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ISSUE 10 SHAWNEE MISSION EAST PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KS FEB. 7, 2011 SMEHARBINGER.NET

FOREVER

YUNG

Freshman rapper Yung Dre pursues hip-hop record deal

E

BobMartin

verything about that night makes freshman Andre Bowie uneasy. His voice drops when he talks about it, and he stares at the floor. Twelve-years-old at the time, he was at his grandmother’s house on the phone with his cousin when he heard the whole story. There was a fight, a gun pulled, 11 shots. His close friend, whose name he won’t mention, passed away shortly after being taken to the hospital. This was someone Bowie had looked up to, confided in, and in the flash of a muzzle—he was gone. This wasn’t the first traumatic moment in his life, and certainly not the last, but through writing and recording hip hop music as his alter ego Yung Dre, Bowie has found an escape from a world he desperately needed escaping from.

***

Sitting in study hall at Mission Valley Middle School, Bowie wrote his first lyrics. This clean cut environment was a far cry from his days at Quindel Elementary in the Kansas City, Kan. school district. Up until middle school, he had lived in Wyandotte County his entire life. It was where his friends, his family and his memories lived. But here, he knew nobody. “When I was in seventh grade, I just didn’t even talk, because I didn’t like it out here,” Bowie said. Writing came to be a routine, and before long, Andre transitioned from a notebook to his Blackberry, where he could write his thoughts the moment they came to him, anywhere. This concept wasn’t new. Writing had always been Bowie’s escape from the violence and trauma that so often took place in his former neighborhood. Continued on page 12

GrantHeinlein

Exchange student Christian Otzen brings acting experience to East

pg.p.211

Junior John Lee takes on more Review of Jasper’s Ristorante responsibility with mother’s p. 20 diagnosis of cancer

p. 23

Pictures from the SHARE Trivia Night benefit event

p. 32


NEWS 02 02-07-11

Like Father Like Son Colleges are accepting more students based on legacy

PeterHung

AnnaBernard

The past decade has seen a vast increase in student involvement in the college application process. A 2009 National Association for College Admissions Counseling report shows that the number of overall applications has increased by 24 percent since 2002, and the number of applications individuals are submitting is also growing. With this increase comes an applicant’s desire for better stats, better recommendations and better essays--a way to stand out from the crowd. However, recent evidence shows that a deciding factor in admissions doesn’t weigh on the applicant’s achievements but someone else’s: their parents. According to a recent article in the New York Times, a new study published by Michael Hurwitz, student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, reveals the impact of the legacy on college admissions. Hurwitz reviewed 30 unnamed colleges and their 133,236 applicants in 2007. The article says it is very likely the colleges surveyed were Ivy League universities and other selective private colleges. “Colleges often claim that legacy preferences are just a ‘tie-breaker,’ but research suggests the weight of the preference can increase one’s chances of admissions very significantly,” said Richard D. Kahlenburg, senior fellow at The Century Foundation, a non-profit research organization. Kahlenburg, editor of the 2010 book “Affirmative Action for the Rich: Legacy Preference in College Admissions,” said that a legacy most often applies to the children of alumni, but can also extend to other relations such as grandchildren, nieces, and nephews. Both Hurwitz’s and Kahlenburg’s research shows that, on average, ten to 25 percent of selective colleges are made of legacies, a much higher number than previously thought. Applicants with parent graduates were also seven times more likely to be accepted, and those with other relations were twice as likely to be admitted. Their research indicates that admissions consider the legacy status to be the equivalent of adding 160 points to their SAT score, on the 1600 scale, though being a legacy will help an applicant’s chance the most only if their initial test scores are high. Daniel Golden, author of “The Price of Admission: How America’s Ruling Class Buys Its Way into Elite Colleges—and Who Gets Left Outside the Gates” and contributor to Kahlen-

burg’s book, said that legacy preference began right after World War I, when many qualified Jewish students were applying to selective colleges like Harvard and Yale. “These colleges...wanted to find a way to limit their enrollment without appearing to be anti-Semitic,” Golden said in an e-mail interview. “Preference for the children of alumni -- few of whom were Jewish -- was one of their solutions, along with preference for students from rural areas.” Senior Susie McClannahan proposed eliminating alumni preference as her bill this year at Youth in Government after reading recent statistics on the issue. “I thought this issue wasn’t discussed enough or considered very much,” McClannahan said. “People don’t have an idea how big of a role legacy preference can play into college.” McClannahan is planning on attending the University of Kansas next year, where both her mother and grandfather attended. McClannahan said this connection didn’t influence her decision to apply—her parents wanted her to go to an in-state school, and the University of Kansas was the only one that offered Korean. Though she doesn’t feel that legacy preference affected her acceptance into the university, she said that she has been contacted by its alumni association with offers of special tours and events. “[Colleges] make the choice to accept applicants who aren’t as competitive as other applicants simply because of who their parents were, which I think is absolutely unfair,” McClannahan said. McClannahan’s sentiment seems to be echoed by much of America. A 2004 poll by the Chronicle of Higher Education indicates that 75 percent of Americans oppose the practice of alumni preference. Senior Peter Bautz does not think this practice should be eliminated in all instances, but instead supports using alumni preference as a tie-breaker between two candidates. Bautz applied to three schools as a legacy: Colorado College, his mother’s former school, Amherst College, his dad’s alma mater, and Harvard University, where his dad attended both medical and law school. He thinks his connections to the colleges probably influenced his decision to apply, especially in the cases of Colorado College and Amherst, which he said were lesser-known schools. While he

has not been approached by representatives as a legacy, he knows that his status might help his chances somewhat. “If you have a parent who is an alumni... but you’re being compared to someone of equal application merit...and the one who has the parent who went there gets picked, I think I’m more okay with that,” Bautz said. “Yeah, it’s sort of old-school and a little snobbish, but I think that’s a better system than just saying, ‘Well, your parents give a lot of money, so we’re going to accept you.” A speculated reason for the continued practice of legacy preference is that it encourages alumni to donate to their alma maters, an issue Kahlenburg said colleges keep “shrouded in secrecy.” His research, however, indicates that legacy preference does not increase these donations. According to Golden, since most elite private universities use legacy preference, it is hard to determine how much of an impact the preferential treatment has on fundraising. However, he said the California Institute of Technology does not weigh admissions under legacy preference, but they still receive many donations and endowments. Additionally, Golden believes that, if legacy preference was eliminated, overall private donations would not be affected, just rearranged. For example, an upset alumnus might stop giving to his former college, but would then start giving to new schools associated with his family. However, Golden does believe that admissions all come down to one thing: money. “If a university is hoping for a multi-million dollar donation from an alumnus, it will lower its standards very far to admit the child. If the alumnus is not wealthy, the university will only give a small edge to the child,” Golden said. This reasoning is what makes McClannahan and Kahlenburg against alumni preference, since first-generation college applicants have no colleges they can apply to as a legacy. Students with parents who went to college are more likely to be able to give generous donations. “Legacy preferences help a group that is already pretty advantaged on average,” Kahlenburg said. “In my view, ancestry discrimination is wrong, and I think legacy admissions should be abolished.”

Local Legacies

Mizzou

Heritage Scholarship • • •

A parent went to Mizzou 27 or higher on ACT or 1210 or higher in math and reading on SAT Out of state tuition is waved

Kansas

Jayhawk Generations Scholarship

• •

Parent or Grandparent graduated from KU At least a 3.25 high school GPA 12-20 percent of out-ofstate tuition paid

K-State

Heritage Scholarship • • •

Parents graduated from Kansas State Pay 15 percent of tuition Maintain a 3.0 GPA for four years


NEWS

issue 10

03

THE FUTURE OF THE TEACHERS With the closing of Mission Valley, questions arise as to what will happen with the current staff members JackHowland The Shawnee Mission School District Board of Education announced the impending closure of Mission Valley Middle School on Nov. 8. According to the Board’s presentation, “Proposal 10” would relocate students who attend Mission Valley to Indian Hills—using the building’s 912 student capacity. Superintendent Gene Johnson explains that operating two schools when you only need one is a “huge inefficiency.” While students are assured to be reassigned to schools next year in the district, staff members’ jobs are not as secure. Mission Valley currently has 55 teaching positions—all of which will be listed as “excess” in the SMSD. Some may go to Indian Hills, some may get other jobs in the district; decisions can’t be made until student enrollment is complete. “The teachers who are at Mission Valley will have the opportunity to slot into those open spots that at are at Indian Hills because, obviously, you’re going to need more teachers,” Dr. Johnson said. “There is a possibility that maybe you’re not going to need as many [teachers], so those teachers would go on excess and be placed in other jobs within the school district.” Dr. Johnson has said that staff members should learn where they’ll be working next year sometime after spring break. Although he says they “should have a pretty good idea of what the process is like,” he also notes that there is some uneasiness. Nancy Fritz is the SMSD Kansas National Education Association (KNEA) director and has noticed rising worry. “They are concerned about where they’re going to work next year and that’s a legitimate concern,” Fritz said. “I’ve been on excess myself in the past. It’s very unnerving.” She says that although teachers are concerned, they will definitely have a job in the 2011-12 school year as of right now. Doug Jones teaches social studies at Mission Valley and notes that teachers are particularly worried about what and where they’ll be teaching next year. “I think in general more people are worried about going to a new school,” Jones said. “There’s definitely a sense of nervousness—not knowing where [you’re] going to be. Once you get assigned to a new school, all you do is get assigned to a school; you don’t have control over what you teach.” On the whole, Jones thinks the District has “handled the situation well.” The teachers were given a form by human resources where they can request what they would like to teach next year and the SMSD has promised to try to uphold these. Although generally happy with the measures taken by the district, Jones is bitter towards the state. He points out that the district’s funding has been cut substantially—something he accredits to teachers losing jobs. According to a SMSD position statement filed for the 2010-11 school year, the operating budget is $14.7 million less than it was last year. The 2010 Annual Comprehensive Finance report shows that $11,707 is spent on each student—the highest it has been in 10 years. Sue Storm oversees District 1 for the State Board of Education and says that all districts have collectively been given less funding over the past few years.

“[Funding has been less] because of the revenue shortfall and the [legislature’s] unwillingness to—well, last year they did raise sale tax—but there were some other things they could have done that other legislators saw, but legislature wasn’t willing to do them,” Storm said. Storm blames it on “the whole economic picture.” She explains that her home may have been worth $200,000 this year, but now it may be worth only $160,000 due to foreclosures and the value of property going down. She thinks this has contributed to a $500 million deficit. With the state of the economy, Dr. Johnson explains that certain measures must be taken to save money. One of the things that will be done to benefit the district is the layoff of certain staff—excluding teachers—at Mission Valley. “You’re going to save money on two principals, custodians...you only need one librarian, one nurse and you don’t need two office staff,” Dr. Johnson said. “So there’s a lot of employees that you don’t need to hire if you only have one building.” The news that custodial and office workers will not be receiving jobs next year has not gone over particularly well at East. According to a poll of 110 students, 78 percent think that it is unfair that they won’t be employed in the district. Junior Morgan Satterlee’s family is “very involved” with the school and she wishes that workers could receive jobs next year. “I don’t think it is fair that they lose their jobs due to the switch,” Satterlee said. “But if budgets must be cut, then there is nothing else to do about it.” Freshman Andy McCoy also went to Mission Valley and thinks that the the laid off workers should receive jobs at Indian Hills. “I think some of the custodians should get to keep their jobs and go to Indian Hills, mainly because there are a lot more kids,” McCoy said. “Maybe some of the office workers should be able to go over there [too]. It just depends on how difficult it will be with twice as many kids.” If the layoff of particular staff members doesn’t help the district enough financially, then they will have to revert to the Reduction In Force (RIF) system. Dr. Johnson describes that this will eliminate teachers who have been in the district the least amount of time. East students have taken a general stance against the RIF system. Of the 110 polled, 83 percent think this is a poor way to enforce layoffs. David Muhammad taught at East before being let go as a result of the RIF system and remembers telling himself that “it wasn’t because of his ability.” “Being young, you go through these sort of things,” Muhammad said. “Money is tight everywhere, and sadly, education suffers as well. I tried to remain optimistic and tell myself that everything happens for a reason.” Muhammad thinks that the RIF system, while a good system, isn’t perfect. He says that it is a “knock against young, passionate teachers.” But he also explains that “just because a teacher is young doesn’t mean that they’re better.” Fritz notes that the district would like to avoid this system, but she feels

there is a high probability that they will have to go to it. “We will be watching the state budget and what kind of money they send the school district,” Fritz said. “Governor Brownback’s proposal to the state legislature is that there will be a two and a half million dollar cut for this year.” Throughout this entire process, stemming back to Nov. 8 when they announced Mission Valley would close, Dr. Johnson has tried to be conscious of people’s feelings. He knows that no one is going to want their school to close and he understands that. He has encountered general disapproval thus far regarding Mission Valley’s closing. A group was created called “Save Mission Valley,” whose sole purpose was to countermand the decision to close. They wrote a petition and got 800 people to sign, citing six major points as to why it should stay open. Through meetings and statements, Dr. Johnson has dealt with this disapproval. He still firmly believes that they made the right decision and that Indian Hills will ultimately benefit. In the future, he says he plans on adding “upgrades” to Indian Hills, and that five years down the road, it should be operating well. As for the staff members: the future is less certain. Fritz has said that from board meetings she has seen that “nobody wants anybody to lose their job,” but trying to maintain a profitable district can be difficult at times. “This is a cycle of economy and unfortunately it has nothing to do with fairness or not,” Fritz said. “It’s trying to run a economical, financially feasible school district.”

EAST’SVIEW

78 61 83 53

percent think it’s unfair that office and custiodial workers are not gettrig jobs at Indian Hills next year percent think that the benefits of saving the district money still do not make layoffs acceptable percent think that the RIF system—which lays off teachers who have been in the district the least amount of time—is not a good way to downsize teachers. percent that voted went to Mission Valley.

According to a poll of 110 East students


NEWS 04 02-07-11

Hallway fights more frequent KatyWesthoff

In the past six months, East has had 20 fights. More than a heated word or someone shoving, but an actual engaged, physical altercation. Last year, there were a total of eight or nine fights. Compared to the three fights in the whole school year in 2008-2009, physical violence is a growing trend in the halls of Shawnee Mission East. This is a new issue for the administration to handle, some of whom have never dealt with more than a few fights per year. Principal Karl Krawitz, however, has taught in five different schools and has encountered these situations before. "We've had more fights and confrontations, no question," Dr. Krawitz said. "For this building, it's excessive, but it's still far below any other building." Dr. Krawitz attributes the fights to the "mobility factor" that many students are facing. In the current economy, families have to move around where jobs are, so East has seen a change in its demographics. There are 106 students transfer students currently enrolled. Dr. Krawitz suspects that transfer students might have brought some of their problems from other schools into East. Only East has seen an increase in fights, even though the other Shawnee Mission high schools have had even higher transfer rates. SM North has around 200 transfer students, and North principal Richard Kramer said that there is less violence than last year. Dr. Krawitz does not see the new students as the sole reason for the trend in fighting. “We're seeing just as much tension among students who have always been in [the Shawnee Mission School District]," Dr. Krawitz said. Senior Alex Lewis, who has lived in the East area since elementary school, was suspended for ten days after being

East has already seen more fights this year than the last two school years combined

charged with resisting arrest and assault of an officer. Lewis claimed that he did no such thing. “The main reason they pinned it on me is because I talked to all the people that went crazy that day,” Lewis said. “It’s kind of [screwed] up about how they judge you based on who you hang around with.” Students engaged in a fight are referred to the office, where they give their statement. Usually both sides of the fight are sent home for a minimum of three to five days. These short suspensions continue until a student becomes a bigger problem, and then longer suspensions are given out at the discretion of the administration. “Generally we'll try to send both parties home, not for their own protection, but to protect the environment,” Dr. Krawitz said. “If you bring those kids back [too soon] and they rally their friends, the issues get bigger.” Lewis attributes the fights as a way to earn respect. He said that students at East don’t know anything outside of their school and don’t understand how schools and students are like in Kansas City, Mo. “I went to middle school out here so I kinda just accept all that s[expletive] talk [from East kids],” Lewis said, “but [my friends are] trying to prove that they’re real and are trying to earn respect. Where they come from, if you come to them like they ain't real, they’re going to fight you.” Lewis has always felt judged by the administration and his fellow students. “It was always kinda funny to me, like how they judge people as much as they do,” Lewis said. Most of the problems this year have been among underclassmen: 90 percent of the fights have been among non-se-

Creating your story at JCCC …

niors. Last year's freshmen class saw a “visible spike” in disciplinary action, according to Dr. Krawitz. He imagines that online social networking, on sites like Facebook and Twitter, has a lot to do with the fights. "A lot of issues and problems show up [online], and when those parties come to school the reality of the conflict shows up here after starting somewhere else," Dr. Krawitz said. Schools can do little to control social networking, according to Dr. Krawitz. Online bullying is done at home, where the administration can’t interfere. This means the administration can't fix the source of the problem but can only deal with the aftermath that often takes place at school. A survey taken in Issue 2 of the Harbinger reported that 23 of the 87 students surveyed have been bullied online, and Dr. Krawitz sees fights in school as an extension of these online spats. "Technology is just where it starts," Dr. Krawitz said. "You have access to so much just in the palm of your hand with your phones, and how does one control that?” Dr. Krawitz also imagines that many problems are following underclassmen from middle school. This combination of family instability and the use of social networking sites, with the issues carried over from middle school, has caused a change in East community dynamics. The sources of the fight typically start somewhere else, but end up in the hallways. In an attempt to stop the sources of the fights at home, the administration has been trying to share the information about the fights in meetings with the Parent Teacher Association and the East Fund, through their monthly newsletters and through parent-principal coffees. “It’s going to take a parent who monitors their kids to really have an impact on what’s going on,” Dr. Krawitz said.

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7 DOWN SYNDROME

DANCE Students will pile into East’s cafeteria for the annual Down Syndrome Dance on Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. The dance is a SHARE project that has been going on for several years and invites disabled students from around the district to dance and interact with other students. Junior Lanie Leek, one of the chairs on the project, said that the dance is designed to not only help the disabled students feel comfortable among other students and show them how to act in a social setting, but also to make them feel special. Because of its proximity to Valentine’s Day, Leek and senior Samantha Bartow, the project’s other chair, plan on giving the dance a Valentine’s Day theme so the students can celebrate the holiday. This, combined with the timing of East’s Sweetheart Dance, makes the dance a special experience for the students. “It’s kind of like their WPA,” Leek said. “It’s a dance for them.” Leek said that anyone is welcome to come to the Down

8

Syndrome Dance and help, dance and interact with the students. Some people opt to wear more formal apparel like coat and tie or nice dresses, but others opt to wear jeans. Even if every student doesn’t dress formal or bring a date, Leek said that all of the students who attend seem to have a good time. “It’s great seeing how much fun they have,” Leek said. “It gives them something to look forward to.”

