scout badges and the requirements to earn them

RileyMeurer

Mountains to then hike for 11 days? Hayden went for it this summer with Troop 1132. But this first trip was just the beginning. This two-week trip was not the extent of Hayden’s travels. He not only traveled to Philmont, but also to Camp Gieger in St. Joseph, MO and The Boy Scout National Jamboree in Bowling Green, VA. Hayden spent virtually his entire summer with his Boy Scout troop; more time than with his own family, a fact that affected them while he was gone.

“He is my best entertainment and he is willing to go places with me that not everyone would want to. I like to have fun a lot and not to have a partner was tough,” Hayden’s mom, Lea Wylie said. Hayden hiked 51 miles in 11 days in the Sangre de Cristo Range of the Rocky Mountains near Cimarron, New Mexico with nine other boys and leaders. The area where they were hiking, a working cattle ranch, was donated to the Boy Scouts of America by a wealthy oilman named Waite Phillips, of the Phillips 66 family. It is 214 square miles of pure hiking and adventure. Thousands of scouts have hiked the trails there and had experiences they will never forget, and Hayden is no exception. Hayden has gone hiking on other occasions and even backpacking, but never anything to the extreme of Philmont. For him, 51 miles wasn’t what he was thinking of - 70 sounded more his speed - nevertheless he hiked the 51 with a smile on his face. He wanted the extra challenge of 20 more miles, but the others in his troop weren’t thrilled about it. “I’ve done other stuff, but this is the major topper of the cake,” Hayden said. One night at Philmont around 4:00 a.m. Hayden and his tent mate woke up to their scout master yelling about a bear. The bear was about 60 yards away in the woods, and was hoping to snap up the food out of their bear bag. The boys made enough noise to deter the bear, but they were on the look out for another one for the rest of the trek. When they reached the next campsite, there was word of a bear that would get into food day and night. That night the boys and leaders were taking turns staying awake all night to keep watch for the bear. Hayden kept the coffee flowing for those on lookout, but luckily none of them ever saw a bear. Hayden spent merely two weeks at home after Philmont before he headed off to the National Jamboree. This year’s Jamboree was a huge celebration of boys and Boy Scouting because it was the 100th anniversary of Boy Scouts in America, so thousands of scouts from around the world met in Virginia to celebrate this momentous year. Hayden’s troop spent a few days in Washington D.C. before heading to Jamboree, and visited places like the Spy Museum and the Smithsonian Institution. On the bus ride to camp there were boys that got car sick, but unfortunately one boy did so right as they were pulling into camp and the doctor was getting on the bus. Hayden and his troop were put in quarantine for 36 hours. Hayden wasn’t able to enjoy the festivities on the first

dog care: scouts must be able to discuss the history

of dog domestication, know dog body parts, take care of a dog for two months and train a dog correctly

coin collecting: scouts should be able to

understand how coins are made, collect foreign coins and know how to properly store coins

11

day, but the second day he rose early at 6:30 a.m. to get the day started. During the remainder of the event, Hayden found activities to do such as shooting a 50 caliber rifle, scuba diving, BMX, and throwing tomahawks. However, the main event was the stage show each night complete with fireworks and light shows, along with guest appearance from Mike Roe of “Dirty Jobs”, the rock band Switchfoot, and a slightly humorous appearance by Miss America, Katie Stam. “She called us girls on accident. She was like sorry I talk to girls all the time,” Hayden said. Visiting Philmont was a huge part of Hayden’s scouting adventures, but to him scouting is more than just hiking and earning patches. For Hayden, it is a great learning experience, and teaches him skills such as fire building and survival techniques he couldn’t learn anywhere else. Scouting started for Hayden in 3rd grade when his dad, John Hayden, started a Cub Scout troop. Since then scouting has just been a normal part of his life. Hayden realizes that some people think it’s nerdy, but to him it’s their loss. “I don’t really care if people make fun of me for it. Getting your Eagle Scout looks amazing on a resume and on college applications, it’s a learning curve,” Hayden said. Giving up more than half of his summer to scouts wasn’t hard for Hayden, but he did skip out on activities that he generally doesn’t miss. He missed out on treasured summer time at the pool and hanging out with his best friend Nathan. Although he didn’t get to spend as much time as he wanted with Nathan, he went on two of the trips with his other good friend Steven Schmidt. The two have been in scouting and attending school together from the beginning; they were even tent mates in Philmont. The biggest thing Hayden missed was visiting his grandparents in Nebraska. They usually shoot off fireworks and go golfing, two of Hayden’s favorite activities, but Hayden missed it all for scouting. Hayden came home for good that summer Aug. 5, and finally hung out with his best friend and went to the Prairie Village pool for the first time. He spent more nights in his sleeping bag than his bed, and when he put on his tennis shoes after hiking those 11 days in his boots they were no longer comfortable. Hayden was able to have the rest of summer to spend with his friends, family. He especially spent time with his sister, Mackenzie, an East graduate, who was leaving for college. He had the summer of a lifetime, and says that he would do it all again “in a New York minute.”

cooking: scouts must plan menus, un-

derstand the food pyramid and describe food-related illnesses

cinematography: scouts must know the elements of a

good motion picture, demonstrate different motion shooting techniques and research careers in cinematography scouting.org


12

FEATURES 09 07 10

ORLANDO’S

aOrlando’s nightTeenatNights have seen a rise in the number of East attendees JackHowland

Senior Scott Watson hurriedly hops out of his friend’s car and heads inside his home. He doesn’t have much time to get ready. He quickly showers, then throws on a plain orange tee-shirt with khaki shorts. Nothing special. Tonight, he’s going to go to a club where teens can dance. That’s really all he was told. He doesn’t know what to expect, more than anything he’s curious. Curious to see how a collection of teenagers act in a night club setting. He has no idea what could happen. A Honda Accord pulls into his driveway. He’s ready for his questions to be answered. “One of my buddies told me what it was and I was like ‘Yeah, sure, I’ll go,” Watson said. “They said it’s so unique and that I had to try it at least once.” Watson went to Orlando’s on one of many “teen nights” that took place over the summer. These have become a popular spot among East students as they’ve been drawing larger crowds from local high school fare. Watson was one of the first to go. Watson and East graduates Paul Wolff, Amanda Privitera and Hannah Quillec tried it on a whim one Sunday night. His friends got word of it through peers laughing at the thought of barely legal drivers going to a full fledged night club. Walking into the bass-thumping, strobe-flashing, strippole-bearing spot, Watson and pals burst into laughter. “It was not like your normal Shawnee Mission East dance, that’s for sure,” Watson said. “It was dark and pretty creepy, with a lot of random strangers close to your age.” Initially, the teen night feels more like prom held at a 21 and over night club. Watson looks to the floor and sees nothing more than teenagers uncomfortably staring at each other, stuck in a momentary lapse of no dancing. As the DJ continues to spin songs, the uncomfortable stares begin to fade. Just in time, the unmistakable synth intro to “Your Love Is My Drug” booms out of the speakers right on cue. They dance and continue to song after song, high-fiving and cavorting around the dance floor. After hours of equal weirdness and fun, the night ends. Watson’s group doesn’t know what to think. “Everyone had the same kind of look,” Watson said. “Just confused at what was going on.” On the car ride home, the group of Lancers is ecstatic. Laughter fills their car along with an overpowering clicking

of text messages. We’ve got to tell everyone! Through texting and word of mouth, senior Cooper Toombs caught wind of the new club. “They were just saying that it was ridiculous,” Toombs said. “And it was kind of funny because it’s not what East is at all, but it was refreshing in a way.” At first, Toombs was skeptical of Orlando’s. He heard from Watson and others that it was indescribable and unlike other KC run-of-the-mill entertainment. But he was still uncertain. A seemingly insignificant Sunday he sat at the pool. Three of his friends came up to him and told him they were planning to go. After a lot of “will it be fun, won’t it be fun” debating, Toombs was in. “It was one of those things where I was like ‘Yeah, I’ll go as a joke,” Toombs said. “Then it turned out to be pretty fun.” Toombs’ group enjoyed themselves with the mentality that no one they knew was there. He and four of his friends went to the club around 8 p.m. They saw mostly strangers and the occasional familiar face. With only a few other small groups of East students in attendance, Toombs’ group shifted from tentative to out-of-control. Later in August, they went again. There were more than a few East groups this time. “It’s definitely [gotten more popular],” Toombs said. “It’s sort of become a cult phenomenon.” This “phenomenon” is largely attributed to Facebook. Towards the beginning of last May, Orlando’s developed a Facebook profile aptly named “Orlando’s Teen Nights.” This grew substantially over the course of the summer. Ten new friends on some days. Twenty on others. Eighty-one of them are listed as Lancers. Senior Kirsten Clark was unaware of the Facebook page before she gave the club a try. Her knowledge of Orlando’s was mainly restricted to drill team conversation and radio commercials. Upon hearing the advertisements, Clark typically would laugh and think how funny it would be to actually go to a teen night. Her drill team friends had the same thoughts.

“It was always a joke before, we were like, ‘Yeah, let’s go to Orlando’s!” Clark said. “Then one time we were like, ‘Should we actually go?” The entire drill team went on Orlando’s back-to-school themed night. Clark thought the evening could be a grotesque experience. A sweaty, uncomfortable mess set to pop music. Somewhere between watching masses of kids climb up a pole and hang from the ceiling, and getting in a spontaneous dance-off with a stranger, Clark realized it was fun. When she went, she was overwhelmed with how many East students she saw. Quickly after the night, Clark friended the Facebook profile. She was one of the later people to do so. Co-owner of the club Wendy Orlando maintains the page and attributes the recent popularity of the club to it. “We were reinventing ourselves [at the start of summer] and with the help of Facebook, it really gave us the avenue to advertise and contact our target audience,” Orlando said. “Because, as you know, Facebook is the place to be.” Now with the help of a good reputation and newfound friend-ing skill, the teen nights are more popular than she’s ever seen them. She estimates they are currently doubling or tripling the number of kids that attended at the start of summer. Barring alcohol consumption, Orlando’s does nothing differently on teen nights than they would on a regular evening. They give kids the full night club experience. Strobe lights and all. Toombs and Watson both are planning to go again. Sept. 11 is the first Saturday teen night, and it’s a black light theme. They both can’t wait for the club’s patented craziness and 95.7 the vibe-esque playlist. Maybe they’ll see someone climb the stripper pole and do casual pull-ups from the rafters again. Or they’ll see a friend embarrassing himself with inexcusable dance moves. They’re confident they’ll enjoy it either way. “I think there are definitely a lot of people who will [continue to] like going there, who will probably go a lot,” Watson said. “Then some people will probably treat it as a joke, but I bet there’s people out there that will really enjoy it.”

