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Summer Guide 2008


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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S


THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

SUMMER GUIDE 2008

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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

contents

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PUBLISHER Ross Furukawa ross@smdp.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Kevin Herrera editor@smdp.com

MANAGING EDITOR Daniel Archuleta daniela@smdp.com

Fresh and clean

STAFF WRITER Melody Hanatani melodyh@smdp.com

Farmers’ Market a place to meet, greet and eat.

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Brandon Wise brandonw@smdp.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Taylor Van Arsdale, Elizabeth Brown, Mariel Howsepian and Chythia Vazquez

PHOTOGRAPHY INTERNS Geoffrey Dunn news@smdp.com

water everywhere ... 18 Water, These summer recipes help you stay

Morgan Genser news@smdp.com

hydrated and trim at the same time.

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Rob Schwenker

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schwenker@smdp.com

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Julie Martinez juliem@smdp.com

Robert Hertel

Summer is upon us, and what better way to enjoy the outdoors than with a bit of al fresco dining and seasonal summer treats?

ADVERTISING TRAFFIC FACILITATOR Amber Kessee amberk@smdp.com

Connie Sommerville connies@smdp.com

PRODUCTION MANAGER Robert Summa

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Get down, get funky The Westside offers some of the hottest entertainment and night life.

Flip-flopping through summer

CIRCULATION

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Keith Wyatt Osvaldo Paganini circulation@smdp.com

Let the good times roll Getting around this summer may be just a rental away.

The scoop on frozen treats What could top off a sweltering summer day better than something cold and tasty?

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Little readers

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Playtime by the sea

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Fashionable environmentalism

Kids’ books to take along or read before hitting the road.

ON THE COVER A newspaper with issues 410 Broadway, Suite B Santa Monica, CA 90401 OFFICE (310) 458-PRESS (7737) FAX (310) 576-9913

With concerts, movies and Pacific Park, there is always something to do at the Santa Monica Pier.

Visit us online at smdp.com

The Santa Monica Daily Press is published six days a week, Monday through Saturday. 19,000 daily circulation, 46,450 daily readership. Circulation is audited and verified by Circulation Verification Council, 2006. Serving the City of Santa Monica, and the communities of Venice Beach, Brentwood, West LA. Members of CNPA, AFCP, CVC, Associated Press, IFPA, Santa Monica Chamber of Commerce.

© 2006 Newlon Rouge, LLC, all rights reserved.

calendar 2008 20 Summer Get out there already. A complete directory of listings for the summer.

summa@smdp.com

Published by Newlon Rouge, LLC

for summer.

Taste of the season

roberth@smdp.com

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ready to hit the beach 19 Getting Take the 21-day challenge to get fit

Dressin’ so fine and lookin’ so pretty now begs the question: What is ecofashion?

down Abbot Kinney 16 Strolling There’s a curious enclave of the Venice COVER DESIGN/ROBERT SUMMA COVER PHOTOGRAPHY/ BRANDON WISE THE SANTA MONICA PIER

community stretching several blocks down Abbot Kinney Boulevard.

The sound of summer in this city is the slap of foam rubber against bare feet.

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BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Get down, get funky, get loose The Westside offers some of the hottest entertainment and night life By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS

The Temple Bar For one of the best times out, head to The Temple Bar at 1026 Wilshire Blvd. and 11th Street. It has been providing local clubgoers with a wide variety of music choices since it opened its doors for operation in 1999. The club, a bit “Eastern meets Urban,” boasts “diversity through music” and features smooth jazz, world beat, funky bass rhythms and groovy sounds from around the globe. Hanging behind the stage is a giant mural of Buddha (painted by artist John Robertson) and the décor is an upbeat mix of red and amber hues. Artists who have graced The Temple Bar stage include: Ben Harper, Damien Marley and Jackson Browne. The club’s bookings agent, said he looks for, “Music that makes people move, that touches them, so they get in the groove. It can be anything from indie rock to funk soul to Latin and world music. It’s really about the universality of music.” Thursday, Friday and Saturday The Temple Bar offers a “Happy After Hour Special” with no cover charge ‘round midnight, $3 beers, $5 martinis and $2 tacos. Plus, there’s a live DJ from midnight till closing. For information, call (310) 393-6611.

blue pastel hues coming from the iridescent drapes that embellish this otherwise white on white chromatic design. Off the bar area is an area reminiscent of a library with oversized, tufted leather wing chairs, mahogany tables and an open flame fire wall, made cozier by its surrounding white curtains. The club also features private beach cabanas for parties of five or more, which are available on a first come, first served basis, but can be reserved for the mere price of $600. Yes, you read it correctly … $600. For information, call (310) 394-5454.

Air Conditioned If it’s dance you’re looking for head to the Air Conditioned dance club at 625 Lincoln Blvd. in Venice (the former site of the El Marquez). It is 3,700 square feet with an ample dance floor for you to get your groove on. They have ‘80s and ‘90s Party Jams on Friday nights and Old Skool Hip Hop, R&B and Reggae on Saturday. Professional dancer Lisa Kellogg frequents the Venice venue on Saturdays for it’s classic hip-hop vibe and said, “The DJ (Quickie Mart), really puts a lot of verve into his mixes. It’s also the biggest club on the Westside and it’s great for dancing.” The cover charge is a mere $10 but if you’re having a party you may want to think about reserving their “Godfather Booth” which seats a party of 12 to 15 people. For information, call (310) 4522573.

The Penthouse at the Huntley

Wilshire

The Penthouse ultra lounge located atop the Huntley Hotel on Second Street and California Avenue is the coolest spot to see and be seen in Santa Monica, offering 360 degree views of the ocean, mountains and city amidst one of the most inviting atmospheres. Famed designer Thomas Schoos (best known for his work on restaurants such as Koi and TAO New York/Las Vegas) combines sensuality and artful aesthetics in this fabulous space. The large circular metal bar is the club’s main feature, and at its center, pillar candles are stacked, tiered and surrounded by bottles of liquor. Contrasting the dark wood floor are high white leather bar chairs, and muted

Drink under the stars at Santa Monica’s top outdoor/indoor supper club. Wilshire, at 2454 Wilshire Blvd. and 24th Street, (also designed by Thomas Schoos) features an outdoor patio with an open fire pit, a water feature, and a warm inviting ambiance. You’ll definitely feel serene in this natural setting while you’re seated on the plush, earth-toned couches ensconced by real pine trees. Above the back bar, the club hosts a “cigar room” but most of the time, it’s filled with cigarette smokers. Go early and grab a drink before you hit the clubs around town. For information, call (310) 587-1707. news@smdp.com


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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Taste of the season BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Summer is upon us, and what better way to enjoy the weather than with a bit of al fresco dining and seasonal summer treats? By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS

Rosti

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Savory rosemary shrubs growing from ceramic pots adorn the entrance of Rosti, a neighborhood restaurant located at 931 Montana Ave. and 10th Street that serves healthy pasta dishes and plenty of fresh vegetables. The outdoor dining atmosphere is made festive with terra-cotta colored tablecloths, maize napkins and lattice green chairs. Everything, save for a few deserts, is made on the premises. Their al fresco menu features the California Caesar Mare — marinated calamari, shrimp, bell peppers, and the jumbo shrimp risotto Toscana — served atop arborio rice cooked with artichokes in a tomato and basil white wine sauce. If you’re feeling adventurous try the handmade crab ravioli tossed in a vodka pink sauce. Rosti doesn’t serve alcohol but permits you to bring your own wine with no corkage fee. You can pick up summer deals on some smooth rosés from Provence, France for under $20 or a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc for about $15 at The Fireside Cellars at 1420 Montana Ave. For information, call (310) 393-3236.

A Votre Sante Located at the rather nebulous Santa Monica/Brentwood border (at 13016 San Vicente Blvd. and 26th Street) is a treat for your palette, A Votre Sante — which means “to your health.” Co-owners Coco Artin and Bashar Molen opened in 1987 to bring “light and natural fare from around the world” to the dining public and are currently expanding their restaurant. The remodel features patio seating along with delicious seasonal specials such as the salmon fajita with an avocadojalapeño sauce and the lemon chicken breast with asparagus and angel hair pasta. For information, call (310) 451-1813.

The Penthouse For one of the most beautiful views in Santa Monica and some of the greatest food, don’t miss The Penthouse atop the Huntley Hotel on Second Street just north of Wilshire Boulevard. Chef Seth Greenberg whips up delectable treats with fresh veggies from local growers at the city’s Farmers’ Market such as his seasonal specialty white gazpacho with locally grown melon and cucumber and fresh Dungeness crab meat. Greenberg uses local organic produce from Weiser, McGrath and Windrose Farms. And it’s no surprise the food is so spectacular because Greenberg was one of the chefs at L’orangerie working under Chef Gilles Epie during the restaurant’s heyday. The crowd is diverse with more serious diners during the week and a younger more eclectic group frequenting the restaurant/bar on the weekends. For information, call (310) 394-5454.

Real Food Daily Vegetarians can satisfy their cravings for organic vegan cuisine at Real Food Daily at 514 Santa Monica Blvd. and Fourth Street. They feature “delicious and life-enhancing” fare and offer weekly and monthly specials such as the lemon-pepper tempeh smothered with roasted red pepper and walnut sauce and grilled polenta. No need to fret about parking either; there are both parking meters and a valet available. For information, call (310) 451-7544.

