Page 1

SMALL TOWN STUDIO

revitalizingMecosta Ferris State University


Brad Edlund Dan Horvath Taylor Heldt Jake Leestma Sheila Kakavand Brian Maneke Daniel Montgomery Joseph Nodge Geena Pickering Mike Schauble Justin Totty Victor Urban

SMALL TOWN STUDIO

Striving to embody a multi-scaler and holistic approach to sustainable development and design education, the Small Town Studio in Ferris State University’s Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Sustainability has been established to educate architectural design professionals versed in a holistic approach to sustainable design. The Small Town Studio seeks to bring attention to the small urban areas of Michigan that have previously been overlooked

Professor: Paul Long by design professions and the architectural education establishment. Within the Small Town Studio, these smaller urban areas are viewed both as a significant force for sustainable development and a significant portion (20%) of Michigan’s population. They thus deserve focus in their own right. With a focus on sustainable urbanism, Small Town Studio students provide skills and resources not readily available in smaller urban communities. Further-

II Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

more, students working directly with local communities help bridge the jurisdictional divide which in many cases prevents communities from seeking sustainable solutions to urban problems. It is the intent, and hope, that students in the Small Town Studio will help Michigan’s smaller, forgotten urban areas grow and develop in a sustainable fashion that they might not have been able to achieve on their own.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

past 2 History of Mecosta 6 Historic Rail lines 8 Climate

present

2.1 Demographics

14 Population 16 Age 18 Household Occupancy 20 Family Household 22 State Income Levels 24 County Income Levels

2.2 Transportation 28 30 32 34

Regional Transportation Travel Paths Township Transportation Work Travel Times

2.3 Regional Amenities 38 County Services 42 Township Services 44 Recreation 46 Farmer’s Markets 48 Outdoor Activities 50 Rails to Trails

2.4 Land Use/Buildings 54 Plats & Right of Ways 56 Current Land Uses 60 Building Density 62 Existing Conditions 64 Setback Requirements 66 Septic Requirements 70 Soil Type 72 Parking

future 76 Opportunities

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5

Urban Design Park Redesign Woody’s Renovation Downtown Eatery Multi-Purpose Facility

appendix

176 Survey Results 178 Parking Regulations 180 Index


1

past mecosta

HISTORY OF MECOSTA HISTORIC RAIL LINES CLIMATE


past mecosta

history of mecosta

The names of both the village and the county of Mecosta originate from a Native American chief of the Potawatomi tribe, Chief Mecosta. He is best known as a signer of the Treaty of Washington which ceded a large portion of the Lower Peninsula as well as the eastern part of the Upper Peninsula to the United States Government. But the village was not always known by that name. Originally, before it was incorporated, it was referred to as “Little River.” At this time much of Michigan’s forests along major water networks had been depleted by lumber companies, but the land around Mecosta was rich in timber. The introduction of rail in 1883 made it possible for major logging operations to be established which also expanded the town into a small trading hub. Trainloads of goods, mail, and visitors arrived to the small village and produce and lumber from local mills (the Webbers Brothers and the George Collins Timber Company) was sent out on the D, L,

& N Railroad to the Western and Southern portions of the United States.

The town was platted by E. B. Moore and Giles Gilbert when he saw an investment opportunity knowing the lumber and agriculture industry would eventually need a place to purchase supplies and market their goods leading him to open a stock company. Amos S. Johnson was appointed by the new business to sell all of the lots. The 120 acres we stripped of trees and the first building

Figure 1.1: Mecosta Depot

2 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

was constructed on October 1, 1879, but it wasn’t until May 1880 when the train was constructed that the village truly began growing. Once the platting was complete the first post office opened in December 1879. The Mecosta House, a hotel, began taking reservations in 1879 and religion entered the village when Baptists began preaching in 1880 followed soon after by a Methodist Church. The village would also expand to


include many other businesses as well: a wagon shop, livery stable, furniture store, photograph gallery, and a shoe shop which would all eventually leave the community. The decline of Mecosta’s population began with the declination of the lumber industry which also resulted in the railroad system being taken out shortly after World War Two. This blow put the town into a similar situation of many other Michigan communities as a small community without a strong economic base and a struggle to maintain the population.

LEGEND xxxxxx xxxxxx Figure 1.2: Main Street Looking West, 1912

Though logging is no longer part of Mecosta’s economy an alternate route for the future of the village is being pursued which also has roots in the founding of the village as. The pursuit of learning began with the first school built from the logs that supported the settlement financially. The one room schoolhouse would not operate very Figure 1.3: Mecosta High School, 1936 (Brad Edlund)

Figure 1.4: View of Downtown Mecosta

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 3


past mecosta

history of mecosta long due to the fact that the next school, a two-story timber framed building on Washington Street, began construction in the same year the first building opened in 1879 and was completed in 1881. The trend of expanding education continued with a brick high school. Mecosta only offered a ten grade education (students would have to commute to Big Rapids for the final two years) until 1932 when an expansion was added to the Mecosta High School allowing the opportunity for a complete education.

Currently Mecosta Elementary is the only public school in the city limits, while the Middle and High School are located in Remus. There is not higher education in Mecosta, however, the Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal allows Fellows from all around the world to work on writings or research in an intellectual environment and that is located on M-20 near downtown. Knowledge is also one of the driving forces of the downtown business of Mecos-

Figure1.5: Far Left Building Destroyed by Fire in 1961 4 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

ta. People travel from surrounding states to visit to the unique bookstores. The Mecosta Book Gallery in particular has developed quite the reputation for rare and quality books. The Women’s Improvement League raised funds and gathered over 1100 books to propose a library and in 1966 the plan was approved by Morton Township voters. The first location was in the front of the old firehouse but it continuously evolved first moving into a donated building purchased for one dollar in 1969. It continued to collect more literature until 1979 when it outgrew the space. The building next door was attained allowing the growth to continue, but the library’s popularity once again made it necessary to move. Many people wanted the location to be near Canadian Lakes, but it was decided that the library remain in Mecosta to remain accessible to the lower income levels of the village. The building was built in phases beginning in 1989 so it would fit the collection appropriately until 2012 when the last expansion was


completed. The new building is an important cornerstone of the community serving not only the village but Morton Township and the residents of Martiny, Austin and Sheridan as well. The downtown of today, however, is nothing like it was during the village’s heyday. Several fires erupted throughout the years including the destruction of the Wilson Hotel in 1931 and a large commercial building in 1961 and many other buildings fell victim to neglect and had to be torn down. Few historic buildings in the town remain. Understanding a community’s history allows a visitor or a resident to understand how a town developed into what it is today. One can appreciate its former achievements as well as better understand opportunities based on past failures and successes. All of the towns of Michigan have a unique character which is valuable and must be

Figure 1.6: Mecosta Late 1880’s maintained. The past is an important part of identity and if used effectively can create an inviting place that people will want to go out of their way to experience.