TEEN NIGHT BASICS Where:

Orlando’s Nightclub 126 Clairborne Olathe

When:

Sundays if no school the next day, and Saturdays starting Sept. 11

What time: 8 p.m.-12 a.m. What to wear: Dress for the theme, strict on dress code How much: $5 before 8 p.m., $10 after 8 p.m.

For additional coverage, view a video feature on Orlando’s at www.smeharbinger.net Photo Courtesy of Orlando’s


FEATURES issue 1

all photos by EdenSchoofs

13

Name:Tatiana Verdonck Country: Belgium Age: 18

Name: Christian Otzen Country: Denmark Age: 17

were you most looking Q: What forward to upon your arrival in the

were you best known for where Q: What you are from? am a very good listener and I enterA: Itain theater. I also danced in Copen-

A:

United States? The team spirit (pep rallies), the friendly American high schools, yellow buses, cheerleading and things that we see in the movies but are actually real.

hagen.

were you most looking forward Q: What to upon your arrival in the United

A:

Q: Mexican food, peanut A: Hamburgers, butter and jelly and the typical What new foods were you looking forward to trying?

American things.

is one thing that’s happened to Q: What you in your time here that you didn’t

is one thing that’s happened to Q: What you in your time here that you didn’t

expect?

A:

I tried out for volleyball, but I had never played in my life. But I made it to the last day there were only 13 people left and only 10 could make the team. I did pretty good. I was sad I didn’t make it, but I’m very happy because I’m on cross country and I get to meet so many people.

A:

the inside scoop on east’s

exchangestudents HaleyMartin

Name:Nicole Broberg Country: Sweden Age: 17

Q: A:

What were you best known for where you are from? The girl who laughs the most (laughs). The girl who laughs the most *laugh*. Did you get to choose to come to

Q: Kansas? I couldn’t choose. I did hope for A: No, California, Florida and New York. I am getting back money because I didn’t get there, but I mostly paid that money so I wouldn’t end up in the South. is the biggest difference Q: What between East and your old school? schedule and the school A: The system. It is all different. The times mainly, in Sweden we have breaks between classes for 15 minutes to two hours sometimes and lunch is at least an hour. We don’t have hours like first, second, third. We just have a lesson and one class with all of the lessons put together.

States? I really don’t know what I was expecting. I want to see the rodeo and for my host family to take me there. When I came for vacation last year, my family drove three hours to find a rodeo and no luck. So I am very excited about the rodeo and they are very jealous.

expect? It is hard to explain. When you are sitting on the plane to America you don’t think. You have only slept a few hours because you are so excited and you don’t know what to expect. The first time I really thought about what I was doing was when I was at my host family’s house laying in bed. But you don’t expect anything, it is very hard to explain to people who haven’t experienced it.

Name:Celia Faye Jacobsen Country: Denmark

Q: A:

What were you best known for where you are from? I was called the psychologist. Usually if people were sad then I would try and listen to them.

Q: A:

is one thing you miss the very Q: What most from your home country? Q: freedom that you have as a teen. A: The You can drink when you are 16 and drive when you are 18. You can get A: around as a teenager with public transportation and in America it’s harder to be a teen.

Age: 15

What clubs or activities are you getting involved in here at East? Cross country and international club because I’m automatically a member and at the meetings there are cookies, which is always a plus. What is one thing that’s happened to you in your time here that you didn’t expect? I’ve seen that pretty much all people are really open. I kind of knew that before I came here but it took me by surprise. Americans are really welcoming, just a little immature sometimes.


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Buy a Black Out T-Shirt. Wear it to the Game. Get your Black Out t-shirt Thursday and Friday at lunch or at the gate on Friday. Look for tables outside the cafeteria - $10 while supplies last.

2010 Football Black Out Game This Friday vs. Lawrence

The Lancer Gridiron Club wishes all Lancer athletes, teams and coaches the best of luck


SPREAD

Lake Lotawana

MASON

6FLAGS

went to

Diamond McDonald

moved to

Kansas from

SUPER GEEK

Heather went to the Nelson

se-

Justin bieber

concert

what did

YOU DO this summer?

PaigeHess

Rain pounds down onto their campsite as sophomore Chris Watkins questions if he has made the right choice. The soaking packs, which originally weighed 45 pounds, now felt as if they were carrying buckets of water on their backs. After waiting out the nine-hour downpour, Watkins and his group had no choice but to set up camp and cook in the rain. Watkins and a group of seven teenagers and four adults spent 10 days this summer hiking up the mountains of Northern New Mexico. The group did practice runs throughout the year at parks and the Ozarks, but even with the training, according to Watkins, it was a very challenging trip. The group was given a Ranger the first two days they were there. She introduced all procedures and everything they would need to know on the first day. The second day she only observed the group so they would have to use their knowledge and remember what they learned. Once they got the basics down, together, they started their hikes of 10-13 miles a day before the sun rose, and they would be forced to take down their camp once the sun set. As a fifteen year old with no real training for hiking, Watkins found himself feeling as if he could barely lift his legs. He could not mentally prepare, because he had no idea what to ex-

17

THE EXPLORER ErinReilly

pect. Once he got through it, he realized what he was capable of. “At times, I didn’t think about anything” said Watkins. “I just concentrated solely on walking.” Watkins had built up stamina playing soccer and swimming in the weeks leading up to the trip, so he believed he was going to have it easy. Though Watkins had trained hard for this expedition, the mountains had other plans for him. The mountains didn’t only push those who are in bad shape; it also challenged Watkins just as hard. One of Watkins’s most memorable days was when the group woke up around four in the morning, and hiked a total of 13 miles to reach the top of a mountain. It was so dark that they could barely see anything outside the range of their flashlights. The group felt it was the biggest accomplishment once they got to the top. “Looking down from the mountain was a rewarding feeling, said Watkins. “It was hard but worth it.” Watkins and the group say that they appreciate things a little better, now that they have gone for 10 days without eating normal food, showering and having no real amenities. “It really does put things into perspective,” said Watkins, “no matter how ready you think you are.”

Day 1 After 14 hours of travel, sophomore Tiernan Shank lugs her camping gear down the Eugene, Oregon terminal. Trying to avoid any more problems like the one earlier that day when her flight was canceled, she glances around anxiously trying to find anyone from the program, Apogee Adventures, with whom she’ll be conquering a 635 mile bike ride from Eugene to San Francisco. After frantic searching, she finally spots them--a group of eight teens and two supervisors gathered in the far corner near the baggage claim. Day 2 — Mile Count- 0 If first day awkwardness wasn’t enough trouble, the team wakes up to find that raccoons ate every last morsel of food. “It was an awful start, seeing the food boxes all torn up and littered with bagel crumbs,” Shank said. The team begins their 635 mile biking trek with empty bellies, which forced them to take a pit stop to the closest grocery store about five miles away. Day 13 — Mile Count- 400 Today, the team will volunteer at Redwood National Park. The group eats a delectable breakfast of waffles and bacon in honor of a team member’s birthday. “It was such a good change of pace to not be eating bagels!” Shank said. The team rides up to the park and is greeted by Ranger Nicole, who promptly takes the group on a 10 minute tour of the park. Then the ranger has the

team weed the trails. “They gave us these huge orange things that we were supposed to weed with,” Shank said. “I ended up mostly using my hands.” Day 20 — Mile Count- 598 The team wakes up elated—only 37 miles left of the trip. They pack up camp and head down a biking trail, in contrast from the usual Highway 101. “We passed through a small town, and I was amazed to know towns like that still existed!” Shank said. We hadn’t been near civilization in forever! Suddenly, we saw a bridge in the distance, and we were like ‘What is that?’ But once we went over several hills it was obvious—we were staring at the Golden Gate Bridge!” “Crossing the bridge wasn’t as amazing as I thought it’d be, because there were a ton of tourists who wouldn’t move, which was annoying considering how much work I’d put in to the trip.” After finally crossing the Bridge, the group goes to a youth hostel, unpacks, and eats a hearty lunch for a job well done. Day 22— Mile Count 635 Shank’s flight departs at 6:00 a.m. for Salt Lake City connecting to Kansas City, where she is greeted by her family. “I really got to know myself on this trip, like my physical boundaries and how much I can do,” Shank said. “At first I was like ‘Why did I do this? I’m gonna die!’” But after the trip it was like ‘Whoa, I can bike 635 miles!’ That was the best part.”

All photos by DanStewart

senior Henry Foster

CLIMBED

YALE

Ashley Wasson went to the

with her family

senior ISENBERG wentto the

Adam

sailed

SOPHOMORE

carrying a statue of the saint to the church. The ceremony ended with a fireworks show. The following nights consisted of singing, dancing, and torros, or bull fights. Over the course of her stay, Bavley began to feel like part of the family. “Whenever they would go anywhere they would take me with them, and we always joked around. It was easy to become close with them because my siblings were around my age,” Bavley said. Bavley spent many hours playing cards and hanging out in the town with her siblings, Gilisa, Dianis, and Mario, and the local jovenes, or teens. She felt welcomed by them from the minute she arrived. The most important thing she gained from her experience was independence. “I had to go there by myself and I didn’t know anyone, but I got to meet a lot of neat people,” Bavley said. Half way through her trip, she had a mid-term. This was the only communication with her parents, other than a few letters. While Bavley thought she would be homesick after weeks away from her family, the warmth of her community made her feel at home. “I would love to go back and visit my community if possible,” Bavley said. “Maybe next summer.”

issue 1

INTO THE WILD

zoo

SUNCHIPS

Hamilton

in

garden salsa

sophomore

AnnaMarken

Last summer, senior Maddie Bavley’s daily routine consisted of sleeping in and spending time with friends at the pool. This summer her days were spent educating kids about environmental awareness and building concrete walls. Bavley spent eight weeks working and living in the town of Lomobonita, Panama, an opportunity offered through the Amigos de las Americas program. She first heard about Amigos in her Spanish 3 class. “I didn’t know much going into it, but I went to the informational meeting and it sounded like a cool experience,” Bavley said. During her stay in Panama, Bavley spent her days teaching the children of the community environmental awareness by playing variations of tag. “In the games, the kids were like trees or animals. It was more the format of summer camp than school,” Bavley said. In the evenings, Bavley and her family went to many events for the Santa Liberada Festival happening in Las Tablas, the city next to Lomobonita. The festival kicked off with a city- wide procession honoring Saint Liberada. People of the city followed the small float

cepted student had backed out of the program and after reviewing the remaining applicants, they had decided on Dexter. Overjoyed, she accepted, and on June 29th was headed to Nashville, Tennessee. The six week program involved the ins and outs of Vanderbilt’s bio-medical and chemistry courses. With 8 hours of classes a day, Dexter had anywhere from 45 minutes to three hours of homework every night, and a 10-15 page lab report every other weekend. Along with classes, the students also took part in real research projects, including analyzing a flooded Nashville river and measuring the electricity levels on human skin when a muscle is used. “It kind of gave me a good idea of what I want to do in college, and what size I could adapt to,” Dexter said. Only three weeks into her senior year, Dexter is already back in the lab taking AP biology and honors physics. Hoping to attend Vanderbilt next year, she’s doing everything in her power to boost her resume, and believes that PAVE played a big part in that. While she plans to major in chemistry or mechanical engineering, Dexter still isn’t sure about whether or not to pursue a science career. “I think once you get through a major like that in college, that’s really intensive, you’re kind of set up to apply yourself in anything you want to do.”