The Buffalo Club For the ultimate outdoor dining-in-style experience head to The Buffalo Club at 1520 Olympic Blvd. (between 14th and 16th streets). You won’t find any markings to indicate you’ve arrived at your destination save for a small neon sign that reads, “cocktails,” although the valet, in this otherwise industrial area, is a dead giveaway. Inside you’ll find yourself transported to a New Yorkstyled 1920s chophouse, with dark mahogany woods and burgundy leather booths redolent of an era long gone. Head to the back bar and private garden courtyard where pink and red Chinese lanterns strung across the courtyard provide just the right amount of ambient lighting for dining under the summer sky. Here amidst formal hedges, potted orange and palm trees, topiaries and a lush wall of greenery, Executive Chef Patrick Healy whips up comfort food like real mac & cheese and chicken potpie. Celebrities frequent the establishment and reservations fill up quickly — so be sure to call ahead. For information, call (310) 450-8600. news@smdp.com

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM


THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

SUMMER GUIDE 2008

The scoop on frozen treats If ice cream isn’t your thing, give this place a try

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS hat could top off a sweltering summer day better than something frozen? Whether it’s ice cream, gelato or sorbet, Santa Monica offers some of the best frozen treats on the Westside.

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Angelato Café Just off the Third Street Promenade, at 301 Arizona Ave., the Angelato Café serves over 100 varieties of exotic flavored gelato and sorbet such as, cinnamon, cola float, and pear sorbetto. Owner Ted Ang opened four years ago to rave reviews. Their products contain no artificial flavors or colors and taste exquisite. The only downside is the scoop policy on their smallest portion (available for $3.45 and comprised of two miniature scoops); they refuse to mix flavors. You’re going to have to tough it out with one flavor, unless you opt for the larger and pricier ($4.95) size. For information, call (310) 656-9999.

Di Dio’s Italian Ices Di Dio’s Italian Ices at 1305 Montana Ave. has been a neighborhood hot spot for seasonal fruit sorbets for almost 12 years. Summer flavors include blood orange, melon and pomegranate. Owner Robert Di Dio, who recently added gelatos, said, “I didn’t want to miss that extra customer, the one that comes in with a family of four and one of them wants ice cream.” If you love chocolate, Di Dio’s has one of the richest, and most delicious gelatos available at very reasonable prices. For information, call (310) 393-2788.

Bud’s Deli For a place that boasts “the best ice cream” in town, Bud’s Deli at 2727 Ocean Park Blvd. has very little in the way of selection. There are roughly 12 ice cream flavors including chocolate, chocolate mint chip, chocolate dipped strawberry and a lonely vanilla. The shop itself is a mishmash of styles: a mirrored wall seems strangely reminiscent of the 1970s disco era. Red Naugahyde-ish and chrome parlor chairs grouped around white café tables cramp the already tight space. For information, call (310) 450-6860. news@smdp.com

Five generations of family jewelers Custom Design • In House Manufacturing Serving the Community of Santa Monica for Five Generations Specializing in Platinum, Gold and Engagement Jewelry.

Gregory Edward Avedis

Eddie Avo

331 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica 310.451.1349 www.readersjewelers.com

VANILLA BAKE SHOP Amy Berman’s Vanilla Bake Shop at 512 Wilshire Blvd. offers some of the most delectable treats. They bake from scratch daily, use no artificial flavors, primarily feature couture cakes and cupcakes (their red velvet’s are the biggest seller) and seasonally flavored macaroons. Berman, recently featured on The Martha Stewart Show, uses seasonal fruits and said, “We’re rolling out a passion fruit filled cupcake this summer.” Imagine your favorite confection, whether it be: Key lime pie, Meyer lemon tarts, dirt cake (a specialty consisting of callebaut chocolate mousse, chocolate crumbles and fresh whip cream) or triple berry shortcake, available in a shot-sized tumbler and chilled to perfection — these are Berman’s “Icebox Desert Shots.” While ice cream is certainly a must for the summer, you won’t want to miss out on trying these cold, creamy treats. For information, call (310) 458-6644.

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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Fresh and clean Farmers’ Market a place to meet, greet and eat By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS rganic produce, a wide variety of herbs and spices, fresh flowers, olives, cheeses, raw milk, organic chicken, grain-fed bison, multi-colored carrots and potatoes, and the freshest produce in town are just a smattering of what’s available at the Santa Monica Farmer’s Markets. In a nearby tent, Bill’s Bees sells honey and pollen. A sign above reads, “We get stung so you don’t have to.” In an adjacent stall the Pistachio Lady doles out samples of unique flavors such as, chili-lemon, onion-garlic and red-hot habanero. It’s estimated that 90,000 shoppers visit the markets each year and with the wide array of vegetables on display it’s easy to see why. For shoppers like Brielle Chaslow and Michael Kroman shopping here is a weekly ritual. Of the produce, Chaslow said, “It tastes like it’s picked right off of somebody’s farm.” Local growers bring their best, typically specializing in a particular crop. The folks at Weiser Farms are friendly and willing to take time to explain the differences between their abundant variety of potatoes and root vegetables. Dennis, a Weiser employee explained, “The little red thumbs are the most popular potato for soups, stews, roasts and potato salads … the French fingerlings are the best mashing potatoes … the Peruvian purple’s are

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very high in iron.” Mai Thao of Thao Farms said, “We’ve been in business for 12 years … and we sell Asian veggies and herbs.” They’re not organic, however they do not use any sprays or pesticides. Shopper Richard Anderson, a 15-year market veteran said he comes for the, “quality of the food, the competitive prices and the variety.” Thao Farms is his first stop every Saturday. He said he likes that, “local growers tend to have a smaller carbon footprint.” Spring Hill Jersey Cheese in Petaluma, Calif. (just north of San Francisco) uses Jersey cow milk; which has 25 percent more butterfat than Holstein cows. They also offer a deliciously creamy pesto-jack. Some favorites are garlic cheddar, sage cheddar and their signature white pepper cheddar. Organic Pastures Dairy, based in Fresno, sells organic raw milk and raw almonds. Their cows are grass-fed in pastures and are not kept in corrals. Maurice Kaehler, an effervescent and knowledgeable rep for the company, said they’ve been, “selling to the local Farmer’s Markets for the past five years, as well as to local retail stores throughout the state.” As for its shelf life, he said, “Raw milk does not go bad. It will sour, and turn into a drinkable yogurt.” Just remember, the Farmer’s Market has a no pet policy so be sure to leave “Fido” or “Frederica” at home. news@smdp.com

These Farmers’ Markets are open rain or shine ■ Arizona Avenue and Third Street is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 8:30 am — 1:30 p.m. ■ The 2200 Virginia Ave. location is open Saturdays from 8 a.m. — 1 p.m. and on Sundays from 9:30 a.m. — 1 p.m. ■ The 2640 Main St. market, also features live music.


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Let the good times roll Getting around this summer may be just a rental away By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS here’s absolutely no reason to sit home this summer when you can be out riding a bike or Rollerblading down the beach bike path, taking in the great weather and sunshine. But hey, if you don’t have a bike or blades, don’t despair, Santa Monica has numerous rental facilities to make any beach outing a fun-filled adventure.

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BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Blazing Saddles Blazing Saddles, located on the Santa Monica Pier, adjacent to the Police Sub Station, rents cruisers and mountain bikes for $8 per hour; $23 per day. Fun cycles (three wheelers) and choppers are $10 per hour; $30 per day, and tandems are $14 per hour; $38 per day. Blazing Saddles is open weekdays from 9 a.m. — 7 p.m. and weekends from 8 a.m. — 7 p.m. For information, call (310) 393-9778.

Perry’s Bike Rentals At Perry’s Bike Rentals you can rent a beach cruiser or a mountain bike for $8 per hour, choppers are $10 per hour and skates are $8. Hours are 9 a.m. — 7 p.m. during the week, and 8 a.m. — 9 p.m. on weekends. They require a $150 deposit, which may be paid via cash or credit card. There are four Santa Monica locations and two in Venice. For information, call (310) 696-8644.

Spokes ‘n Stuff Spokes ‘n Stuff at 1715 Ocean Front Walk in Santa Monica, rents beach cruisers, mountain bikes and choppers for $6 per hour for kids and $7.50 per hour for adults. Tandems are $15 per hour and $40 per day and fun cycles are $22 per day. They also rent skates at $7.50 per hour or $18 per day and pedal-powered go-carts for $10 per hour or $40 for the day. If you have a hankering for hitting the waves, Spokes also rents surfboards at $20 per day. Spokes is located near the Loews Hotel. The store is open 8:30 a.m. — 7 p.m. everyday. Their last rental is at 6 p.m. For information, call (310) 395-4748.

Segway Los Angeles Another fun and safe way to tool around town is on a Segway, an environmentally friendly “human transporter” that uses gyroscopes and tilt sensors to keep riders upright at all times. Riders may opt to stand or use the seats that come with some of the older models. Rentals are for two-hour periods and the cost is $75 per person. Employee Tresa St. Hill, said, “We have a short, 15 minute training before the rental, we show you a safety video, provide a helmet and make sure you feel comfortable before taking the Segway out.” Additional hours are $35 each, or you may rent the Segway for a full 24 hours for $275. Segway L.A. is located at 1660 Ocean Ave., just two blocks south of the Santa Monica Pier, adjacent to the Hotel California. Their hours of operation are: Monday — Saturday from 10 a.m. — 7 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. — 7 p.m. ID and a $250 credit card deposit is required. For information, call (310) 395-1395.

Z J Boarding Z J Boarding rents surfboards at $20 for six hours or $30 for a 24-hour period. Boogie boards are $10 and $15 for a full day. Wet suits are $10 and $15 respectively. Hours are 10 a.m. — 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. — 7 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. — 6 p.m. For information, call (310) 392-5646.