Figure 1.7: Rubble After Fire Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 5


past mecosta

historic rail lines The history of railroads running through Michigan dates back to 1830, seven years before Michigan was declared an official state. The rails have played a very important role in the creation and growth of population along with trading of goods in the state of Michigan.

The rail lines ran in all directions throughout the state. Prior to the railroad consolidation in the 1900’s, Michigan Central and the New York Central were two of the major railroads in the country. The Michigan lines also connected to others both large and small outside the state, such as the P&D (Putnam & Dutchess Railroad), which runs to New York City. The location of the state bordering Canada made it an ideal location for east-west trading from the eastern shore of Lake Michigan to Canada.

(Mike Schauble)

Figure 1.8 illustrates the rail lines that historically ran through Mecosta County. One of the main rail lines that went east to west is the Grand Rapids to Detroit line. This line once connected Ionia to Big Rapids with Mecosta as a stop that would then branch off to Barryton, Chippewa Lake and other important places at the time. Today many of these lines are still there though they are out of commission and are relatively obscure. Some of these lines are state owned, while others are privately owned, controlled, and maintained. A select few have been changed to modern trails such as the “Rails to Trails� as well as many others. These induce positive and engaging activities for people throughout the state such as walking, cycling, and in the winter driving snowmobiles. Existing rail lines that have not been changed are in a state of disarray and are poorly maintained if maintained at all.

6 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


131

66

20

LEGEND 20

Detroit-Grand Rapids W. Grand Rapids

131

Chicago-W. Michigan 66

Mecosta Village

Figure 1.8: Historic Railroad System (Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 7


present Mecosta

climate

(Jake Leestma)

Mecosta Village is located just east of the center of Mecosta County in the northeast corner of Morton Township. Morton Township is surrounded by Martiny Township to the north, Hinton Township to the south, Wheatland Township to the east, and Austin Township to the west. Mecosta is one of many small villages located in Mecosta County. A county 24 miles square, Mecosta County is bordered by Osceola County to the north, Montcalm County to the south, Isabella County to the east, and Newaygo County to the west. The county is located in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula west of the geographic center.

Mecosta Village, similar to the rest of Michigan experiences a wide range and variety of temperature, snowfall and rainfall. July is the hottest month with an average temperature of 70˚F. January is typically the coldest month with an average temperature of 20 ˚C. Mecosta Village receives an annual average rainfall of 33” per year. September is the wettest month of the year with an average of 4.1” of rainfall. February is the driest month of the year with an average of .5” of rainfall. From October thru May, Mecosta Village receives snowfall with an annual accumulation of 50”. January see the most snowfall with an average of 16”.

Mecosta Village is located twenty five minutes east of Big Rapids, and fifteen minutes northeast of Canadian Lakes. M-20 an interstate highway, runs directly through Mecosta providing east-west travel needs between Big Rapids and Mount Pleasant with smaller towns dispersed along the highway.

Mecosta County contains a plethora of wildlife and habitat inherent to Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. Numerous types of coniferous and deciduous trees provide habitat for game birds, turkey, whitetail deer and a variety of mammals, reptiles and amphibians. The marshes and small lakes of the area also provide opportunities for fish and

8 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

waterfowl to thrive. The amount of wildlife in Mecosta County provides ample ways for people to interact with the environment. Since Mecosta is such a small place, no FEMA flood maps are available for the area. However, no significant flooding has been experienced along the Little Muskegon River.

Figure 1.9: Winter Trail


80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Figure 1.10: Average Temperature (F)

20

Rainfall Snowfall

15 10 5 0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Figure 1.11: Average Snowfall and Rainfall (in)

30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Jan

Feb

Figure 1.12: Average Wind (Jake Leestma)

Mar

Apr

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 9


2

present Mecosta demographics

transportation regional amenities land use/buildings


2.1

demographics


present mecosta

population

The population of Mecosta Village has increased by 4% from 2000 to 2010. In 2000 the population was 450, and in 2010 the population was 457. Figure 2.2 illustrates the populations of Mecosta Village with the surrounding townships of Morton, Colfax, Martiny, Sheridan, Austin, Wheatland, Deerfield, Hinton, and Millerbrook.

As shown in the Figure 2.1 the potential growth for Mecosta Village remains strong and gives potential for continuing growth of the community which can in return increase population as well as revenue.

(Sheila Kakavand)

Negative Growth (-)

Positive Growth (+)

Mecosta Village 4% Mecosta County 5.5% Austin Township .94% Martiny Township .97% Sheridan Township 2.7% 2.7% Michigan .6%

Figure 2.1: Population Growth

14 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Green 1, 228

Grant 3, 018

Chippewa 4, 617

Big Rapids 3, 249

Colfax 1, 594

Martiny 1,643

Fork 1, 678

Sheridan 1, 393

Mecosta Village 457 Mecosta 2, 435

Austin 1, 505

Morton 3, 597

Wheatland 1, 258

Aetna 2, 044

Deerfield 5, 796

Hinton 1, 035

Millerbrook 1, 081

Figure 2.2: Population (Sheila Kakavand, Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 15


present mecosta

age

(Sheila Kakavand)

Although the population of Mecosta has increased, the age demographics are not consistent or evenly distributed when compared to Morton Township, Mecosta County, or Michigan. Mecosta Village has a large percentage of youth from ages 5 to 19, approximately 30%, while the other age brackets are significantly lower. Figure 2.3 shows that as minors grow older they leave Mecosta Village, the percentage for ages 20-24 is only 3.28%, which is the smallest percentage comparable. The large percentage of youth in Mecosta Village has led to the issue of boredom, this creates many opportunities to give these children and young adults something positive to channel their energy into. The younger demographics are key in order to keep Mecosta Village thriving.