freshman

junior

A TRUE AMIGO

RobertMartin

It may be small and out of the way, but for senior Meagan Dexter, the “super geeky” tattoo inked into her right foot is perfect. In chemistry, the equilibrium symbol represents balance and equality, and for Dexter, it’s something she can see when she wants to. Hide when she wants to. Ever since taking her first chemistry course sophomore year, science has been Dexter’s scholastic passion. And it’s the thing that led her to spend six weeks of summer studying at Vanderbilt University. Dexter first heard about PAVE, a pre-college academic program at Vanderbilt, from a generic mailer that thousands of students receive nationwide. After talking with her mom, she decided that she should apply. Dexter then began the lengthy process of writing essays, sending in her transcript, and even getting a letter of recommendation from her favorite teacher, chemistry teacher Cole Ogdon. “I’m always excited when I know students are going to go above and beyond, and take a look at real research,” Ogdon said. “This was not a play camp; this was truly about students who have a propensity for and interest in actual research.” With roughly 200 students accepted from a pool 3,000 applicants deep, Dexter didn’t hear anything until the second week of May. Her mother received a call informing her that one ac-

MT.

NathanAre

chicken burritos at Chipotle, and you’ve got the summer of Horvath: 2010 edition. “I basically worked a lot, made a lot of money, got a tan and met new people,” Horvath said. “It was pretty repetitive...but it was nice to have the money, so it balanced out to be a decent summer.” As a lifeguard, Horvath spent more than 350 hours looking out for the lives of local pool-goers. He found that the values he gained, such as being on time and putting duties before play, carry over to real life. “It was a good learning experience” Horvath said. “I feel like I know about how business works and how to act professionally.” Another thing Horvath learned this summer was how many shades darker he could get. In early June his SPF was in the 30’s, but by late July he was using SPF 4—sparingly. “This one girl asked if I spray tanned,” Horvath said. “And on the first day of band camp someone asked if I fell asleep outside.” As long as he doesn’t fall asleep on the stand, Horvath is hoping for a salary raise next summer. He’s currently saving up to buy his own car, preferably a used Toyota Solara. One thing he won’t be spending any money on is an M16A4 assault rifle in Russia.

Leslie

Papers scatter across the empty office. Junior John Horvath jogs to a shattered window and climbs outside—descending into the chaos that is Soviet Russia. Gunshots sound at a constant rate. Bombs drop in the distance. Through the smoke Horvath spots his comrades racing down the street. He aims his M16A4 assault rifle at a nearby enemy, only to be struck in the chest by a bullet. Horvath falls to the cement, clutching at his heart. Blood splatters across the television screen. Click. Not bothering to check the scores of the match, Horvath shuts off the video game, cracks his knuckles and springs up from the brown leather loveseat in his family room. Call of Duty would be the closest he’d get to leaving the country this summer. While his friend junior Michael Hill went to debate camp for a month, and his brother Mike was off visiting colleges, Horvath stayed in Kansas. All summer. The farthest he drove his dad’s white 1996 Lexus was 35 miles to Lawrence. Tucked away in Prairie Village, he followed a strict schedule of sleeping in until 11, lifeguarding at Prairie Village pool, and playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. Throw in a few musical jam sessions with friends and multiple fajita

Five students share experiences from their summer vacations

Freshman

THE KANSAS BOY LillyMyers

summertime livin’s easy

SPREAD

and the

09 07 10

ate

16

junior

Amy Sachse

LAKE

nannied

ozarks

her sister

of the

with

senior

Emily collins worked at a camp care package company


SPREAD

Lake Lotawana

MASON

6FLAGS

went to

Diamond McDonald

moved to

Kansas from

SUPER GEEK

Heather went to the Nelson

se-

Justin bieber

concert

what did

YOU DO this summer?

PaigeHess

Rain pounds down onto their campsite as sophomore Chris Watkins questions if he has made the right choice. The soaking packs, which originally weighed 45 pounds, now felt as if they were carrying buckets of water on their backs. After waiting out the nine-hour downpour, Watkins and his group had no choice but to set up camp and cook in the rain. Watkins and a group of seven teenagers and four adults spent 10 days this summer hiking up the mountains of Northern New Mexico. The group did practice runs throughout the year at parks and the Ozarks, but even with the training, according to Watkins, it was a very challenging trip. The group was given a Ranger the first two days they were there. She introduced all procedures and everything they would need to know on the first day. The second day she only observed the group so they would have to use their knowledge and remember what they learned. Once they got the basics down, together, they started their hikes of 10-13 miles a day before the sun rose, and they would be forced to take down their camp once the sun set. As a fifteen year old with no real training for hiking, Watkins found himself feeling as if he could barely lift his legs. He could not mentally prepare, because he had no idea what to ex-

17

THE EXPLORER ErinReilly

pect. Once he got through it, he realized what he was capable of. “At times, I didn’t think about anything” said Watkins. “I just concentrated solely on walking.” Watkins had built up stamina playing soccer and swimming in the weeks leading up to the trip, so he believed he was going to have it easy. Though Watkins had trained hard for this expedition, the mountains had other plans for him. The mountains didn’t only push those who are in bad shape; it also challenged Watkins just as hard. One of Watkins’s most memorable days was when the group woke up around four in the morning, and hiked a total of 13 miles to reach the top of a mountain. It was so dark that they could barely see anything outside the range of their flashlights. The group felt it was the biggest accomplishment once they got to the top. “Looking down from the mountain was a rewarding feeling, said Watkins. “It was hard but worth it.” Watkins and the group say that they appreciate things a little better, now that they have gone for 10 days without eating normal food, showering and having no real amenities. “It really does put things into perspective,” said Watkins, “no matter how ready you think you are.”

Day 1 After 14 hours of travel, sophomore Tiernan Shank lugs her camping gear down the Eugene, Oregon terminal. Trying to avoid any more problems like the one earlier that day when her flight was canceled, she glances around anxiously trying to find anyone from the program, Apogee Adventures, with whom she’ll be conquering a 635 mile bike ride from Eugene to San Francisco. After frantic searching, she finally spots them--a group of eight teens and two supervisors gathered in the far corner near the baggage claim. Day 2 — Mile Count- 0 If first day awkwardness wasn’t enough trouble, the team wakes up to find that raccoons ate every last morsel of food. “It was an awful start, seeing the food boxes all torn up and littered with bagel crumbs,” Shank said. The team begins their 635 mile biking trek with empty bellies, which forced them to take a pit stop to the closest grocery store about five miles away. Day 13 — Mile Count- 400 Today, the team will volunteer at Redwood National Park. The group eats a delectable breakfast of waffles and bacon in honor of a team member’s birthday. “It was such a good change of pace to not be eating bagels!” Shank said. The team rides up to the park and is greeted by Ranger Nicole, who promptly takes the group on a 10 minute tour of the park. Then the ranger has the

team weed the trails. “They gave us these huge orange things that we were supposed to weed with,” Shank said. “I ended up mostly using my hands.” Day 20 — Mile Count- 598 The team wakes up elated—only 37 miles left of the trip. They pack up camp and head down a biking trail, in contrast from the usual Highway 101. “We passed through a small town, and I was amazed to know towns like that still existed!” Shank said. We hadn’t been near civilization in forever! Suddenly, we saw a bridge in the distance, and we were like ‘What is that?’ But once we went over several hills it was obvious—we were staring at the Golden Gate Bridge!” “Crossing the bridge wasn’t as amazing as I thought it’d be, because there were a ton of tourists who wouldn’t move, which was annoying considering how much work I’d put in to the trip.” After finally crossing the Bridge, the group goes to a youth hostel, unpacks, and eats a hearty lunch for a job well done. Day 22— Mile Count 635 Shank’s flight departs at 6:00 a.m. for Salt Lake City connecting to Kansas City, where she is greeted by her family. “I really got to know myself on this trip, like my physical boundaries and how much I can do,” Shank said. “At first I was like ‘Why did I do this? I’m gonna die!’” But after the trip it was like ‘Whoa, I can bike 635 miles!’ That was the best part.”

All photos by DanStewart

senior Henry Foster

CLIMBED

YALE

Ashley Wasson went to the

with her family

senior ISENBERG wentto the

Adam

sailed

SOPHOMORE

carrying a statue of the saint to the church. The ceremony ended with a fireworks show. The following nights consisted of singing, dancing, and torros, or bull fights. Over the course of her stay, Bavley began to feel like part of the family. “Whenever they would go anywhere they would take me with them, and we always joked around. It was easy to become close with them because my siblings were around my age,” Bavley said. Bavley spent many hours playing cards and hanging out in the town with her siblings, Gilisa, Dianis, and Mario, and the local jovenes, or teens. She felt welcomed by them from the minute she arrived. The most important thing she gained from her experience was independence. “I had to go there by myself and I didn’t know anyone, but I got to meet a lot of neat people,” Bavley said. Half way through her trip, she had a mid-term. This was the only communication with her parents, other than a few letters. While Bavley thought she would be homesick after weeks away from her family, the warmth of her community made her feel at home. “I would love to go back and visit my community if possible,” Bavley said. “Maybe next summer.”

issue 1

INTO THE WILD

zoo

SUNCHIPS

Hamilton

in

garden salsa

sophomore

AnnaMarken

Last summer, senior Maddie Bavley’s daily routine consisted of sleeping in and spending time with friends at the pool. This summer her days were spent educating kids about environmental awareness and building concrete walls. Bavley spent eight weeks working and living in the town of Lomobonita, Panama, an opportunity offered through the Amigos de las Americas program. She first heard about Amigos in her Spanish 3 class. “I didn’t know much going into it, but I went to the informational meeting and it sounded like a cool experience,” Bavley said. During her stay in Panama, Bavley spent her days teaching the children of the community environmental awareness by playing variations of tag. “In the games, the kids were like trees or animals. It was more the format of summer camp than school,” Bavley said. In the evenings, Bavley and her family went to many events for the Santa Liberada Festival happening in Las Tablas, the city next to Lomobonita. The festival kicked off with a city- wide procession honoring Saint Liberada. People of the city followed the small float

cepted student had backed out of the program and after reviewing the remaining applicants, they had decided on Dexter. Overjoyed, she accepted, and on June 29th was headed to Nashville, Tennessee. The six week program involved the ins and outs of Vanderbilt’s bio-medical and chemistry courses. With 8 hours of classes a day, Dexter had anywhere from 45 minutes to three hours of homework every night, and a 10-15 page lab report every other weekend. Along with classes, the students also took part in real research projects, including analyzing a flooded Nashville river and measuring the electricity levels on human skin when a muscle is used. “It kind of gave me a good idea of what I want to do in college, and what size I could adapt to,” Dexter said. Only three weeks into her senior year, Dexter is already back in the lab taking AP biology and honors physics. Hoping to attend Vanderbilt next year, she’s doing everything in her power to boost her resume, and believes that PAVE played a big part in that. While she plans to major in chemistry or mechanical engineering, Dexter still isn’t sure about whether or not to pursue a science career. “I think once you get through a major like that in college, that’s really intensive, you’re kind of set up to apply yourself in anything you want to do.”