THE BRIEFS SarahMcKittrick VanessaDaves

NEWS

issue 10

A CONVERSATION

WITH MISSION VALLEY TEACHER

DOUG JONES

9

PLAY 10 AUDITIONS 11 12 13 14 Auditions for the spring play, “The Government Inspector,” will be held on Tuesday and Wednesday in the auditorium. “It’s a comedy, so I’m looking for big characters,” theater teacher Brian Cappello said. “I’m looking for people who look comfortable in comedy, who make me laugh, who have big facial expressions, big body movements and really understand the piece they’re auditioning with.” The play is about a small, corrupt Russian village that finds out a government inspector is coming to investigate them. They immediately begin to try to cover up their considerable transgressions, such as reading other people’s mail and bribery, before the arrival of the inspector. However, this is interrupted by a rumor that a suspicious person has been staying at a local inn for the past two weeks. “They mistake this deadbeat conman as the government inspector, and all the funny complications [come] with that,” said Cappello. Capello and theater teacher Tom DeFeo will be picking the 25 member cast, which does not have to be gender specific. The cast list will be posted on the call board on Friday.

15-16 17 18 19 20

OF THE QUESTION

WEEK

Which do you prefer—video or intercom announcements?

86 STUDENTS VOTED 53 percent—Intercom 47 percent—Video

05

What has your experience been l at Mission Valley? Generally I’ve liked it. I’ve liked the age group, predominantly I taught eighth grade which I prefer to seventh grade a lot . Like any job it has its up and downs but it’s been alright.

You’re very popular with students—what do you differently from other teachers? I don’t know if I do anything differently, obviously like any other teacher I try to make it as interesting as possible, also I think I’m fairly laid back which helops.

When did you first hear Mission Valley might close? Oh geez. I probably heard that about a year and a half ago. There’s always rumors floating around, we were definitely talking about it last year.

So it was a lot of gossip?

Yeah, more or less, just people in the school, people in the district.

And how did you react to that?

I guess I have mixed feelings but I do get it. That Shawnee Mission School DIstrict has ‘X’ amount of students in middle schools and you have too many buildings. And given the budget situation, I do think there’s a need to shut down schools. At the same time, it’s bittersweet because it happens to be my school.

FOR MORE INFO REGARDING MISSION VALLEY TEACHERS SEE PAGE 5


NEWS 06 02-07-11

MORE CUTS TO COME AnnieSgroi

This school year has been full of reductions at East. Four teaching positions, 10 percent of the supply budget, 25 percent of the library budget, and some administrative and paraprofessional work hours—all these things have been lost due to budget cuts, but there are still more cuts to come. On Jan. 13, Governor Sam Brownback presented his budget plan for Kansas schools. In his State of the State Address, Brownback stated that education was his second priority, after economic recovery. Despite Brownback’s focus on education, he acknowledged in the address that funds will be tight in the coming years, and cuts will be required. His proposal will bring cuts of the base state aid per pupil (BSAPP) by $75 this year and $157 for the 2011-2012 school year or fiscal year (FY) 2012. BSAPP is a set amount of funding allotted by legislators each year for each full-time student in Kansas. According to the Kansas Department of Education, Kansas’s BSAPP increased a small amount in the middle of the decade, but in the past two years has been reduced due to economic stress in the state. This year Kansas faces a $50 million, deficit and legislators have been forced to make cuts in most state departments. The Shawnee Mission School District calculates that this proposal would result a state funds cut of $2.6 million for this year and $5.7 million for 2011-2012. In addition, the district will have a cut of $4.5 million in federal funds in the 20112012 school year. Principal Karl Krawitz was not surprised by the cuts stated in the Governor’s proposal, given the financial situation of the state. Dr. Krawitz explained that since education funding makes up 51 percent of the state’s budget, it is only logical that cuts would be made in education. Still, Dr. Krawitz is concerned about the changes these cuts may bring to East in the 2011-2012 school year, as well as the following year. In the upcoming school year, Dr. Krawitz predicts that East will lose more teachers and as a result of those losses have to increase core class sizes to 33 to 35 students. He said that the increase in class size will clearly be hard for students,

Both a proposal from Governor Brownback’s and a bill from the Kansas House of Representatives’ propose budget cuts in education

but it will also be a challenge for teachers—bigger classes will mean more grading, and less time to devote to each student. “I don’t think that anybody can realistically think they’re going to grade the 150th paper in a class the same way they graded the first paper,” Dr. Krawitz said. For 2012-2013, Dr. Krawitz foresees core class sizes at East rising to between 38 to 40 students on average. He explained that with the additional reduction of $157 BSAPP, even bigger changes will have to be made across the state. Although he doesn’t have specific programs in mind, Dr. Krawitz worries that the budget situation may be dire enough to cut funds from some programs. “The district has cut what people might say is taking a piece of meat and cutting off the excess fat and making it leaner,” Dr. Krawitz said. “ In 2012 and 2013, there will not be any fat to cut, so then we’re cutting into the heart of what is truly the school district’s tradition of excellence.” On Jan. 31, the Appropriations Committee of Kansas House of Representatives proposed additional cuts to programs in the Kansas Department of Education in House Bill 2014. Pre-K Now and Parents as Teachers (PaT) face reductions in HB 2014. Pre-K Now is a state-funded program designed to provide early childhood education for low-income children. Albert Wat, National Project Manager of Pre-K Now has studied the cuts facing the program in Kansas. “High-quality pre-k can’t be considered a luxury reserved for upper income families or a public-assistance program for the disadvantaged,” Wat said. “Based on what we now know about children’s brain development during the crucial early years, pre-k is just as necessary as kindergarten or first grade.” Parents as Teachers is an organization funded by the state that works with school districts to set up programs to get parents actively involved in their children’s early education. With these cuts, Kansas PaT will likely have to close programs, as was the case in Missouri, when their funding was cut earlier this year. The state’s budget for the next two upcoming fiscal years

has yet to be finalized, but educators are operating under the assumption that the Governor’s proposals will be carried through. Though Dr. Krawitz believes East students and staff will try to support each other through the possible changes, he is worried for the future. “For staff there’ll be this rush of the challenge, the adrenaline—that says we’re not going to fall to this pressure and we’re going to maintain the quality and standards,” Dr. Krawitz said. “They’ll feel like they can pull it off, but the reality is that we’re only human . . .Unless we have that motivation internally to handle that stress, it could be very difficult.”

HOW TO SPEAK STATE BUDGET BASE STATE AID PER PUPIL(BSAPP)

BSAPP is a set amount of funding allotted by legislators each year for each full-time student in Kansas. BSAPP is multiplied by Adjustment Enrollment to calculate State FInancial Aid to schoools.

ADJUSTED ENROLLMENT

This is the number of full-time students in a schooldistrict with “weights” taken into account. “Weights” are factors such as vocational education, bilingual students, or students achieving below their grade level, that can adjust the resources needed.

FISCAL YEAR (FY)

The measure of a financial year for any organization, like a government or business, that operates on a yearlyadjusted budget—it can be different from a calendar year.

To read House Bill 2014 and other proposals for the upcoming year visit www.kslegislature.org

PIECES OF THE PROPOSED CUTS Base Student Aid Per Pupil (BSAPP) (in dollars)

A breakdown of the proposed cuts in the state’s education budget Parent Education Program of the Children’s Initiative Fund [ $7,539,500 to $7,356,130 ]

Changes in Kansas Base Student Aid Per Pupil (BSAPP)

5,000

4,257 4,000

3,863

4,400

4,316

3,863

Pre-K Now Program of the Children’s Initiative Fund [ $5,000,000 to $4,880,370]

3,780 3,623

3,000

‘00-‘01 ‘01-‘02 ‘02-‘03 ‘03-‘04 ‘04-‘05 ‘05-‘06 ‘06-‘07 ‘07-‘08 ‘08-‘09 ‘09-‘10 ‘10-‘11 ‘11-‘12* ‘12-‘13*

KS Dept. of Education

School Year

children. The Parent Education Program is the formal name for Parents as Teachers— which helps parents become involved with their children’s early education.

4,012 4,012

3,863

3,870 3,820

4,374

The Children’s Initiative Fund (CIF) is run by the The Kansas Children’s Cabinet, was formed in 1999, by the KS Legislature to start and evaluate programs that benefit

*proposed funds

Pre-K Now is a program established by CIF to provide at-risk four-year-olds with early childhood education. It is a half-day program run by private non-profits and school districts. Children are chosen

based on risk factors like being an English language-learner, being eligible for free-lunch, coming from a single or teen parent home, having developmental problems or having poorly educated parents.


EDITORIAL

CUTTING THE QUALITY

issue 10

07

Classes at Indian Hills will be unmanagable, which will negatively carry over to high school Despite parent protests and student outhaving trouble with a certain concept, he or rage, the school board’s decision is final, and she must feel confident enough to be able Mission Valley Middle School will close its to approach the teacher and ask for help. doors forever at the The teacher then must be able end of this year, send- The majority opinion of the to help the student in a way ing most would-be at- Harbinger Editorial Board that works well for that stufor against absent dent based on how they learn. tendees to Indian Hills Middle School next With larger classes, there isn’t fall. enough time for substantial Although combinone-on-one interaction with ing MVMS and IHMS each student during a 45 minwill reduce unnecesute class. sary district spending, The transition from elone huge middle school, as opposed to two ementary school to middle school brings medium-sized schools, will create a whole on huge changes in a child’s education, and new range of challenges for students and many new students need help dealing with teachers. the concept of eight different classes and the The average enrollment of MVMS and increased load of homework. IHMS this year is 471 students for each “There are always some students who school. Closing MVMS and sending the stustart out not doing any homework at all, eidents that would go there to IHMS will put ther because they aren’t used to it or because the enrollment of IHMS at over 800 students they get overwhelmed,” former MVMS for the 2011-2012 school year, according to counselor Trudy Vande Kamp said. the SMSD Enrollment Summary. This will If a teacher does not have the time to put the average class size at 25-30 students, help students who are falling through the a number far too high for effective learning. cracks, many will never learn to correct Teacher interaction and teaching style are these issues before entering high school. just a few of the aspects that are affected. If a student never does assignments and With teachers responsible for up to 180 the teacher never brings them aside to talk students each, there is no way they will be about it or help them because that teacher able to devote the time necessary to get to has too many other responsibilities, the stuknow and help out each student. Knowing dent will get into the mentality that not doeach student’s strengths and weaknesses is ing homework is acceptable. key in helping each individual student sucHowever, when this student arrives at ceed. A strong teacher-student relationship high school they will encounter multiple is key to effective learning. If a student is problems. For one thing, they will not have

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Harbinger

the built-in study habits necessary to succeed in advanced classes. Also, the student will start out high school already behind from not learning what they were supposed to in middle school. Middle school teachers must have enough time to meet with students like this, but if they have 180 essays to grade and enter in the computer, that time might not be available. Not only will teachers have to change the way they devote their time, but many will also be faced with the problem of changing the way they teach certain concepts. With overcrowded classrooms, new and more dynamic teaching strategies and techniques cannot be implemented. According to a 2009 study by Purdue University, hand-on activities like building models or playing educational games have been proven to increase retention and understanding of ideas. These activities can be more difficult in a larger classroom. For example, Socratic circles would not be as effective with a huge class due to the fact that there is not enough time for each student to fully voice their opinion and contribute a substantial amount to the conversation. In addition to academic development, middle school is also a critical time in children’s social development. There are lots of adolescents that struggle to deal with the social atmosphere of middle school as it is, and the increased size of the grade will make it much more overwhelming. After all, going from a grade size of 60 students in elementary school to over 800 in middle school is a

the

a publication of shawnee mission east high school 7500 Mission Road, Prairie Village, KS 66208

Dan Stewart 

Feb. 7, 2011 Assistant Photo Editor issue 10, vol. 52

Editorial Board Andrew Goble Annie Sgroi Corbin Barnds Logan Heley Kevin Simpson Jennifer Rorie Jack Howland Evan Nichols Kat Buchanan Bob Martin Katy Westhoff Photographers Grant Kendall Sammi Kelley Samantha Bartow Claire Wahrer Caroline Creidenberg Emma Robson Brendan Dulohery Jake Crandall Sara Baumann Ads/Circulation Manager Vanessa Daves Erin Reilly Staff Artists Peter Hung DJ Burton

drastic change. Another major issue of larger class size is the behavioral aspect. Middle school classes often get off topic and out of hand, simply because many students have not yet matured and often prioritize socializing before school. With more students this problem will just become more evident. Teachers will waste even more time than before simply trying to get their classes under control. By closing MVMS, the district is already saving a substantial amount of money, not only from not having to run the building anymore, but also from not having to pay a second principal, custodian, and administrative staff. However, the money saved by not having to pay as many teachers is not worth the problems that would arise from this action. SMSD should hire as many teachers as needed to keep IHMS class sizes at manageable levels next year. Although it will cost a bit more, the long-term benefits are far too important to jeopardize.

Letters to the editor should be sent to room 521 or smeharbinger@gmail.com. Letters may be edited for clarity, length, libel and mechanics and accepted or rejected at the editor’s discretion.

Online Copy Editors Natalie Parker Anne Willman Online Photo Editors Lindsey Hartnett Samantha Bartow Multimedia Editor Maggie Simmons Asst. Multimedia Editors Thomas Allen Nathan Walker Live Broadcast Editor Jeff Cole Asst. Live Broadcast Editors Dalton Boehm Duncan MacLachlan Convergence Editor Maggie Simmons Asst. Convergence Editor Drew Broeckelman Homegrown Editor Mason Pashia Asst. Homegrown Editor Jackson Dalton Podcast Editor Robert Martin Blog Editor Natalie Parker

Video Editor Alex Lamb Multimedia Staff Riley Watson Duncan MacLachlan Natalie Parker Live Broadcast Producers Thomas Allen Tom Lynch Drew Broeckelman Anchors Andrew Simpson Maggie Andriani Chloe Stradinger Becca Brownlee Meagan Dexter Alex Goldman Haley Martin Riley Watson Paige Hess PR Representative/Business Managers Becca Brownlee Meagan Dexter Online Photographers Gail Stonebarger Adviser Dow Tate

Eden Schoofs  Mixed Editor Editors-In-Chief Copy Editors Emily Kerr Andrew Goble Evan Nichols Spread Editors Annie Sgroi Andrew Goble Chloe Stradinger Assistant Editors Annie Sgroi Toni Aguiar Kat Buchanan Kevin Simpson Features Editor Evan Nichols Kat Buchanan Sarah McKittrick Art and Design Editor Jack Howland Features Page Editors Emma Pennington Jennifer Rorie Christa McKittrick Head Copy Editor Logan Heley  Haley Martin Kevin Simpson  Bob Martin Alysabeth Albano Online Editors Matt Gannon A&E Editor Logan Heley Chris Heady Aubrey Leiter Pat McGannon Staff Writers A&E Page Editors Online Assistant Editor Vanessa Daves Kennedy Burgess Maggie Simmons Alex Lamb Tom Lynch News Editor Chris Heady Sports Editor Jack Howland Julia Davis Corbin Barnds News Page Editors Zoe Brian Sports Page Editors Jennifer Rorie Caroline Creidenberg Matt Gannon Editorial Editor Paige Hess Anne Willman Katy Westhoff Holly Hernandez Freelance Page Editors Opinion Editor Kim Hoedel Anna Bernard Raina Weinberg Maggie Andriani Matt Hanson Opinion Page Editors Katie Knight Photo Editors Will Webber Drew Broeckelman Grant Heinlein Anna Marken The Harbinger is a student run publication. The contents and views are produced solely by the staff and do not represent the Shawnee Mission School District, East faculty, or school administration.


08

OPINION

02-07-11

Search...

Staffer struggles to overcome Twitter addiction.

Will Webber @webbgemz

My eyes glaze over as I stare at the trembling, scuffed up Samsung phone in my hands. I rack my brain for just one funny thing to say, one sarcastic comment to get a few laughs from my followers. I haven’t tweeted all day and I’m beginning to feel the withdrawal. Then it hits me. I have a tweet. I vigorously type into the weathered keypad and hit send. Feelings of regret instantly wash over me as I scrutinize my work. Was it funny? Will people understand it? Will they think I’m some kind of freak? If my next tweet is funny, people will forget about the last one. All I need is one more tweet... Maybe it’s the rush of trying to cram my thoughts into the 140 character limit, or the thrill of knowing my followers will instantly read what I have to say. Maybe it’s the yearning for something new and exciting, an escape from my years of Facebook “poke” wars and “like” attacks. The point is, I’m hooked (or as we say on Twitter, #ImHooked). I restrained myself from getting Twitter for quite some time. But day after day I would see the hilarious tweets of Chad Ochocinco and LeBron James, kings of social media, on SportsCenter. Around the beginning of this school year, my friends started tweeting. I seemed to be the last person to find out about school events and themes for games. Not wanting to be out of the loop, I made a Twitter account. When I first created my Twitter in the early days of December, I had very few followers, but I began to receive compliments on my tweets. Soon enough, I was being introduced to people I’ve never met by my Twitter persona, @webbgemz. My tweets defined me. It didn’t matter if I wasn’t a comedian in real life, but on Twitter, I felt constant pressure to make people laugh. Then my December phone bill came; concrete evidence of my addiction. I would be penniless, shoveling every driveway in sight if it weren’t for my unlimited messaging plan. Just one month in, I had become addicted. My parents believed there must have been an error when they saw the number of messages; I had no explanation for the insanity. I overheard on an Oprah episode that thousands of alcoholics had used a 12-step program to quit drinking. With some changes, I hoped it could get me off of Twitter. My name is @webbgemz, and I am a Twitter addict.