Santa Monica Surf Shop Santa Monica Surf Shop located at 2934 Wilshire Blvd. rents surfboards for $25 per day. Wet suits are $15 per day. Hours are 10 a.m. — 7 p.m., except Sunday when they close at 6 p.m. For information, call (310) 315-7244. news@smdp.com

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Playing it safe ■ Most rental facilities require a credit card and valid identification to secure the rental, call ahead to be sure. ■ Always practice proper safety procedures. ■ Return all rentals in good condition.


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Kids’ books to take along or read before hitting the road By LEANNE ITALIE

ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER eading for the beach, hopping a plane to France or hitting the American road with your kids this summer? Some books to prep or pack:

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■ “Scaredy Squirrel at the Beach” (Kids Can Press, $15.95, ages 4-8) written and illustrated by Melanie Watt. The germophobic and jittery squirrel is back and stressing out over a trip to the beach to hunt down the perfect shell. What about the hazards? Tribes of jellyfish, mobs of lobsters, packs of pirates. And the crowds. Oh the crowds. After careful planning, he makes his peace. ■ “Where’s Waldo? The Ultimate Travel Collection” (Candlewick Press, ages 6-up) by Martin Handford. Waldo, the knit-capped, stripe-sweatered pop icon, has come of age. Twenty-one years after he first tried to get lost in a crowd, he’s squeezed into a tricky travel collection as he traverses the globe. And he’s joined by some friends who dress a lot like him! The book is small and light weight. Good luck. ■ “Go Go America” (Scholastic, $17.99, ages 9-12) by Dan Yaccarino. The perfect take-along for a road trip. Pile in with the Farleys as little Freddie wows his family with obscure facts organized by state and accompanied by playful visuals. Did you know, for instance, that it’s illegal to tie a giraffe to a telephone poll in Atlanta, Ga.? Passing through Kansas? Look for a very large ball of twine in Cawker City that weighs 17,554 pounds. ■ “Wonders of America: Yellowstone” (Aladdin Paperbacks, $3.99, ages 4-6) by Marion Dane Bauer and illustrated by John Wallace. The latest in a series for Level 1 readers, there’s a surprising amount of information: Yellowstone became a national park in 1872. Old Faithful is one of 500 geysers. More than 100 wolves roam Yellowstone in a reintroduction program. The park is home to one of the world’s largest petrified forests, and to Bison, pronghorn antelope and bighorn sheep. ■ “Everybody Bonjours” (Alfred A. Knopf, $16.99, ages 5-8) by Leslie Kimmelman and illustrated by Sarah McMenemy. A little girl in a smart red dress bonjours high at the Eiffel Tower and bonjours low in the Metropolitan, the Paris subway system, as her family demonstrates in this rhyming picture book that Paris isn’t just for lovers. They stop at the magnificent Sacre Coeur on the city’s highest hill, take in the Mona Lisa at the Louvre and sail toy boats at the Tuileries Gardens. Tips on sights to see included.

SANTA MONICA HOMEOPATHIC PHARMACY Specializing in the finest products with the most knowledgeable staff in the country, available to assist you. Homeopathy Chinesee Herbs Western n Herbs Nutritionall Supplements

Books Cosmetics Aromatherapy Flowerr Essences

Open Monday - Saturday, 9:30 am - 5:15 pm 629 Broadway at Seventh Phone: (310) 395-1131 Fax: (310) 395-7861 Website: www.smhomeopathic.com

Email: info@smhomeopathic.com


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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Playtime

at the pier acific Park at the Santa Monica Pier is an admission-free amusement park open 365 days a year. The park features 12 amusement rides, 21 midway games and an oceanfront food court. There are also several gourmet restaurants, shops, and continuing events, so whether it’s day or night, there’s always something going on at the pier. Parking is ample. Limited shortterm parking is also available. Prices and operating hours vary so please call ahead (310) 2608744 or visit pacpark.com.

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The Carousel The Carousel is open Monday through Thursday between 11 a.m. — 5 p.m. and on weekends, from 11 a.m. — 7 p.m. Rides are only $1. The original carousel was built in 1922 but this particular version has been on the pier since 1947 and is located inside the Looff Hippodrome. In honor of some of the seasons the Pier Restoration Corporation has added new animals to its rotating lineup. Ben Franz-Knight, executive director of the Pier Restoration Corporation, said, “In the spring there was a rabbit, and during the winter there were reindeer.” According to Franz-Knight, some new ones will be arriving in the fall but he’s not giving any hints as to what they will be. You’ll have to come down and see for yourself.

TSNY Los Angeles — Trapeze School For the ultimate in fulfilling your need for adventure, you absolutely must try the Trapeze School (made famous in episode #82 “The Catch” of “Sex In The City”). TSNY L.A. made its Southern California debut at the Santa Monica Pier on May 10 to spectacular reviews. Native Californian Jonathon Conant, president and co-founder of TSNY, along with his partners Dave and Anne Brown, were looking to expand the school (which also has locations in NY, Baltimore and Boston) and since the partners are from the West Coast, they thought Santa Monica, with its natural beauty and diverse population seemed a natural progression for what Conant calls a “life affirming activity.” Conant started the flying school because he said, “Everybody has dreams of flying and this is the first public access to try something new and unimaginable and make it real.” Visit TSNY L.A.’s Web site at www.trapezeschool.com. For more information, call (310) 394-5800.

Restaurants If you’re hungry there are plenty of restaurants on the historic Santa Monica Pier. Bubba Gump’s

The Pacific Wheel A grand opening celebration and re-lighting of the world’s only solar powered Ferris wheel, the “Pacific Wheel” took place May 22. One reason for the change, said Pacific Park’s Director of Marketing and Sales Jeff Klocke, is that “The effort to go green is extremely important to the community and the new LED lighting system uses 75 percent less electricity.”

Bubba Gump’s, the fictitious restaurant from the film “Forrest Gump” is a reality and it’s located at 301 Santa Monica Pier, Building 9. They specialize in appetizers like Cajun Shrimp and entrees such as their Dixie Style Baby Back Ribs. Bubba’s is kid friendly and has crayons and puzzles for your little ones to amuse themselves with while you’re relaxing with one of their specialty drinks. For information, call (310) 393-0458.

The Arcade

Mariasol

The Pier’s arcade features skeeball, a dart game, long range basketball hoops, a balloon pop race, ring toss, a climbing wall, miniature golf at Pirate’s Cove and the X-Treme Wave Jumper — a multi-bungee attraction that Klocke said, “Will have you jumping over two stories high while you experience free-fall sensation and achieve gravity-defying feats.”

If you’re looking for a taste of “fare reminiscent of that found in the Mexican beach towns Cabo San Lucas and Puerto Vallarta” head to Mariasol at the very end of the pier (401 Santa Monica Pier). Distinctive sauces and fresh fish make it a favorite amongst locals and out-of-towners alike. This jewel of a restaurant overlooks the Pacific Ocean and with its outdoor patios and dining it’s a great place to take in a sunset. For information, call (310) 917-5050.

The Rides If it’s action-packed rides you’re in search of you’ll find plenty for both adults and children at Pacific Park. Kid’s Cove has more sedate rides for youngsters like the Pier Patrol (mini-cars), the Frog Hopper, the Crazy Submarine and Inkie’s Mini-Scrambler. But for adults and teens, hang on to your hats when you board “West Coaster,” the only West Coast, over-the-water, steel roller coaster. If that doesn’t satisfy your yen for adrenaline, head to the Pacific Plunge — a nine-story tower gondola ride that Klocke said, “Lifts riders more than 150 feet over the Santa Monica Bay, before rendering them in a momentary state of flight.” For those of you who prefer to stay on the ground there are bumper cars and a large scrambler.

Rusty’s Surf Ranch Rusty’s Surf Ranch has been an institution of the pier for over 12 years. It’s a laid back, casual bar/restaurant that serves food, alcohol and offers plenty of live music. Cover charges vary depending on the bands playing, but typically it’s $7 for 21 and over and $12 for 21 and under. Bands like the Red Elvises and Tom Nolan command a $15 cover. Live music starts at 8 p.m. Monday nights is karaoke and Sunday is open mic with music, poetry and comedy. There is no cover on Sundays. Rusty’s is at 256 Santa Monica Pier — right next to the carousel. For information, call (310) 393-7437.

The Lobster

August Drive-In Movies Every Tuesday night starting August 5 is “Movie Night” on the pier. Tickets for movies and events are free but should be picked up ahead of time. The primary outlet for movie tickets is the Visitor Center on Main Street, however Vidiots (302 Pico Blvd.) also distributes tickets for events on the pier.

At the top of the pier is one of the best restaurants in Santa Monica, The Lobster. The mood here is more upscale and the prices aren’t cheap, but with dishes such as the pan-roasted lobster with Jim Beam sauce served over mashed potatoes, outdoor dining and views that overlook the entire pier, you can’t go wrong. Be sure to call ahead for reservations. Open 9 a.m. — 11 p.m. For information, call (310) 458-9294. news@smdp.com

The Pier Summer Twilight Dance Series The Twilight Dance Series kicks off, and continues every Thursday beginning June 26 through August 28. Shows start at 7 p.m. For more information, call (310) 458-8900. June 26 The Bonedaddys July 3 One Hawaii with Keali’i Reichel and Na Leo July 10 Spanish Harlem Orchestra July 17 Special presentation — TBA July 24 Bachata Roja Legends, Legendary Dominican Republic artists first ever California performance

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July 31 Michelle Shocked with Mike Ferris Aug. 7 Oliver Mtukudzi with opening act Rocky Dawuni Aug. 14 Carmen Consoli, Italian songstress in her West Coast debut Aug. 21 Peter & Gordon with Gerry & The Pacemakers Aug. 28 Toots & the Maytals


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ROYAL ELASTICS ON MAIN STREET FEATURES A LINE OF FOOTWEAR INSPIRED BY THE ART OF ANDY WARHOL.