16 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


26-30 29.75%

30%

26%

Percentage (%)

21-25

21.19%

24.7%

21%

19.48%

16-2O

16.9% 15.36% 15.7%

11-15

15.27%

14.48%

13.77% 12.25%

12.4%

12.19%

6-10

10.8% 6%

12.66

Michigan Mecosta County

12.08% 11.6%

11.6%

Mecosta

6.76%

Morton Township

5.47%

0-5

LEGEND

5.2% 4.7%

3.28% 2.6%

<5

5-19

Figure 2.3: Age Distribution (Sheila Kakavand)

20-24

25-44

45-54

55-65

65+

Age (In Years) Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 17


present mecosta

household occupancy Figure 2.4 shows housing distribution of Mecosta Village with how many people live in each household. Most of the listed townships experienced a decline from the years 2000 to 2010. However, Mecosta Village has experienced an increase from 2.63 in 2000, to 2.75 in 2010. This increase demonstrates the potential for future growth in Mecosta Village in families, resulting in future increased growth and expansion in the community.

18 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Sheila Kakavand)


3

2.8

2.75

2.5

2.63

2.45

2.22

2.5

LEGEND

2.81

2.6

2.7 2.61

2.3

2.22

2.56

Year 2000 Year 2012

2.21

2

1.5

1 Mecosta Village

Mecosta County

Morton Township

Sheridan Township

Austin Township

Martiny Township

Michigan

Figure 2.4: Average People per household (Geena Pickering)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 19


present mecosta

family household

Figure 2.5 shows Mecosta Village compared to the surrounding townships. There are more family households in Mecosta Village than non-family households. The Sheridan Township has the largest number of family households with just over 1,775 family homes and only 191 non-family homes. This means 90% of Sheridan Township are family homes. For the Mecosta Village, only 36% of the homes are family-based. With the growing statistic of family homes, it is apparent Mecosta Village could potentially be a great place for raising families and transforming. Although the amount of total households is smaller than surrounding townships, the growing potential is key.

20 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Sheila Kakavand)


Family Households

Non-Family Households

Mecosta Village 122 73%

44

Green Charter 784

80%

184

Austin Township 1,252

90%

132

Martiny Township 1,300

84%

236

Sheridan Township 1,775

90%

191

Morton Township 3,133

87%

442

Michigan 2,575,699

47%

1,209,962

Figure 2.5: Family Homes vs. Non-Family Homes (Geena Pickering)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 21


present mecosta

state income levels According to Figure 2.6 you can see the diversity amongst average household income levels throughout the state of Michigan. Although the majority of the population maintains an income level of approximately $35,000-$45,000, there are areas of wealthier counties, which include tourist destinations such as the Traverse City area and a few along Lake Michigan.

Out of Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 83 counties, 27 of them have an average income of 0 - $34,999; these counties are represented in blue and include such counties as Lake, Chippewa, and Mecosta. The majority of the counties in Michigan make an average income of $35,000 - $44,999; some of these counties include Kent, Newaygo, Cass, and Allegan and are colored in green. The next color is yellow, and represents income levels between $45,000 - $54,999. Some of these counties include Grand Traverse County, Leelanau, and some in the metro Detroit area. Oakland County is colored orange

and represents an income level of $55,000 $64,999. The county that is colored in red is Livingston County has the highest average income level in Michigan ranging from $65,000 +.

Figure 2.6 gives us an understanding of the surrounding counties income levels. With this information, Mecosta Village can utilize the surrounding trails and highways that connect both of these counties to bring them to the Mecosta area.

22 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Brian Maneke)


LEGEND $0 - $34,999 $35,000-$44,999 $45,000-$54,999 $55,000-$64,999 $65,000+ Mecosta Village Figure 2.6: State Income Levels (Brian Maneke, Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 23


present mecosta

county income levels

Figure 2.7 shows the average income levels of Mecosta County. In Mecosta County, the majority of the population makes roughly $35,000 to $44,999. These areas are colored in green and include Morley Stanwood parts, of Chippewa Hills, parts of North and South Big Rapids, and the Paris region.

peoples income levels and how they compare to Mecosta Village. By learning the income levels of the surrounding areas, it opens up opportunities to the people of Mecosta Village to branch to these wealthier regions in Mecosta County to bring in a profit to Mecosta Village and Morton Township.

As the income levels rise, the ratio of population making a higher income decreases. The regions of Canadian Lakes, North and East of Big Rapids, and parts Rodney maintain an income level of $45,000 to $54,999, colored in yellow. Just west of Big Rapids is a region of high-end family housing units which have an average income level of $55,000 to $64,999. This region is the wealthiest in Mecosta County and is signified by the color orange. This figure much like figure 2.6 on the previous page gives an understanding of

24 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Brian Maneke)


Mecosta

LEGEND $0 - $34,999 $35,000-$44,999 $45,000-$54,999 $55,000-$64,999 $65,000+

Figure 2.7: County Income Levels (Brian Maneke, Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 25


2.2

transportation


present mecosta

regional transportation

Figure 2.8 illustrates the opportunity that Mecosta Village has of becoming a central hub to all surrounding activities and points of interest. The location of Mecosta Village is directly in the middle of four main transportation routes. Highways US 131 and US 127, run north and south on each side of Mecosta Village. Highways are US 10 and M-46, run east and west and are North and South of Mecosta Village.

This could be the turning point of Mecosta Village because there is another transportation route that runs directly through Mecosta Village; state highway 20. The majority of the users on M20 come from Big Rapids and Mount Pleasant. Mecosta Village becoming a central hub for these locations would help it become a focal point and more people would want to use M20.