Timeline

Profile

Help

During movies people around me have always been annoyed by my perpetual talking (#ImThatGuy). I guess that’s the part of Twitter that appeals to me. Through Twitter, I found a way for people to hear me at all times. Step 5 - Admit to yourself the exact nature of your wrongs. Since creating my account I have lost sight of the purpose of Twitter: community. A self proclaimed “Elitist Tweetist,” I became entirely wrapped up in myself (#OverinflatedEgo). I became selfish and basically acted like God’s gift to Twitter. I constantly urge people to follow me, but often fail to reciprocate the favor. Why should I expect them to care about what I have to say if I won’t take the time to read their tweets? Step 6 - Be entirely ready to remove all these defects of character. This is about more than Twitter. This is my life. I have always been an unfocused, poor listener, and Twitter has only magnified these defects. I wish to be freed from the shackles of Twitter. I am ready for a new life. I could live slowly, but with purpose, focusing on enriching myself. Perhaps I could notice the teacher is asking me a question instead of trying to think of a six letter word for “peak” in the daily crossword, or actually read Huckleberry Finn instead of tweeting my opinion regarding its censorship. There’s a new world waiting for me, and I can’t get in with all these issues. Step 7 - Humbly ask to remove these shortcomings. Save me from myself. Strip me of my hashtags and @ signs and teach me how to listen (#Please). Step 8 - Make a list of all persons you have harmed. (#OhBrother) @webbgemz has done a lot of damage. I have quoted many a teacher out of context, making them look like complete idiots. I have teased my friends on their petty spelling errors. I have neglected Facebook (#SorryZuckerberg). I’ve tweeted about friends who don’t even have Twitter, leaving them defenseless. Worst of all, I have encouraged approximately thirty members of the junior class to join Twitter and exposed them to the addiction which burdens me (#SorryForTweeting). Step 9 - Make direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. I could just stop tweeting, but it’s not that simple. Twitter allows me to delete past tweets, but I don’t have the ability to erase memories (#Yet). I can only apologize. I have already explained to a few of my friends the nature of my addiction and expressed my regret for any tweets that have caused harm. With each day, I will spread my message to more Twitter users. In the past, I criticized my friends’ tweets and noted their lack of humor, but now I see that it was never my place to judge them. In the future, I can just fake a laugh. Next time a friend asks me if they should get a Twitter account, I won’t be so eager to say “yes.” The world doesn’t need another @webbgemz. Step 10 - Recognize the positive effects of your change. I have begun to listen. I’ll admit, it’s not easy to give something my undivided attention, but I am learning a lot more. Taking notes in math instead of playing Angry Birds eliminates the hour I usually spend teaching myself the lesson at home. I can’t figure out everything on my own, and by listening to my friends, family and teachers, I can reach my full potential in the class and in life. As a result, I have become more comfortable with myself. I used to only be happy if I was tweeting, and if I wasn’t tweeting I was talking about tweeting. But I see now that I don’t need @webbgemz. I’ve probably missed out on some serious conversations while expressing my contempt for TBS original programming in 140 characters. I know now that a tweet doesn’t express true feelings. I can talk to my friends, (#NotFacebookFriends) or followers. Step 11 - Improve yourself and search for knowledge. January rolled around and I resolved to tweet only once or twice a day in the new year, only things that really mattered. Within a week, I realized there wasn’t much in daily life that did matter enough to be reported to my followers, and found I didn’t need to tweet at all. It was a major breakthrough, and this time away from Twitter has done me good. Rather than spitting out a stream of witty tweets, I am keeping my thoughts to myself, and I can develop them. I have been thinking about my future, especially college: what I want to study and the field I may enter. It’s a better use of time than imagining what it would be like to have Severus Snape as a chemistry teacher. I have realized my listening problems and selfishness, but also discovered my strengths which Twitter once hindered. I can sit before a blank sheet of paper and fill it with my essays or stories, and it’s a great deal more gratifying than typing a quick tweet. I don’t care if anyone sees it. Step 12 - Having changed, I carry this message to other addicts, and practice these principles in all your affairs. This is not only to the people I signed up, but to everyone who has fallen to the evils of Twitter, Facebook, Myspace or any other poison. Believe me, you don’t need to hear from 90 people that there’s a snow day, look outside your window or turn on the TV long enough to see Shawnee Mission roll through the ticker. Our generation has a serious problem with information overload, and I’m just another statistic. I will make my horror story heard and if I can help one person stop tweeting, then I’ll feel I’ve made an impact.

Step 1 - Admit that you are powerless to your addiction-I was in control when I created my Twitter. I chose when to tweet, what to tweet and who to follow. Now the line between mild-mannered Will Webber and @webbgemz is ever-blurring (#TwitterIsMyLife). I feel the necessity to make my every thought and experience heard and it seems my Twitter account has control of me. Step 2 - Believe that you alone do not have the power to rid yourself of your addiction. I am too weak to kick this Twitter addiction alone. Tweeting has taken a physical toll on me--my eyesight has deteriorated from constantly glaring at a screen (#NewGlasses), the radiation from my phone has surely killed off a few brain cells and my fingers are calloused from beating on the keypad. Unfortunately, I’ve dragged most of my friends with me on this downward social networking spiral. Upon joining Twitter, I noticed a lack of presence from the junior class and began to tirelessly recruit friends. I can’t look to them for help and my family is about as hooked on social networking as I am--my dad burns away his iPhone’s battery by constantly posting on Facebook and my sister sends thousands of texts each month. Social networking is in my blood. Step 3 - Decide to make a change. Ever hear the expression “too much of a good thing?” Well, I’ve taken that to the extreme. I started off as a social tweeter, but now tweet in the double digits on a daily basis (#ModerationFail). I wish to return to my old innocent self and go back to the days of occasionally updating my Facebook status, but I have become immersed in this Twitter world. I recently viewed my tweets collectively on the computer. There on the screen, I saw all the time I had wasted on these meaningless tweets. Beyond the stream of hollow remarks, I saw a boy crying out for help. My work habits had declined. In late December, most students were cramming for finals, but I was wasting my time on Twitter. My test scores were fine, but I am at the breaking point and absolutely need to change. Step 4 - Make a searching and fearless moral inventory of yourself. I have always had issues with talking too much. I still remember idling my recesses away in time out, “thinking about my actions” (#DisruptingTheClass). I wasn’t loud, but I was always These 12 simple steps can go a long way. My name is Will Webber, and I am Twitter free. busy pointing out errors in my teacher’s lessons or making snide jokes.


OPINION

WEEK OF FORTUNE I’m not the biggest fan of Chinese food. I hate half of the traditional Chinese meals, and one time Panda Express gave me extreme food poisoning - but we’re not going an opinion of Aubrey Leiter to go into that. My favorite part of the whole experience is opening the fortune cookie at the end that is supposed to tell what the future has in store for the reader. After hearing about a guy from Kansas City named Matt Kelsey who has made it his goal to open a fortune cookie each day of 2011 and do what it says, I decided I was going to do my own miniature version of just that: I would open a fortune cookie for five days this week and see how it would affect my life.

Day Two There is nothing I hate more then pessimistic people. Not that I never complain, but when people are consistently saying negative phrases like “This sucks,” it makes me furious. After I opened this, I decided I was going to be optimistic all day to spread happiness. It wasn’t hard during the school day, since everyone was so ecstatic about for the Rockhurst vs. East basketball game, and the Chick-fil-a competition had everyone filled with excitement, so I didn’t have to act too different. Then, that night at the game, we found out we lost to the Rockhurst in the Chick-fil-a challenge. Then, we lost the varsity game by one point. Normally after such a close loss, I would’ve been really upset. When the football season ended in the first round of the playoffs, I ended up in tears as my friend and I drove home in silence. This time, it was different. I looked at the whole situation positively by thinking about how Coaches vs. Cancer still raised over $750 and East students contributed almost half of the money raised. And even though we lost, the game was still a blast and we didn’t get killed--it was just a one point loss. I’m not sure if Others will take notice of your being happy all day affected anyone beradiance. Share your happiness sides myself, but I’m glad I opened this fortune on this day.

Day Four Due to extreme laziness and a huge case of senioritis, my senior paper has somewhat been put on the back burner since the start of this semester. I copped out by choosing two books that I had already read. Doing this made me even more behind, because my mindset was, “Aubrey you don’t have to start your research today because you have already read your books,” which ultimately made me start almost a month later then I should have. When I opened this fortune cookie this morning, I knew it was a sign that I needed to get a huge chunk of research for this paper done today. I spent all of the late morning and early afternoon annotating, finding sources and writing my note cards. This fortune couldn’t have come at a better time because I know that if I hadn’t opened it, I would’ve found some excuse to put off doing work for this paper even more. The project definitely gained momentum; this fortune worked in a mysterious way because I probably wouldn’t have A project you have in mind gained any at all if the tiny piece of will soon gain momentum paper hadn’t reminded me.

issue 10

09

Staffer opens a fortune cookie every day for five days and lives her day by what they say

Day One When I opened this fortune this morning, I was very hesitant. I knew I would have to get out of my comfort zone to meet someone new if I was going to actually make a new friend today. I had a feeling random stranger on the street wouldn’t just walk up to me and become my friend. If that did happen, that would be weird...and creepy because not very often, or ever, do people just start casual conversation with a stranger with hope of becoming friends. So tonight, when I went to work out at the YMCA, I was determined to make a friend. The girl next to me on the elliptical looked nice. She looked about 20, was watching E! News (a show I watch religiously) and had a smile on her face. I started up casual conversation. I said, “Hi!” and she responded awkwardly with a hesitant “Hey...” I mentioned the Charlie Sheen debacle, which was the current story on her personal TV, and her one word responses consisting of “Yeah” and a quick giggle made me realize she didn’t want to talk to me. I was about to get off the machine a stranger around you will and move due to the awkward tension, but she beat me to it. My attempt to turn soon become a friend a stranger into a friend actually just made me a creep.

Day Three

Opening this the morning of day three was very coincidental. I planned on spending the afternoon with all of the girls in my extended family to celebrate my birthday and my cousin’s birthday, and random family gatherings like this never happen. With everyone in my family being busy with work, sports and friends, major holidays are usually the only time we get to see each other. The fact that I opened this fortune on this day freaked me out. It was definitely a wake-up call. The day we spent together was much needed, and a blast. We ate lunch at the Cheesecake Factory and talked for a couple hours. I was able to spend time with people I only get to see three times a year. It made me realize that spending time with my family should be a higher priority than it has been and that I need to take the time to plan days like this more often. This fortune was deadon.

Today is a lucky day for those who remain cheerful and optimistic

Day Five When I opened this fortune on day five it made me laugh. How much more luck can you get then having a snow day? So yes, I would consider this a lucky day. Yesterday, everyone was questioning if we would have the day off or not and saying things like, “I bet the storm goes north of us and we get two inches.” But I remained positive. Remaining cheerful and optimistic has definitely paid off. Even though there was two feet of snow surrounding my slug-bug, which makes it virtually impossible for me to leave my house, I had the opportunity to catch up on a few things, including the pressing amount of DVR I had to watch. Any day where I can be lazy and watch TV all day is a lucky day for me.

Today is a lucky day for those who remain cheerful and optimis-


10

FEATURES

02-07-11

FIGHTING FOR HOPE Junior copes with mom’s struggle with cancer ToniAguiar

Julie Lee carefully bends over the square of floral patterned paper as her unpainted fingernails press down on the folds of the paper. Forgetting that a dark brown knit cap covers her head, she absent-mindedly reaches up to touch the leftover wisps of dark hair on her forehead before lowering her hand. Her gold wedding band, flashing in the sun, sits aside a purple silicone bracelet bearing the message “HOPE.” She reaches out to her son, junior John Lee, as he walks by and pats him on the shoulder, smiling. As she continues to fold, stopping occasionally to ask her friends for direction, a delicate paper crane takes shape under her hands. These cranes symbolize hope and healing, the connection between Heaven and Earth, and the faith community that has helped her through the past couple months. Since Julie was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer three months ago, the Lee family has clung to hope. On a sunny November day, John pulled into his driveway and saw two unexpected cars in the driveway: Village Presbyterian Church pastor Tom Are’s silver Buick and his grandma’s white Lexus. Thoughts raced through his head. Did something happen to my grandfather? What’s happening? Why is Pastor Are’s car here? His family, gathered around their small round kitchen table, shared the news as openly as they could: his mother had a pancreatic tumor. From that moment on, the Lees have tried to stay positive as Julie battled the tumor that had already traveled to her lungs and liver. “John is pretty positive; he’s my cheerleader,” Julie said, tears welling up. “He’s always looks at this situation as a battle, as something that we’re going to get through.” John has stepped forward as a leader in his household in the past few months. He has accepted more responsibility around the house, doing laundry and taking care of his little brother Evan, an eighth-grader. Of course, there are still chores to be done and small disagreements— Mom, can I miss school for the Big 12 Games? Um, no, I don’t think so— but there’s a change in the tone of the relationship. Hugs aren’t taken for granted, small arguments no longer turn into yelling matches, and gone are interrogations about Friday night plans. “We don’t fight anymore, but it’s more than that; I respect her more,” John said. “There’s a chance that I won’t have her around.” The knowledge that his mom is battling stage-four pancreatic cancer follows him throughout his day and is evident in his thoughts and actions, in the way he talks to his friends and in the way he responds to questions at youth group. When asked on a recent ski trip with Village about living in the moment and his favorite time of his life, he responded with, “I wish we could go back to the way things were. You know… the good ole’ days.” Not only does John deal with the normal day-to-day events of teenage life—swim practice, going to church, memorizing the unit circle and watching KU basketball—he balances his school and social life with the life at home punctuated by both good and bad news, tumor markers, chemotherapy and visits from people at church. The more he focuses on the other parts of life, the better it seems. The hardest things have been small jolts of reality. “I don’t know why, but just having her lose her hair made it all real,” John said. “One day I came home from swimming, and it was halfway gone.” It’s the support network of church, family and most importantly, friends and classmates who have experienced similar situations that help John get through those harsh moments. With the development of his mother’s cancer, John has changed in the way he is affected by his friends’ reactions to the cancer. At first, John only told the two friends he was

Junior John Lee talks to his mom about her cancer. Julie Lee was diagnosed with cancer three months ago. all photos by Toni Aguiar

closest to. “I didn’t want to be the kid you feel sorry for,” John said. “The kid whose mom has cancer.” But when something like this occurs, the word moves fast and people move to help in any way they can. The first Sunday after the Lees got the news, they went to church. No one meant for it to be too much. But in that morning alone, John recalls, 30 or 40 people approached him with words of comfort. It’s been progressively easier for John to talk about it and accept the support of his friends. “My friends have been good to me,” John said. “My friend, [junior] Chris [Heady], would call me every day. It got to the point where I had told him he could stop.” John’s situation with his mom’s cancer has prompted other students with similar experiences to step forward. The situation that students are thrust into when loved ones have cancer both distances them from their peers and draws them closer to their friends. Junior Tyler Germann, looking back on his mother’s breast cancer, reflects on how hard it was during that time simply not to know how things would work out. “It changed me, and made me a part of a different group of people,” Germann said. “It makes me feel for John, but it’s hard because pancreatic cancer is so different from breast cancer.” As with the Lees, Village Presbyterian Church was a place of love and safety for Germann when his mom had breast cancer. The church was the place where he could come and feel safe to talk about his mother. Village considers its role to be one of being present when people need help, whether it is through prayer, bringing meals to families, providing helpers or simply being there when just getting through the day feels like too much to handle. “Lord God, calm now. Heal now. Love now. Just as Julie is wrapped in this quilt stitched with love, and as she is surrounded with our presence now, enfold Julie in your care, O God, hold her tight to you.” These words rang out in the simple, white sanctuary of Village Presbyterian Church on the prayer service held for Julie on Dec. 10. Around 150 people met at the church and spent the evening singing hymns, reading Scripture and praying for Julie. At the end, they wrapped her in a multi-

colored quilt that had been made for her and prayed for her strength and for the future. Her faith has grown through this time, as she has asked questions about the nature of her faith and read the Bible. “I don’t think she interprets this as God’s will for her,” Village Presbyterian Church pastor Meg Peery McLaughlin said. “She doesn’t think that God gave it or will take her away, but she has felt God’s presence through the outpouring of love for her.” Even with immense support she’s received, there are some things that just can’t be fixed with a hug or a word of encouragement. Julie isn’t able to do things that are viewed as chores to most parents, things like going to Enrollment Night for Evan, or running errands all day. She can’t eat until she takes pancreatic enzymes that aid her digestion. She makes plans in anticipation of canceling them. And each day, Julie tries not to focus on the disheartening statistics about pancreatic cancer or the reasons why. “I have said, ‘Why me?’ because I have absolutely none of the factors for pancreatic cancer,” Julie said. “But in the same breath, I’ve said, ‘Why anybody?” What she’s going through now has made Julie more aware of other families who have struggled through the same thing. Watching her friends effortlessly reach out to her has made an impact upon her and reminded her how to be a good friend. Laughter is often the best way for Julie to fight the sadness and the pain. Some comes in the form of comedic relief, such as when her husband puts on her wig to make her giggle. Some comes in a return to the old days, when she went to her sister’s house and danced all night to old high school favorite like “Don’t Leave Me This Way.” Sometimes it’s a card, or prayer or a greeting from her sons. There will always be valleys, and bad days, but there will also always be her family and her friends and her faith. “I fight feeling blue more than anything, because that’s when the fears come in,” Julie said. “I’m more scared when I think about the future for my family and my loved ones. No matter what, I have faith in God that we will get through this.”


FEATURES issue 10

11

Otzen rehearses a song for a school production. Otzen went to a specialty music school which performed for schools around the area.

courtesy of Christian Otzen

MollyHowland

ChristaMcKittrick

As soon as Danish exchange student Christian Otzen heard the news that East put on a musical, he was excited and knew he would join. When he learned the musical would be “Beauty and the Beast,” he was ecstatic and couldn’t wait to audition. A big theatre back in Denmark had performed the same musical, and Otzen had loved it. He was eager to take part in East’s version and he immediately began preparing his audition song: “Be Our Guest.” Otzen practiced the lyrics until he was practicing every night before his audition. He went into the audition confident and was rewarded with the role of a dancer. Acting and dancing isn’t new for Otzen; he has a history of performing in plays, dances and short movies in Denmark. Four years ago, Otzen got the rare chance to act in two short films. The films depicted bullying and child care and were shown to schools around the country. The first movie focused on a boy who went around bullying other kids and it was a choose-your-own-ending. During the movie there would be a situation and three choices, each choice leading to a different outcome and different storyline. Otzen played a boy in one of the gangs. The second movie was basically the same, except it was about care for children; Otzen played a boy who was abused by his dad. For those picturing Hollywood lights and fancy staging, it’s nothing of the sort. The movies were filmed in a simple club with a couple cameras. “It’s not the same level as Hollywood, don’t think about it like that,” Otzen said. “It’s just some cameras and that’s it and then some people.” Along with these short films, Otzen has been in several plays back in Denmark, with the most notable being Odense

Denmark

denmark drama straight from

Foreign exchange student Christian Otzen rehearses for his role as a dancer in “Beauty and the Beast.” Otzen acted in several productions in his home country of Denmark.

I mean it’s not that big of a difference—we don’t do anything special [in Denmark]. I never really noticed something special or anything because the people that are there have the same interests as you—to make a performance. There’s nothing special back home that we don’t do here. Maybe the only thing that is special back home is that we perform outdoors.

Foreign exchange student brings acting experience to the musical Theatre’s production of “A Christmas Carol.” While Otzen was attending a special dance school, the director for the show came in one day and asked him if he would like to be in his play. Otzen immediately said yes. The cast was made up of about 20 actors, including Otzen, playing many different roles. Otzen was cast as several small parts and even had a couple lines. After performing in these Danish productions, Otzen has enjoyed taking part in an American musical. Otzen said Danish and American musicals are very similar. “I mean it’s not that big of a difference,” Otzen said. “We don’t do anything special. What you do in a musical or play or whatever is you come, you rehearse, you produce and make it as good as possible so the audience will like it.” The only minor difference is that all of the big shows in Denmark are put on in the summer and are performed outdoors. For those in the East musical, it has been a fun experience to perform with Otzen. Junior Meghan Spivak has noticed how he really gets into the role he is playing. “In the Gaston scene at the bar, he’s just wild and crazy,” Spivak said. “It’s really funny and he fills the scene. He really develops a distinct character that he keeps throughout the show instead of just getting into the character in the scene. He develops his own part.” Otzen first got the idea to be an exchange student when he learned one of his very best friends from Denmark was planning to go to Brazil as an exchange student. “I think if he could be an exchange student then so could I,” Otzen said. Otzen waited a year before applying to be an exchange

student, but he sent in his application a day late so he wasn’t sure he would be accepted. One by one, the programs he applied to said no, since he was too late. One Saturday morning, Otzen lay sleeping in bed when his phone began ringing with a call. “I picked up the phone and said, ‘Yeah, hello, who’s this?” Otzen said. “And they said, ‘Yeah, you sent me an application form to be an exchange student,’ and I just jumped out of bed and said, ‘Yes! Yes! That’s me!” Rotary Youth Exchange Program had an opening for Otzen if he wanted it, and Otzen could hardly contain his excitement. Otzen had heard of Kansas as a state, but he had no idea what it was famous for. Like any teen would do, Otzen got on the computer to see where he would be living for almost a year. “I looked [Kansas] up on Google and I went to images and I saw lots of pictures of ‘Wizard of Oz,” Otzen said. “I just didn’t get why there were so many pictures of this ‘Wizard of Oz.” When Google failed to give Otzen insight to his future home, he turned to YouTube. “I searched for Kansas and there was something about cheerleaders and I thought, ‘Oh, maybe they have some good cheerleaders there,” Otzen said. Otzen has found more than Wizard of Oz and cheerleaders here in Prairie Village; in the musical, he’s found a group of friends in the cast he can relate to and enjoy. Surrounded by all the new experiences in America, returning to the theatre is a welcome comfort.

stages

America

comparing the

a look at the performing Otzen has done in Denmark and America

“Beauty and the Beast” is a very good musical, of course. It’s very hard to produce because there are so many details you have to notice, and also there are songs that are very hard. Everyone’s been doing hard work. It’s not drama all the time; it’s funny most of the time too, so it’s a very good musical that anyone can see.