freshman

junior

A TRUE AMIGO

RobertMartin

It may be small and out of the way, but for senior Meagan Dexter, the “super geeky” tattoo inked into her right foot is perfect. In chemistry, the equilibrium symbol represents balance and equality, and for Dexter, it’s something she can see when she wants to. Hide when she wants to. Ever since taking her first chemistry course sophomore year, science has been Dexter’s scholastic passion. And it’s the thing that led her to spend six weeks of summer studying at Vanderbilt University. Dexter first heard about PAVE, a pre-college academic program at Vanderbilt, from a generic mailer that thousands of students receive nationwide. After talking with her mom, she decided that she should apply. Dexter then began the lengthy process of writing essays, sending in her transcript, and even getting a letter of recommendation from her favorite teacher, chemistry teacher Cole Ogdon. “I’m always excited when I know students are going to go above and beyond, and take a look at real research,” Ogdon said. “This was not a play camp; this was truly about students who have a propensity for and interest in actual research.” With roughly 200 students accepted from a pool 3,000 applicants deep, Dexter didn’t hear anything until the second week of May. Her mother received a call informing her that one ac-

MT.

NathanAre

chicken burritos at Chipotle, and you’ve got the summer of Horvath: 2010 edition. “I basically worked a lot, made a lot of money, got a tan and met new people,” Horvath said. “It was pretty repetitive...but it was nice to have the money, so it balanced out to be a decent summer.” As a lifeguard, Horvath spent more than 350 hours looking out for the lives of local pool-goers. He found that the values he gained, such as being on time and putting duties before play, carry over to real life. “It was a good learning experience” Horvath said. “I feel like I know about how business works and how to act professionally.” Another thing Horvath learned this summer was how many shades darker he could get. In early June his SPF was in the 30’s, but by late July he was using SPF 4—sparingly. “This one girl asked if I spray tanned,” Horvath said. “And on the first day of band camp someone asked if I fell asleep outside.” As long as he doesn’t fall asleep on the stand, Horvath is hoping for a salary raise next summer. He’s currently saving up to buy his own car, preferably a used Toyota Solara. One thing he won’t be spending any money on is an M16A4 assault rifle in Russia.

Leslie

Papers scatter across the empty office. Junior John Horvath jogs to a shattered window and climbs outside—descending into the chaos that is Soviet Russia. Gunshots sound at a constant rate. Bombs drop in the distance. Through the smoke Horvath spots his comrades racing down the street. He aims his M16A4 assault rifle at a nearby enemy, only to be struck in the chest by a bullet. Horvath falls to the cement, clutching at his heart. Blood splatters across the television screen. Click. Not bothering to check the scores of the match, Horvath shuts off the video game, cracks his knuckles and springs up from the brown leather loveseat in his family room. Call of Duty would be the closest he’d get to leaving the country this summer. While his friend junior Michael Hill went to debate camp for a month, and his brother Mike was off visiting colleges, Horvath stayed in Kansas. All summer. The farthest he drove his dad’s white 1996 Lexus was 35 miles to Lawrence. Tucked away in Prairie Village, he followed a strict schedule of sleeping in until 11, lifeguarding at Prairie Village pool, and playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. Throw in a few musical jam sessions with friends and multiple fajita

Five students share experiences from their summer vacations

Freshman

THE KANSAS BOY LillyMyers

summertime livin’s easy

SPREAD

and the

09 07 10

ate

16

junior

Amy Sachse

LAKE

nannied

ozarks

her sister

of the

with

senior

Emily collins worked at a camp care package company


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PHOTO ESSAY 09 07 10

“JOGA

BONITO”

The soccer team chose this phrase as this year’s motto, Portugese for “Play Beautiful.” Varsity is ranked sixth in Kansas. As juniors Jeremy Young and Nathan Ross collide, above, the ball springs into the air in the direction of the Varsity team. “We were both going in to tackle and we collided—my cleat hit his ankle,” Young said. “I wasn’t frustrated, I was concerned, because I hit him pretty hard. It didn’t phase us though.” After the collision, the two boys sprung from the ground and got right back to the scrimmage. The play ended up being in varsity’s favor.

DanStewart Senior Cam Smith, left, passes the ball up the field to a teammate to make an attempt for a goal. “The JV scrimmage set the tone for the upcoming season, Smith said. “It showed us the necessity to progress and play as a team.”

GrantHeinlein Sophomores Tyler Rathbun and Tommy McGillicudy, below left, chase after the ball. McGillicudy fought hard for the C-team throughout the entire game contributing to the close score in the varsity and C-team scrimmage.

DanStewart

In his third year on varsity, senior Zach Colby, above, fights for possession of the ball against freshman Ben Tschudy.

DanStewart


MI X E D I am excited for the DECA trip in New York City.

the

issue 1

19

the page about life

I am looking forward to the football games. I think that they will be a blast.

BIG ? question Senior Drew Auer

MIXED

Sophomore Emma Vickers

“I am so excited to perform in the Musical Revue. It should be a great show!” Sophomore Maggie Niven

{BANDZ { SILLY

This summer, Silly Bandz became the new craze in Kansas City. Spotted all around are dozens of colorful bands covering seemingly every wrist. Selling at $2.99 per pack, they are affordable and in style.

What are you looking forward to this fall?

“The soccer games. They will be great.” Junior Boomer Welsh

“The weekends...breaks from school.” Freshman John Sallaz

“I think that I am up to 50 now. They keep piling up, I get them from friends, family and I buy them.” Sophomore Chloe Hubler

Q. How tall are you and your parents?

A. I am 4’9’’ and three quarters. My parents, on the other hand, are

4’11’’ and 5’5’’. Q. Where do you get your clothes? A. I get most of my clothers at Gap Kids, Target Kids and I just started fitting into Forever 21. Q. What is the youngest grade you have been mistaken for in this past year? A. I have been mistaken for a sixth grader this year. Yeah, that was pretty great. Q.What do say when people ask you about your height? A. Usually I just go along with it and then walk away.

all photos by Kaitlyn Stewart

30

SECONDS sophomore with

Helena Buchmann

“I have collected my bands from friends. My favorite by far is my dragon one.” Junior Frankie Miner


20

A&E

the new

9 07 10

BBQ 1 Wyandot Location: 7125 W 75th St. Travel time: 5-6 mins

Great Harvest 3Cafe Provence 2Location: 4002 W 83rd St. Location: 3936 W 69th Ter. Travel time: 2-3 mins

What this small BBQ joint lacks in style and appearance, it makes up for in its quick, homestyle ribs and sandwiches. The chimney was smoking as I pulled up to the little stone building (which used to be an A&W’s drive-thru in the 80’s) located just west of the 75th and Metcalf intersection. It was quiet and uncrowded, with no waiting in line. The service was the fastest out of all the stores I had been to before, with the cashier shouting back my order to the cooks right after ordering. My pulled pork and fries came out two minutes later on a lunch tray flanked by two full bottles of ketchup and barbecue sauce. With a drink, the whole meal cost a little over $8 total. The sandwich itself was a little dry, but it was salvaged with plenty of the surprisingly sweet BBQ sauce. Only bits and pieces of pork remained after five minutes of eating. And as for the fries, tasty as they were, they lacked the freshness of the Five Guy’s fries. They looked like the type you find in the frozen foods section of the grocery store. Wynadotte: Good barbecue at the expense of not-so-good atmosphere.

STAR SCALE

OPEN LUNCH

CHECK PLEASE

DINEONTIME quick tips for quick eating

Another small independent PV restaurant, C Jack���s Sidewalk Cafe is a perfect bet for a quick, inexpensive meal. It’s contemporary, light and laid back, and the cafe itself already has some established ties to East, employing several students and displaying new works of student photography every month. The menu offers a variety of options including soups and salads, sandwiches, wraps, paninis and pastas. All the individual meals and the combinations — say a soup and half salad, or half sandwich and cup of soup — range from only $6-9, a pretty thrifty buy compared to Provence. The Fajita Grilled Wrap I chose was made right after ordering, and the freshness shined through. The chicken was largely sliced and succulent, and that combination of that and the fresh vegetables made for a delicious wrap despite the generous amounts of chipotle sour cream gobbed inside. Along with the caesar salad, it made for a quick, fairly healthy meal, all in under 20 minutes. C Jack’s wins as my personal favorite in the PV area.

DELIGHTFUL

Let’s be honest here. If you’re looking for some comfort food, some well cooked burgers and fries, Five Guys is the place to go. Walking into the simply decorated, red and white checkered restaurant in the former Ward Parkway McAllister’s Deli, it reminded me of summer cookouts- the smell of cooking burgers, sizzling fries, crunching peanuts and the comforting sounds of classic rock playing softly in the background. I was waiting for American flags to roll down from the ceiling and bald eagles to land on my shoulder; this place was simply American. I ordered a regular hamburger (beware: regular hamburger means two patties, you’ll have to get the “little hamburger” for one patty), regular fries, and a drink. The pricealmost $10, a bit on the expensive side for open lunch. The meal itself, pricey as it was, couldn’t be topped by any other my past burger experiences. Perfectly cooked, juicy, loaded with onions, lettuce and peppers. And the fries? Thick, generous cut, natural flavor, fried in peanut oil, loaded into a 12 oz. cup. I had enough for the drive home, the taste of America lingering with me. Simply delicious.