There are other modes of transportation that can be utilized in Mecosta Village and the surrounding. Mecosta Osceola Transit Authority is a big part of public transit in Mecosta and its surrounding counties. There are seven main connecting services that Mecosta Osceola Transit Authority provides, but the four main transportation services that surround Mecosta County would be, Isabella County Transportation Commission in Isabella County, Clare County Transportation Commission in Clare County, Big Rapids Dial-a-Ride in the city of Big Rapids, and Indian Trails which is a statewide service.

These public transits can become a helping hand when it comes to bringing more focus to Mecosta Village. If there were more people that were interested in Mecosta Village because they knew what it has to offer, that would also further expand the Village limits and opportunities.

28 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Dan Horvath)


Reed City 10

CLARE Evart

Clare

OSCEOLA

131

10

66 127

Big Rapids

Barryton Mecosta 20

MECOSTA

ISABELLA Mount Pleasant

Remus

LEGEND US Highway

127

131

80

20

Howard City

MONTCALM

25 mi 13 km

46

Alma

County

GRATIOT

County Lines State Highway

Figure 2.8: Regional Transportation Map (Dan Horvath)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 29


present mecosta

travel paths Looking at travel paths through Mecosta County and nearby counties, significant paths start to show when and why people drive through Mecosta Village, but also reveal why many do not travel through the village. Figure 2.9 shows the connectivity between popular destinations. Many of the travel paths connect to Canadian Lakes, although out of the routes to Canadian Lakes, there are none passing through Mecosta Village. For example, the main roads between Evart and Canadian Lakes divert drivers just south of Mecosta Village. The one connection that runs through Mecosta Village is the path from Big Rapids to Mount Pleasant.

(Joseph Nodge)

are near Mecosta Village, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass through, but if the village has something to offer, more people would be likely to drive into downtown.

This map is important to understand the amount of traffic passing through Mecosta Village. Although there is local traffic constantly driving through Mecosta Village, there is much less outside traffic driving through downtown. Many travel paths

30 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Reed City 10

CLARE Evart

Clare

OSCEOLA

131

10

66 127

Big Rapids

Barryton Mecosta 20

MECOSTA

ISABELLA Mount Pleasant

Remus

LEGEND US Highway

127

131

80

20

Howard City

MONTCALM

25 mi 13 km

46

Alma

County Lines

GRATIOT

State Highway To Mt. Pleasant To Detroit To Grand Rapids

Figure 2.9: Travel Routes (Joseph Nodge, Dan Horvath)

To Evart Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 31


present mecosta

township transportation (Taylor Heldt, Joseph Nodge)

Figure 2.10 includes Morton Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s road systems, classifications. State routes, county primary, county local and secondary roads are represented according to the map legend. The location of Mecosta Village in Morton Township is in relation to surrounding areas including Canadian Lakes, Mecosta/ Morton Airport and also surrounding lakes. This map highlights the relation of the key areas in Morton Township. One main focus is the connectivity between Canadian Lakes and Mecosta Village. From this map, routes can be determined to see how often people pass through Mecosta Village. The map helps to understand the main roads in Morton township. From these roads, we are able to start looking into travel paths and find out which routes take people through Mecosta Village.

32 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Mecosta Village Mecosta

LEGEND County Primary Lakes Canadian Lakes Lakes Canadian

Morton Airport 1 mi 1km

M-20 County Local

Figure 2.10: Morton Township Road Map (Joseph Nodge)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 33


present Mecosta

work travel times

Within Mecosta Village 6.9% of people work at home and 69.1% work in Mecosta County. There is an unemployment rate of 9.3%. The 5 main areas in which residents of Mecosta commute to are: Barryton at 16.2 miles, Big Rapids at 17.7 miles, Canadian Lakes at 7.2 miles, Morley at 21.1 miles and Stanwood at 14.7 miles. The most common industries in the area are Construction, Metal and Plastic, Supervisor, and Educational Services, or males. The most common occupation is metal and plastic with 12%, followed by supervisors with 10% and electricians at 8%.

(Sheila Kakavand)

work while 18.1% carpool. The top 3 travel times are: 30-34 minutes at 23.4%, 45-60 minutes at 11.7%, and 5-9 minutes at 9.6%. There is potential, along with the increasing population, for citizens to work in Mecosta Village rather than travel outside for work which can generate a larger population as well as revenue.

For females the most common occupations are: Secretary and Administration work at 6%, building and grounds maintenance at 6%, and supervisors also at 6%. Other occupations are cashiers, food service workers, sales, and carpenters. About 68.6% of people drive alone for

34 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


s

ile

m 25

Barryton 20

s ile

m

s

ile

m 15

Big Rapids

s

ile

m 10

5

m

ile

s

25 mins.

Mecosta

Mount Pleasant

Midland

LEGEND Stanwood

22 mins. 13 mins.

26 mins

Morley

Canadian Lakes

Radius Distances M 20 Average Travel Time Average Route

Figure 2.11: Work Travel Times (Sheila Kakavand)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 35


2.3

Regional amenities


present mecosta

county services

Figure 2.12 shows the county services and their location in relation to Mecosta Village. Figure 2.12 tells you what Mecosta Village is lacking in terms of services and where they would have to go for those services. In turn it shows what services are possible to have in Mecosta Village. Mecosta Public School Mecosta Public Schools consist of one Elementary school in Mecosta Village. It is part of the larger Chippewa Hills school district, and the elementary serves approximately 300 students and employees 31 staff. It is located on 555 W Main st. Mecosta, MI 49332, which can be seen in Figure 2.12. Remus Public Schools Chippewa Hills school district consists of seven different schools. First is the Chippewa Hills Intermediate School, which is located on 3102 Arthur Road Remus, MI (6.9 miles). Second is the Chippewa Hills Middle School, which is located at 3102

(Taylor Heldt)

Arthur Road Remus, MI (6.9 miles). Then the Chippewa Hills high School, which is located at 3226 Arthur Road Remus, MI (7.1 miles). Mosaic School is an alternative education program which is located at 350 Wheatland Ave. Remus, MI (5.4 miles).

to its students. This school district also has a career center which offers students occupational programs that are also open to the public. This school district offers a Head Start Program and the Mecosta-Osceola Early On Program.

Barryton Public School Another one of Chippewa Hills schools is Barryton Elementary School located at 19701-30th Ave. Barryton, MI (12.9 miles). It serves approximately 260 students.