Flip-flopping through summer By Mariel Howsepian

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS he sound of summer in this city is the slap of foam rubber against bare feet. With everyone wearing flip-flops, what’s a fashionista to do? She strolls into Royal Elastics. Royal Elastics was founded in 1996 by two Aussie trend setters with a goal to create “laceless” shoes. They focused on innovation and simplicity, trademarking Stretch-fit Closure Systems to design slip-on fashion athletic shoes. Their logo is the Fleur — a takeoff on the fleur de lis symbol. In 2001, the company was purchased by K Swiss. Royal Elastics’ first store in America is right here in Santa Monica on Main Street. In addition to slip-ons, Royal Elastics carries flip-flops. The Andy Warhol foundation came to Royal Elastics with the idea of creating a line of limited edition shoes using Warhol graphics. “We generally don’t make more than 1,000 pairs of any one design,” says Paulina Castelli of Royal Elastics. “We ran three hundred of the flip flop.” In comparison, the Havaianas factory in Brazil produces 125 million pairs of flip-flops per year. That’s five pairs of flip-flops per second. A pair of Havaianas will cost you $16, while a pair of Royal Elastics cost $65 for women’s flipflops and $70 for men’s — If rising prices have made cost your main flip-flop buying concern this summer, Horizons West Surf Shop carries Locals in colors like blue, light blue, and honey for only $7.99. Perhaps the biggest reason people purchase flip-flops is for comfort.

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One company, Sanuk — which means “happy” in Thai — has even taken the comfort of a flipflop sole and added a closed-toe shoe upper to create Sidewalk Surfers, available at ZJ Boarding House. Royal Elastics did the opposite. Wanting their sandal to have more support than the typical flat flip-flop, they took their Grata fashion athletic shoe and gave it a flip-flop upper. Castelli explained that Royal Elastics’ designers are “classically trained in industrial design.” Referring to the shoe in her hand, Castelli said, “These are like little mini buildings.” Plus, they’re fun. “We love anything that screams nonconformist,” Castelli said. Grata Thongs are printed with bold images of Jackie O., Edie Sedgwick and Andy Warhol. Fun is an important factor. Horizons West carries one of this summer’s most fun flip-flop designs. Reef has created the Fanning, complete with “Thirst Quenching Technology” — a bottle opener built into the flip-flop’s sole ($44.99). Horizons West also offers Rainbow Sandals’ “Eco Sandals.” Designed to last several summers, making them more eco-friendly, these flip-flops are guaranteed against defects such as the straps pulling out or the stitching coming apart. The sole is made from layers of sponge rubber and each of the layers varies in density, which allows for the sandals to mold to the wearer’s feet. Eco Sandals come in brown or black. For more color options, try Dolce Vita. They carry this season’s two trends in color: High gloss crayon brights and metallics. Gold and silver sandals can be worn with your little black dress or your favorite pair of jeans. news@smdp.com

‘Ath-leisure’ shoes are made for walking — in style Samantha Critchell

AP FASHION WRITER NEW YORK — You can leave those blinding white sneakers out of your summer vacation suitcase: Comfortable walking shoes are a fashion dilemma no more. Not only is it possible to find shoes that are both stylish and wearable, it’s probable. Shoe designers, manufacturers and retailers are paying a lot of attention to the burgeoning category of “ath-leisure” — the industry code word for what most people would call weekend shoes. They’re definitely not sneakers, says Catherine Beaudoin, of Gap Inc.’s online shoe store Piperlime, but they incorporate a lot of what sneakers have to offer, including arch support, soft materials and rubber outsoles. What’s different are the styles. Shoes from the likes of Privo, Crocs and Aerosoles started off as “comfort shoes” but have moved toward fashion. On the flip side, upscale brands Cole Haan and Stuart Weitzman have paid more attention to making their fash-

ionable shoes comfortable. Taryn Rose, sold at high-end department stores, was founded by an orthopedic surgeon determined to marry form and function. “Everyone is moving to the center,” says Beaudoin, who personally favors Privo’s Hop shoe, a breathable, lightweight mesh ballet slipper. Another staple of her suitcase is the foldable leopard-print Brad shoe by Bernardo because it’s great to match all the neutral clothes that she likes to pack. “I’ve been in the business 15 years, and in the ‘90s, `comfort shoes’ was a euphemism for matronly orthopedic shoes. No one under 80 would be caught dead wearing them,” says John Kuehl, women’s product merchandizer for Shoemall.com, “but the sneaker generation wants to look nice and get the comfort they enjoyed wearing sneakers. “You have to marry athletic shoes with dress shoes and other stylish shoes to attract this discerning audience.” According to market researcher The NPD Group, fashion-focused comfort shoes, along with low-performance athletic and skateboard shoes, posted the highest growth rates last year in the $44 million domestic footwear market.


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NATURAL HIGH LIFESTYLE OFFERS SCADS OF ECO-FASHIONS.

Fashionable environmentalism By Mariel Howsepian

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS ressin’ so fine and lookin’ so pretty now begs the question: What is eco-fashion? “A lot of it comes down to simplifying, efficiency, limiting packaging, using resources that are plentiful and quick to regenerate,” said Frank Anguili, founder of Natural High Lifestyle, a company that manufactures not only eco-fashion, but also bags, beach blankets, and duvet covers. Their flagship store is located on Main Street. According to the Sustainable Technology Education Project (STEP), eco-fashions are clothes that have been designed and manufactured with the consideration of three factors: The environment, the working conditions of factory employees, and the health of consumers. When Anguili founded Natural High Lifestyle 10 years ago, one of his goals was to bring awareness to the idea of using Earth’s resources wisely. The company offers men’s and women’s clothing made of resources such as bamboo, hemp, and Tencel (a fiber made from wood pulp cellulose). “These resources are quick to replenish themselves,” said Anguili. Eco-fashions are made from raw materials that have been grown without pesticides, and recycled materials such as plastic bottles. Even Wal-Mart is selling T-shirts made from recycled plastic Coca-Cola bottles. When asked for his take on Wal-Mart carrying eco-fashion, Anguili said, “I think it’s a positive thing in the grand scheme of things. They’re so powerful in their buying capability. I hope that if Wal-Mart is demanding organic cotton, it improves the lives of these farmers and the land that they’re farming. But, from a business perspective, it means more competition.” A growing number of Santa Monica shops are carrying environmentally conscious clothing, including children’s boutique Harper Lane. Harper Lane carries Kate Quinn organic cotton onesies, Lola & James dresses made from recycled silk scarves, and Surf Monk Turkish cotton and bamboo blend beach cover-ups. Designer Baby Bean sews dresses from vintage fabric remnants from the 1930s and 1940s; no two are alike. While mommies shop, kids can sit at the back of Harper Lane, underneath a big tree. One of the store’s owners Stacy Bernstein explains that the tree is home to Harper the Squirrel, and if you peak inside, you’ll see his living room. Harper won’t be home. During the day, he keeps himself busy cleaning up the beach. Children can write him letters and leave them in his little mailbox. The next time they come in, a reply from Harper will be waiting. Bernstein’s hope is that the experience creates a dialogue about the importance of taking care of the environment. While many may argue that being eco-friendly should be a concern when buying clothing, Anguili says he wants his customers “to consider ‘organic’ as an afterthought. Eco-responsibility is the responsibility of the manufacturer and not a selling point for the consumer.” Anguili went on to say that he wants his customers to buy something because “it feels good. They like the design. They like the color.” Natural High Lifestyle’s color palette is inspired by the fusion of surf and yoga cultures. Clothes come in colors like berry, monk, lemon, mist, ocean, eclipse, pearl, sage, slate, sand and chocolate. Colors don’t change season to season because Anguili doesn’t follow the traditional fashion calendar. Whereas fashions come in and go out, real eco-fashion is anti-trend. “We want people to wear our clothes until they fall apart,” said Anguili. “The overconsumption of ‘green’ products is its own problem. This isn’t what we’ve been taught in America. We’ve been taught to keep up with the Joneses.” Natural High Lifestyle is situated within walking distance from Urth Café (which uses solar energy), Rawvolution, the community garden, the Santa Farmers’ Market, Bike Attack, and Yoga Works. “Our neighborhood has a leaning toward really promoting simple living,” Anguili said. Anguili hopes to inspire small changes on a local level.