CULINARY GENIUS For maps and further directions for all of the restaurants reviewed, visit www.smeharbinger.net

1 CALL IT IN. 2 EAT FAST. 3 GROUP UP. For restaurants that are farther away (Five Guys), ordering ahead means less wait time, more eating.

all photos by AnnaMarken

Location: 6937 Tomahawk Rd. Location: 8600 Ward Pkwy Travel time: 3-4 mins Travel time: 7-8 mins

Quietly tucked into the shops of Prairie Village, Cafe Provence comes in on the higher-end of open lunch options, with a formal selection of French cuisine to choose from. Perhaps a little too formal and cozy for a half-hour lunch break. With a countryside mural wrapping around the walls of the entire restaurant and fully set-up tables the atmosphere is relaxed, formal, cozy. Although the restaurant does feature a lunch menu, it isn’t exactly fit for a high school wants; it seemed more fitting to serve a business meeting. The prices follow the same suit; none of the lunch items go for under $10, and that’s not including drinks or a side item. I went with a salmon salad, or “Salade de Saumon Fume” as it was called on the menu, partly because I had trouble recognizing any of the other choices. The wait time was longer, around 10 minutes, due to the fact that it was a true sit down restaurant. Also portions were also smaller than I had expected. Although the food was excellently prepared, I wouldn’t suggest this as a go-to lunch spot for the seniors. For the sake of your wallet, very special occasions only.

AVERAGE

EvanNichols

4 C Jack’s Cafe 5Five Guys

Travel time: 3-4 mins

The name gives it away. Great Harvest bakes fresh bread and cookies daily, with generous free samples available at request. In-store soups aren’t available while it’s still hot outside, but come fall they’ll start the cooking again. The store itself is located in the center of the Corinth shops, on the same block as the recently opened BRGR. Although it has some dinerstyle swivel chairs and a small bar, there are no true sit down tables. The store produces five basic breads daily, and the other types depending on the day of the week. The “samples” are actually full pieces of the bread on display, which makes for a nice snack to add to your meal. As for the sweets, there’s a bounty of different choices — from Alpine Cookies and Mountain Munchies to Biscotto and Cinnamon Rolls. I went with a piece of Woodstock and an all chocolate cookie, only $2 total (the bread was free). Both were fresh made that day, and extremely soft. It may not be a place to stop for a full lunch, but if you’re looking for a cheap dessert or an extra addition to your lunch to tide you over for the rest of the day, Harvest is the place to go.

a preview of five local restaurants for seniors

Don’t waste time. Enjoy your food and your time out, but use your 37 minutes wisely.

Carpool. Or if you don’t feel like shelling out the money to go to a restaurant, find a couple of friends and have a “house lunch” instead.


A&E

The business of

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Bank Robbing

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Derivative ‘Takers’ exhausts all heist movie clichés AlexLamb

Heist flicks have always followed a formula. A team of thieves joins together and devises the perfect plan to steal a huge payload. Inevitably, something goes wrong during the job, igniting a race against time/the police/whoever betrayed them as they vie to make it out alive and with the money. There’s not a problem with the formula, but when a film follows it to a T without bringing something fresh to the table, and blatantly rips off of other, better movies, that’s when the heist genre is relegated to mediocrity like “Takers.” The film opens with a skyscraper robbery, wherein a team of professional thieves (played by Paul Walker, Idris Elba, Hayden Christensen, Michael Ealy and Chris Brown) enjoys the rewards of a successful heist. That is until recently released Ghost (rapper Tip ‘T.I.’ Harris, recently released from prison in real life, too), a former team member of theirs who got caught on a previous job, approaches them with an opportunity to rob an armored truck carrying $20 million. The catch: they only have five days to prepare and they’re unsure if they can trust Ghost. In addition, a pair of detectives (Matt Dillon and Jay Hernandez) are investigating the skyscraper robbery, hot on their tail. Despite the risks, the team takes the job, and anyone who’s ever seen a heist film can easily guess where it goes from there, especially anyone who’s seen the crime epic “Heat” and/or “The Italian Job.” The real agenda of “Takers” doesn’t seem to be about the characters stealing money, but about

the movie stealing the structure, plot points and characters of these two far superior heist flicks. Copying off of such great material, you’d think that writers Peter Allen, Gabriel Casseus, Avery Duff and co-writer/director John Luessenhop would at least be able to produce something exciting to make up for the lack of originality. Unfortunately, Luessenhop’s style of jittery, never-ending quick cuts and overuse of shaky-cam keep viewers from becoming engaged in the action, more often just leaving them wondering what’s going on. Seeing as how the writers struggled to come up with their own story and only created hackneyed, underdeveloped characters, it’d definitely be too much to expect serviceable dialogue. Many conversations either abound with clichés or are just plain annoying. The latter usually involve T.I., who fails to ever make his performance anything beyond irritating and vacuous. In the sequence where the team ambushes the armored truck, T.I. describes every action the audience is seeing onscreen into his comm radio (“Aw mann, watch out fo’ these guys!”). What a shame, because this is one of the few set pieces that’s moderately cool, but it loses half its entertainment value due to the rapper’s inane running commentary. But the other musician in the movie, Chris Brown, turns in the biggest surprise.

He’s likable and fun to watch, and almost redeems himself for his infamous behavior against Rihanna through a parkour-styled foot chase. Agilely running through the subway, streets and jumping from roofs, this sequence makes for the only legitimately thrilling part of the film, and helps elevate the second half of “Takers” to watchable status, until it starts falling apart at the end. Few of the other actors leave much of an impression, however. Walker simply plays his “Fast and Furious” character again, and Ealy feels overly serious. Elba, on the other hand, emanates coolness by speaking in his natural cockney accent, taking charge of the robbers, while Christensen drops his Anakin Skywalker whining routine to prove himself a charming presence. Both of the detectives play their stereotypes well, but Dillon’s done this part several times before and he’s obviously tired of it here. Hernandez performs competently beside him, but fails to make his character stand out. For such a star-studded cast, there was a lot of potential in this genre piece, but Luessenhop fails to take advantage of all the talent on display. Earlier this summer, “Inception” treated moviegoers to a completely unique and original heist experience. Now, at the end of the season, “Takers” slaps us with the antithesis of that, a humdrum heist flick that can’t even steal its ideas from other movies without screwing them up. Don’t let this botched robbery take your money.

Film guru Alex Lamb discusses the superior heist flicks that “Takers” steals from.

Heat

The ultimate crime movie epic, “Heat” follows a group of bank robbers planning a huge heist, while a tireless cop tries to hunt them down. “Takers” essentially copies most of its dual narrative from “Heat,” but drops the deep characters and intense shoot outs.

The Italian Job Slick and stylistic, this fast-paced heist movie follows an elite team of robbers who are double-crossed by their inside man, then set out to steal their loot back from him. The robbers in “Takers” face a similar set-up, and also have to steal from an armored truck.

True Romance While not exactly a heist film, “True Romance” follows two lovebirds who steal and try to sell a briefcase of cocaine. In the movie’s climax, several groups vying for the coke show up and have a shoot it out in a hotel room. The climax of “Takers” is almost a carbon copy of this scene, but not nearly as cool. www.allmoviephoto.com

STAR SCALE

STAY AT HOME

RENT IT

WORTH SEEING

OSCAR WORTHY


C. Jack’s Sidewalk Cafe 6937 Tomahawk Rd. In the Prairie Village Shops

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Harbinger?

384-2445 cjackscafe.com

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Bring in THIS COUPON for a FREE COOKIE with the purchase of a sandwich, salad, wrap, or panini. one coupon per customer, per visit. Not good with any other offer.

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ZoeBrian

As of late the horror film genre has been bombarded with mockumentaries, hand-held cameras and attempting-tobe-indie films. From Quarantine (and the much superior original Spanish film, [Rec]), Cloverfield and Paranormal Activity, this style has seemed to draw audiences in and guarantee box office success. While any Lost-Footage film causes questions like “Where is that music coming from,” “Who found this ‘lost footage’”and “why is this footage edited,” to distract from the films other aspects, these films showcase a new way of telling a story. Technically speaking though, if you’ve seen one of them you’ve seen them all. They all have the same exposition, lack of music and the always shaky hand-held camera. As expected, The Last Exorcism begins with interviews of family members and routine scenes of characters at home and work. From the get-go, Reverend Cotton Marcus (Patrick Fabian) shows an ironic lack of faith considering his line of work. Through sermons over banana bread and a magnetic Jesus fish for his car, Cotton’s skepticism obviously doesn’t weigh heavily on his mind. Even though Cotton justifies his exorcisms as an almost medical service, he admits that exorcisms are a scam and sets out to expose them as such. Followed by a camera-man (actor) and sound assistant (Iris Bahr), Cotton takes a case deep in the bayous of Louisiana. Having only skimmed the letter pleading for his help, Cotton is surprised to find that it is not the man who wrote him who wants to be exorcised, but his doe-eyed 16 yearold daughter, Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell). Uncomfortable conning a child, Cotton tries to leave but is stopped by Nell’s overbearing father Louis (Louis Herthum). In probably the strongest sequence

A&E in the entire movie, Cotton performs the ‘exorcism’ with many tricks. As the exorcism is performed the audience is shown clips of Cotton explaining each trick used in the ceremony. From wires to sound effects to dry-ice producing crosses, this sequence reveals a comical and well-planned agenda behind the film. While this light touch is welcomed in a genre of over-the-top scenes the film lacks any scare-factor for the first hour. When Cotton and his team are left alone in the house with Nell, the film finally takes a horror-oriented turn for the better. When the team finds Nell chained to her bed, they release her and hope she will sleep. But after the team goes downstairs they hear the sound of a crying baby. As they rush up the stairs with the camera man in tow the shaky filming adds to the suspense of what could be up those stairs. While the reveal is anticlimactic, the suspense and sense of running up the stairs with them restores the credibility of the almost trite shaky camera. Soon after we experience another pleasure of the mockumentary style. Cotton’s assistant has the sound bites from the last scare and they review them after the reveal, leaving the audience with more thirst to discover exactly what is happening to Nell. In an equally tense scene Nell gets ahold of the camera and films herself while possessed. After a shot of her blue teeth and green eyes she undresses and leaves the house. Turning the camera off and on, Nell enters her father’s tool shed and zooms in on a white cat. This scene is enhanced by the fact that we are only seeing what Nell wants us to see. This trick may be used in nearly every film of the “I made it myself!” category but writers Huck Botko and Andrew Gurland (the mastermind duo behind the upcoming Virginity Hit) have a trick or two up

their sleeves. Throughout the methodically slow paced scene of Nell drawing closer and closer to the cat, the audience surely will find itself saying “No! Not the kitty!” yet still thoroughly enjoy what happens next. While this scene wasn’t anything spectacular, it showcased Botko and Gurland’s fresh take on the plot while also breaking out from the typically restrictive ‘behind-the-camera’ point of view. Throughout the film Nell’s sanity comes into question as well as the sanity of those around her. With an overly religious drunk father, a creepy mumbling brother, and a recently deceased mother, Nell’s home seems like a breeding ground for abuse and incest. But is it possible that the only thing causing trouble in the home is supernatural forces? Could Nell just be acting out? Or is it really possession by an entity not yet understood? These questions and many more keep the audience intrigued while also frightened at the thought of an answer. This well thought-out and engaging take on the familiar exorcism plot is supported by Fabian’s strong acting skills and entertaining jokes throughout the film. While some bits, including the ending which is unexpected, but not in a good way, are disappointing, the movie as a whole works out surprisingly well. Throughout the film the question of whether or not Nell is possessed probes at the back of your mind along with the feeling that something just isn’t quite right about her family. Cotton’s journey through his faith and Nell’s journey through a living hell make the film a suspenseful and well-done horror experience while retaining the dignity of a smart and funny script.