Colleges and Universities In Mecosta village there are no secondary schools, but east and west of the village there are two located in Mount Pleasant and Big Rapids. Ferris State University is located in Big Rapids (18.6 miles) and Central Michigan University is located in Mount Pleasant (24.6 miles). Both of these universities offer associates, bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees, and doctorates. Another higher learning school that has a branch in Mount Pleasant is Mid-Michigan College.

Weidman Public School Weidman Elementary school is apart of the Chippewa Hills school district and is located at 3311 School Rd Weidman, MI (20.1 miles). It serves approximately 340 students. Mecosta-Osceola Intermediate School District Mecosta village is served by Mecosta-Osceola Intermediate School District, which has vocational and specialized education

38 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Mecosta County Youth and Family Center The mission of offering after school programs started in 1999, but it officially opened up its own building in 2009. It


provides educational, social, preventative, and mentorship programs to help support the youth of Mecosta County. It also holds classes for the parents and families of Mecosta County. It is located at 587 South Washington Street Mecosta, MI (0.6 miles). Mecosta County Commission on Aging/ Senior Center This Senior Center is supported by a millage tax and is a township service. It offers a variety of activities, programs, and assistance to the seniors of Mecosta County and Morton Township. It is located in the Senior Center Facility at 12954 80th ave. Mecosta, Michigan (2.9 miles). Mecosta County Banks There are a total of 13 banks in Mecosta County and six of them are located in Big Rapids. The others are located in Evart, three in Stanwood, two in Remus, and Lakeview.

Mecosta County Libraries There are six libraries located in Mecosta County and one library center.

The Wheatland Township Library is located in Remus at 207 W Michigan Ave (5.6 miles).

Big Rapids contains two libraries, the Ferris State University library, which is located at 1010 Campus Dr Big Rapids, MI, and the Big Rapids library which is located at 226 N. Michigan ave Big Rapids MI (17.8 miles).

The Evart Public Library is at 104 N Main st in Evart, MI (28.9 miles).

There is one library in Mecosta which is the Morton Township Public Library and is located at 7062 9 Mile rd, Mecosta, MI (1.7 miles). It serves approximately 4,311 people, who are residents of Morton Township. The Tamarack District Library is in Lakeview MI and is located at 832 S Lincoln Ave (15.2 miles). The Barryton Public Library is located at 198 Northern Barryton, MI (13 miles).

The Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal is a nonprofit educational institute. It is located in Mecosta, Michigan at P.O. Box 4. Its mission is to strengthen the foundations of western civilization including the economic, cultural, and religious parts. Its efforts are directed toward students, business and religious leaders, policy makers, and the general public. Village Office The village of Mecosta Office is located at 115 West Main Street. It is the only building for the Mecosta Village operations. The building currently operates with one person only one day a week.

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 39


present mecosta

county services Township Office Morton Township Office is located at 290 West Main Street. It is the primary location for the township administrative offices. Departments inside the township hall include the Township Supervisor, Clerk, Treasurer, Assessing, Transportation, and Recreation.

Emergency Services The village of Mecosta has a branch of the Morton Township Fire Department located at 200 E. Hayes Street which serves the village. The main fire department branch is in Canadian Lakes approximately seven miles away. There is no Department of Public Safety in or around Mecosta Village; the nearest is located approximately 15 miles away in any direction.

(Taylor Heldt, Mike Schauble)

approximately 6 miles away, and Rodney, approximately 9 miles away. Parks and Recreation Brower Park is at the center of Mecosta Village and is maintained regularly in order to be readily accessible by the public. The park has a wide range of attractions for all ages, including various recreational pieces of equipment, a skate park is located right next to a section of the East Branch of the Little Muskegon River.

Post Office The post office located at 250 West Main Street serves all of Mecosta and surrounding areas. The nearest post offices are in Remus,

40 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Barryton

131

66

Big Rapids 20

Stanwood

Canadian Lakes

Mecosta

Remus 20

LEGEND Post Offices Banks

131

Library Morley 2 mi 5m

Figure 2.12: Mecosta County Amenities Map (Taylor Heldt, Mike Schauble)

66

Schools Restaurants Emergency Services City Offices Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 41


present mecosta

township services

Figure 2.13 shows the small scale services Mecosta Village and others in the townships have. It shows where people are most likely to go to get these services. There is one pharmacy in the township located in Remus, Michigan, and there are three gas stations; one is in Mecosta Village, one is in Canadian Lakes, and one is in Remus. This map helps to show what services could be brought to Mecosta Village that would entice more customers there.

42 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Taylor Heldt)


Mecosta

LEGEND Pharmacies Gas Stations Lawn Service 1 mi 1km

Hardware Stores Bookstores Body Shops

Figure 2.13: Morton Township Amenities Map (Taylor Heldt)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 43


present mecosta

recreation

Mecosta Village lacks many recreational and physically engaging activities that many surrounding communities have. However, there are many different ways to improve the recreational aspects of Mecosta Village. One way of doing so is by creating a community that caters to the surrounding areas that have successful recreation activities along with gaining access to new recreation within Mecosta Village.

Surrounding areas like Canadian Lakes and Barryton, and different parks such as School Section Lake Park, and Merrill Lake Park have the potential to assist the growth of the downtown area of Mecosta village. This section identifies key areas and characteristics of the existing area along with its surroundings. This section suggests different ideas of how to grow the downtown area of Mecosta village, and what characteristics are essential for Mecosta Village to grow.