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Strolling down Abbot Kinney By Taylor Van Arsdale

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS here’s a curious enclave of the Venice community stretching several blocks down Abbot Kinney Boulevard, which is host to a myriad of eclectic clothing stores, restaurants and art galleries. Nestled between these brightly colored shops are the occasional homeowners in their bungalow styled houses. There’s a real sense of community here and the local purveyors are friendly and eager to chat. Ron Rosenthal of The Perfect Piece buys and sells one-of-akind antiques such as old radios, road signs and patio furniture for your home and garden. The first item spotted is an old Hollywood film light called a “keg” notably for its barrel shape. Rosenthal rewires these pieces for home use. “Most of the stores that are selling ‘antiques’ are buying wholesale out of a catalogue, but these are all one-shot deals,” he said. Trek Thunder Kelly a third-generation artist at Red House Gallery has the best of two worlds, appealing artwork and an alluring studio. You may remember Kelly as the “blue candidate” who ran against Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 2003 California Gubernatorial Election, his color choice spun from his “Blue Period” in which he spent $20,000 to update his entire wardrobe to a shade of royal blue. Think him a tad eccentric

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Check it out: First Fridays (June 6 — Sept. 5) is a celebration of the Venice creative community featuring art openings, live music and in-store events. Stores will remain open until 10 p.m. For more info: www.venicechamber.net. however he’s also a most genial host. His artwork is irreverent and enticing. Kelly is inspired by, “People I think have strong personalities or that I like from the past,” evidenced in the acrylic of Jim Morrison’s face painted onto the body of a model in a Vanity Fair ad. Kelly said his series is, “Famous icons against advertising; the juxtaposition of something familiar contrasting with modern advertising.” His galleries are separated by a serene courtyard, which Kelly said, “Used to be asphalt and a picnic table.” After a complete a remodel, the area has been transformed into “recreation space.” Gray gravel surrounds symmetrically laid pavers and a bamboo bar; a long rattan couch with orange pillows and a chessboard beckons players. Black strips of tarpaulin runners float above strung blue lanterns and a lush, emerald green canopy of trees envelops what otherwise remains open to the sky. Kelly leaves his doors open so people may come in and observe his process. Don’t miss the chance to see one of Venice’s best artists at work.

FRESH FUNKY FUN

Twist

2601 1 17th h Stt and d Ocean n Park (lookk forr thee Pinkk storee acrosss from m Bob’s)

Santaa Monicaa 310.314.9161

Hours:: Tuess Frii 12-7 Satt 11-6 6 Sun n 12-5

Buildings here are painted brightly, like the olive green Floral Art, a floral design studio, whose company’s white fleur-de-lis twines up its side. The boutique sells scented candles, perfumes and birdcages that can be purchased separately or arranged with flowers. Lexi Beerman said, “Designer Jennifer McGarigle uses a vintage modern aesthetic … with clean modern lines to create elegant arrangements with an unusual twist.” Custom shops abound on Abbot Kinney. Kevin Simon Clothing creates one-of-a-kind pieces to fit your body type and Stansbury Collection crafts sofas in any style to fit their client’s specifications. After walking around you may wish to stop in at Lamai, a Thai massage therapy center which combines stretching and massage for maximum benefits. Prices range $30 per 25 minutes and $80 for two hours. And if you’re hungry for delicious food and award-winning cocktails like Liam’s Cantaloupe Martini there’s Hal’s Bar and Grill or try Primitivo, a Mediterranean wine bistro that serves hot and cold tapas and a wide variety of wines. The trip would not be complete without a stop at Abbot’s Habit, a coffee shop and café that’s abuzz with denizens. For the ultimate in refreshments, try their Citrus Mint Freeze; an iceblended mix of orange juice, lemonade, honey and real mint leaves. And if you’re still jonsin’ for something to cool you off, across the street is a Pinkberry. news@smdp.com


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Water, water everywhere … These summer recipes help you stay hydrated and trim at the same time By Elizabeth Brown

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS verybody flocks to the beach for one big reason. It’s the biggest reason in the world actually, comprising 70 percent of the planet’s surface and, ideally, up to 70 percent of your body weight. It’s water, the most essential element of life. Aside from its aesthetic beauty, did you know that water contributes to your outer beauty by fulfilling your inner needs? Water is an essential nutrient, a macronutrient no less. That means that it is a major nutrient similar to carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Water is the one thing that is tied to everything. It is the

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secret to weight loss, the key to longevity, the literal fountain of youth. Californians are big on detox diets. All you really have to do is drink more water. It is the great equalizer of all things. Water is found in both the inner and outer parts of every cell, in every organ and in every aspect of the body. Trying to lose weight? Try more water or at least more waterrich foods such as soups, salads, vegetables and fruits. Barbara Rolls, a professor at Penn State, my alma matter, is known for her research on water and weight management. She conducted a study during which she had participants eat a 270 calorie chicken and rice appetizer before lunch. Sometimes the “appetizer” was accompanied by a glass of

water while other times the water was added to the “appetizer” to make a soup. Eating the soup caused participants to eat 100 fewer calories at lunch and the effect lasted through dinner because they did not eat more to make up the difference. The volume of the soup, and other water-rich foods, stimulates stretch receptors in the stomach which send signals to the brain that say, “Yes, I am being fed.” Bottom line, eat soup and other water-rich foods, they fill you up, keep you full and help you maintain that summer body all year long. ELIZABETH BROWN IS A DIETITIAN, HOLISTIC CHEF AND PERSONAL TRAINER. YOU CAN SEE HER ON YOU TUBE AS THE KITCHEN SCIENCE VIXEN. FOR MORE INFO E-MAIL HER AT EAT2LIV@EARTHLINK.NET.

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

Summer recipes

All of these recipes are water-rich and loaded with antioxidant nutrients. Cocoa Sorbet: 1/2 cup organic non-dutched cocoa (cocoasupply.com) 1 cup water 14 ice cubes (give or take a few) 1/2 cup honey (local is best) Pour cocoa, water and honey into a blender and about 5 ice cubes. Then gradually add more ice cubes until you reach a sorbet or ice cream like consistency. You will have to enjoy this one right away or freeze in “Ball” brand 8 oz. freezer jars also known as little canning jars; available on-line or at Smart and Final. You can freeze in a big mixing bowl to enjoy at a later time. Cover with wrap. When ready to enjoy, scoop out with an ice cream scooper. To take to the beach, scoop into Thermos’ which may keep the sorbet “frozen” for about 1-2 hours depending on outside temps. Garnish with fresh chopped mint or cinnamon. Berry Mint Salad: Combination of seasonal fresh berries and stone fruit (peaches, plums, pluots, nectarines or apricots) plus fresh chopped mint or tarragon leaves; simple, yet delectable. To prevent “browning” (oxidizing) of freshly cut fruit. Add a squirt of fresh lemon, lime or any citrus juice; rich in Vitamin C, an Anti-oxidant. Kale Salad: 1 bunch fresh green Kale, washed and coarsely chopped, stems and all -Blanch kale by placing in boiling water for 30 seconds. Immediately rinse under cold water to stop the cooking process. This will make some nutrients more bio-available and the kale a brighter green 1/2 cup dried Cherries 1/4 cup chopped Walnuts (Buy dried Cherries and Walnuts at the Farmer’s Market, you will taste the difference)

Juice of one lemon 1/4 cup canola or olive oil (canola has more Omega-3s) Sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste Mix it up. Eat it up and Enjoy. Watermelon Gazpacho: 1 cup watermelon, diced 1/4 cup cucumbers, diced 1/4 red bell pepper, diced 1/8 yellow onion, diced 10 basil leaves, chopped 2 sprigs parsley, chopped 6 sprigs fresh chopped cilantro for garnishing 1 tsp red wine or balsamic vinegar 1/8 tsp sea salt (or more, to taste) Set aside 1/4 to 1/2 cup of watermelon to add back after blending Pour everything else (except cilantro) into a blender and pulse. Add the reserved diced watermelon and sprinkle with cilantro before serving. Sandwich alternatives: If you are a lover of sandwiches but are “cutting carbs” for the summer, try lettuce wraps. Use the greenest of the greens such as collards, Swiss chard, mustard greens, romaine and Boston baby bib. Fill “greens” with your favorite protein rich salad mix such as egg, tuna, chicken or tofu. Hydration stations: Take Thermos full of freshly brewed flavored teas with fresh mint leaves. Try water with added slices of lemons, limes, oranges or cucumbers.


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Getting ready to hit the beach Take the 21-day challenge to get fit for summer By Elizabeth Brown

SPECIAL TO THE DAILY PRESS t was at the young age of 17 when I first found my love for strength training. That was over 22 years ago. I started out as a power lifter and then a body builder. I was never “huge” but when I first started to see them, I was so very proud of my muscles. People would say, “Sure, you look good now but wait until you stop lifting weights. It will all turn to flab.” Which is just silly by the way, muscles do not turn to flab. Regardless, I have never stopped and I doubt I ever will. At least I will never stop exercising. I will always make an effort to move my body in purposeful ways that take me out of my comfort zone of sitting on my butt all day at the computer. You too have to move your body each and everyday if you want to have a beach body all

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year long. Whether you live in beautiful Santa Monica year round or are simply visiting for a spell, it is never too late to start achieving that lean summer body. There is a Buddhist principle which states that if you do something for 21 days, you own it, baby. OK, I added the “baby” part, but I’d bet that the Dalai Lama won’t mind my little twist. So, why not take the 21-day challenge? Let’s get physical for 21 days without fail and see what happens. A pretty informative study conducted by the National Weight Control Registry sheds some light on the subject. It is a prospective study, which means they look at the habits of people who have successfully lost weight and then follow them into the future to see how things turn out. Study participants, over 5,000 of them, are those very rare individuals who have lost at

least 30 pounds and have kept it off for at least a year. Losing weight is actually easy, it’s keeping it off that is the hard part. Of the participants in the study, 45 percent lost weight on their own while 55 percent lost weight with the help of some type of program. An astounding 90 percent continued to exercise for at least one hour per day. Walking was the most common activity. Most of the study’s participants also did some sort of resistance training to improve their cardiovascular fitness and build muscle mass. Building muscle keeps people youthful, strong and independent longer in life. Strength training helps increase bone density by putting much needed “stress” on bones which can help in the prevention of osteoporosis. Being strong allows you to carry stuff. I love hefting my five-gallon water bottles up the stairs to my second-floor apartment. If I can still do that when I reach my 100th

birthday I will be very happy. Strength training is a key ingredient to your recipe for weight loss success. Strength training helps you build muscle which can equate to a faster metabolism. A faster metabolism means you burn more calories, during exercise and at rest. Strength training also makes you look more fit by sculpting those beach muscles. If you are new to strength training, please employ the help of a personal trainer. Yoga and other group classes are great ways to help you develop good form and habits. Make a commitment to do something, anything, for an hour a day for 21 days. It will become a part of your life in no time. ELIZABETH BROWN WROTE THE EXERCISE DESCRIPTIONS AND ROUTINES FOR A BOOK TITLED ”BANISH YOUR BELLY.” SHE IS A DIETITIAN, HOLISTIC CHEF AND PERSONAL TRAINER. YOU CAN CATCH HER WORKING OUT AT GOLD’S GYM AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE, OR SEE HER ON YOU TUBE AS THE KITCHEN SCIENCE VIXEN. FOR MORE INFO E-MAIL HER AT EAT2LIV@EARTHLINK.NET.