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lms i F ary ade t n c e um he de k c Mo ugh t thro Paranormal Activity2009 The epitome of and indie film turned main-stream, Paranormal Activity was made with a small budget and nobody actors but caught the attention of Steven Spielberg who quickly changed the ending, not for the better, and gained a more public campaign.

Quarantine2008 This remake of the Spanish film [rec] somehow manages to copy 90% of the film, shot by shot, yet at the same time ruin the scariest moments and make the characters feel flat while still making a killing at the box offices. Honestly, just watch the original.making a killing at the box offices. Honestly, just watch the original.

the Blaire Witch Project1999

The film that started it all, Blair Witch Project first terrified audiences in 1999, claiming, and convincing the audience, that the footage was shot by three students who disappeared during the making of the movie and found one year after their disappearance. all photos byhttp://www.sbs.com.au/films/movie

perfectly

possessed

The Last Exorcism delivers a predictable and enjoyable mockumentary horror film STAR SCALE

STAY AT HOME

RENT IT

WORTH SEEING

OSCAR WORTHY


24

A&E

9 07 10

FRO-YO FRENZY

The Harbinger reviews new self-serve frozen yogurt places around Kansas City

M

y love for frozen yogurt is extreme, some might even call it an obsession. With so many new shops opening up nearby, my fixation may never end. Here’s the scoop on some places that are already local favorites.

AlysabethAlbano

all photos by GrantHeinlein

PEACHWAVE

T

ucked in the corner of a strip mall is a self-serve frozen yogurt shop, Peachwave. Driving down Mission, one may make the mistake of overlooking it. The bland outside design and barely noticeable sign make it easy to miss, but after one taste of what they offer, you’ll never skip over it again. Any hesitation to visit disappears when you walk in. You can usually expect that upon any trip there will be a line all the way to the door. This place is so popular that it already has locations on Foursquare, a social networking site that allows you to see where your friends are visiting. People are “checking in” to the “Peachwave Patio” and even the “Peachwave Bathroom.” Upon walking in you are dropped right into the amazing atmosphere that Peachwave has to offer. The walls are painted bright white which makes the lime green accents really pop. But what caught my eye the most was the tile mosaic wall leading you right to the self serve wall—my favorite part. Peachwave has over 25 flavors, although

not all are available each day. They only have room for 16 flavors on the floor, so they rotate every so often. They range from “original tart” to mango to Tiramisu and everything in between. The topping bar they have is adequate, but not impressive. They have basics such as sprinkles, chocolate chips and marshmallows, which was enough for me but if you wanted to get really creative with your dish it would be pretty difficult. After taking my time to look over all the flavors, I finally decided on chocolate, coffee, raspberry and “original tart.” The self-serve set-up allows you to pick as many flavors and how much of each of those flavors you want. This is how I perfected my signature mix--half chocolate, half cheesecake with cheesecake pieces, chocolate chips, marshmallows and chocolate syrup. But this time, I decided to try something new. The “original tart” tasted a lot like yogurt, so much so much that it tasted like I just took yogurt out of my fridge. The yogurt taste was just a little too strong for my taste, I prefer more flavor in my frozen yogurt. Because of this I was excited for the choco-

late and my excitement was well warranted. The chocolate here is a must have. The texture was very smooth and creamy for a frozen yogurt. The chocolate flavor wasn’t too rich and overpowering, leaving it just right for my taste buds. The small amount I had wasn’t enough and I was left wanting more. I tried coffee next and as I took my first bite I was overcome with a strong coffee flavor. I personally enjoy things that are flavored with coffee but not actual coffee. However, if you are a huge coffee drinker you may really enjoy the taste. Next was the raspberry and I have to admit it was delicious, even more so than the chocolate and it was so creamy and true to taste that I couldn’t stop eating but was also much lighter than the previous flavors. The raspberry flavor was refreshing and by far the best flavor I ate there. With it’s ample seating, frozen yogurt flavors and toppings a stop at Peachwave is a must. Although it is generally busy, after your first bite you won’t mind the wait in line.

Why do you like going to Peachwave? Mayor of Peachwave on Foursquare “I don’t really like the ice cream all that much but people are always there. It’s fun when there’s nothing to do. “

Senior Cooper Toombs

Regular at Peachwave “I love going to Peachwave because I get to see all my friends and it’s a really fun environment. It’s also inexpensive for something really good.”

Senior Olivia Mansfield

Peachwave Employee “I like seeing a ton of people I know cause it’s really popular. I work two days during the week and one weekend day.”

Junior Morgan Denton


A&E

issue 1

RED MANGO

T

his past July, local comedian Elliot Threatt opened a new frozen yogurt shop at Oak Place. Located near UMKC, it claims it “offers a healthy choices in yogurt in an environmentally friendly space.” From the outside it seemed to have an awesome atmosphere since it was located in a more downtown-esque area. But from the inside it has a very different feel. The walls are painted grey with red and black accents placed around. Even though the decor is very modern and sleek the place is still incredibly small and it is hard to look past. Your first step in the store put you right in front of the selfserve wall. I barely had room to turn around and grab my cup from the counter behind me. The thing that really caught my eye was the “Red Mango vs. The Other Guys” sign next to the yogurt. On it says that unlike the “other guys” they offer 100% all natural non-fat, low-

cal gluten-free yogurt that is also good for your immune system. It was interesting to see how proud they were to healthy alternative to frozen yogurt. Like the other two shops, you can serve yourself although this feature is only offered at certain locations. They have up to ten flavors to choose from and rotate them weekly. Unlike the other two places, though, there were hardly any options to choose from. They all sounded way to healthy, which in retrospect was probably what they were going for. But after awhile I finally decided on POM, Madagascar Vanilla, Key Lime Pie, and Mandarin Orange. The POM was not very good at all. With my first bite I was immediately overcome with this gross milky taste, I couldn’t take another bite. I would stay clear of this one. Next I tried the Madagascar Vanilla and again it wasn’t very good. It tasted like the original flavored offered at all three of the shops. After

both of these flavors turned out to be duds I was really discouraged going in to the Key Lime Pie but surprisingly it was delicious. It was really creamy. It really tasted like key lime pie which is important to me because I hate when things aren’t true to taste. The last flavor I tried was Mandarin Orange and I was really impressed. The best part was it didn’t taste like fake orange sherbet. It actually tasted like I took the time to peel an orange and eat it. I would definitely get this again. My second favorite part of every shop is their topping bar and theirs disappointed. A lot of the slots that were supposed to hold toppings were empty and what they had didn’t look appealing. I was used to sprinkles, candy, and syrup but I only saw fruit, cereal and Mochi balls here. This place isn’t worth the time or gas it would take you to get there. If you’re in the neighborhood and really craving fro-yo you could take a chance and stop by.

YOGURTINI

A

few streets from The Plaza is a small, often ignored, area with a great atmosphere. Located at 49th and Main these four blocks are full of restaurants and shops, such as Spin Pizza. And now they have added Yogurtini, their newest frozen yogurt place to the line up. Crammed between a Chipotle and The Mixx, Yogurtini can barely be seen from the street. The only sign that anything had filled the once vacant spot was the “Now Open” sign still hanging in the window. I heard a lot of buzz about this place and with my love of frozen yogurt, I had to try it. Finding the entrance and a parking spot was a bit of a task. The only parking they offer is a parking garage shared by other nearby shops and restaurants. Since it’s shared, it is always packed. If I wasn’t craving my fro-yo fix I would

have given up after my fourth circle around the garage. From the outside it doesn’t look all that impressive but once you step inside you see it has a much classier atmosphere than Peachwave. The walls are painted in a mellow blue and brown giving it a much calmer feel. The biggest difference I noticed was they have someone at the door to greet you and help guide you to “your perfect flavor.” They had their menu of flavors displayed proudly on the wall which helped me select my flavors before going to the self-serve wall. It was also a lot less busy then Peachwave, which was a definite plus. When I went to grab the flavors I had picked out I was really let down. Most of the ones I wanted were out of order, which was an inconvenience. With their advice and my own curiosity I decided to have the Green Apple Tartini, Chelsy’s Cheesecake and Summer Berry Sorbet. The Green Apple Tartini was by far the best frozen yogurt I have ever had. It was light, re-

freshing and had great consistency. The green apple flavor reminded me a lot of candy, like a green apple Jolly Rancher, but it wasn’t too sweet. I love cheesecake everything, so obviously I was pumped to try Chelsy’s Cheesecake and to be perfectly honest it was awful. It didn’t even faintly taste like cheesecake. The last one I tried was Summer Berry Sorbet. Yogurtini doesn’t offer very many fruit flavors but I am glad they had this one. It had a very nice fresh, fruity flavor and was light and creamy. It was a nice combination for your taste buds. Then I saw the topping bar and was totally infatuated—they had everything you could want. It offered so many unusual options such as pie crust, waffle cone pieces, runts, vanilla wafers and even pop rocks. Next time you’re down by the Plaza , take a detour a few blocks over to Yogurtini. It’s definitely worth the drive and the search for a parking spot.

25


ae

26 09a&e07 10

AubreyLeiter

sept. 14

BY

HURLEY WEEZER The band Weezer and the television show “Lost” might not have much in common, but on Sept. 21, all that will change. The band will release their new album cover with actor Jose Garcias portrait covering it. They also named the album after Garcia’s character on the show, Hurley. The groups eighth album brings you 10 new songs including their latest single “Memories.” The album is expected to deliver just as well as past work.

weezer.com

sept. 17

The CW Premiere of

cwtv.com

The CW has a new series adding to their lineup on Wednesdays featuring Ashley Tisdale and Aly Michalka. Think a mixture of “Bring It On” and “Gossip Girl.” The new show focuses on the action-packed and drama-filled lives of college cheerleaders.

Hand All Over by Maroon 5

The Buzz has delivered a strong alternative line-up for this year’s Buzz Beach Ball at Sandstone Amphitheater. With Smashing Pumpkins, Cake, Anberlin and others scheduled to show up for the festivities, there should be a packed house. The show begins at 5 p.m. and general admission tickets are $32. Expect to see guys in their little sister’s jeans and plenty of crowd surfing.

anberlin.com

sept. 25

BUZZ BEACH BALL

sept. 23

Maroon 5’s third album, “Hands All Over,” will be their first new material since the very popular 2007 album “It Won’t Be Soon Before Long”. This album features their newest hit single, “Misery,” which is currently one of Mix 93.3’s over-played pop music songs.