(Justin Totty)

The existing recreation destinations in Mecosta village include: • “Books village” • Mecosta County Youth Center • Mecosta County Commission on Aging/ Senior center • Music on the river • Bike trail • Brower park Existing recreation activities that are in the village are lacking key characteristics that are needed to build and attract people to Mecosta Village. The Power of 10 includes: shaping streets as public spaces, squares and parks as multi-use destinations, build local economies through markets, design buildings to support places, link a public health agenda to a public space agenda, reinvent community planning, create a comprehensive public space agenda, lighter, quicker, cheaper: start small, experiment, and restructure government to support public spaces. These are all ways that the

44 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

downtown area of Mecosta village can grow according to the “power of 10” of the PPS Publication (Project for Public spaces). These points can be easy to obtain in the Mecosta area due to the vast existing recreation around the area within a 10-15 mile radius. Catering to the areas around the village has potential to be a positive influence on the communities’ existing Recreation near Mecosta Village. Parks • Brower Park • Merrill Lake Park • School Section Park • Tubbs Lake St. Forest Campground • Paris Park • Haymarch Lake Game Area Golf Courses • St. Ives Golf Club • The Resorts of Tullymore & St. Ives • Tullymore Golf Course • The Pines


131

Barryton 66

Big Rapids 20

Mecosta

Stanwood

Canadian Lakes

Remus 20

LEGEND Mecosta Parks and rec

131

Golf Course

Y Morley 2 mi 5m

66

Sporting Outlets Music on the river

Figure 2.14: Mecosta County Recreation (Justin Totty, Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 45


Lakes • Chippewa Lake • Jehnsen Lake • Horsehead Lake • Canadian Lakes

(Justin Totty)

within the community can bring value to the community as well as fresh, local produce. Local business and farmers can use the surrounding places as a target when selling their goods.

Bike Trails • The White Pine Trail Combining Mecosta Village to the county’s surrounding attractions can be a big lift to the communities upcoming success. By transforming the downtown area to an area known for camping, golfing, biking, and water sports. Mecosta could be a desirable asset to the people driving through downtown. Farmers markets can also help communities. There aren’t many farmer markets near Mecosta Village. The closest farmers markets are in the Big Rapids and Canadian Lakes areas. Incorporating farmer’s market

12am noon

markets

present mecosta

farmer’s markets

12pm

Paris CrossRoads Ricterville Big Rapids Standwood Canadian Lakes

sun

mon

Figure 2.15: Farmer’s Market Schedule

46 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

tue wed

thu

days of the week

fri

sat


131

Barryton 66

Big Rapids 20

Stanwood

Canadian Lakes

Mecosta Remus 20

LEGEND Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market

131

Morley

66

2 mi 5m

Figure 2.16: Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market Location Map (Justin Totty)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 47


present MECOSTA

outdoor activities

(Jake Leestma)

Though Mecosta County boasts great outdoor recreational activities, most of those great opportunities lay in the hands of the private land owner, not in state or public hands such as land and lakes. Waterways are scattered throughout the county, but many lack the public boat access needed for people to use the lakes themselves. Public access is allowed to a select lakes such as Lake Mecosta and Chippewa Lake. State Hunting Land is also very limited in the county. Only in a few scattered areas is state land available for hunting and other public use. The Muskegon River and the Little Muskegon River are the only two trout streams in the county to boast a viable trout population. The Muskegon River flows from north to south exiting the county at its western border. The Little Muskegon cut across Mecosta County and right through the village exiting at the southern border of the county.

Figure 2.17: Brook Trout

Figure 2.18: Yellow Perch

Figure 2.19: Canadian Geese

Figure 2.20: White Tail Buck

48 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


131

Barryton 66

Big Rapids 20

LEGEND

Mecosta Remus Stanwood

20

Canadian Lakes

State Hunting Land Public Lake Access

131

Trout Stream Morley

66

2 mi 5m

Figure 2.21: Outdoor Hunting and Fishing Map (Jake Leestma)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 49


present mecosta

rails to trails There are various trails that criss-cross Michigan. The research shows there are three primary paths in our area of interest. The first path is called the White Pine Trail. The White Pine Trail runs north and south from Grand Rapids, on the way this path stops in Reed City, which is 30.5 miles or 2 and a half hours by bike from Mecosta. The path also goes through Big Rapids. This location is only 17.2 miles away or 1 and a half hours by bike.

This could be a key tie in location for Mecosta and theses cities. The second largest path in that region is the Pure Marquette Rail-Trail. This trail runs from Baldwin to Midland. Mecosta Village could also be tied into this trail to start to create a central hub for all of the surrounding trails. This trail runs through Evart which is directly north of Mecosta Village. This city is 22.5 miles north or 1 hour and 49 min by bike. The last Trail that is around Mecosta Village is the Fred Meijer Heartland Trail. This

(Daniel Montgomery, Justin Totty)

Trail runs from Greenville to Alma. It runs north of Stanton 9 miles then turns east and goes to Alma. This corner could be linked to Mecosta Village because it is only 23.3 miles away or 1 hour and 50 min by bike. The combination of these three trails shows a large potential to create a central core for the surrounding paths and can bring a lot of new people to the Village. The White Pine Trail could be connected to Mecosta Village. The DNR has a Trail Proposal process, the first step is to complete a proposal form that can be provided by request. Along with the completed form, the following information would also be needed. • Documented property owners consent to open their property for public use • Good maps, showing location of proposed trail, along with ownership map (plat map book) • The maps showing ownership, need to have a corresponding letter giving consent

50 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

to use their lands • Letters of support, from local units of government, township recreation boards, public, etc are helpful •Costs, and how the trail will be funded for construction, maintenance—unfortunately, the DNR cannot be relied on as a funding source for these costs… (volunteer groups are very popular for trail maintenance) • A narrative indicating the advantages of the proposed trail—try to “sell” the project to the DNR • Follow the documentation listed above, it will be sent to the DNR in Lansing Michigan for review


LEGEND Trails Mecosta Village

Figure 2.22: Rails to Trails Map (Daniel Montgomery, Dan Horvath, Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 51


2.4

land use/buildings


present mecosta

plats & right of ways

As in many similar small towns across Michigan, Mecosta Village is aligned in a typical grid plat system to maximize use of space. Roads have been developed in parallel and perpendicular angles to allow ease of access and minimize confusion. Figure 2.23 also shows the right of ways where roads could be developed. Figure 2.23 shows the property outlines. For residential scenarios there is a 30 foot set back from a road right of way, 10 feet on each side lot and 25 foot rear set back. The total land use for build-able area should be 40 percent. For commercial scenarios there is a 40 foot set back from a road right of way, 10 feet on each side lot and 25 foot rear set back. The total land use for buildable area should be 40 percent.