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SUMMER-LONG EVENTS TREASURES OF THE VAULT

The Petersen Automotive Museum collection contains one of the most diverse samplings of important vehicles ever assembled. Still, there are a number of important vehicles that have never been presented to the public. “Treasures of the Vault” will highlight a selection of these important acquisitions. Petersen Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. First weekend of each month; 11:30 a.m. Adults $10; seniors and students (with ID) $5; children (12 and under) $3. Reservations are recommended. For more information, call (323) 9646358.

MAMI WATA:ARTS FOR WATER SPIRITS IN AFRICA AND ITS DIASPORAS Beautiful and seductive, protective yet dangerous, the water spirit Mami Wata (Mother Water) is celebrated throughout much of Africa and the African Atlantic. Often portrayed as a mermaid, a snake charmer, or a combination of both, she and the “school” of related African water spirits all honor the essential, sacred nature of water. Experience the debut of this multimedia exhibition and explore the visual cultures and histories of Mami Wata through a dynamic presentation of the rich array of arts surrounding her — sculpture, paintings, masks, posters, and more from west and central Africa, the

Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States. Fowler Museum at UCLA Wed. – Sun.; Noon – 5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.fowler.ucla.edu.

PAVILION OF WINGS Enter a world of free flying butterflies. See a giant swallowtail, monarch, American painted Lady or even a California dogface — California's state butterfly. Over the summer, thirty different butterfly and moth species will call the pavilion home. Discover how butterflies interact with the plants and gain a new understanding of various environmental issues. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, 900 Exposition Blvd., L.A. Adults $3; $2 for seniors and students; $1 for children (12 and under).

For more information, visit www.nhm.org./exhibitions/butterflies.

AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE SCREENINGS AT THE AERO THEATRE Weekly screenings of art, independent and classic films by American Cinematheque, a non-profit, viewersupported cultural organization. Sneak peaks of up-coming movies with celebrity guest appearances and discussions with film-makers. Aero Theatre, 1328 Montana Avenue General admission tickets are $10 or $7 for members. Call (323) 466-3456 for program information.

SANTA MONICA FARMERS’ MARKETS Santa Monica's four weekly farmers markets feature field-fresh produce,

assorted vegetables, cut flowers, breads, cheeses, prepared foods, live music and more. The locations and times are as follows: ■ Third Street and Arizona: Wednesdays from 9 a .m. – 1:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. ■ Virginia Avenue Park at Pico and Cloverfield: Saturdays from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. ■ Santa Monica Airport (in the parking lots at Airport Avenue and Bundy): Saturdays from 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. ■ Main Street at Ocean Park: Sundays from 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. For Farmers’ Market information call (310) 458-8712.

RUSKIN THEATRE’S L.A. CAFÉ PLAYS Café Plays gives directors, actors and writers the chance to create a

one-act play from scratch in 10 _ hours before presenting it the same evening to a live audience. Five oneact plays, bound by a common theme and locale, are stages each night. The plays occur every third Sunday of the month. 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Admission is $10. For more information call (310) 397-3244 or visit www.ruskingrouptheatre.com.

SANTA MONICA CONSERVANCY SATURDAY WALKING TOURS Every Saturday morning, this 2-hour walk traverses more than 130 years of Santa Monica history, from its Wild West frontier beginnings to the sophisticated metropolis of today. Downtown Santa Monica 10 a.m. – Noon

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FROM PAGE 20 Reservations required by the Thursday before chosen tour. Tour fees are $5 for members and $7 for the public. For more information call (310) 496-3146, or visit www.smconservancy.org.

SANTA MONICA OUTDOOR ANTIQUE MARKET Every fourth and fifth Sunday of the month, the Santa Monica Airport hosts a flea market specializing in furnishings and interior décor. Santa Monica Airport – in the parking lots at Airport Avenue and Bundy Drive Early admission fees are $7 for entry between 6 a.m. – 8 a.m. General admission fees are $5, seniors pay $3, and kids are free. Parking is free. 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. Smaller antique market is held in the same lot on the first Sunday of every month, from 8:30 p.m. – 3 p.m. Admission is $4. For more information call (323) 9332511

THE NIGHT SKY SHOW: JOHN DRESCHER PLANETARIUM Night-time shows begin at 7 p.m. and are followed by Planetarium Feature Shows and Guest Lectures at 8 p.m. John Drescher Planetarium, Room 223, Santa Monica College, 1900 Pico Blvd. 7 p.m. Admission for a single show or lecture: $5; $4 for seniors and kids, 12 and under; or $9 for a double show. For a schedule or tickets, call (310) 434-4223, or visit www.smc.edu/planetarium.

EAMES CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION As part of the Charles Eames Centennial, the Eames Office is staging exhibits and events through mid-July. The first installment of a two-part show on Charles and Ray Eames has opened at the Eames Office. Through mid-2008, the Eames Office will hold centennial events on the 17th of each month. Eames Office, 850 Pico Blvd.

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For more information, call (310) 396-5991, or visit www.eamesoffice.com.

MAY

MAY 25 A GEISHA’S JOURNEY: MY LIFE AS A KYOTO APPRENTICE Celebrate Asian-Pacific Heritage Month with this brief, but beautiful performance of music and dance by Kyoto geisha, Komomo. Photographer Naoyuki Ogino and Komomo will sign books after the performance. MLK Jr. Auditorium, Main Library, 601 Santa Monica Blvd. 12:30 p.m. (NOTE: This event begins a half hour prior to the Library’s regular opening.) For more information, call (310) 4588606 or visit www.smpl.org.

SANTA MONICA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Admission is free. Auditorium parking is $8. Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. For program information call (310) 395-6330, or visit www.smsymphony.org.

‘LAWRENCE WEINER – AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE’ The first major United States retrospective of the work of New Yorkbased artist Lawrence Weiner one of the key figures associated with the emergence and foundations of conceptual art in the 1960s, this exhibit provides a comprehensive examination of Weiner’s remarkable and cohesive oeuvre, assembling key selections and bodies of work from throughout his 40-year career. Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), 250 S. Grand Ave., L.A. 11 a.m. For more information and tickets, visit www.moca.org.

VENICE CHAMPIONSHIPS BODYBUILDING AND FIGURE CONTEST Bodybuilding competition on Venice

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Beach. 1800 Ocean Front Walk 10 a.m. Admission is free. For details, visit www.musclebeachvenice.com/hom e.

SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES Get down to the Pier for the best in local music – rock, Latin, and R&B. Santa Monica Pier 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Free event.

MAY 26 SPANISH STORIES FOR LITTLE ONES Stories and songs in Spanish for ages 2 – 5. Ocean Park Branch Library, 2601 Main St. 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. Admission is free. For details, call (310) 392-3084.

VENICE CHAMPIONSHIPS BODYBUILDING AND FIGURE CONTEST Bodybuilding competition on Venice Beach. 1800 Ocean Front Walk 10 a.m. Admission is free. For details, visit www.musclebeachvenice.com/hom e.

MAY 29 RUNNING A GREEN HOUSEHOLD Lean to manage household chemical purchasing and learn simple steps in evaluating products and services for your home. Karl Bruskotter and Andrew Basmajian bring decades of experience working for the City of Santa Monica’s Environmental Programs Division. Multipurpose Room, Main Library, 601 Santa Monica Blvd. 7 p.m. For more information, call (310) 4588606 or visit www.smpl.org.

MAY 31 GRAM RABBIT AT SAFARI SAM’S KCRW and Safari Sam’s present Gram Rabbit; Sabrosa Purr; Quasar

SEE PAGE 22 BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM


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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

FROM PAGE 21 and the Bamboozled; and Kind Hearts and Coronets. This show is 18 and over. Safari Sam’s, 5214 W. Sunset Blvd. 8 p.m. This event is free. For band information, visit www.gramrabbit.com.

19TH ANNUAL SILENT FILM GALA Presenting Harold Lloyd’s whimsical and stylish “Speedy” (1928), a hilarious comedy shot on location in Manhattan, with an extended cameo by Babe Ruth. This movie’s got it all: New York’s last horse-drawn car, baseball, and good guys and bad guys. Score by Carl Davis, performed live by the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Joel McNeely. Royce Hall, UCLA 8 p.m. General admission tickets are $35. For tickets and information, visit www.laco.org/events/54.