FEATURES

02-07-11

Continued from page 1 “I was born in Wyandotte county,” Bowie said. “I’ve always been there, but for somebody that don’t know, they don’t wanna go there.” A long-time hip-hop fan, it was at 13-years-old that Bowie tried performing some of his written lyrics for the first time. Using the basic recording software “Cool Edit Pro,” he created his first track, “Stay The Same,” on his home computer. Lyrically, Bowie kept his music consistent with the thoughts in his head. Reality and his experiences both good and bad were all fair game. It just had to be the truth. “Everything that I say, I’m serious about, because it’s stuff I probably don’t want to talk about,” Bowie said. This becomes apparent after only a few listens, in songs like “Watch Me from Heaven,” dedicated to his grandmother. “I know it’s been hard over these long years, but no more tears if I tell you how I feel,” sings Bowie. Moving into the eighth grade, he would develop his name as an artist and start to find his voice as Yung Dre. By October, under the lights of the all-school talent show, Bowie was on stage performing for a full room of classmates and parents, an experience he references as both boosting his confidence and making his presence as an artist more legitimate in the eyes of his peers. *** Promoting himself through both a Facebook fan page and a self-run YouTube channel featuring nearly 40 songs, Bowie is do-

BUILDING THE BEAT ing everything in his power to get his name out and follow up on a dream he mentions in countless songs--getting signed by a record label. This is a pursuit he has actively worked on for about a year, at one point even speaking briefly with local rap sensation Tech N9ne’s label “Strange Music” about what it would take to make a record. Social networking is Bowie’s hub for everything as an independent artist. All four of his mixtapes have been advertised here, along with links to songs on each. Going on the theme of color, each of “Yung Dre’s” album titles and covers are based on a different pastel. His most recent release, “Red Rose Champion,” still recorded on Bowie’s home computer, was ready in November, and features Yung Dre on the front surrounded by a swirl of the dark, thorny flowers. Even without a tangible deal, Bowie is serious about frequently releasing new Yung Dre songs and getting feedback from fans who have found him online. There’s even the girl in Florida who went so far as to get his named tattooed on her neck, a picture he

proudly displays on his Facebook page. This moderate success hasn’t changed the freshman’s hardworking attitude, one that his English teacher, Meredith Birt, believes will take him far. “I’ve never heard him complain, and I’ve never heard him say ‘I can’t do this,’ and I can’t say this enough, he’s extremely dedicated,” Birt said. Birt went as far as to purchase Bowie’s most recent release and fourth mixtape to show her support for a student who she believes is completely capable of achieving everything he has set out to do. “He has a goal,” Birt said. “He’s going to get an ‘A’ in my class, he’s going to be a rap artist, and he’s going to do it, and that’s how it’s gonna be.” *** “I’m confident in the work I do. Yeah, I’m still true, even after what I been through, living life on a journey, even though I’m so worthy,” rhymes Yung Dre in the thoughtprovoking “Dear God” from his “Red Rose” album.

Only in his first year at East, Bowie is still finding his place in a school that’s worlds apart from where he comes from. He also hasn’t received unanimous support for his music or ideas. Not everyone understands Bowie, he’s doesn’t fall into the normal East demographic, and some don’t take the idea of a freshman rapper seriously, but it doesn’t matter. He’s doing what feels right. “People choose to dislike me, ‘cause they think I’m just ghetto, that’s not how I am at all,” Bowie said. “I’m just going to tell you what’s real about Wyandotte County.” That’s all he ever planned on doing: telling the truth, and writing songs about what has happened or what he believes will happen. Making a living off of music may be a distant vision, but with every new song, Bowie moves a little further past the struggles in his life, and a little closer to the dream. “All this music is just a must, I’m gon’ make it, and that I trust,” Bowie raps, in Red Rose’s fitting finisher, “Music is my passion”.

Reason for the Words Yung Dre talks about the meaning behind some of his raps Dear, God:

That’s a big part of me that I let the world know and how dedicated I am about this music. I just won’t stop. It tells about my feelings here and there about how I feel about music.”

Bad Girl Twerk:

One of my new songs is called “Bad Girl Twerk” - mostly a song for partying and a fun song to perform and hype up everybody. I love to perform to make me into a better performer and to get my music out.”

GrantHeinlein

12

My Super Woman:

Basically, it’s a song that girls would like. I’m really nice to girls and I write a lot of songs for them, but that would probably be my best pick.”


10% off cosmetics and jewelry Expires: October 18, 2010

www.smeharbinger.net


14

FEATURES

02-07-11

a glance into the life of

hawar khalandi Biology teacher spent her childhood in Iran

CarolineCreidenberg

CorbinBarnds

First year biology teacher Hawar Khalandi gets her toughness from her father. The same toughness that her father used to change their lives 16 years ago. In 1979, Iran’s monarchy under Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was overthrown and replaced by an Islamic republic under Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Along with numerous other American traits, Iran was loose on the religions practiced in the country. With a desire to get back to their former traditional ways, riots and protests arose; very quickly the revolution caused the government to change to a republic. Immediately after the new government grabbed their foothold, things started to change. Islam was the religion chosen by the republic and quickly, any Iranian against it was pushed out of the country or else they were “taken care of” by the government. After the initial transition period, common belief was that the repercussions of the revolution were over. Fifteen years later, people were still disappearing. Khalandi’s father was never an overly religious person, but he didn’t want to hide his beliefs from the government. This refusal was not tolerated—Iran wanted him out. He was left with no choice; he had to flee the country that his family had called home for generations. He snuck out of the country to go to Turkey with the hope that the United Nations would accept him. If not, he would be forced to stay in Iran. The United Nations accepted his application and several months later, the Khalandis got the OK to relocate to Turkey. Only 12 years old at the time, Khalandi didn’t pick up on what was happening. “We were just told, that we were going to start a better life, and move to a better country,” Khalandi said. “That was all I needed to know and at that time, I didn’t ask any questions. We just did it.” The Khalandis were forced to start a new life, even though they were just a country away from their home. Everything was temporary because at any moment the UN could reassign them to their permanent location; it could have been the next day, month or year. As time passed, the family became accustomed to life in Turkey. They picked up enough of the language to make due and they made friends with the neighbors next door by playing games with them, just like they would with their friends left back in Iran.

Khalandi’s two favorite Iranian music groups are Googoosh and Omid.

Two years later they got the call; their time had come to start their new life in America. Everything the Khalandis could put their name to lay in one suitcase. They were set to live in the confines of a two bedroom apartment in Missouri. “All I knew of America was that Michael Jackson lives in America,” Khalandi said. “Coming to America, I would talk to [my half-brother] on the phone and say, ‘You know, I’m here where Michael Jackson is.” Right away, Khalandi was placed into high school as a freshman without knowing any English and having no idea about what she was about to encounter. She cried out to her father, pleading to not make her go to school that day. Her father had his way, and as soon as she entered school, Khalandi experienced a culture shock. It was there that she realized how difficult her assimilation to American culture would be, unlike Turkey. American life had zero similarities to her old life in Iran. In Iran, schools, along with many other facets of life, were segregated and in public there was never even a slight sign of affection towards another. During her first walk down the hallway, Khalandi saw some things that she never anticipated and never thought possible. Her eyes caught glimpses of numerous pregnant students walking the halls, along with the frequent sight of couples making out in public sight. For her first year in high school, Khalandi was mainly an observer. Trying to grasp the American way of life, and how to survive through high school. “I loved school in Iran and was always a straight A student,” Khalandi said. “If you can imagine going to class every single day where you can’t understand what the teacher is saying, what the students are saying, what everyone is doing. I would have no idea what was going on; I would just sit quietly in my little chair.” Early on, Khalandi struggled and she would frequently tell her father that she was finished with school and that she never wanted to go back. But her father would always remind her of her future and how she needed to have a degree. Khalandi was enrolled in three standard classes to go along with four classes in the ESL program. These classes were intended to help her learn English and get acclimated to American life. Another benefit of the program was that these second language students could meet people to whom they could relate; although they may be coming from countries on opposite sides of the world, they are both completely in

Khalandi’s

favorite

things from Iran

a new element. Almost immediately, Khalandi became friends with her fellow students in the ESL program. Just like her, they were learning little pieces of the language, step-by-step. Together, they had someone with whom they could relate, eat lunch and hang out. The program required dedication from the students. What would be one homework assignment turned into three for Khalandi, since she had to translate every assignment to Iranian, do the work and then translate it back to English. “It was really hard but I think if you are put in that situation you either quit or you learn how to survive,” Khalandi said. After two years in the ESL program, Khalandi went through a normal high school schedule. Not only did she graduate, but she also finished in the top 10 percent of her class. The process to become “American” was one fueled mainly by her father. Khalandi’s father was driven to succeed in his new country, and he wanted to make sure his children had all of the opportunities they needed. He kept them focused on the ultimate goal, and to Khalandi, he led by example. Whenever her father wasn’t working, he would pick up one of the numerous dictionaries lying around his house and would translate books, newspapers and magazines just for practice. His goal was to be a business owner, and to get there, he worked as a porter in a casino. After only six months, he started his own transportation business. Khalandi was inspired by her former ESL teacher, Sarah Boyd. “She was so passionate and she loved her job and she just loved all of her students and she did her best to do her job,” Khalandi said. “That to me was an eye-opening experience. I just wanted to be someone like her, who made a difference because she made a difference in my life. I just wanted to do the same thing for kids in the future.” Sixteen years after she had left her home country, Khalandi is now married. Although she can only make it back to see her family around once a year, Facebook has helped bridge that gap. “I’m an Iranian-American,” Khalandi said. “I have been away from that culture and tradition for so long but I can’t say I’m fully an American, so I’m an Iranian-American and that’s awesome.”

Her mom brought one thing from Iran, a jewelry box.

Khalandi visits her family in Tabriz, Iran. www.morguefile.com


FEATURES

Grecian odyssey

issue 10

15

English teachers are in the midst of planning a trip to Greece for their students ZoeBrian

Large block letters sprawl across the white board in room 523: “Ask Me About Greece!” As students chatter before the bell rings, Honors English 10 teacher Spring Gehring-Lowery, more commonly known as G-Lo, is preparing yet another lesson on Greek mythology. But this lesson involves more than just reading books and taking quizzes. This lesson includes traveling the world and experiencing Greece first-hand. Using the tour program Education First, Gehring-Lowery has planned a trip to Greece that will take place from June 23 through July 7, and is open to all East students. Gehring-Lowery is hoping this will give students a different perspective on Greek literature, a subject studied in nearly every grade. “Students shouldn’t just learn from books,” Gehring-Lowery said. “They should have a chance to really see and interact with the culture. I want [students] to taste the food and see the sights, and do things that they can’t in a classroom. With this trip, I’m hoping students can experience something they wouldn’t otherwise have a chance to.” Having worked in an underprivileged school in Texas, Gehring-Lowery understands the trouble students have trying to understand Greek literature. At East, she decided to take it upon herself to get students involved in a different way: with travel. After asking fellow teachers, Gehring-Lowery narrowed the selection down to two companies: Education First Tours and American Center for International Studies Tours. After researching both companies, Gehring-Lowery decided on the Education First Tours based on recommendations from previous student and teacher customers. She also chose Education First due to their wide array of trips and their reasonable pricing. Gehring-Lowery chose a tour complete with guides, meals and passes to museums. The tour includes visiting the Greek cities Athens and Delphi as well as a three-day cruise tour of the Grecian Islands. Along with seeing sites such as the Oracle of Apollo and the Temple of Zeus, students have free passes to museums and all breakfast and dinners are included. Before she knew it, Gehring-Lowery was filling out the registration form and answering questions about herself as a teacher and why this trip would be good for students. Weeks later she learned that the information she provided she filled out would reshape the entire trip. “A woman from EF called and said ‘Spring, you won!” Geh-

Travel Itinerary

Day 1 Fly overnight to Greece in Athens and take Day 2 Arrive a walking tour of the city Day 3

ring-Lowery said. “I didn’t even know I had entered a contest. I remember filling out a box about why I wanted to take the students, but I don’t even remember what I said.” The woman explained that along with the information she’d given, Gehring-Lowery had entered for a chance to win a $12,000 grant towards her trip. EF only bestows scholarship when they think they’ve found a teacher who deserves it. “The woman who called had to explain to me that I had just won $12,000 for the trip,” Gehring-Lowery said. “I was the first person to win in years and it was completely accidental. I think [the woman from EF] was more excited than I was. She kept saying, ‘We’ve never had someone win before! This is so incredible!” But this posed another challenge for Gehring-Lowery: how to distribute the money. After recovering from the shock of winning, Gehring-Lowery read the rules and regulations of how she could disperse the grant and decided that the best course of action would be to hold an essay writing contest for the students. Two students would win completely free trips to Greece, priced through the tour at around $3,700, first runner up would be given $2,500 while the second and third runners-up would win around $1,100 each. “I wanted as many people as possible to benefit,” GehringLowery said, “Hopefully students who wouldn’t otherwise be able to go will get a chance to have this amazing opportunity.” Students are being asked to write an essay of no more than 700 words explaining why they think they deserve to win the trip and many students have expressed interest. But GehringLowery isn’t looking for the most eloquent paper or the longest one. In fact, she won’t be reading them at all. “I’m getting together a panel of judges,” Gehring-Lowery said. “Some might be English teachers and some won’t be. I hope students will write about personal reasons as well as educational and monetary. The whole point is to give it to someone who deserves it, not necessarily the person with the best writing.” Sophomore Matti Hayes, one of Gehring-Lowery’s current students, is a contestant in the essay writing competition. “I’m really interested in the trip because I want to study abroad in college and I think this will be a good introduction,” Hayes said. “I’m relying heavily on the essay contest because [I’m] not really sure if we can afford it otherwise.” And while it seems the trip would have a syllabus, Geh-

Day 4 Tour Athens Day 5 Take a guided tour of Delphi and view the Temple of Apollo

Parthenon: day 3

Day

“The other place I am so excited for is the Temple of Apollo. There is something about actually standing on the same streets as literary greats and characters that connects you to the literature, making it unforgettable and giving you a deeper understanding of the true nature of the story that was being told.” -Birt Take a guided tour of Epidaurus and Mycenae

6 Tour Olympia and visit the Olympia Museum

“I want to go to the Olympic Stadium; it’s so historical and you know, what an amazing piece of history to go and actually say- I’ve been there, I’ve see that.” - Spring Gehring- Lowery

“I am excited to see the Parthenon in Athens. I think I have watched every available History Channel special about this place and the amazing feat of architecture that it is. The idea of actually being able to stand before it makes me smile. It’s one of those sites in the world that I can’t imagine not going to see at least all photos courtesy of morguefile.com once in my life.” -Meredith Birt

ring-Lowery is not requiring any reading or essay writing to be completed during the trip. “I think the trip itself will be enough,” Gehring-Lowery said. “It’d be great if students brought a journal or diary, but I am not requiring them to do any reading or writing. I’m confident they’ll learn from their surroundings.” If student turnout exceeds six people, as Gehring-Lowery is hoping it will, IB English 11 teacher Meredith Birt will also be chaperoning the trip. Birt is an avid traveler herself, having traveled to Italy and France among other countries. She feels that traveling is essential to all student’s learning experience, so when Gehring-Lowery approached her, there was no hesitation. “I thought it was a great idea because every freshman is required to read the ‘Odyssey,’ and from then on, we only do more work with Greek literature,” Birt said. “It’s really important to walk the streets with these people. It’s necessary for people to get out there and see the world they live in.” Aside from experiencing other cultures and learning about literature’s “birthplace,” Birt feels that this trip will affect students outside the English classroom. “Traveling can extend into so many other classrooms,” Birt said. “It can be applied to social studies, foreign languages and every day life. [Everyone] needs to see and explore the world we live in. I can’t say enough about how it benefits students.” As of Jan. 31 Gehring-Lowery has no registrations or essays submitted, and with the recent snow-days finds herself moving the deadline to a later date. Yet with the essay deadline so close at hand she is expecting a flood of entries. “While I haven’t received any registrations or essays yet I’m hoping for a reasonable turnout,” Gehring-Lowery said. “If we don’t get enough students [the trip] won’t happen. [The students] are all waiting to see if they won the trip.” Even though a registration deadline has been set for Feb. 9, Birt says that students can continue to approach her and Gehring-Lowery and register in special cases. As more and more students trickle in, Gehring-Lowery and Birt prepare for essays, arrangements and, above all, adventure. But when it comes to speaking the language, Gehring-Lowery has a more relaxed attitude. “I won’t have time for classes,” Gehring-Lowery said, “but maybe I’ll pick up ‘Greek: For Dummies.”