54 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery)


LEGEND Lot Separation Right of Way

1000 ft 200 m

Figure 2.23: Right of Way and Lot Separation (Daniel Montgomery)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 55


present mecosta

current land uses

In Mecosta Village there are eight different types of land uses. The land uses are the starting point to knowing what can be placed on which site location without having to change any current regulations. This is also very important because if any renovations change the land use the building must be brought up to current code requirements which may not be feasible on certain plots.

or barn. This category only relates to owner-occupied single-unit homes because they are for single families. There are some homes that are bigger and others that are smaller due to the number of lots that is owned. Single family residential homes cover 246 acres and 34 percent of Mecosta Village.

Methodology In figuring out what the current land uses are for Mecosta Village, utilizing existing maps and Google maps for satellite imaging and surveying. Categories will correlate with the future land use map so that there is continuity between the two and the tracking of changes are distinguished.

Mobile Home Parks This category relates to any area where mobile homes or any other types of homes manufactured off site are located. This category consists of any conglomerate group of these home structures are located, such as mobile home parks. Mobile Home Parks covers 51.6 acres and 7 percent of Mecosta Village.

Single Family Residential This category consists of any single-unit home. It also considers the lot it sits on which includes any separate free standing structures on the lot such as a garage, shed

Government This category relates to a wide diversity of building types such as municipal buildings, federal, state or county office facilities, maintenance facilities, and any other related

56 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery) facilities to government. This category also relates to parking structures/lots, and the land these structures occupy. Government buildings cover 0.06 acres and less than 1 percent of Mecosta Village. Schools This category relates to public, private, and charter schools (K-12). This category also relates to any supporting structures, recreational facilities/areas, parking lots, and land that are occupied by this entity. Schools cover 3.64 acres and 0.005 percent of Mecosta Village. Churches This category relates to any type of religious facility. This category also relates to any other free standing structures and parking lots that these facilities occupy. Churches cover 0.08 acres and less than 1 percent of Mecosta Village.


Village and Parks This category relates to Bower Park in the middle of Mecosta Village by the East Branch Little Muskegon River. This category also relates to any free standing structures supporting this area which also includes parking lots and land. Village and Parks cover 6.53 acres and is 6 percent of Mecosta Village. Commercial This category relates to any business, wholesale business, retail, services (professional or personal), and any other business that provides a good or service for the public. This category also includes any land use, parking, access areas, or any other related freestanding structures that the business occupies. Commercial covers 45.31 acres and less than one percent of Mecosta Village.

Vacant Land Conveyed in the 2010 Census there were 37 vacant homes, 4 vacant homes of rent, and 4 vacant homes for sale in Mecosta Village. Vacant Land covers 179.1 acres and 25 percent of Mecosta Village. With the knowledge of the existing land use shown in Figure: 2.33 in combination with Figure: 2.24 we are able to see the potential for what buildings could be added in Mecosta Village.

Figure 2.24: Land Distribution Graphic

LEGEND

Single Family Residential 34% Vacant 25% Mobile Home Parks 7% Single Family Residential-34% Commercial 6% Parks 1% SchoolsVacant >1% - 25% Churches >1% Goverment >1%

Mobile Home Parks - 7%

Commercial - 6% Parks - 1% Schools > 1% Churches > 1%

(Daniel Montgomery)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 57


present mecosta

Figure 2.25: Vacant Land

Figure 2.26: Single Family Residential

Figure 2.27: Government

Figure 2.28: Commercial

Figure 2.29 Church

Figure 2.30: School

Figure 2.31: Mobile Home Park

Figure 2.32: Park

58 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 58


LEGEND Parks Single Family Miscellaneous School

1000 ft 200 m

Figure 2.33: Current Land Use Map (Daniel Montgomery)

Mobile Home Commercial Vacant Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 59


present mecosta

building density

Mecosta Village is represented in Figure 2.36 as a figure ground map. This two dimensional map of Mecosta Village shows the relation between built space and unbuilt space. In an urban planning sense, the figure group map shows the density of homes and buildings along with the main streets in the village. The majority of structures are fairly sprawled out with the exception of the downtown area, which has more local businesses and a denser area. This map is important to understand the density of Mecosta Village. The map can further be used to determine current and future land uses, and study the current state of the buildings in the village. Lastly, the map starts to give an understanding of where new buildings could possibly be built.

60 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Joseph Nodge)


1000 ft 200 m

LEGEND Existing Buildings M-20

100 ft 20 m

Figure 2.34 Mecosta Village Core Figure Ground Figure 2.35: Mecosta Village Figure Ground (Joseph Nodge)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 61


present mecosta

existing conditions

(Geena Pickering)

Mecosta Village has a variety of existing building conditions. There are certain buildings in downtown that need work. Looking at the existing conditions shows which buildings need the most work, or need to be removed from the village. The research showed that there were 7 buildings withing the village limits that need full renovations. The existing buildings conditions are shown on Figure 2.41, along with some examples of the four different condition types. This is very important to the revitalization of downtown Mecosta Village because if these buildings are renovated or removed it will increase the visual appeal of downtown and will make it more likely for people to come to Mecosta Village.

Figure 2.36: Mecosta Library

Figure 2.37: Abandoned Building

Figure 2.38: Village Church

Figure 2.39: Big Red Barn

Figure 2.36 - No Work Needed Figure 2.37 - Full Renovation Figure 2.38 - Little Work Needed Figure 2.39 - Lots of Work Needed

62 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


1000 ft 200 m

LEGEND Important No Work

c

a

Little Work

b

d

Lots of Work Full Renovation

100 ft 100 ft 20 m 20 m

Figure 2.40: Mecosta Village Core

M-20

Figure 2.41: Existing Building Conditions Map (Geena Pickering)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 63


present mecosta

setback requirements Plots are of great importance because it determines how much space is available. Figure 30 shows all the plots in the village and figure 2.42 is a close up dimensioning of those plots with setbacks. On M-20 the plats are 24 feet by 120 feet. This means that if a building is to be constructed on the main road multiple lots would be needed because the plats are not dimensionally large enough to build on a single lot. The graphic shown to the right is an organization for a single plot, double plot, and triple plot according to the Morton Township Zoning Ordinance. The typical setback for a commercial use is 40 feet from a Right of Way (R.O.W.), 10 feet for side setbacks, and 25 feet for services like garbage pickup on the back side of the building. In Mecosta, there is a forty foot setback from the R.O.W. Mainly because the buildings of Mecosta Village were built before the zoning ordinances were accepted giving

these buildings a grandfather clause. The grandfather clause allows these buildings to hold their position in which they were built unless there is an addition, a land-use change after 10 years or a differentiation in building use.