NIKITA

This new show is about the character of Nikita who, after forced to be an assassin her entire life, is seeking revenge on a team of murderers who killed her husband. This show is sure to be filled with action and should keep you on the edge of your seat. cwtv.com

MATT KIM

b2b.optone.com

sept. 21

Superbad’s Emma Stone uses the rumor mill at her school to improve her social and financial status by letting guys say they hooked up with her in exchange for money. As a modern day version of ‘The Scarlet Letter,’ this movie is sure to be hilarious. With the familiar faces of Amanda Bynes (The Amanda Show) and Lisa Kudrow (Friends) you definitely won’t want to miss it.

sept. 8-14

AND

EASY A

allmoviephotos.com

kcstarlight.com

The Broadway show “Rain” is showing at Starlight Theater this week. The band Rain has mastered every song of legendary group, The Beatles, and is delivering a live, infectious performance of The Beatles greatest hits. This tribute will take you back in time and deliver anything from the Beatles early work, to the classics, to their last album. So get a group to ‘Come Together’ to ‘Twist and Shout’ at Starlight. Tickets range from $10-75.

Hellcats

september edition

sept. 7-12

calendar

&

RAIN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES

You won’t want to miss the dance punk duo, Matt and Kim, when they come to the Granada Theater in Lawerence on Sept. 23. The duo hasn’t performed in Kansas City since last summer, when they opened for Blink 182. Even though the show is on a Thursday night, SMSD has blessed us with Parent/Teacher conferences the next day—leaving us out of school. Plenty of time to recover from this mind-melding show. Tickets are $21 and the show starts at 10 p.m.

mattandkimmusic.com

sept. 24

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’hoole Who wouldn’t want to see a 3D movie about owls? This animation-adventure is based on a series of books called ‘Guardians of Ga’hoole’ by Kathryn Lasky. Coming from the same animation studio as ‘Happy Feet’, Legends of the Guardians is expected to be a heartfelt, exciting adventure about the owls of Ga’hoole who help the innocent. Also, this is coming from the same director of ‘300’ and ‘Watchmen,’ so be prepared for fantastic special effects. allmoviephotos.com


SPORTS

SCANDAL SQUAD

issue 1

Seniors Katy Richardson and Betsy Blessen walk side by side along the field as Richardson crams a handful of goldfish into her mouth. Chatting and munching, the pair remains oblivious to what is going on around them on the fall morning. Only when the starter fires his gun signaling the beginning of the girl’s first Cross Country race do they realize they’re supposed to be running. With a scream of surprise, they run off to join the rest of the girls in the C-team race. From talking on race mornings to chatting on runs, Richardson loves socializing at cross country. She runs to be with her friends, as well as to keep in shape. Richardson and her friends were passed down the honorable “scandal squad” name by the seniors who established the group the previous year. “We [the scandal squad] aren’t looking to be varsity runners, just looking to enjoy the sport,” Richardson said. While Richardson and her friends always keep cross country fun, they know it’s hard work. Next year, the scandal squad will pass down the honor to a group of the coming year’s C-team senior girls with the same positive attitude, and who, of course, love to socialize. Because after all, that’s what the scandal squad is all about.

As coach Tricia Beaham announced the three mile run on the first day of cross country, a jumble of negative thoughts ran through sophomore Brennan William’s head, on top of which perched her neon-yellow “BAM!” bow. “What am I doing here?” Williams thought. “I won’t be able to finish this run…I’m not a runner.” But she did finish it. And all of the runs after that, since the beginning of the season. Before those runs, she never would’ve thought she’d be improving each day, or planning on running for the rest of her high school career. And, against her expectations, she was actually enjoying cross country. “I always thought cross country wasn’t for me, but you can go your own pace, be your own person,” Williams said. “And I can still wear my bows.”

27

UP and

RUNNING Cross country members reveal their diverse secrets for success ChloeStradinger

NEWBIES

The vast, mountainous Colorado terrain stretches before junior Reid Frye’s eyes as he looks down at his accomplishment. He and his teammates had climbed up Gray’s Peak-all 14,000 feet of it. “I looked down and saw what me and my teammates had just completed,” Frye said. “It was the highlight of my trip.” The trip Frye took this summer was with the varsity boys’ and girls’ teams. They went to Grand Lake, CO, where they ran in a race and took long climb/runs up the local mountains. At nights, they all played games like poker and Twister for fun after their day of rigorous activity. They bonded as a team, which was one of Frye’s favorite parts of the trip, since he said his teammates make cross country enjoyable for him. “It got us focused for the year and ready to go,” Frye said.

VARSITY

From left: seniors Katy Richardson and Jordan Herring, sophomores Helena Buchmann and Brennan Williams, juniors Mitch Daniel and Adam Simmons, senior Hanna Jane Stradinger, junior Emily Kerr

all photos by GrantKendall

BEFORE THE MEET

CROSS COUNTRY

CULTURE

Although cross country meets can be grueling, runners enjoy the moments before the races when the teams come together and yell out their signature chants: “Good, better, best,” “Rufio” and of course, “Blood makes the grass grow. Kill, kill kill!”

POPSICLE PARTIES

As a special after-practice treat, runners from all of the teams get to indulge in cold popsicles provided by the parents of runners on select Wednesday evenings. “It’s nice to have a popsicle after a long run but I feel bad because sometimes varsity gets back too late to have any,” said junior Jake Seitz, a C-team runner.

THURSDAY JERSDAY

A recent custom of the cross country trade, Thursday Jersdays were established this year by a group of senior guys. Each male in the group wears a sleeveless jersey to practice. “Jason Sabin set the bar high with some sort of New York hybrid jersey in the first week,” senior Kevin Simpson (left) said.


This team is built on players that all care about this team and this season and would give up almost anything for it to be successful. Ask them how g will play; that is all they can do to be as good as they can be.

28

SPORTS

PRIMED for HISTORY 9 07 10

2010 FOOTBALL PREVIEW

THE MORE YOU KNOW

IN 53 YEARS, SHAWNEE MISIN COACH CHIP SHERMAN’S SECOND SEASON, THE LANCER FOOTBALL TEAM IS PREPARED SION EAST HAS FOR ITS BEST SEASON IN SCHOOL HISTORY WON 206 GAMES. IN 23 SEASONS, CHIP SHERMAN HAS WON 203 CorbinBarnds

PLAYERS TO WATCH JOHN SCHROCK QB, SENIOR

Since his sophomore year, Schrock has been getting varsity snaps; meaningful or not they have all been building up to this year. In each of the previous seasons, Schrock has been splitting time with senior Robby Moriarty, but this off-season Sherman gave Schrock the nod, allowing him to finally take total control over this offense. At 6’3”, Schrock is the ideal quarterback and has all the skills to make the passing game tick.

GEORGE BROPHY OT & DE, SENIOR

One thing East has not had enough of over the past few years are big players upfront. Senior George Brophy brings that size and collegiate talent to go with it. Brophy will be able to disrupt the offense on defense and dominate his man on offense.

JOSH MAIS

LB & OG, SENIOR

Just like Brophy, Josh Mais has some major size for a high school linebacker. Leading the linebacking corps, Mais will be able to stuff the run like a brick wall.

QUAN BRUNT WR & CB, SENIOR

all photos by GrantHeinlein

This is somewhat of a wild card but senior Quan Brunt especially fills a desperate need for East : speed. A convert from the soccer team, this will be Quan’s first full year of football. Although he may be a tad raw, he will surely make plays.

YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT PLANNER (AND A FEW THURSDAYS AND SM NORTHWEST

LAWRENCE

SM NORTH

OLATHE NORTH

LAWRENCE FREE STATE

SEPT. 2 NORTH STADIUM

SEPT. 10 NORTH STADIUM

SEPT. 16 NORTH STADIUM

SEPT. 24 OLATHE DISTRICT ACTIVITY COMPLEX

OCT. 1 LAWRENCE FREE STATE


good they think they can be and they say that they can win state, and they mean it. These players have put as much into this season as any team they

SPORTS

THE OFFENSE

GAMES YOU CANNOT MISS

issue 1

29

EFFICIENCY THROUGH CONSISTENCY

SHAWNEE MISSION NORTHWEST

If students at East only remember one game from the previous season, without question, it is the Shawnee Mission Northwest game. Nothing marked the arrival of Coach Sherman better than the goal line stop to win the game that was no step short of a miracle. Not only will East remember that game for a long time, but so will Northwest, which was robbed of a playoff berth with the loss. There is no better way to open the season than against the Cougars, and no better way to prove that under Sherman, East is going to be a daunting threat for the perennial powers of the Sunflower League.

OLATHE NORTH

The fourth game of the season against the defending state champs could go two ways: things could go the way they went last year or East could make this a winnable game. Last year, Olathe North led 14-13 at halftime in the playoffs matchup against a Lancer squad that went 2-8 the year before. And that was before the Eagles lost their best running back in school history, a linebacker to Kansas State and a defensive tackle to Missouri. I’m not trying to say that the 4th ranked team in the metro, according to Metro Sports, is going to be deprived of talent, but it is certainly a game that will be great to watch.

SHAWNEE MISSION WEST

On October 12, Shawnee Mission East will line up against West; a game that any of the Metro Sports anchors will have already marked off as a sure win for the Vikings. But with Coach Sherman in the headset, any game is winnable. The number 12 ranked team in the metro according to Metro Sports, the Vikings lose a very good quarterback from last year and an even better game-breaking defensive back and receiver. West still will have a very good team led by 23 seniors and spearheaded by senior running back William Livingston. If the Lancers defense can contain Livingston, who averaged 7.3 yards per carry last season, there will be a new king of Shawnee Mission football, putting the Lancers into a spotlight they haven’t seen in a long time.

For this team to be as good as people think they will be, the offense must be able to make big plays. Fortunately, they have the players to do that. With a solid line led by seniors Jack Harrigan, Josh Mais and George Brophy, there should be holes in the defense for junior running back Adam Lowe. To complement Lowe’s speed, senior Will Severns and junior Jeff Cole will provide the power to the running game. Without question, the passing game will be the strength of this offense due to their depth and experience. The options that senior quarterback John Schrock will have are as good as any quarterback at East has ever had. The receiving corps consists of Seniors Grant Ellis, Krey Bradley, Alex Pirotte, and Quan Brunt; senior tight end Brett Miller and junior Elliot Faerber round off the group. Schrock will have the weapons to make this offense move, but can he make everything click?