Day 7 Day 8 Visit Cape Sounion and the Temple of Poseidon Days 9 11 Take a cruise around the Greek islands of Mykonos, Patmos, Crete and Santorini

Santorini: days 9-11

“I also want to go to Santorini. It’s one of the Greek isles where you can ride the donkeys up and watch the sunset from the mountain top. That’s the place that artists have been inspired due to its magnificent location; it’s supposed to be gorgeous.” -Gehring-Lowery

Day12Fly back to the US


16

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BUILDING A RELATIONSHIP

2-07-11

issue 10

17

one piece at a time Junior’s relationship with her Autistic brother teaches her maturity and acceptance

KimHoedel Alex leans against the couch in his classic Lionel Richie pose, leaning on his side with one leg bent at the knee sticking out into the air and watches as his sister, junior Maddy Pigeon, leads a stranger through their front door and escorts her to the couch Alex is laying on. Alex plays with the buttons on his Hawaiian shirt for a while before beginning to push himself up from the sinking couch cushion he broke last year. Alex makes eye contact with the new person in the room who’s chatting with his sister and says “Hi there!” “He is just like any other teenage boy,” Maddy said. “He just does things in a very autistic way.” Alex is 16. When he was three, he was diagnosed with severe autism and mental retardation. Autism is a developmental disorder that hinders social and communication skills. Alex’s autism not only affects him; it has permanently altered Maddy’s life. Maddy can remember in grade school when kids at recess would run away because they had heard there was something wrong with her brother and were afraid they might catch it. Even adults at times react poorly to Alex’s condition. Once, at Winstead’s, when Maddy took Alex out to dinner, a man sitting at the table nearby lashed out at Alex when Alex ran up and touched the side of the man’s plate. After Maddy explained to the man that Alex was autistic and meant no harm, the man proceeded to scold her for ever bringing someone “like him” out in the first place. Maddy took her glass of water from the table and dumped it over the man’s food. Maddy thinks people her age are more understanding and empathetic of people with autism. When she tells people now that her brother is autistic, they have a better grasp of what that means and what it entails. All of Maddy’s friends know Alex and enjoy being around him. Granted, it is not hard to get along with Alex. Unlike many autistic people who are very introverted, Alex is extremely social. He loves greeting people and he eagerly seeks out eye

contact. his parents couldn’t, like how to interact with his Recently, while in BCBG waiting for Maddy peers. to find her perfect WPA shoes, Alex sat in a “I feel like I have already gone through the chair squeezing a stuffed ostrich he had brought process of raising a child,” Maddy said. along. When a man walked by, Alex extended And she isn’t finished. For the rest of her life, the ostrich to him with both hands. The man Maddy will assume the task of being in charge took the bird with a mix of confusion and grati- of her brother: making sure he has a safe place tude, apparently recognizing Alex’s condition. to live, being there when he asks for something The man held the bird for a while then tried to and making sure he is alright. No matter where return it to Alex. Alex refused the offer and sat she is in her life, she will always have to be there smiling up at the man watching for him. him hold the ostrich. “For the rest of my life, I am going “It is like his token of appreto have to make sure he is clothed,” ciation towards people,” Maddy He is just like any other Maddy said. said. Having an autistic brother to take teenage boy. He just Despite his sweet disposicare of has matured Maddy beyond does things in a very her years. Maddy remembers being tion, his lack of understanding autistic way. of behavioral norms leads him in middle school and having the perJunior Maddy Pigeon to break things without remorse. sonality of a 25-year-old when she During the summer, Alex’s was at home. mother let him sit in their parked minivan and “Whereas he is the eternal two-year-old, I pretend to drive while she did yard work. Later, had to mature quickly because I had no other she discovered that Alex had broken off both the choice,” Maddy said. turn signal and the gear shift. Maddy’s maturity has helped her to underAlex’s tendency to break things causes his stand and accept people’s different reactions tofamily to refer to him as the “household terror- ward her brother. Maddy gets pity from a lot of ist,” but he has never struck a family member. At peers when she first tells them about her brothtimes, though, he turns his strength on himself. er, but she knows that they just don’t know any Out of confusion and frustration caused by other way to react. She understands that their being unable to understand the world around reactions are human nature. him, Alex hits himself. His hitting himself has “They are teenagers, they don’t even undercaused a slight depression on his forehead the stand struggles in their own life,” Maddy said. “How are they supposed to understand the strugsize an egg. One night while Maddy was watching him, gles of a sister with an autistic brother?” While Maddy’s mom considers the word Alex began beating himself on the head in a fit of frustration. Maddy tried all she could to stop ‘retarded’ the R-word, just as offensive as the him, but nothing was working. Finally, she ran N-word, it doesn’t bother Maddy in everyday to her kitchen to find a roll of Gaff tape and two conversation--as long as it isn’t directed toward oven mitts. Maddy grabbed his arms and taped anyone with special needs. Maddy is very religious, and believes that the mitts onto his hands to protect him. Maddy is used to taking care of Alex and feels God brought Alex into her life because she and like she really plays a sort of secondary-mother her family were the best people for him. Maddy role in his life. She knows that whatever he is do- looks at Alex as a blessing that has helped her ing takes priority over what she is doing. Maddy to understand the people and the world around has been there for him to teach him the things her.

“God created Alex because he is the perfect Alex Pigeon,” Maddy said. Even though Maddy is accepting of her brother, that doesn’t mean there aren’t times where he makes her nervous. Earlier this year Maddy’s parents brought Alex to watch Maddy perform in “Machinal,” an intense suspenseful drama put on by East’s theater department. “I was so worried that during that dead silence at the end, Alex was just going to yell, ‘Hi there!’” Maddy said. Often, the recipients of Alex’s exuberant “Hi there!” are pretty women. Once, while stopped at a light on Mission Road, Alex turned and looked at the car next to him to see a goodlooking girl staring back at him. When the light turned green and Alex’s dad began to accelerate, the girl in the car over accelerated at the same rate to keep eye contact with Alex. “He is a complete ladies’ boy,” Maddy said. Maddy can see the true teenage boy in Alex: the way he acts around the house and his prominent mannerisms remind her of any other teenager. “I can see the ‘bro’ in him,” Maddy said. While at times Alex may seem like an ordinary teenager, the truth is that he is not. Due to his autism, there are many things in life Alex will never have. “I will never be an aunt,” Maddy says. “I will never see my brother have children.” But there is one thing Alex won’t miss out on: Maddy is planning on taking Alex to her senior prom. “I think he’ll look smashing in a tux,” Maddy said.

EdenSchoofs EdenSchoofs

there’s NOT a

EdenSchoofs

known cause for

there are no TESTS to diagnose

AUTISM

about

FACTS about

Autism

the AUTISM AWARENESS ribbon The puzzle pattern reflects the mystery and complexity of the autism spectrum.

fastest

GROWING

developemental

disability

between and

1.5 1million Americans have AUTISM

photo courtesy of Maddy Pigeon

occurs in of births

1 110

AUTISM

the MOTTO of

the AUTISM SOCIETY is improving the lives of all affected by Autism

www.autism-society.org


16

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SPREAD

BUILDING A RELATIONSHIP

2-07-11

issue 10

17

one piece at a time Junior’s relationship with her Autistic brother teaches her maturity and acceptance

KimHoedel Alex leans against the couch in his classic Lionel Richie pose, leaning on his side with one leg bent at the knee sticking out into the air and watches as his sister, junior Maddy Pigeon, leads a stranger through their front door and escorts her to the couch Alex is laying on. Alex plays with the buttons on his Hawaiian shirt for a while before beginning to push himself up from the sinking couch cushion he broke last year. Alex makes eye contact with the new person in the room who’s chatting with his sister and says “Hi there!” “He is just like any other teenage boy,” Maddy said. “He just does things in a very autistic way.” Alex is 16. When he was three, he was diagnosed with severe autism and mental retardation. Autism is a developmental disorder that hinders social and communication skills. Alex’s autism not only affects him; it has permanently altered Maddy’s life. Maddy can remember in grade school when kids at recess would run away because they had heard there was something wrong with her brother and were afraid they might catch it. Even adults at times react poorly to Alex’s condition. Once, at Winstead’s, when Maddy took Alex out to dinner, a man sitting at the table nearby lashed out at Alex when Alex ran up and touched the side of the man’s plate. After Maddy explained to the man that Alex was autistic and meant no harm, the man proceeded to scold her for ever bringing someone “like him” out in the first place. Maddy took her glass of water from the table and dumped it over the man’s food. Maddy thinks people her age are more understanding and empathetic of people with autism. When she tells people now that her brother is autistic, they have a better grasp of what that means and what it entails. All of Maddy’s friends know Alex and enjoy being around him. Granted, it is not hard to get along with Alex. Unlike many autistic people who are very introverted, Alex is extremely social. He loves greeting people and he eagerly seeks out eye

contact. his parents couldn’t, like how to interact with his Recently, while in BCBG waiting for Maddy peers. to find her perfect WPA shoes, Alex sat in a “I feel like I have already gone through the chair squeezing a stuffed ostrich he had brought process of raising a child,” Maddy said. along. When a man walked by, Alex extended And she isn’t finished. For the rest of her life, the ostrich to him with both hands. The man Maddy will assume the task of being in charge took the bird with a mix of confusion and grati- of her brother: making sure he has a safe place tude, apparently recognizing Alex’s condition. to live, being there when he asks for something The man held the bird for a while then tried to and making sure he is alright. No matter where return it to Alex. Alex refused the offer and sat she is in her life, she will always have to be there smiling up at the man watching for him. him hold the ostrich. “For the rest of my life, I am going “It is like his token of appreto have to make sure he is clothed,” ciation towards people,” Maddy He is just like any other Maddy said. said. Having an autistic brother to take teenage boy. He just Despite his sweet disposicare of has matured Maddy beyond does things in a very her years. Maddy remembers being tion, his lack of understanding autistic way. of behavioral norms leads him in middle school and having the perJunior Maddy Pigeon to break things without remorse. sonality of a 25-year-old when she During the summer, Alex’s was at home. mother let him sit in their parked minivan and “Whereas he is the eternal two-year-old, I pretend to drive while she did yard work. Later, had to mature quickly because I had no other she discovered that Alex had broken off both the choice,” Maddy said. turn signal and the gear shift. Maddy’s maturity has helped her to underAlex’s tendency to break things causes his stand and accept people’s different reactions tofamily to refer to him as the “household terror- ward her brother. Maddy gets pity from a lot of ist,” but he has never struck a family member. At peers when she first tells them about her brothtimes, though, he turns his strength on himself. er, but she knows that they just don’t know any Out of confusion and frustration caused by other way to react. She understands that their being unable to understand the world around reactions are human nature. him, Alex hits himself. His hitting himself has “They are teenagers, they don’t even undercaused a slight depression on his forehead the stand struggles in their own life,” Maddy said. “How are they supposed to understand the strugsize an egg. One night while Maddy was watching him, gles of a sister with an autistic brother?” While Maddy’s mom considers the word Alex began beating himself on the head in a fit of frustration. Maddy tried all she could to stop ‘retarded’ the R-word, just as offensive as the him, but nothing was working. Finally, she ran N-word, it doesn’t bother Maddy in everyday to her kitchen to find a roll of Gaff tape and two conversation--as long as it isn’t directed toward oven mitts. Maddy grabbed his arms and taped anyone with special needs. Maddy is very religious, and believes that the mitts onto his hands to protect him. Maddy is used to taking care of Alex and feels God brought Alex into her life because she and like she really plays a sort of secondary-mother her family were the best people for him. Maddy role in his life. She knows that whatever he is do- looks at Alex as a blessing that has helped her ing takes priority over what she is doing. Maddy to understand the people and the world around has been there for him to teach him the things her.

“God created Alex because he is the perfect Alex Pigeon,” Maddy said. Even though Maddy is accepting of her brother, that doesn’t mean there aren’t times where he makes her nervous. Earlier this year Maddy’s parents brought Alex to watch Maddy perform in “Machinal,” an intense suspenseful drama put on by East’s theater department. “I was so worried that during that dead silence at the end, Alex was just going to yell, ‘Hi there!’” Maddy said. Often, the recipients of Alex’s exuberant “Hi there!” are pretty women. Once, while stopped at a light on Mission Road, Alex turned and looked at the car next to him to see a goodlooking girl staring back at him. When the light turned green and Alex’s dad began to accelerate, the girl in the car over accelerated at the same rate to keep eye contact with Alex. “He is a complete ladies’ boy,” Maddy said. Maddy can see the true teenage boy in Alex: the way he acts around the house and his prominent mannerisms remind her of any other teenager. “I can see the ‘bro’ in him,” Maddy said. While at times Alex may seem like an ordinary teenager, the truth is that he is not. Due to his autism, there are many things in life Alex will never have. “I will never be an aunt,” Maddy says. “I will never see my brother have children.” But there is one thing Alex won’t miss out on: Maddy is planning on taking Alex to her senior prom. “I think he’ll look smashing in a tux,” Maddy said.

EdenSchoofs EdenSchoofs

there’s NOT a

EdenSchoofs

known cause for

there are no TESTS to diagnose

AUTISM

about

FACTS about

Autism

the AUTISM AWARENESS ribbon The puzzle pattern reflects the mystery and complexity of the autism spectrum.

fastest

GROWING

developemental

disability

between and

1.5 1million Americans have AUTISM

photo courtesy of Maddy Pigeon

occurs in of births

1 110

AUTISM

the MOTTO of

the AUTISM SOCIETY is improving the lives of all affected by Autism

www.autism-society.org


18

FEATURES

02-07-11

all photos by JakeCrandall

[costumes]

The musical’s costume crew brushes aside the occasional negative comment about how they are not a serious crew with one phrase: “Without us, you would be naked.” The costume crew deals with all the clothing within the show. They must measure every cast member, and although they have some expensive rented costumes, they have to create the remaining ones. The breaks they take help this crew trudge through their deadlines. Although they say they are looked down upon at times for this, it is what they do to keep away from stress and to really get their tasks done. Sophomore Jesse Burnes and senior Polly Mytinger, co-crew chiefs, are the leaders for the group and help the others out by making executive decisions about the acting cast’s apparel. “Working on the costumes crew can be either really easy or really hard, because you have to interact with the cast the entire time,” Burnes said. Both agree that it is rewarding to see their clothing on stage or receive compliments on their hard work and the outfits they have created to fit the show’s storyline. But according

[lights]

Musical crew works on creating the world behind the performance PaigeHess to Burnes, it was hard to interact with those individuals whom have short fuses. “It is stressful when the cast is snappy with you or are unwilling to be helpful,” Burnes said. “You really need to be able to deal with people’s issues with a lot of patience.” One of their most stressful days was the day of the Rockhurst-East basketball game. The rented costumes that had come in that day. The cast was rushing to get out of the rehearsal early and get to the game, and many of the new costumes were lost or misplaced. After a long period of searching and bickering, the costumes were found and they were able to relax. “We were so worried because there were only so many days for the cast to practice with them,” Burnes said. Despite a few mishaps, this group of 11 students finds confidence within each other, and the members help each other out whenever help is needed. “We have an awesome group of people for this show,” Burnes said. “Everyone gets along and is ‘weird,’ but we all share great work ethic.” According to sophomore crew member Kim Hoedel, members of the crew should have somewhat of a background in sewing before joining, seeing as there is a lot of work involved with working on the extensive amount of costumes in the show. The chiefs agree that they are similar to the set crew: they both make what the audience sees and help to tell the story that the cast is trying to portray. Even when they are not participating in the actual show, they still want to help out because each enjoys staying involved in the theater and making lasting memories there. “I will remember all the thank you’s from the cast and crew members on the adjustments on the costumes,” Burnes said.

The lights crew has been worrying the past couple weeks over the question of whether the show will be a success. Unlike many of the other crews in the production, the lights crew is not completely done until the lights go out at the end of the production; they are constantly running cues throughout the entire show. Junior Mallory Harrington, assistant crew chief for the musical, has been working on lights crew since her freshman year. For “Beauty and the Beast,” she will be in the booth running the control board that cues the lights, which is usually the job of the crew chief; this year, crew chief Ricky Latshaw will be helping with some of the special effects (like fog and dry ice) on the main stage. Harrington has worked in many different

Musicals don’t always require the same complex sets that other productions do, but this does not restrict the “Beauty and the Beast” set crew. They have been working on the sets for East’s rendition of the timeless musical since early November. Their crew of 18 students is one of the largest groups the department has seen, and they have gotten the most of this size in spending as much time as possible on the set. The set crew is important: it highlights the cast and helps them portray the story. The crew wants the audience to enjoy themselves and be entertained while viewing the actors in an aesthetically pleasing environment. Co-crew chiefs sophomores Josh Light and Dani Mader are the ones to push the crew to meet their deadlines. The two agree that the set crew is the starting point for many who participate in the theater programs. “Set is where everyone funnels through and then branches out into other crews or higher positions,” Mader said. “We both fell in love with this part, so we stayed here instead.” This is both of the sophomores’ first time in a leadership position, and fifth production working together on a show. Their role is one that gives them the ability to guide the others in the group to do what they are told and get their projects done on time. The crew cannot build every set all by themselves; they sometimes use pre-made, borrowed props, which has created some additional problems. “One of the most stressful situations we have gone through so far is that one of the borrowed sets was hurt,” Mader said. “It took multiple weeks to fix, since it was not built to be broken.” Just like other crews, the members are

positions within the theater in the past, being on “run crew” three times (“Woyzeck,” “Grapes of Wrath,” and “Arsenic and Old Lace”), serving as assistant crew chief (“Footloose”) and cocrew chief of lights (“Machinal”) once before. “I think that this show has a lot of potential--the cast is full of really talented performers and all of the tech elements are really cool,” Harrington said. “The tricky part will be pulling everything together [the week of the musical] and making it run smoothly. I think by [Feb. 3, the night of the first performance] it will be an awesome show.” The lights are run by a group of around seven students on the crew. The jobs received on lights crew are four spotlight operators, two backstage running the effects, and one board operator. “I like lights crew because each production brings a com-

hard at work every day after school for multiple hours. They are also working from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., or even 7 p.m. on Saturdays. “We are making sure that the set pieces get out there on time and that they are what the directors want and the cast can use them properly,” Light said. “We are also backstage the entire show and the paint crew to helps to move them on stage and off.” Since most of the show’s workers are friends, they all want to make sure that no one has to carry too much responsibility or feel too much stress. “Our crew will do anything,” Mader said. “We design the entire sets ourselves so it is cool that we all enjoy that design element.” According to Light, his goal outside of a smooth-running show is to make art. “Theater really is an art, and it is amazing how much creativity we receive with this job,” Light said. These individual goals also play into the time the group spends together as a single entity. Both Mader and Light say that all the time that the crew has put into the production has made them closer as a group. “We hang out all the time because we all have grown up through theater together,” Mader said. “We are like a huge family, and being here is the highlight of my day.”

[set ]

pletely new experience, and there is always more to learn about lights,” Harrington said. According to Harrington, the lights add a lot of new, interesting effects in this musical, especially during the transformations; it adds “magic” to the show. But with this magic-making comes a lot of stress. “Because of the snow days, there has been some added stress about getting things done,” Harrington said. “[Show week] is really important for coordinating shifts and large dance numbers.” Despite blizzards taking away rehearsal time, the pressure to get things pulled together helps the crew operate well in a short amount of time. Crew members say this stress pays off tenfold when they experience the satisfying moment once the final performance is complete.