JUNE

LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION!:THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF GEORGE HURRELL As studio photographer for MGM, Warner Brothers and Columbia, Hurrell was instrumental in shaping the images of stars such as Joan Crawford, James Cagney, and Rita Hayworth. The exhibition will include 80 iconic photographs ranging from Jean Harlow and Clark Gable, to Joan Collins and Arnold Schwarzenegger, along with a replica of Hurrell's studio. California Heritage Museum, 2612 Main St. Open Wed. – Sun., 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Through June 28. Admission is $5; seniors & students are $3; children under 12 are free. For information, call (310) 392-8537.

BOB DYLAN’S AMERICAN JOURNEY, 1956 – 1966 The Skirball’s exhibit on Dylan ends on June 8. Included in the exhibit are handwritten song lyrics, posters and a recording of his first-ever, neverreleased concert. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Brentwood General admission tickets are $7; seniors and students pay $7. For hours and ticket information, visit www.skirball.org.

LA VIDA LOWRIDER: CRUISING THE CITY OF ANGELS The Petersen Automotive Museum’s exhibition on Lowriders ends June 8. Check out this exhibit on a local tradition rich with culture and creativity before it ends. Petersen Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Tues. – Sun., 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Adults $10; seniors and students (with ID) $5; children (12 and under) $3. For information, visit www.petersen.org.

OXFORD STREET DANCE THEATER Led by artistic directors Marissa Levine and Michelle Garcia, this cutting edge contemporary dance company utilizes the premiere talents of many local choreographers. Ends June 8. Miles Playhouse, 1130 Lincoln Blvd. For more information, call (310) 4588634.

JUNE 1 SANTA MONICA COLLEGE CHORALE:A

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

FESTIVAL OF MUSIC The SMC concert Chorale will join the First United Methodist Chancel Choir and the Los Angeles Concert Orchestra to present a program that includes Faure’s Requiem and a 100th anniversary tribute to noted composer and musicologist, Halsey Stevens. Pre-concert lecture given by KUSC’s Kimberlea Daggy. First United Methodist Church, 11th and Washington, Santa Monica Tickets begin at $10. For information, call (310) 393-8258.

SUMMER LIVE PUBLIC ART AUCTION This annual summer auction features the work of mid-career and established artists of all mediums. Highlights include important works by Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Ed Ruscha, Roy Lichtenstein, and unique Polaroid’s by Helmut Newton. Robert Berman Gallery, C2/D5, Bergamot Station Arts Center, 2525 Michigan Ave. 1 p.m. For information and a catalogue, visit www.smauctions.com. Ticket fees start at $10. For more information call (310) 434-4393. For more information tickets call (310) 434-3000.

JUNE 6 PHANTOM SIGHTINGS:ART AFTER THE CHICANO MOVEMENT This will be the largest exhibition of cutting-edge Chicano art ever presented at LACMA. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Noon For detailed exhibition information or tickets, visit www.lacma.org/art/ExhibPhantom.as px

AIMEE MANN AT HOUSE OF BLUES General admission. House of Blues Anaheim, 1530 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim 7 p.m. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased by visiting www.ticketmaster.com.

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS MARKET Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.contemporarycraftsmarket.co m.

JUNE 7 COPA CABANA BEACH SOCCER TOURNAMENT Beach at 1550 Pacific Coast Highway Parking Lot 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

VENICE BEACH CARNEVALE Lively costume celebration honoring the art, artists, and soul of Venice. Food, fire-spinners, belly dancers, live theatre, and a day-long costume contest where the best dressed are awarded prizes by Venice’s own local merchants. Beyond Baroque, 861 Venice Blvd. Noon to 9 p.m. Admission is free. For details, visit www.carnevale.us.

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS MARKET Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.contemporarycraftsmarket.co m.

JUNE 8 PORSCHE CLUB OF AMERICA L.A. REGION CONCOURS Porsches of all kinds will be on display at this annual car show. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Admission is free. Visit www.pcala.com for details.

COPA CABANA BEACH SOCCER TOURNAMENT Youth and adult sand soccer tournament. Beach at 1550 Pacific Coast Highway Parking Lot 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. For more information, call (323) 3148622.

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS MARKET Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.contemporarycraftsmarket.co m.

JUNE 12 MARINA DEL REY BOAT SHOW This year’s bigger and better MDR Boat Show will feature hundreds of newest and largest recreational boats – from million-dollar yachts to incredible sailboats. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults pay $10; kids, 12 and under, are free. For more information, visit www.marinadelreyboatshow.com.

JUNE 13 INTERNATIONAL GEM & JEWELRY SHOW Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. Noon – 6 p.m. Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.intergem.com.

MARINA DEL REY BOAT SHOW This year’s bigger and better MDR Boat Show will feature hundreds of newest and largest recreational boats – from million-dollar yachts to incredible sailboats. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults pay $10; kids, 12 and under, are free. For more information, visit www.marinadelreyboatshow.com.

JUNE 14 BIG BLUE BUS GETAWAY: SAN DIEGO ZOO On this day trip to the world famous San Diego Zoo, you will see some of the rarest wildlife including giant pandas and koalas. Visit Ituri Forest - a mysterious Central African rain forest featuring hippos, okapis, acrobatic monkeys, and much more. Bus pick up at Santa Monica College Campus, 1900 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica For full information, call (310) 4515444, or visit www.bigbluebus.com.

INTERNATIONAL GEM & JEWELRY SHOW Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.intergem.com.

Citizens pay $4. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For further information, call 310-458-8551.

MARINA DEL REY BOAT SHOW

JUNE 23 DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

This year’s bigger and better MDR Boat Show will feature hundreds of newest and largest recreational boats – from million-dollar yachts to incredible sailboats. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults pay $10; kids, 12 and under, are free. For more information, visit www.marinadelreyboatshow.com.

JUNE 15 PLAYBOY JAZZ FESTIVAL Master of Ceremonies Bill Cosby hosts a jazz night at the Hollywood Bowl with a line-up that includes Herbie Hancock with Dave Holand, Vinnie Colaiuta, Chris Potter, and Lionel Loueke. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 2 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

INTERNATIONAL GEM & JEWELRY SHOW Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is $7. Auditorium parking is $8. For detailed information, visit www.intergem.com.

MARINA DEL REY BOAT SHOW This year’s bigger and better MDR Boat Show will feature hundreds of newest and largest recreational boats – from million-dollar yachts to incredible sailboats. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults pay $10; kids, 12 and under, are free. For more information, visit www.marinadelreyboatshow.com.

JUNE 20 SANTA MONICA ANTIQUES SHOW & SALE Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. General admission is $7: Senior Citizens pay $4. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For further information, call 310-458-8551.

JUNE 21 16TH ANNUAL JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION Entertainment, food, vendors, and opening and closing ceremonies. Virginia Avenue Park, 2200 Virginia Ave. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is free. Call (310) 4518124, or (310) 908-4554, for more information.

SANTA MONICA ANTIQUES SHOW & SALE

NOKIA Theatre L.A. Live, 777 Chick Hearn Court, L.A. 8 p.m. For this event, ticket prices are $40 for the entire house. To purchase tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.com.

JUNE 24 STONE TEMPLE PILOTS Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 7:30 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

JUNE 25 TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 7 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

JUNE 26 OPENING NIGHT OF THE TWILIGHT DANCE SERIES Santa Monica Pier Admission is free. For a full schedule, visit www.twilightdance.org.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES – BIRD WATCHING Ballona Wetlands hosts a day of bird watching. Small children are allowed, but must be accompanied by an adult. Burton Chace Park Community Room, 13650 Mindanao Way 9 a.m. Free admission. Reservations required and can be made by calling (310) 305-9595.

JUNE 28 CELEBRATE AMERICA Due to construction work on Corsair field, the annual Independence Day Celebration will happen this year at another venue. Please visit www.smc.edu/events in June for details. 5 p.m. Admission is free.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES – SURF KAYAKING Kayak the Marina and surf the North Jetty waves. Burton Chace Park Boathouse, 13640 Mindanao Way 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Admission is $25 - $30. Reservations are required and can be made by calling (310) 822-8530.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES – HARBOR KAYAKING

Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. General admission is $7: Senior Citizens pay $4. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For further information, call 310-458-8551.

Basic kayaking instruction and exploration of Marina del Rey. Burton Chace Park Boathouse, 13640 Mindanao Way 11:30 a.m. – 1:45 p.m. Admission is $25 - $30. Reservations are required and can be made by calling (310) 822-8530.

JUNE 22 SANTA MONICA ANTIQUES SHOW & SALE

JULY

Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. General admission is $7: Senior

JULY 4 JULY 4TH FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR:A BALL AT THE BOWL WITH THE L.A. DODGERS Have a ball on the 4th of July with America’s favorite pastime! The Dodgers celebrate their 50th Anniversary in L.A. with special guest Randy Newman. Enjoy classic baseball music, visuals, plus appearances by Dodger greats and the Bowl’s dazzling fireworks. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 7:30 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

MARINA DEL REY ANNUAL FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS Fireworks shot over Marina’s main channel. Burton Chace Park and Fisherman’s Village are popular viewing spots, but any water-view seat is a good choice. 9 p.m. Early arrival is recommended. Free event. For information, call (310) 305-9545. BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM

MR.AND MS. MUSCLE BEACH Bodybuilding, figure, and swimsuit

competitions. 1800 Ocean Front Walk, Venice Beach 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free event. Visit www.musclebeachvenice.com for information.

WESTCHESTER ANNUAL FOURTH OF JULY PARADE The Westchester Chamber of Commerce presents this annual parade of floats, elephants, marching bands and community groups. The route starts at Westchester Park and continues along Loyola Boulevard to Loyola Marymount University. Noon Free event.