THE DEFENSE

WINNING THE WAR UPFRONT Coordinated by Coach Chip Ufford, this unit is expected to be the strength of this team. Anchored by two bookends on the line, seniors George Brophy and Brett Miller will give the defensive line the size that East teams haven’t had in the past. Although the linebacking corps loses junior Chris Pinne, they return two playmakers in senior Josh Mais and junior Seth Hartman. With only one defensive back with game experience, the defensive backfield will be the wild-card. If they can manage to hold their own against the pass, this defensive unit could be a top three defense in the league.

MAKING THE DIFFERENCE

A 4-6 TEAM DOESN’T MAGICALLY BECOME A STATE CONTENDER IN THE MATTER OF AN OFF-SEASON. HERE ARE FOUR DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THIS TEAM AND LAST YEAR’S TEAM.

4

FINAL PREDICTIONS

3

FINAL RECORD: 7-2

PLAYER OF THE YEAR: GEORGE BROPHY SURPRISE PLAYER: SETH HARTMAN BIGGEST UPSET: EAST OVER SHAWNEE MISSION WEST

2 1

STATE FINISH: STATE SEMI-FINALS

SATURDAYS TOO)

RHYTHM Just like a batter on a baseball team, the quarterback has to be in a rhythm to be successful. Instead of splitting time like last season, quarterback John Schrock will finally have the opportunity to be the only quarterback throwing to his receivers. ROUND TWO One of the biggest bonuses of having the same coaching staff for two years is that the team will already know the system going into the season. Instead of working on the basics a week before gameday, they can be polishing what they have. The players will already know what to expect from the coaching staff and their philosophy before they even have their first official game. DEDICATION This team is built on players that all care about this team and this season. Ask them how good they think they can be and they say that they can win state, and they mean it. These players have put as much into this season as any team they will play; that is all they can do to be as good as they can be. EXPERIENCE The Lancers’ best players will be seniors all across the board, with most of their starters being seniors. Each night they will be putting everything on the line because they know it’s their last chance to leave a mark on this school’s athletic history.

OLATHE NORTHWEST

BLUE VALLEY NORTH

SM WEST

SM SOUTH

OCT. 7 COLLEGE BOULEVARD ACTIVITY COMPLEX

OCT. 15 SOUTH STADIUM

OCT. 22 SOUTH STADIUM

OCT. 29 SOUTH STADIUM


30

SPORTS 09 07 10

KatieEast

CHANGING the

CULTURE of the GAME

New volleyball coach, Rosacarla Salonoa, is ready to add some Brazilian flare to this year’s squad

S

AlexGoldman

enior Julie Aliber walks off the court after her first practice with new volleyball head coach, Rosacarla Salanoa. Aliber is exhausted from over two hours of intense conditioning and going over new plays that Salanoa has designed for the team. “With Rosa we really have to earn our spot on the team,” Aliber said. “We have a more intense warm-ups and more conditioning. We’ve set higher goals than last year and are getting pushed a lot harder to achieve them.” Salanoa is replacing former coach Scott Dowis, who left East after four seasons to coach the new Blue Valley Southwest volleyball team. Salanoa, a native of Curitiba, Brazil, has played and coached for several school teams and clubs, including representing Brazil in the international stage. In 2009, Salanoa led St. Pius to a 27-3 season as well as earning the Missouri Coach of the Year, before applying for the coaching position at East. Once she was offered the position, Salanoa didn’t hesitate to accept. “I was coaching my club team in a tournament and got a voicemail right after the last game,” Salanoa said. “I played it three times in my car and couldn’t be more excited.” Former athletic director Jim Ricker, who hired Salanoa in the summer, said he didn’t even have to make a pitch to entice her to come to East. “She really pitched to us,” Ricker said. “Rosa wanted to be at East. She knew about our history and where we wanted to go.” Despite only having been in the area for five years, Salanoa knew all about her new program. “Shawnee Mission East volleyball has a good reputation of parents and students that are very supportive,” Salanoa said. “East is always in contention and has a good team every year. I want to make this program even better.” According to sophomore Audrey Hitchcock, Salanoa’s practices are much more demanding than Dowis’. They begin with 15-20 minutes of warm-up, in which they work on ball control and conditioning. Then, the team works on passing and hitting drills for another 40 minutes. For the rest of practice, the team works on game situations and designed plays such as “white, blue and black” - a play that is supposed to trick the opposing team by having the outside

players switch sides. Ricker also believes Salanoa can bring her competitiveness and experience as a player to the program. “She understands all positions and knows how to get the best out of her players,” Ricker said. “To be a good coach you have to put in a lot time. She is more than willing to doing that and has got the community more involved with volleyball.” This community involvement will start next summer, when Salanoa will lead volleyball camps for girls from fourth grade up to high school. Salanoa wants to get younger girls accustomed to good fundamentals such as passing, approaching and how to rotate in the court. Reaching out to the younger kids is just one of Salanoa’s challenges this season. The volleyball team lost two top seniors in Lindsey Sauls and Kareen Schwartze - two of the top players in the state of Kansas last season. Despite their absence, Aliber is optimistic and believes the team could even be better than last year’s. “Last year we were really built around two players,” Aliber said. “This year we are a lot better conditioned and have a better rounded team. ” In tryouts, Salanoa looked for players that could play in her offensive style. She is planning to use a 5-1 formation in order to be very aggressive both offensively and defensively. Salanoa stressed hard work and playing smart on the court in tryouts and wanted the players to be competitive to earn their spot on her team. “We don’t have a really tall team so we are going to have to play smart and not waste points,” Salanoa said. “Every offense is going to start with passing. We are going to need to think of what were doing when we’re on the court.” Salanoa also wants every player to improve and get better through out the season. Every two weeks, Salanoa sits down with the players individually and goes over what the player should work on to get more playing time and to see if they have any concerns. “She really wants us to improve,” Hitchcock said. “She works us hard to get us to where we want to be. That’s her number one goal.” Coach Salanoa is optimistic about the teams chances to go far this year. “We have a very good group of girls and I truly believe we can make state and contend.”

PRAISEfortheCOACH Varsity players explain the pros of their new coach

Senior Lauren King “It’s definitely more intense this year, and she’s more about the defense instead of the offense. I love her accent, though.”

Junior Taylor Wolf “She’s a girl, so we can relate better, and it’s very different from before. She is still getting used to the traditions we have.”

Sophomore Audrey Hitchcock

“Her accent is funny. She mispronounces words a lot and things get jumbled up. She’s definitely more fun off of the court.”

For additional coverage including a video-interview with Salonoa visit smeharbinger.net all photos by GrantKendall and SamBartow


SPORTS

BOYS SOCCER

KEY GAMES

LED BY A CORE GROUP OF SENIORS, HOPES ARE HIGH The boys soccer team this season is one of the most experienced in school history due to the 17 seniors that are on the team. After not having the most satisfactory season last year, the team hopes to get back to their winning ways. Opening their season today against Blue Valley, the Lancers have the capability to show the state that they are indeed a threat to compete not only for a league championship but a state championship as well. Seniors Lucas Throckmorton, Cam Smith and Zach Colby will be the keys to this season. With so many seniors, this team’s time DanStewart to win is now.

GIRLS GOLF

issue 1

SEPT. 7-11 KA-MO TOURNAMENT SEPT. 14 OLATHE EAST OCT. 21 BLUE VALLEY NORTHWEST

PREDICTION:

31

CAN’T MISS SPORTS EVENTS OF THE FALL FOOTBALL VS. SHAWNEE MISSION WEST FRIDAY, OCT. 22

SEMIFINALS AT STATE

KEY GAMES

DESPITE LOSS OF FOUR SENIORS, STATE IS GOAL Just like the volleyball team, the girls golf team lost four seniors, three of which were players on varsity but the team still has its eyes on state. Leading the team are sophomore Anne Willman, and seniors Sarah Genton and Lizzy Ward. Standing in front of the Lancers on their way to state is Blue Valley North. The Mustangs won the 6A state title last year. For their dreams of state to come true Willman must be able to place top five at state along with top finishes from a few other players. Though it will be tough, the Lancers have a serious shot at winning state. Things just must go perfectly during the days of state.

SEPT. 27 SM EAST INVITE SEPT. 20 SION INVITE OCT. 12 REGIONAL TOURNAMENT

MackenzieWylie

(POSSIBLE MATCHUP) SOCCER VS. BLUE VALLEY NORTH SATURDAY, SEPT. 11

PREDICTION: THIRD AT STATE

MackenzieWylie

GIRLS TENNIS

KEY GAMES

SEPT. 11 SM DISTRICT TOURNAMENT

WITH FOTOPOLOUS, ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE After last year’s strong second place finish at state, the Girls tennis team hopes to build on what they have, with the mindset that they could beat Blue Valley North and win state. After losing two key seniors from last year, juniors Mimi Fotopolous and Mollie Cooper will be leading this team. Fotopolous is one of the top players in the country and has a legitimate shot at winning state individually. Winning singles will most likely be necessary for the Lancers to surpass the Mustangs on the final day of the season, but they must also place high on their doubles teams as well. Winning state is possible but coach Sue Chipman has her work cut out for her. AnnaPetrow

YOUR ONE WEEK PLANNER SEPT. 7, 9, 10 SOCCER IN KA-MO TOURNEY

SEPT. 10 FOOTBALL VS. LAWRENCE

SEPT. 18 PEMBROKE VARSITY TOURNAMENT

DanStewart

FOOTBALL VS. BLUE VALLEY NORTH (HOMECOMING) FRIDAY, OCT. 15

SEPT. 30 SUNFLOWER LEAGUE TOURNAMENT

PREDICTION: SECOND AT STATE

SEPT. 14 SOCCER VS. OLATHE EAST

MackenzieWylie

SEPT. 11 TENNIS IN DISTRICT TOURNAMENT


32

PHOTO ESSAY 09 07 10

NEW LANCER

PRIDE This year’s first pep assembly marked the beginning of new traditions at East

Junior Lanie Leek, above, gets tossed into the air during the varsity cheerleaders’ first pep assembly performance of the year. Leek is new to the varsity squad. For her, being on varsity rather than JV allows her to perform stunts and routines during pep assemblies.

GrantHeinlein

Grasping the new school spirit stick, senior Matt Hoffman, above right, yells with enthusiasm. The idea is to get the different classes more energized during the assemblies by rewarding the most spirited class with the stick.

DanStewart After getting clotheslined by the new school mascot, senior Zach Colby, right, dramatically flies towards the ground. Colby was decked as the mascot fought to save a young Lancer girl from rival school bullies.

GrantHeinlein

Principal Karl Krawitz, left, dons KISS apparel as he and fellow administration members put on a lip syncing show in front of the entire student body.

KatieEast Senior pep club presidents Caroline Doerr and CC Creidenberg, below, address the East student body with the fall sports rundown. “I was definitely nervous being in front of 2,000 people,” Creidenberg said, “but once the assembly went on, it got much easier.”

GrantHeinlein


The Harbinger: Issue 1 2010-2011