FEATURES

MANAGING WITH THE PAIN KatieKnight

Eleven freshman boys are spread across the locker room floor after their basketball game, sitting and listening to coach Ryan Hintz talk about their 30 point victory over the SM North Indians. He goes into detail about all the things done well, and finishes with possible improvements. Just as he is wrapping up, a small voice in the back pipes up. “Coach?” he said. “Can I say something?” Freshman manager Hunter Bickers makes his way to the front. Hintz, surprised, said, “Well, uh, sure. Everybody turn your attention to Hunter.” Beaming, Hunter turns around and looks at the team, and then enters into his speech. “First of all guys,” he said. “Great game, awesome job!” Immediately the room erupts into cheers and hollering, and high fives are traded from player to player. “I am so proud of you guys,” Hunter continues. “Way to kick some butt. You know guys, if you can play like that, as well as you did, every game, we’re gonna dominate this season.” Giving his famous speeches and pumping the team up has always been Hunter’s favorite part of his job, and although he more than enjoys working as manager for both A and B teams, it’s not a true substitute for being able to play on the team. What holds Hunter back is his mild cerebral palsy. He was diagnosed with the palsy when he was born--doctors predicted he would never be able to walk. Although he struggled with walking as a young child, he managed to prove them wrong. When Hunter was in elementary school, he had problems with extremely tight muscles and temporary inability to walk. Depending on how good his legs were feeling, he would switch between a wheelchair, and special boots that gave him support but allowed walking at the same time. “Hunter has gained quite a bit of mastery over his cerebral palsy,” Hunter’s father, Patrick Bickers, said. “He has learned to go around many obstacles. But as a child, he walked unsteadily and frequently fell if he tried to run.” After struggling with little things like walking up stairs, running and riding a bike his whole life, naturally, Hunter gets frustrated some days. “I usually end up thinking to myself ‘When is this gonna end? This is ridiculous. I’m so sick of this,” Hunter said. “Then after being mad all day, I’ll start thinking and realize that I will be in this wheelchair for maybe four or six weeks, while there are people out there who have the same thing I have, who will

be in wheelchairs for their entire lives. Then, I tell myself to be glad that it’s not me, and to be thankful for what I do have.” One of the worst parts of growing up with cerebral palsy for Hunter was the load of teasing that came with it. Patrick’s most significant memory of Hunter being teased goes back to when he was nine or ten. “In the fourth grade, name-calling was getting so frequent and upsetting that I telephoned his teacher and the principal about it,” Patrick said. “Unfortunately both of them said, in effect, ‘Boys will be boys,’ and threw up their hands. That was an eye-opener for me as a parent.” Although Hunter admits to a lower level of teasing since grade school, he still gets a decent amount today. “Whenever I get teased, I always say to myself, ‘You know what Hunter? It’s not you. Odds are, they’re making fun of you because they think its funny, or they’re trying to make themselves look cool,” Hunter said. After long days whenever he feels stressed or angry, Hunter’s one escape is music. “I plug in my iPod, and it just calms me down,” Hunter said. “It just keeps me cool. My favorites are the Beatles, Altarbridge, Shinedown, Disturbed, the Monkeys and Queen.” * * * At the end of the day, the one thing that he always comes back to is basketball. Hunter knew from the start that he wanted to tryout for the team in November. He grew up shooting hoops after school in his backyard for hours on end, and watching KU basketball with his dad during the week. “I’ve just always loved the sport. I knew I wasn’t the best at it, but I really wanted to try out,” Hunter said. When the big day came, Hunter was nervous. Even though he had practiced his lay-ups and free throws for weeks, he still had the jitters. “I was very nervous the first day, but it got less each time,” Hunter said. “I wasn’t very confident in my skills, but I knew I was giving it 110 percent every time. That’s one thing you can count on with me. I never, ever will give less than 100 percent.” During tryouts, it was obvious to the players and coaches that Hunter put out the most effort of anybody there. For freshman A coach Ryan Hintz, Hunter’s efforts truly stuck out to him on the last day of tryouts. “During the hardest part of tryouts when some of the other kids sat out, Hunter tripped and fell and his glasses came off,”

issue 10

19

Despite not making the boys’ basketball team, freshman Hunter Bickers still bonds with the players

Hintz said. “He ran over to get his glasses, put them on and then started sprinting again. Quitting never even crossed his mind. He won my respect right there.” Three days passed, and finally the lists were posted. Hunter’s eyes scanned the pages multiple times, and to his disappointment, didn’t find his name. “I was disappointed at first, but it all changed one day at lunch,” Hunter said. Hunter is sitting with his friends at their table when, unexpectedly, varsity coach Shawn Hair approaches. “Hey Hunter,” Hair said. “Can I talk to you for a minute?” The first thing that pops into Hunter’s head is, ‘What did I do?’ Despite his hesitation, he agrees and goes off to the corner to talk. “So I talked to the freshman coaches,” Hair said, “And they said they really loved how hard you worked and your perseverance. They want to know if you want to be their team manager.” Hunter gladly accepted the offer, and was told that the first practice was that night at seven. “At first I was a little nervous, especially when coach was introducing me to the team,” Hunter said. “But as he was talking, my face just grew into a huge grin. I tried to hide it because I didn’t want to seem too excited.” “I was happy for him when I found out he was manager,” freshman basketball player Sage Thomson said. “I knew he really wanted to make the team...so this way he had a part in it.” As a manager, Hunter’s prime duties are working the clock when the boys do their sprints, filming their games, each including his own commentary, and even joining in a scrimmage as an all-time defender, if he’s lucky. Hunter is unique in where he takes each little job and does it to the best of his ability. Thirty minutes before the home game and five minutes before coach gets there, Hunter arrives and is headed down to the basketball offices. He scrounges through piles of equipment to find ten water bottles and three towels. After filling each bottle and wetting down one of the towels, his preparations are done. Finally, Hunter heads upstairs and meets up with the rest of the players. “Hunter’s really fun during the games,” Thomson said. “He gets really excited. He jumps up and down and screams until he starts coughing.” “I love going to games just because I get to see how it has all paid off,” Hunter said. “In practice you get to see them working so hard, and in games you get to see them just clobber the other guys.” Hunter loves his job, without question. Sometimes, though, in the back of his head, he still dreams of actually making it to the court. Hunter plans to try out again next year, and shoot for making the team, although he may change his mind before then. If things fall the right way and Hunter decides to try out, Patrick will support him the whole way. “I encourage Hunter to follow his heart.” Patrick said. “If he wants to try out next year, I’m behind him 100 percent and I’ll practice with him all summer, if he wants.” But for now, Hunter is content with where he is. He’s met many different types of people and made many different friends. According to Patrick, the whole experience has been more than rewarding. “Hunter enjoys being part of the team, and enjoys the camaraderie with the other boys,” Patrick said. “He’s learning any team or groups of people needs more than “stars” to succeed. They need people who will come to the task every day and give their best effort. Hunter does that.”

JakeCrandall


MIXED 20 02-07-11

[the really must haves for

the

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2 Hair gel. Essential

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1 Ed Hardy Tee. Tight, flashy and perfect for showing off the gun show.

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random page about life] “I like Snooki because she is so funny and out there. She is so entertaining and never gets old to watch on T.V I’m a lot like her because I’m short and most of the time loud.” Caroline Marland

Will Severns

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30

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Howto celebrate

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Take a drive to Lawrence to catch a great concert

Hit up the Crossroads for a “night on the town” complete with gelato and an art gallery Laser taggingmakes for an eventful date that you two will always remember


A&E

issue 14

21

Coming Soon

Staffer shares his picks for the spring movie season AlexLamb

Drive Angry

FEB. Battle: Los Angeles

25

Nicolas Cage is usually most entertaining as over-the-top, ridiculous characters, and “Drive Angry” should be no exception. In this balls-to-the-wall action flick, Cage plays a vengeful father who busts out of hell on a mission to stop the same cult that murdered his daughter from sacrificing her baby, while also being chased by Satan’s right hand man (William Fichtner). From the director of “My Bloody Valentine,” this is a sure bet for not only great 3D, but one hell of an awesome ride too, because there’s nothing quite as satisfying as Nic Cage in a good ol’ fashioned killing rage.

MAR.

11

Paul

Comedy duo Simon Pegg and Nick Frost proved they’re one of the funniest pairs around with “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz,” so expect a continuation of that legacy in their latest adventure, “Paul.” Pegg and Frost play two comic book geeks on a U.S. road trip who encounter and befriend a slacker alien by the name of Paul (voiced by Seth Rogen), and suddenly find themselves on the run from the federal agents trying to capture the extra-terrestrial fugitive. “Superbad” director Greg Mottola is a perfect fit to handle these three hilarious actors, so hopefully this becomes a box-office hit instead of just a geeky cult favorite.

Water For Elephants

When not in “Twilight” films, Robert Pattinson is actually quite a good actor, and as the lead in the adaptation of this beloved bestselling book, he may finally earn some respect from moviegoers other than tween girls. Pattinson plays a veterinary school drop out in the Great Depression who joins a traveling circus and finds his place there, but risks it by falling in love with the star performer and wife (Reese Witherspoon) of the circus’s nefarious animal trainer (Christoph Waltz). Watch for Waltz to give another memorable villain performance here, rounding this period piece into a highly engaging drama.

The mysterious marketing campaign for this alien invasion movie suggests it’ll be a mixture between “District 9” and “Cloverfield,” but likely with less plot and character development and more city-destroying mayhem. The film follows a platoon of Marines in Los Angeles (led by Aaron Eckhart and Michelle Rodriguez) as they fight for their lives against aliens trying to wipe out the human race. Expect plenty of large-scale, special effects-fueled action set pieces, but don’t count on anything deeper than that. This is strictly a big, loud and explosion-laden blockbuster, perfect for lots of frenetic popcorn entertainment.

Sucker Punch

MAR.

18

Zack Snyder earned his credit as a visionary of style and visceral storytelling with “300” and “Watchmen,” two of the most astounding movies of the last five years. Now he presents his first original story, this one about a group of young institutionalized girls who plan to escape from a mental hospital. The girls imagine it as a fantastic, other-worldly realm which they must fight their way out of by defeating an army of soldiers, samurais, dragons and killer robots. This will probably be the epitome of special effects and visual achievement this year, as well as a full-on action extravaganza unlike anything else. Prepare to be dazzled.

MAR.

25

APR.

22

MAY.

6

Thor

Marvel opens up every summer season with a new superhero film, and in preparation for the Avengers movie, the next origin story is Thor’s. The movie covers how Thor has been cast out of Asgard and sent to Earth, where he learns about human life and then must protect humans from an evil sent by a villainous Asgardian. It’s a little worrisome that Shakespearean actor/director Kenneth Branagh is helming such a largescale superhero blockbuster with no previous action experience, but considering Marvel’s track record, “Thor” should be a big hit.

all photos by www.allmoviephoto.com


A&E

02-07-11

www.last.fm

22

HE’S ‘IN THE HOUSE’ Kansas-City-hosted electronic music festival, featuring beat master Steve Aoki, in review KatBuchanan

I went into the experience of attending an electronic music festival with the notion that it would be much like the rave montage in “Black Swan” or a less-censored-andtherefore-more-entertaining episode of the original British Skins. The media portrays the underground rave scene as this social, jovial, even spiritual experience; kids drop pills and find themselves raging, letting loose, and completely vibing to the music in the multicolored flashing lights. If there’s one genre of music that I know I can always enjoy, it’s dance music. I bought my $41-with-tax ticket to the FROST Electronic Music Festival from the local Hen House and planned on an interesting evening. – Each quick scan around the venue revealed a new scantily-clad girl with gigantic furry boots and straightened hair, wearing beaded bracelets up her arms and clinging to a cell phone for dear life. There were also those who were dressed crazy on purpose: the girl in the anime Barney suit, the bright yellow chicken costume, the platform boots and multicolored wigs, and the ever-present Binky, which I was informed is a way to keep yourself from grinding your teeth while under the influence of Ecstasy. Everywhere I turned, a different beat was thumping: there was the poorly-attended set at Indie Bar next door, and down in the basement, the B-lister DJ that rocked out on an electric violin. Speakers blasted prerecorded music by the merch tables, and DJs mixed away on the main top floor. Then, there was the main stage, the real treat. Flashing lights shaped like fireworks enticed us as we

made our way up to the front row as the first performer, Ecotek was playing (or rather, mixing while standing behind a laptop) his set. Snagging a spot to the right of the stage (in hopes that Steve Aoki, the third performer on the stage, would pay our side of the crowd a visit), we posted ourselves in anticipation for the bigger-name performers. The performers on the main stage were dubstep artists, DJs who mix together pre-existing songs with their own beats using the genre’s characteristic bass. We listened to our fair share of dubstep before the concert, and I was more than excited to feel the “drop” (or build-up turning into a heavy bassline) into the music live. Ecotek was good; I found myself moving along to the beat without realizing I was doing so. His stuff was upbeat and light compared to the impending beats of Excision and Aoki. The songs flowed nicely, and the bass kept everything on tempo and danceable. The same went for his following act, Marty Party, another guy with fittingly party-worthy beats and a laptop. As Excision, a name I hadn’t heard before the concert, took the stage, I prepared myself for something much heavier. He opened with this futuristic, almost mechanic, mix that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. The massive twelve-foot-tall speakers directly in front of me thumped along with the bass, moving the gate that I was leaning on; I could see my hands shaking from the sheer force of the music. By the time his dark, hour-long set was up, I felt too burned out to enjoy Steve Aoki. How could he live up to the hype of that?

the vocals of BOB DYLAN

I was wrong. Aoki was the most high-energy act I’ve ever seen live, and I couldn’t help myself from jumping up and down, clapping, and headbanging along to his cutting edge beats. Aoki actually sang/yelled into the mic as needed, unlike his openers, and shot off bottles of champagne on the front row as confetti erupted from the edges of the stage. He played his two most popular songs, “Warp 1.9” and “I’m In The House,” and his hour-and-fifteen-minute set felt like a mere 10 minutes; I wanted more when he was through. But sadly, Aoki exited stage right and Infected Mushroom went on next. We were officially too burned out to really enjoy the set, and left before the final act closed. Excision and Aoki were more than enough electro for one sitting (or rather, standing). – The Sunday after FROST, I spent a large portion of the day sleeping off the experience, and moaning in bed about muscle cramps and a potentially-dislodged brain (main cause being “whipping my hair back and forth”). Unlike plenty of the other ravers, my “concert hangover” came not from drugs or alcohol, but from dancing much too hard. Advil and caffeine could not cut deep enough into the lingering baseline in my bloodstream. When I finally forced myself out of bed and brushed my hair out, leftover bits of metallic blue and silver confetti strew themselves all over my bathroom floor. As my friend and fellow-concert-goer Bob told me, “You may leave FROST, but FROST will never leave you.”

the lyrics of

the feel of

BEACH BOYS

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

the vocals of BON IVER

TOTALLY SOUNDS

the lyrics of MUMFORD & SONS

LIKE

the feel of PHANTOM PLANET

THREE ARTISTS

THAT YOU KNOW

WHO ROCK IN THE SAME VEIN AS SOMEONE NEW

the feel of THE DECEMBERISTS

the vocals of

FEIST

THE TALLEST MAN ON EARTH

Kristian Matsson of Dalarna, Sweden is known for his very charismatic raw voice.

STAR SCALE

EAR PLUGS

RADIO ONLY

the lyrics of

TENNIS

VAMPIRE WEEKEND

Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore, a husband/wife duo (chemistry implied) sing of the adventures at the sea.

ADD TO PLAYLIST

FOALS

A band from Oxford, England, Foals’ style is linked to various genres such as indie rock, dance-punk and math rock.

FRONT ROW


issue 10

23

www.last.fm

A&E

HE’S ‘IN THE HOUSE’ Kansas-City-hosted electronic music festival, featuring beat master Steve Aoki, in review KatBuchanan

I went into the experience of attending an electronic music festival with the notion that it would be much like the rave montage in “Black Swan” or a less-censored-andtherefore-more-entertaining episode of the original British Skins. The media portrays the underground rave scene as this social, jovial, even spiritual experience; kids drop pills and find themselves raging, letting loose, and completely vibing to the music in the multicolored flashing lights. If there’s one genre of music that I know I can always enjoy, it’s dance music. I bought my $41-with-tax ticket to the FROST Electronic Music Festival from the local Hen House and planned on an interesting evening. – Each quick scan around the venue revealed a new scantily-clad girl with gigantic furry boots and straightened hair, wearing beaded bracelets up her arms and clinging to a cell phone for dear life. There were also those who were dressed crazy on purpose: the girl in the anime Barney suit, the bright yellow chicken costume, the platform boots and multicolored wigs, and the ever-present Binky, which I was informed is a way to keep yourself from grinding your teeth while under the influence of Ecstasy. Everywhere I turned, a different beat was thumping: there was the poorly-attended set at Indie Bar next door, and down in the basement, the B-lister DJ that rocked out on an electric violin. Speakers blasted prerecorded music by the merch tables, and DJs mixed away on the main top floor. Then, there was the main stage, the real treat. Flashing lights shaped like fireworks enticed us as we

made our way up to the front row as the first performer, Ecotek was playing (or rather, mixing while standing behind a laptop) his set. Snagging a spot to the right of the stage (in hopes that Steve Aoki, the third performer on the stage, would pay our side of the crowd a visit), we posted ourselves in anticipation for the bigger-name performers. The performers on the main stage were dubstep artists, DJs who mix together pre-existing songs with their own beats using the genre’s characteristic bass. We listened to our fair share of dubstep before the concert, and I was more than excited to feel the “drop” (or build-up turning into a heavy bassline) into the music live. Ecotek was good; I found myself moving along to the beat without realizing I was doing so. His stuff was upbeat and light compared to the impending beats of Excision and Aoki. The songs flowed nicely, and the bass kept everything on tempo and danceable. The same went for his following act, Marty Party, another guy with fittingly party-worthy beats and a laptop. As Excision, a name I hadn’t heard before the concert, took the stage, I prepared myself for something much heavier. He opened with this futuristic, almost mechanic, mix that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. The massive twelve-foot-tall speakers directly in front of me thumped along with the bass, moving the gate that I was leaning on; I could see my hands shaking from the sheer force of the music. By the time his dark, hour-long set was up, I felt too burned out to enjoy Steve Aoki. How could he live up to the hype of that?

the vocals of BOB DYLAN

I was wrong. Aoki was the most high-energy act I’ve ever seen live, and I couldn’t help myself from jumping up and down, clapping, and headbanging along to his cutting edge beats. Aoki actually sang/yelled into the mic as needed, unlike his openers, and shot off bottles of champagne on the front row as confetti erupted from the edges of the stage. He played his two most popular songs, “Warp 1.9” and “I’m In The House,” and his hour-and-fifteen-minute set felt like a mere 10 minutes; I wanted more when he was through. But sadly, Aoki exited stage right and Infected Mushroom went on next. We were officially too burned out to really enjoy the set, and left before the final act closed. Excision and Aoki were more than enough electro for one sitting (or rather, standing). – The Sunday after FROST, I spent a large portion of the day sleeping off the experience, and moaning in bed about muscle cramps and a potentially-dislodged brain (main cause being “whipping my hair back and forth”). Unlike plenty of the other ravers, my “concert hangover” came not from drugs or alcohol, but from dancing much too hard. Advil and caffeine could not cut deep enough into the lingering baseline in my bloodstream. When I finally forced myself out of bed and brushed my hair out, leftover bits of metallic blue and silver confetti strew themselves all over my bathroom floor. As my friend and fellow-concert-goer Bob told me, “You may leave FROST, but FROST will never leave you.”

the lyrics of

the feel of

BEACH BOYS

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

the vocals of BON IVER

TOTALLY SOUNDS

the lyrics of MUMFORD & SONS

LIKE

the feel of PHANTOM PLANET

THREE ARTISTS

THAT YOU KNOW

WHO ROCK IN THE SAME VEIN AS SOMEONE NEW

the feel of THE DECEMBERISTS

the vocals of

FEIST

THE TALLEST MAN ON EARTH

Kristian Matsson of Dalarna, Sweden is known for his very charismatic raw voice.

STAR SCALE

EAR PLUGS

RADIO ONLY

the lyrics of

TENNIS

VAMPIRE WEEKEND

Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore, a husband/wife duo (chemistry implied) sing of the adventures at the sea.

ADD TO PLAYLIST

FOALS

A band from Oxford, England, Foals’ style is linked to various genres such as indie rock, dance-punk and math rock.