JULY 10 FLEET OF FOOT For their 20th anniversary, the Santa Monica Museum of Art has invited an array of distinguished arts professionals to discuss unique models for the presentation of contemporary art. Lynne Cooke, of the Dia Art Foundation, talks with Ivo Mesquita. Santa Monica Museum of Art, Bergamot Station G1, 2525 Michigan Ave. 7 p.m. Admission is free. For information, visit www.smmoa.org or call (310) 586-6488, ext. 119.

MARINA DEL REY CLASSICAL CONCERT Cellist Marek Spakiewicz appears as soloist with the Marina del Rey Summer Symphony, conducted by Frank Fetta, in “The Concerto for Violoncello in E minor” by Edward Elgar. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

JULY 12 RANGOLI DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS ‘FESTIVAL OF SOLOS’ The Rangoli Dance Company presents “Festival of Solos,” a showcase of Bharatanatyam dances in intimate settings this summer. The festival will feature dancers from Rangoli Dance Company and guest artists from India. The Edye Second Space, SMC Performing Arts Center, 1310 11th St. 7 p.m. Admission is $15.

JULY 13 RANGOLI DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS ‘FESTIVAL OF SOLOS’ The Rangoli Dance Company presents 'Festival of Solos', a showcase of Bharatanatyam dances in intimate settings this summer. The festival will feature dancers from Rangoli Dance Company and guest artists from India. The Edye Second Space, SMC Performing Arts Center, 1310 11th St. 6 p.m. Admission is $15.

JULY 18 JULIE ANDREWS — THE GIFT OF MUSIC Julie Andrews hosts an evening of Rodgers & Hammerstein classics. Joined by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and special guest vocalists, Ms. Andrews will lead you on a journey from “The Sound of Music,” “The King & I,” “Cinderella,” and more. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 8:30 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

JULY 19 GLOW With the historic Santa Monica Pier and adjacent world-famous Santa Monica Beach as their space, artists will be commissioned to create unique and inviting works of art that welcome the public to be both audience and actor for twelve celebratory hours. Inspired by the wildly successful Nuit Blanche in Paris, GLOW takes its spirit from the fabled grunions that live in local waters and come ashore several times a year to spawn in the sand creating a momentary sensation of iridescence.

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THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S

FROM PAGE 22 Santa Monica Pier and adjacent locations 7 p.m. – 6 a.m. This event is free. For further information, contact the Cultural Affairs Division at (310) 458-8350.

MARINA DEL REY POP CONCERT Grammy-winning singer Melissa Manchester will perform. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

BIG BLUE BUS GETAWAY TO VIEJAS CASINO AND OUTLET CENTER Players at Viejas Casino can choose from 2,500 slot machines, 80 game tables, a bingo pavilion, and six restaurants. Across the street, Viejas Outlet Center houses more than 60 of America’s favorite brand name stores. 1900 Pico Blvd.; buses will depart and return to Santa Monica College Departing at 8 a.m.; returning at approximately 7:30 p.m. $35 per adult or senior (meals not included). No one under 18 years of age. For tickets and information, visit www.bigbluebus.com, or call (310) 451-5444.

JULY 22 MOZART UNDER THE STARS Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 8 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com

JULY 24 MARINA DEL REY CLASSICAL CONCERT The annual “Evening with the Los Angeles Opera” features four stellar company singers performing with the Marina del Rey Summer Symphony. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete informa-

SUMMER GUIDE 2008

tion, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

JULY 26 DIANA ROSS: LADY SUPREME Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 8:30 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

JULY 27 OLD-FASHIONED DAY IN THE PARK Grab a parasol and stroll down to Burton Chace Park to view vintage yachts, and antique cars and motorcycles. Channel Samuel Clemens as you enjoy a free ride on a steam launch in the harbor. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way Free event.

AUGUST

AUGUST 2 MARINA DEL REY POP CONCERT Singer Steve March Torme appears in concert with his 10-piece band. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

FESTIVAL OF THE CHARIOTS This Hare Krishna-themed parade features Indian music, dance, and a vegetarian fest. Parade route starts at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium and ends at Ocean Front Walk in Venice. Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. Free event.

AUGUST 7 MARINA DEL REY CLASSICAL CONCERT The 75-member Marina del Rey Summer Symphony, led by Music Director Frank Fetta, will headline this night’s concert. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way

7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

AUGUST 9 GILLIS VOLLEYBALL INVITATIONAL In this zany volleyball tournament beach bash players compete dressed in quirky, kooky costumes. Docweiler Beach, 6200 Vista del Mar, Playa del Rey 8 a.m. – Dark Free event. For further details, visit www.thegillis.com.

AUGUST 10 GILLIS VOLLEYBALL INVITATIONAL In this zany volleyball tournament beach bash players compete dressed in quirky, kooky costumes. Docweiler Beach, 6200 Vista del Mar, Playa del Rey 8 a.m. – Dark Free event. For further details, visit www.thegillis.com.

AUGUST 15 FABULOUS FIBERFEST Spinners, Knitters, Freeformers, Crazy Quilters, Handpiecers, Heddlers, Hookers, and everyone – grab seats at Fiberfest 2008. Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is $6. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For more information, visit www.thefiberfest.com.

AUGUST 16 MARINA DEL REY POP CONCERT The Fifth Dimension will perform. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

FABULOUS FIBERFEST Spinners, Knitters, Freeformers, Crazy Quilters, Handpiecers, Heddlers, Hookers, and everyone – grab seats at Fiberfest 2008. Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Admission is $6. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For more information, visit www.thefiberfest.com.

Ave., Hollywood 7 p.m. For tickets and further information, visit www.hollywoodbowl.com.

AUGUST 17 FABULOUS FIBERFEST

SANTA MONICA CAT SHOW

Spinners, Knitters, Freeformers, Crazy Quilters, Handpiecers, Heddlers, Hookers, and everyone – grab seats at Fiberfest 2008. Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission is $6. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For more information, visit www.thefiberfest.com.

AUGUST 21 MARINA DEL REY CLASSICAL CONCERT Pianist John Novacek returns for a solo performance of Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” and Rachmaninoff’s “Piano Concerto no. 2 in C minor.” Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

AUGUST 23 SANTA MONICA CAT SHOW Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. General admission is $10; seniors and children pay $7. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For detailed information, visit www.cfasouthwest.org.

SRI LANKA DAY EXPO 2008 Head over to the promenade for a day-long festival celebrating Sri Lankan culture, music, and cuisine. Visitors will experience a food court serving Sri Lankan cuisine (1300 block); live music and a performance stage (1200 block); beauty pageant cat walk (1400 block); and an exhibition of arts, crafts and businesses of Sri Lanka (1200 &1400 blocks). 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.srilankafoundation.org.

AUGUST 24 RADIOHEAD Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland

Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. General admission is $10; seniors and children pay $7. Auditorium parking is available for $8. For detailed information, visit www.cfasouthwest.org.

AUGUST 29 SWEET & HOT JAZZ FESTIVAL This annual Labor Day weekend tribute to the sounds of the ‘20s and ‘40s will include swing, jazz and blues bands; dancing; and memorabilia. Los Angeles Airport Marriott, 5855 W. Century Blvd., L.A. For hours and ticket prices, visit www.sweethot.org.

AUGUST 30 MARINA DEL REY POP CONCERT The “Royal Family of Jazz” - Dame Cleo Laine and Sir John Dankworth perform with the Dankworth Group. Burton Chace Park, 13650 Mindanao Way 7 p.m. Free event. For complete information, including a list of allowed items, visit www.visitmarina.com/events.

SWEET & HOT JAZZ FESTIVAL This annual Labor Day weekend tribute to the sounds of the ‘20s and ‘40s will include swing, jazz and blues bands; dancing; and memorabilia. Los Angeles Airport Marriott, 5855 W. Century Blvd., L.A. For hours and ticket prices, visit www.sweethot.org.

AUGUST 31 SWEET & HOT JAZZ FESTIVAL This annual Labor Day weekend tribute to the sounds of the ‘20s and ‘40s will include swing, jazz and blues bands; dancing; and memorabilia. Los Angeles Airport Marriott, 5855 W. Century Blvd., L.A. For hours and ticket prices, visit

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www.sweethot.org.

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 1 SWEET & HOT JAZZ FESTIVAL

This annual Labor Day weekend tribute to the sounds of the ‘20s and ‘40s will include swing, jazz and blues bands; dancing; and memorabilia. Los Angeles Airport Marriott, 5855 W. Century Blvd., L.A. For hours and ticket prices, visit www.sweethot.org.

VENICE BODYBUILDING & FIGURE CHAMPIONSHIPS Venice Beach crowns their best and bulkiest body builders. 1800 Ocean Front Walk Competition begins at 10 a.m.; finals at 2 p.m. Free event.

AT THE THEATER For information on events throughout the summer, contact:

Santa Monica College 1900 Pico Blvd. (310) 434-4393 events.smc.edu/theater Santa Monica Playhouse 1211 Fourth St. (310) 394-9779 www.santamonicaplayhouse.com Highways Performance 1651 18th St. (310) 315-1459 www.highwaysperformance.org Powerhouse Theatre 3116 Second St. (310) 396-3680 www.powerhousetheatre.com Pacific Resident Theater 703 Venice Blvd. (310) 822-8392 www.pacificresidenttheatre.com City Garage Theatre 1340 1/2 Fourth St. Alley, between the Third Street Promenade and Fourth Street (310) 319-9939 www.citygarage.org

BRANDON WISE/BRANDONW@SMDP.COM


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SUMMER GUIDE 2008

THE SANTA MONICA DA I LY P R E S S


Summer Guide 2008