FRONT ROW


A&E issue 10

23

STACKED

WITH

FLAVOR Staffer reviews local Italian Restaurant all photos by EdenSchoofs

ErinReilly

Tucked into a small complex just north of St. Joseph Medical Center on State Line Road, Jasper’s Ristorante is a true gem, radiating an old-Italian family vibe with a modern flair. Jasper’s history of excellence is wellnoted, as the restaurant has won several distinguished national awards. It is one of only 95 restaurants in North America to receive the Mobil Four Stars, the highest award on Mobil’s extremely selective ranking system. Also, Jasper Mirabile, Jr., current owner and head chef, has been featured numerous times on NBC’s local news segment, “What’s Cooking.” Since it is so highly acclaimed, I had high expectations for the restaurant. When I first walked into Jasper’s, I was

ERIN’S TOP

immediately greeted by a life-size cardboard cutout of the Chef Jasper Mirabile, Jr. After starting to talk to it, then realizing it wasn’t real, I was escorted to my table by the accommodating maître d’. I found myself sitting among one of about 30 candlelit, white tablecloth-covered tables and booths inside. Vibrant reds and yellows gave the room an added glow, illuminating many of the framed pictures of the Mirabile family. Nearly all the tables were filled, but quiet chatter was the only noise that could be heard over the sound of smooth jazz. One of Jasper’s best qualities is their quick and friendly staff. Although it was packed the night I went, I was greeted by my waiter within five minutes of being

seated. I then ordered and received my standard Caesar salad after about ten minutes. As soon as I finished my salad, it was whisked away and replaced with my entrée, Lasagne Al Forno, per recommendation by my waiter. Covered in a thick marinara sauce and ricotta cheese and melted onto Italian sausage, the artfully prepared Italian classic was nothing short of delectable. The best part of my experience at Jasper’s was definitely the dessert. My waiter rolled out a three-tier cart with 13 desserts sumptuously displayed. There were traditional cannolis, gelatos, tiramisu and cakes. I finally decided on the Cioccolatta Della Morta, or “Death by Chocolate” cake,

Jasper’s best side dishes to accompany the perfect Italian entree’

STAR SCALE

CHECK PLEASE

For additional photos and a map of directions to Jasper’s Italian Restaurant visit smeharbinger.net

CHOCOLATECAKE

CEASAR

A peppery take on a standard appetizer, this dish left me relieved to have a drink nearby. It wasn’t as pepper-happy as a salad from the Cheesecake Factory (which has so much of the spice it practically inedible), but it could come in at a close second.

which was a big slice of chattily layered chocolate cake with rich chocolate icing and artistically dribbled chocolate sauce topping off the edible masterpiece. I was delighted to find that it was just as scrumptious as it appeared. I left the restaurant feeling full and satisfied. The chef surpassed my expectations; modern styling mixed with old-Italian flavor create the intriguing confection that is Jasper’s Ristorante, and I plan on being a repeat customer.

Thankfully my salad was small, or else there would have been no way I would have been able to attempt eating this huge dish. With so much flavor packed into one bite, it took a lot of willpower to not overindulge in this delicious mix of Jasper’s special marinara, ricotta cheese, and Italian sausage.

AVERAGE

This dish was a generous slice of chocolate cake with Chantilly layers. Rich fudge icing topped this edible masterpiece, while a light chocolate drizzle turned a heavy treat into something sweet. Needless to say, I had to bring home a lot of leftovers.

DELIGHTFUL

CULINARY GENIUS


24

A&E 02-07-11

THE HARBINGER GUIDE TO TELEVISION Staff members share their favorite TV shows for each day of the week

MODERN FAMILY ABC 8p.m.

TV

FORGOTTEN

Staffer decribes the best shows that were taken off the air RainaWeinberg

RainaWeinberg

If you want to start watching TV better, this is where to start. A DVR, in case you don’t know, is a little device that you can get from your cable provider that allows you to record television shows, and more importantly, rewind live television. Imagine this: you’re watching your favorite show. One of the characters is about to reveal who her baby’s daddy is, but she ends up mumbling the name. With a DVR, you can keep rewinding the recording until you finally piece together that it’s her daughter’s ex-boyfriend.

2

Netflix Subscription

“Life as We Know It” never even made it to the end. Its first and only season was cut short just before the last two episodes. Sean Farris starred in this controversial teenage drama. The season was cut short due to an overwhelming amount of complaints from the public because of its racy content.

CMT

8p.m.

Since “Law & Order” was canceled this year, I had to find a new show to watch on Fridays, so, I turned to CMT’s “My Big Fat Redneck Wedding.” Let me tell you, they don’t include “fat” for nothing. Apart from their weight, the participants have many things in common, usually including parenting an infant to toddler-age child who’s responsible for their exchanging of vows. Giving new meaning to the old saying that “ignorance is bliss,” each episode follows a new couple of hillbillies chronicling preparations for their less-than-perfect weddings. I wouldn’t exactly describe this as can’t-miss T.V., but if you liked the MTV hit “Viva La Bam,” this is right up your alley.

TomLynch

THE SIMPSONS FOX 7p.m.

Let’s face it. Who has the time to invest their precious time into a brand new television series with no promises that it’s going to be a good one? You should probably wait until the show has completed a season or two to make sure it has staying power. At the very least, wait until you can’t stand not having any notion of what your friends are raving about nonstop. But who wants to go through the trouble of trying to piece together what’s happened before they started watching? Netflix provides a vast library of television shows that you can stream instantly from your computer, gaming console, or, for the very technically savvy, Roku box. If the show is still running strong on TV, it’s likely Netflix will have all the seasons you missed.

Life As We Know It

MY BIG FAT REDNECK WEDDING

SUNDAY FRIDAY

After a long school week, I always enjoy getting my weekly dose of Seth Cohen. The O.C. ran a good four seasons and ended gracefully. Everything about this show was clichéd, but it was all wonderful. The O.C. follows “bad boy” Ryan Atwood who is taken in by Sandy and Kirsten Cohen after he is released from juvenile hall. Their son Seth, my favorite character, becomes best friends with Ryan and the show follows them on their trivial adventures through the California school system.

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

MONDAY

THURSDAY

O.C. RE-RUNS SOAP NET 6 and 7 a.m.

1 DVR

JackHowland

The Simpsons is starting up its 23rd season, making its episode count going up into the 450s. The show follows the adventure of one yellow family, and after about 21 years on the air it’s still going strong. I have been watching this show before it was even known as “The Simpsons,” and I will continue to watch it ‘til the moment it ends. It’s funny and clever, and has shaped my personality for the better.

Freaks and Geeks

“30 Rock” is a great comedy show about a terrible comedy show. Its satiric look on the “entertainment” business is sharp, especially through the eyes of single-anddesperate-looking head writer Liz Lemon (Tina Fey). Add a typecast CEO (Alec Baldwin), airhead actors (Tracy Morgan, Jane Krakowski) and an innocent NBC page (Jack McBrayer), and you’ve got sitcom disaster--or success, if you’re watching it take place. AndrewGoble

TomLynch

“Modern Family” is the “unexplained documentary” of three families in different stages of their lives. There’s the seasoned veteran going through marriage his second time around with a new stepson, a gay couple with their adopted baby and an oddball husband and wife with three kids. The end result: a whirlwind of suburban chaos. The simple misunderstandings they routinely encounter are sitcom hilarity. All this while never being cliché, using a cheap laugh track or feeling like an episode of “7th Heaven.”

AubreyLeiter

WATCH TV BETTER

30 ROCK NBC 9p.m.

“Parenthood” is a quirky television drama that revolves around the four grown children of Zeke and Camille Braverman as they go through the struggles and joys of parenthood. This may not seem like a show for high school students, but the Braverman grandchildren make it relatable. People of all ages can relate to this show because it features characters from three generations of family. This is definitely a show that is fun to watch with the family, and I enjoy this show because of the comedy and the incredible cast.

“Pretty Little Liars” is a dramatic ABC Family series based off the books by Sara Shepard. It’s about a group of high school girls who are all reunited at a funeral for their dearest friend. After a year-long search, the police of Rosewood had finally found her body. Just moments after the funeral, the girls begin to be stalked by “A,” a mysterious tormentor. “A” sends messages to them any way she can and threatens to reveal secrets from the girls’ past if they don’t do what she says. The search continues to figure out who “A” is on Mondays at EmmaPennington 7 p.m.

PRETTY LITTLE LIARS ABC FAMILY 7p.m. PARENTHOOD NBC 9p.m.

RileyWatson

This unconventional high school dramedy ended after two seasons and quickly became a cult classic. “Freaks and Geeks” gave a real look at relevant teen issues without any glitter and fluff. As well as having excellent plots, it was jam-packed with stars, from James Franco to Seth Rogen. nbc.com, abcfamily.com, tvguide.com, fox.com


A&E

TRUE ‘BLUE’

MattHanson

With Oscar season in full swing, it’s time to forget about the studio-backed blockbusters and commercially successful movies and take a look at the low-budget festival darlings that always step into the spotlight during awards season. This time of year, it’s these indie critics’ favorites that really shine. Powered by spectacular performances from its stars, Derek Cianfrance’s “Blue Valentine” is one of these movies. A gritty, realistic drama, “Blue Valentine” has already garnered plenty of critical acclaim, particularly for stars Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, who deliver wonderfully nuanced, powerful performances as two people struggling to salvage their crumbling marriage. The film focuses on Dean (Gosling) and Cindy (Williams), two hardworking middle class Americans raising their daughter Frankie. From the very beginning of the movie, there are signs of strain in Dean and Cindy’s relationship. The couple seems to be happy, but the initial scenes between the two are tense and suggest otherwise. Dean is a bleeding heart romantic completely devoted to his wife and daughter, but despite his dire efforts he cannot inspire Cindy to return his love and enthusiasm. Cindy is far more concerned with her daughter and her job as a nurse than with her husband. After years of being married, she no longer loves Dean, and struggles with this realization throughout the movie. She wants to love him again, but as “Blue Valentine” proves again and again, love can fade away regardless of our intentions. As the story progresses, the gap between the two grows ever larger. Director and co-writer Cianfrance’s story unfolds in two parts as flashbacks cut into the scenes. The film is both a sweet and touching love story and a bleak and heartbreaking tale

STAR SCALE

STAY AT HOME

issue 10

25

‘Blue Valentine’ offers gritty, real look at modern day marriages of love gone wrong. In the flashbacks, Dean tries valiantly to court the resistant Cindy, and the two eventually develop a relationship despite Cindy carrying her ex’s baby. In one of the sweetest scenes in the film, Dean sings for Cindy while she dances in front of a boutique shop on their first date. Moments like these sharply contrast the tense scenes from the present, and make the audience care more about the fate of their marriage. The contrast has been artfully handled by Cianfrance, who decides to film the two parts very differently. The flashbacks are filmed in digital and the shots show the two lovers together in each frame, while the scenes in the present are shot on film, with the two often isolated in each shot to show the growing distance between them. Cianfrance and cinematographer Andrij Parekh use gritty close ups to capture the raw emotion between the two actors in these scenes. The camera flickers in and out of focus and moves much more in the present, giving those scenes a real, authentic feeling to them. The film’s true strength comes from its two stars. Without Gosling and Williams’ phenomenal performances, “Blue Valentine” would be much less memorable. Both actors poured in a great deal of preparation for their roles. The actors actually lived together for a while in order to experience how tension developed in a relationship, doing everyday activities together such as grocery shopping. As a result, each scene between the two seems real and intimate. Many of the scenes were entirely improvised, and the actors use their free rein to add to the authenticity of the movie. Both actors are equally fantastic here, but it is Williams who has been nominated for an Academy Award for her work. She plays Cindy with subtlety and quiet brilliance, a perfect

RENT IT

counter for Gosling’s commanding and boisterous Dean. To me, however, Gosling had the better performance of the two stars. He plays Dean with the perfect amount of emotion and energy to make him likable. In another actor’s hands, the impulsive Dean could have easily come across as a jerk, but the talented Gosling makes him the film’s hero. While “Blue Valentine” is a very good movie, it’s not without weaknesses. The plot doesn’t take the routine, happilyever-after route as most Hollywood romances do, and some viewers may not leave the theater feeling satisfied with the ending. Also, the movie has multiple very explicit sex scenes that originally got it slapped with a dreaded NC-17 rating (before an appeal got it moved down to R), but these scenes are very necessary to convey the close and complex relationship between Dean and Cindy. As they grow apart, the couple’s interactions in the bedroom parallel their struggles in their marriage. For all its critical acclaim, “Blue Valentine” only ended up receiving one Oscar nomination, for Williams as Best Actress. If there were any justice, Gosling and Parekh would have been nominated as well. As Cindy and Dean fight for their marriage, you find yourself rooting for these characters more than you ever do for characters in generic blockbuster romances. The independent “Valentine” is more relatable than those movies, and overall a much better film than its studio-backed competition. Hollywood needs to make movies like this. Movies with real, mature stories rather than superficial, emotionally shallow films with boring one-dimensional characters and predictable plots. Hollywood, I hope you’re taking notes.

WORTH SEEING

OSCAR WORTHY

www.smeharbinger.net Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @SME_Harbinger

(and Prairie Villagian)

^

Everything a Lancer needs to know. For newspaper subscriptions or advertising opportunities, email us at ads@smeharbinger.net


SPORTS 26 02-07-11

Watching Sports for Dummies A few weeks ago, I watched a KU basketball game with a friend of mine and I’m convinced I would have rather watched the game with a screaming chimp. I love the girl, but it took every ounce of me not to tell her off while she yelled at the

TV when it was utterly unnecessary. This traumatic gamewatching experience lead me to an epiphany: I think there is in fact, a “correct” way to watch the game, and few people actually know how to do it. It’s not hard, and it comes in three

Preparation Prepping for the game is important. Without it, you won’t be able to fully comprehend what is happening. You should prepare to watch a game like you would for a chemistry quiz: you don’t need to know every detail, you just need to know enough to get by.

gummy-bears; you think about the movie. In the sports world, you should try and regurgitate what just happened and answer the questions you posed originally. Who won? Why did they win? What was the deciding factor? Following these steps, asking these questions and understanding the game as it goes along will provide a sports watching experience like you’ve never had before.

ChrisHeady points: Preparation, paying close attention to the game, and meditating about the game afterward. Follow these steps, and soon you’ll realize how great sports actually are.

The Game Itself

Questions are key. What are each team’s strengths or weaknesses? If you’re the coach, where do you attack the opposing team? What will be the deciding factor? Who will win? And most importantly, why? Once you formulate your opinion, it’s gametime.

The Meditation Process

The game ends and you are most likely either distraught and playing the “How did we lose?” game and recapping “the big possession” that you didn’t win. Otherwise, you’re looking like Richard Simmons after a workout and couldn’t be more pleased with life. Now, reflecting on what just happened in the game is important to the viewing experience. You don’t go see a movie like “Inception” or “Black Swan” and walk out of the theatre thinking about popcorn and

Staffer offers advice about how to watch sports

Now you’re to the game. If you are with a group of friends, you may want to set some ground rules. Talking is only allowed on dead-balls and commercials. No knocking over drinks in celebration or unearthing the coffee table out of frustration because the referees suck. You know, the basic guidelines, so there are no distractions - ensuring you won’t miss a big play. Next, you need to understand the circumstances and when to pay close attention. In most sports, (baseball, basketball, football, hockey) the first possession, quarter or inning is huge. The team that sets the tone and comes out and draws first blood has the advantage right off the bat. There are certain moments throughout the game that you have to question. Why did the coach chose that play? Why did the point guard pass up the three pointer? Who will be the game changer in the game?

You always need to pay attention to the situation of the game. If not, you end up looking like a fool and asking “What happened?” 4,000 times instead of debating the last call with the ref. For instance, in the KU-Michigan game I was watching with my friend, it was coming down to the last possessions in the second half. Practically in the fetal position hiding from it all, I couldn’t block out her screaming, “SHOOT A THREE TYREL! SHOOT A THREE!! UGHHHHHHHHHHHHH! Why isn’t he SHOOTING?!?!” Well, let’s see. One, he’s at fricken’ half-court. Two, there was under a minute in the game and KU was leading; they didn’t need a three. They needed to do exactly what they were doing, which was playing keep away from Michigan. I’m sure there is a reason why you are watching these players on TV. They may be okay at the sport the play. I’d trust them.

FORGET YOUR CAMERA? WE DIDN’T. SMEPHOTOS.COM

<

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SPORTS issue 10

27

Weekend Warriors GABL provides student players with relaxed environment

all photos by CarolineCreidenberg

AlexGoldman

High school basketball is very different from the Great American Basketball League. In high school basketball, you will see student bodies get behind their team and cheer them on to the end. In GABL, you will see parents sit in the stands to watch their son or daughter play an insignificant game of basketball. If you go to a high school basketball game, you will see players dive for loose balls and put their bodies on the line for their teams. If you go to a GABL game, you will see kids hack up a mid court shot right after the ball is tipped off. Although it may lack the intensity and physicality of high school basketball, GABL makes up in creativity and laid back entertainment for its players. In 1974, GABL was created by Roger Siuda and had 109 teams composed of kids from the third grade to the seventh grade. It was a volunteer organization until 1995, when it hired Sports Management Associates to handle its day-to-day operations. Today, GABL offers basketball in the fall, winter and spring. It has 435 teams and over 4,000 participants during winter league. The league also started a child-development program in 2008 for pre-kindergarten kids. This introduces children to the game of basketball at an early age. GABL has grown very popular among male East students, including sophomore Luke Faulconer. Faulconer has played three seasons of GABL as a high school student. He says that he has enjoyed playing in the league and plans to continue. “I love having the freedom to do whatever you want on the court,” Faulconer said. “You could air ball a long

GET TO KNOW

range three and laugh about it with your teammates right after. The atmosphere is a lot more relaxed, but still competitive.” Although GABL may have a much more relaxed environment than high school basketball, Faulconer has doesn’t think it lacks any excitement. “Last season, [sophomore] Graham Walter made a buzzer-beating shot to keep our undefeated season alive,” Faulconer said with a grin. “We were almost positive that we were going to lose the game. The team we were playing was kind annoying and trash talking all game. So when that shot went in, we all went crazy. It was like we won the championship. The other team’s parents didn’t take it too well, though.” Just like any other basketball league, GABL is home to many rivalries. The rivalries might not be anything close to the Celtics-Lakers, Duke-North Carolina or even EastRockhurst, but they still pack plenty of excitement. “We have a pretty intense rivalry with Goss,” Faulconer said referring to sophomore Micheal Goss’ team. “They go to East and some of the players were on our team last year. And we don’t like most of them. When we meet, we play for the bragging rights and for pride. It’s definitely not just another game.” According to senior Nick Lucas, there is no better way to beat your rival than throwing down a thunderous dunk to claim victory, something he claims he did his junior year against senior Scott Watson’s team. “It was on a fast break and my teammate, [senior] Peter Frazell, passed me the ball and I just clutched the ball with one hand and drilled it,” Lucas said. “It wasn’t just a dunk. It was a rim rocking tomahawk that was like the final dagger against our rivals. I think I may have almost brought the goal down.” Lucas has enjoyed many other fond memories such as this one since joining a GABL team his junior year after he quit the East basketball team. Lucas played on the freshman and sophomore teams, along with some JV basketball experience, until he quit after he finished his

preseason workouts last year. “After I finished the conditioning, I realized that I just didn’t have any motivation to continue to play,” Lucas said. “Hair was a great coach, and I improved a lot those two years I was with the program. But at that time, I wanted a lot more down time for school and to be with my friends. I don’t regret the decision because it’s allowed me to do several other things, like GABL.” After quitting East basketball, Lucas still wanted to play the sport, but didn’t want something that consumed his time as much as high school basketball did. He figured GABL would be a fun alternative and formed a team with his friends. “GABL is just so lackadaisical and it’s just so much fun,” Lucas said. “You can do just about whatever you want and try as hard as you want. It allows players to be creative and do plays that you wouldn’t usually do.” Examples of these unusual plays include when Lucas pulls up and takes a deep three for no reason at all or when his 5’11” teammate, senior Kevin Simpson, posts up in the paint. But through all the differences between high school basketball and GABL, there is still one thing that stays the same in both leagues: the harsh pain of defeat. “After all the trick plays all game, we still want to win,” Lucas said. “Whether it’s for East or for GABL, no one likes losing. But the main goal is always to have fun, and that’s what GABL is. Lots of fun.”

What is the appeal of playing GABL basketball?

The Ex-Lancer

The GABL Vet

Junior Christian Wiles

Junior Henry Hoffman

“It’s a lot more fun because there’s less pressure to win and you’re with your friends.”

“It’s a way to play structured games without much of a commitment.”


SPORTS 28 02-07-11

Behind Bench the

a look into the life of a sports team manager LoganHeley

photo by SammiKelly

LIBBY STEINBOCK

LIBBY STEINBOCK Senior Katie Griffith watches the girls’ basketball team from the bleachers with a video camera and tripod in front of her. She’s multitasking. She’s part fan, part coach and part manager. The fan part comes from going to every single game, whether at East or in Emporia, and always having something positive to say to the players afterwards. Every game she’s watching to see if the team is executing on defense and making their layups on offense. After the game, she’ll give a full report to the coaches and even some of the players — that’s the coach part. But her official job, team manager, is the one that gives her a backstage pass to all that is East girls’ basketball. Before the season started her junior year, Griffith emailed the then-coach Rick Rhoades about getting more involved with the team. Rhoades offered her the job of manager and Griffith gladly accepted. “I’ve had a ton of fun with it,” Griffith said. “It’s a fun way to get to know a bunch of new people each year.” Before Griffith came on board, Rhoades was the one to get the gym ready for practice every day after school. Now, Griffith is the one to get the balls and clock out, lower the baskets and move the divider curtain before practice begins. Varsity assistant coach Kelli Kurle said that has been a big help this year because current head coach Scott Stein doesn’t teach at East and

As an incoming freshman, East boys’ basketball was “like a legend” to current senior Libby Steinbock. Before high school she had participated in a number of sports—rowing, horseback riding and softball to name a few—but after arriving at East, she didn’t feel she had the skills or competitive drive necessary to make it in high school sports. During Steinbock’s sophomore year, she decided to talk to boys’ basketball coach Shawn Hair about becoming one of the team’s managers. Her friend, senior Samantha Bamford, had been a manager their freshman year and was one of the main reasons why Steinbock wanted to become a manager as well. Three seasons later, they’re still behind the bench for every game, keeping players hydrated as well as writing in “the book,” where every player’s stats are recorded. Though doing laundry and cleaning Kurle isn’t able to get the gym ready everyday. “This summer we got a new coach, Coach Stein, and he would ask me questions like ‘How do we do this?” Kurle said. “And I’d say ‘Uh, Katie does it.’ That’s pretty much my answer to everything… Katie does it.” Griffith is in charge of taping every game and then converting it to DVD for the coaches and players to review. She also gets stats from her recording. At practices, she runs the clock for sprints and other drills, but one of her main jobs is organizing. In Kurle’s words “she keeps track of pretty much everything.” Kurle can remember several occasions when Stein will ask Griffith to do something and she’ll have already done it. Other times Griffith is the only one that knows how to do a task. One memory Kurle has is from the team’s recent tournament in Emporia. Back at the hotel after a game, Stein wanted the camera to review footage with the coaches, so Kurle went to Griffith’s room. Griffith gave Kurle the camera and asked “Do you think he knows how to work it or set it up?” Kurle said probably not and Griffith followed Kurle back to Stein’s room. “She came in the room and set the case down,” Kurle said. “Coach Stein was like, ‘I don’t know how to run that. I need you to do it.’ She just set it up in the hotel room and did everything.” To the players and coaches,

You can watch the rest of this season’s boys’ basketball games go to www.smeharbinger.net

floors are some of Steinbock’s less glamorous jobs, traveling with the team to tournaments is one of the perks. The team has struggled the past two seasons, combining for just 10 wins so far, but Steinbock’s first year as manager was an exciting one. One of her favorite memories is when then-senior Marcus Webb hit a three-pointer against Lawrence to send the team to the state tournament. “I was almost crying I was so excited,” Steinbock said. “It was my first season and I was overwhelmed with all of this emotion. It was kind of embarrassing, but it was one of the most memorable experiences that I’ve had.” Before the season started this year, Steinbock was uncertain as to whether she would manage again. She even told her friends that she wasn’t going to be managing. Ulti-

Griffith is a part of the team. One of Griffith’s favorite memories is when the team won sub-state last year to advance to the state tournament. “It was such a good accomplishment,” Griffith said. “It was the first thing I won as part of the team.” Though Griffith is almost always there for the team, ankle surgery during winter break of her junior year left her temporarily bedridden in the hospital. After a grueling practice, the entire team went to visit her and bring her food. Kurle and the other coaches are already worrying about finding a replacement for Griffith next year. “We’re screwed,” Kurle said. “Who wants to put up with us?”

mately, though, she decided to finish the job she started. She prides herself on not being a quitter and once again joined Bamford behind the bench. Being a team manager isn’t for the fainthearted, especially during a season when the team has lost more games than it has won. While she doesn’t have a number on her back — her normal game attire is a blue or black shirt and jeans — the stings of a string of losses hurts just the same. “It’s a little disappointing when you see the guys and you know they want to win so bad,” Steinbock said. “It’s almost heartbreaking to see them losing game after game, but I think that the winning always trumps over losing and every feeling that you get when you win a game is far greater than [when you lose].”

photo by SammiKelly

KATIE GRIFFITH

Since middle school, senior Alli Wendorff has been following the East wrestling team. Her brother, the current JV coach, wrestled for East and now Wendorff is one of the team’s managers. Being a girl manager for a less than glamorous, all-boys sport like wrestling doesn’t phase Wendorff, though. “It feels kind of natural for me,” Wendorff said. “I grew up around my brother and his friends so I’m kind of used to their habits and things that they do that might seem gross to other girls.” According to Wendorff, a common misconception about wrestling managers is that they wash the boys’ singlets. This, she says, is far from the truth. “We don’t touch their clothes,” Wendorff said. Instead, Wendorff’s main jobs are filming matches, keeping the team’s stats and assisting the boys with small medical issues such as taping athletes up after a match. Senior wrestler Chase Woofter believes the team would be much more chaotic if not for the

managers. “They’re a lot more organized than us guys are,” Woofter said. “They always have everything ready to go when we need to go to tournaments.” In a sport like wrestling where most tournaments are off-campus, fan support is sometimes hard to come by. Wendorff and the other managers, senior Kelsey Chadd, sophomore Allie Chesbrough and freshman Jenna Miller, try to keep the team’s spirits up. “They cheer us on a lot,” Woofter said, “and they’re at every meet so it’s kind of nice to have people there that will always have your back.”

ALLI WENDORFF


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SPORTS 30 02-07-10

DJBurton

THE PRICE TO PLAY

High school sports cost more time and money than students expect MaggieAndriani

Whether it’s an $8 pair of soccer socks or a $125 pair of basketball shoes, athletes ranging from freshman to varsity are finding themselves paying for extra equipment and tournaments not funded by the Shawnee Mission School District. Although playing for the school team itself is free, the cost of extra practices and equipment can be the deciding factor of whether a sport is worth playing. SMSD provides each team with a certain amount of money for the season, depending on how expensive the equipment for the sport is and how many players are on the team. Coaches can use the money to replace old equipment and uniforms. “Anything athletes need to participate is provided by the school,” athletic director Jeremy Higgins said. “For example, football, we provide them with helmets, shoulder pads, all of that stuff. For volleyball, we have volleyballs, we have all the uniforms and all that stuff now. Shoes, obviously, the athletes will have to buy on their own.” One way teams help pay for costs not funded by the district is through fundraisers. Although Higgins says fundraisers aren’t absolutely “critical,” they can help reduce the costs of extra equipment and uniforms. “It’s not extremely important for the bare necessities, but if coaches want to go above and beyond and get new uniforms or fancier equipment, then they have to get that money somehow and fundraising comes into play at that point,” Higgins said. In the past, car washes have been a popular fundraiser for cheerleading and volleyball. Football usually sells mulch, and drill team sells boutonnieres for school dances and holds an annual dance clinic. A major part of athletic teams’ funds goes towards transportation, according to Higgins. For teams that travel to

evaluating

out-of-town tournaments and competitions, renting buses can cost hundreds of dollars. “The school also does own a nine passenger van, which really has helped with transportation and actually cutting costs,” Higgins said. “Now, we don’t have to rent a bus if we are just sending our tennis team somewhere. They can take the school van, so that helps a lot.” This month, the varsity drill team will be traveling to Orlando for three days to compete in the National Dance Alliance Nationals. The cost, which includes airfare and hotel expenses, will be around $1,200. Since the school is not covering any of these costs, fundraisers will help pay for some of these expenses. “There have been some complaints about the cost just because the economy is not as good anymore,” senior drill team member Megan Nass said. “That’s why we’re trying to do as much fundraising as possible so the cost goes down. Our biggest fundraiser is probably the Lancer Dancer clinic.” Since lacrosse is considered a club and is not funded by the school’s athletic department, lacrosse players must pay for all of their own equipment. A lacrosse stick, helmet, gloves, elbow pads and shoulder pads can add up to be around $600, according to junior lacrosse player Michael Stonebarger. “Sometimes we send out sponsorship information to companies and that’s kind of what we do as a fundraiser,” Stonebarger said. Another expense that some athletes pay for is being on a year-round club team. For senior soccer player Cameron Smith, playing club soccer, which costs a monthly fee of $75, helped improve his play for the school team in the fall. “Obviously, it wasn’t necessary for some players to play club soccer,” Smith said. “It may have taken them some more

time to get back in the swing of things, but when you have your foot on the ball all year long it helps you keep your touch and makes you as perfect as you can be. When you play year round, you don’t really have a period of getting back into playing soccer as some people might if they don’t play club soccer.” Nass, who dances at Diamond Academy, said most girls on drill team take additional dance classes at studios. Depending on the studio, dance classes can cost an annual fee that can vary from $700 to $1,800 a year. “(The cost) is definitely worth it for me,” Nass said. “I spend so much time at the studio and at competitions that it always pays off in the end. Dancing at a studio allows me to work on my technique outside of drill team so that I can contribute as much as possible to the team. Being in ballet and contemporary classes helps with overall technique.” One funding alternative that 55 schools in Kansas have adopted is called “Pay to Play.” In order to keep athletic activities from being cut from the district’s budget, “Pay to Play” requires that athletes on a team pay a yearly participation fee. Although SMSD does not currently have a “Pay to Play” policy, Higgins thinks it could be a possibility down the road. “With the budget cuts occurring the way they are, could that be an option that we look at?” Higgins said. “Yes, possibly. But again, we’re going to do everything we possibly can to make sure that anybody can be part of the team if they want and we want to keep the costs down as low as possible. Athletics is a great way for students to get involved and we want every single person to have that opportunity.”

THE EXPENSE Athletes talk about the most expensive equipment they use Speedo LZR Elite

$250 “I don’t think [the equipment] is too overpriced because I don’t have to buy it that often and there isn’t very much to buy.”

-Freshman Andrew McKittrick

Adidas F50 Cleats

$200

“They overprice the cleats because they know that people want to buy the best ones and will buy the most expensive.”

-Junior Bahar Barani

STX Lacrosse Gloves

$179

“It matters more about the quality than the price. If they cost a lot but are good then it’s worth it.”

-Freshman Frank Esberg


.50.49.48.47.46.45.44.43.42.41.40.39.38.3 SPORTS 7.36.35.34.33.32.31.30.29.28.27.26.25.24. issue 10 23.22.21.20.19.18.17.16.15.14.13.12.11.10.9.8.7 Boys’ Swimming Heads to Topeka .6.5.4.3.2.1.50.49.48.47.46.45.44.43.42.41. 40.39.38.37.36.35.34.33.32.31.30.29.28.27 on the 19th With a Chance to Win a .26.25.24.23.22.21.20.19.18.17.16.15.14.13.12. State Title 11.10.9.8.7.6.5.4.3.2.1.50.49.48.47.46.45.44. Chase Hanna - Sophomore - Basketball 43.42.41.40.39.38.37.36.35.34.33.32 Where they will score most of their points Despite it being in a losing effort, Chase Hanna lit it up Like most of Wiley Wright’s teams, this one will shot at getting top-8, although it would be im- 17.16.15.14.13.12.11.10.9.8.7.6.5.4.3.2.1 against Rockhurst. He scored 15 points, most of which

31

looking to

TICKING DOWN

REPEAT

score most of their points with their depth. In fact, they may not even win a single event. Andrew Watkins will be a high placer in the 100 breast as well as the 200 IM. In the breaststroke he will be swimming alongside three Lancers who all will have a

What they need to happen Blue Valley North will be very tough for

the Lancers to beat if they win all three of their relays, and most likely East won’t be the ones knocking them off but Washburn Rural as well as Blue Valley Northwest will have a chance to beat them in each relay. The Lancers are going to need to sneak a good share of guys into the top 8 of their

The competition

Just like our main competition for every other country club sport, Blue Valley North will be the Lancer’s nemesis for the state title. The Mustangs are very top heavy, and will have many more swimmers than East getting 2nd, 3rd and 4th place. Sihan Liu in the 100 butterfly and the 200 freestyle, Griffin Peavey in the 100 breast and 200 IM, and Cameron Gulledge in the 50 freestyle and the 100 freestyle are the heavy hitters for BVN. As a whole, this state meet may be the most talented

0:03 NAMES

possible for all four to finish that high. A pair of underclassmen will contribute major points; Zack Holbrook in the 200 & 500 free and David Martinez in the 100 butterfly. This is just a small piece of the scoring for the Lancers at state.

events that really aren’t supposed to being there. This could be Andrew Hornung in the 200 freestyle, Patrick McGannon in the 200 IM and eight or so other East swimmers. If Peter Frazell doesn’t place second in the diving then a Blue Valley North diver will get second, which is in turn a six point flip. it has ever been with five Division 1 bound swimmers. Junior Ben Bravence, who ranks in the top 10 in the nation in the 500 freestyle for his age group, will be a star in the meet and he may not even be the most talented swimmer there.

The girls’ basketball team has done a great job transitioning to a new coach and Coach Stein has the team poised to make a run. The team placed 3rd at the Emporia tournament, although many of the state’s best teams were missing from it. They are going to be able to compete in the postseason but like always in a tough division, it will be a battle to get out of sub-state victorious.

Shannon McGinley - Junior - Basketball Shannon McGinley played a huge role in the Lancers third place finish at the Emporia Tournament. She was placed on the all-tournament team and once again was the Lancer’s most consistent player.

Zack Holbrook - Freshman - Swimming

Zack Holbrook had an incredible performance at the Topeka Invite. Individually, he swam the 500 freestyle and the 50 freestyle and set the East freshman record in each event. Holbrook will swim the 200 and 500 freestyle at state and will have a shot at getting top eight in each. If the Lancers win state, he will have played a major role in it.

0:02 GAMES

Wrestling at Regional Meet Saturday, February 19th

Any wrestlers Coach Chip Ufford wants wrestling at state have to place well here so next to state, this is the most important meet of the year. Chase Woofter, Blaine Hill, Blake Hill, David Hill, Ben Randolph and Jack Mitchell are all potential state wrestlers.

Boys Basketball vs S.M. Northwest

TALKING POSTSEASON Girls Basketball Boys Basketball

came from behind the arc. Hanna also hit a buzzer beater at the end of the first quarter to give the Lancers a lead.

Wrestling

The boys’ basketball Coach Chip Ufford’s proteam is far better than gram has done a great what their record sug- job building on what they gests but unfortunately have. With Sunflower that record is going to get League this week, the in the way of them want- Lancers won’t win it but ing to make a playoff run they are going to place unless they go on to win a lot of wrestlers very most of their remaining well. Blaine Hill, Blake games. All of those close Hill and Chase Woofter losses the Lancers were headline the group. The dealt are going to come story will be the same at back to haunt them, al- state; they won’t win it though they will be much but the hope is that they better next season. can place some wrestlers very well.

Monday, February 14th all photos by EdenSchoofs

Bowling

The boys bowling team is lead by a pair of seniors in Brennan Burns in Johnny Sheahan. Brennan Burns placed 11th at last years state meet and he looks to build on that. Despite having a couple strong bowlers, placing high as a team will be tough.

The Lancer’s first meeting with the Cougars ended in defeat, although it was a very competitive game. East will be looking for revenge in a game that they know they can win. Shawnee Mission Northwest’s A.J. Spencer will definitely be a threat for the Cougars.

0:01 MOMENT

.50.49.48.47.46.45.44.43.42.41.40.39.38.3 The girls bowling team 7.36.35.34.33.32.31.30.29.28.27.26.25.24. isn’t a pre-tournament 23.22.21.20.19.18.17.16.15.14.13.12.11.10.9.8.7 threat, but Ali Dees is .6.5.4.3.2.1.50.49.48.47.46.45.44.43.42.41. back from last year and 40.39.38.37.36.35.34.33.32.31.30.29.28.2 GrantHeinlein she competed well at Sophomores Conner Rellihan, Conner McGannon and 7.26.25.24.23.22.21.20.19.18.17.16.15.14.13.1 Junior Chris Heady cheer on their team against Rockstate last year. hurst. The Lancers went on to lose in the last minute 2.11.10.9.8.7.6.5.4.3.2.1.50.49.48.47.46.45.4 42-41. 4.43.42.41.40.39.38.37.36.35.34.33.32.17.1 Postseason Begins: Mar. 3rd Postseason Begins: Mar. 2nd Postseason Begins: Feb. 19thPostseason Begins: Feb. 25th6.15.14.13.12.11.10.9.8.7.6.5.4.3.2.1.50.49.48.


`a

32

PHOTO ESSAY 02-07-11

TRIVIAL

PURSUIT

DECA project raises money for the Hope Center through fast-fact competition

Senior Andrew Goble, below, concentrates as he attempts to come up with an answer for the final question. His team ended up in third place out of 18 teams. DanStewart

Celebrating with his team, senior Will Severns, far below, gives high fives after winning the trivia competition. “Going into the competition, we didn’t think that we had a chance to win,” Severns said. “We really counted on the sports and music categories.” LindseyHartnett

Holding up boards with their teams’ collective responses, seniors Julie Chalfant and Mikaila Demetroulis anxiously await the announcement of the correct answer. “[Trivia night] was such a creative fundraiser,” Chalfant said. “Everyone loves competing against each other and their school clubs.” DanStewart

Seniors Allie Hunter and Lydia Shackelford, left, laugh hysterically after answering incorrectly. “We had a really great time because we got to see our cheer coach outside of practice having fun,” Hunter said. DanStewart Senior Cassie Kerr and teacher Jeanette Bonjour, below left, dance to the music during a mashup question. These questions consisted of two songs played together and the teams had to guess the artists. LindseyHartnett

For additional coverage including videos and photos of the Trivia Night, visit smeharbinger.net


The Harbinger: Issue 10 2010-2011