In consideration of a new construction there comes conflicts with setbacks according to the zoning ordinances but with a reasonable circumstance a building may be brought closer to the R.O.W. Line. A variance is permission for more space of the current property which is what grants the designer more space. The setback requirements of the Morton Township Zoning Ordinance for a single plot would give the owner 220 square feet of build-able land, a double plot 1540 square feet, and a triple plot 2860 square feet. To receive a variance the builder would have to go through the Zoning Board of Appeals where health and safety, the zoning board, and any residents within 300 foot radius of the new construc-

64 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Victor Urban)

tion would gather to discuss/vote about the new construction. The graphic, on the right, matters because it visually proves that we cannot just purchase one lot for improving. Most businesses would need a minimum of three lots to build a structure on due to the square footage that their business requires. Variances can be provided or other methods such like building wall to wall with a neighboring building can be viable with a fire wall of at least 4 hours but the neighbor must agree along with the zoning board. The Plots directly tie to septic issues when improving land use or changing the service that a business will be providing as indicated in figure 52.


Single Plot

Double Plot

R.O.W.

Triple Plot

R.O.W.

R.O.W.

40’

4’

10’

52’

10’

10’

10’

10’

10’

LEGEND Build-able Land Property Line

28’ 25’

AREA 220 sq.ft.

25’

AREA 1540 sq. ft.

AREA 2860 sq. ft.

Figure 2.42: Plot Setbacks (Victor Urban)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 65


present Mecosta

septic requirements

There are also setbacks for septic uses. Typical septic fields is that it cannot be located under buildings or drive ways or streets. The septic area must be in an open field with several setbacks from buildings, domestic wells, and property lines. The septic area needs to have a setback from any R.O.W. at a minimum of 10 feet, needs to be 1 foot above the one hundred year flood plain elevation, and 10 feet away from any building. The sizing of the septic area depends on use of the building and basic capacity of people or a general number of feet squared. Then calculations will determine the amount of gallons per day the septic will have to handle. After finding the volume of septic handled per day, the calculations will need a soil type for the diffusion rate of septic into the ground. In Mecosta Village’s downtown the soil type is loomey sand which influences the septic size by a .75 diffusion factor. This will increase the size needed for the septic because this is a slower

diffusion.

In figure 2.43, the top displays three 24’x120’ (typical sized) plots put together with a front setback of 40’, sides 10’, and back 25’, this figure gives the build-able area 2860 feet squared, shaded in gray, where the bank can be built. The bottom graphic shows a ten foot offset from the building and the property lines which define the build-able areas for septic and wells. The septic matters because knowing these rules and mathematic proportions tells the designer(s) that the property owned needs not only a good enough size for the building that the business owns but the plot size needs to be a big enough area for the septic also. This allows the designer(s) to see how much space is needed to complete a project of this scale.

66 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Victor Urban)


A

B

C

LEGEND D Yes

Building Area for Septic or Well Bad

No

Good Property Line

Yes

Building Setback Line

Figure 2.43: Septic Setbacks (Victor Urban)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 67


present Mecosta

septic requirements Figure 2.44 is a graphic study to show how much area would be needed for a decently sized bank in Mecosta Village and then sizing a septic area to the bank. For a decently sized bank (2860 sq. ft.) there needs to be at least 382 square feet of septic area. That is equivalent to a master bedroom or living-room space for middle class homes. In this graphic we showed the difficulties in accomplishing a bank project of this scale.

“A” explores the implications of a well and a septic area on the property. Since septic and personal wells have to be separated 75’ apart from the other designs ran into some difficulties with matching the same distance from street for the new buildings. In “A”, the building could be granted a variance for the build-able area that impedes on R.O.W. setback from the front because well and septic are proving a viable reason for development of land but there will still be that disconnect between the new construction and the rest

downtown.

In “B” is basically the same thing just flipped around and no variance needed but the building is 40’ away from the R.O.W. in front and a does not match the downtown. In “C”, the building could be granted a variance for the build-able area that impedes on R.O.W. setback from the front because well and septic are proving a viable reason for development of land. This won’t work because “C’s” septic and well areas just don’t work due to proximity. Figure D is viable but there is a need for more plots (5) to complete this layout and this option allows, with a variance, the ability to visually connect to the downtown and provide more business space.

68 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Victor Urban)


A

B

C

LEGEND D Yes

Building Area for Septic or Well Bad

No

Good Property Line

Yes

Building Setback Line

Figure 2.44: Septic and Well Spacing (Victor Urban)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 69


present mecosta

soil type

(Jake Leestma)

Adrian Muck consists of very deep poorly drained soil formed in organic materials about 60-80 inches deep. Pipestone Loamy Sand consists of very deep somewhat poorly drained soil in sandy outwash. Coloma Sand consists of very deep, excessively drained soil in sandy outwashes about 80 inches deep. Covert Sand consists of very deep, moderately drained soil in a sandy outwash about 60 inches deep. Plainfield Sand consists of somewhat deep, well drained soil in sandy outwashes. Mecosta Sand consists of very deep excessively drained soil in sandy outwashes about 60 inches deep.

Figure 2.45: Typical Michigan Pond

This map contains significance because it allows us to see what types of structures we can build in Mecosta Village depending on soil type. Larger buildings such as mutli-use will not be viable because of the sandy nature of the soil with no rockbed to help alleviate the weight. Figure 2.46: Typical Michigan Forest

70 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


LEGEND Adrian Muck Mecosta Sand Coloma Sand Covert Sand

1000 ft 200 m

Plainfield Sand Pipestone Loamy Sand

Figure 2.47: Soil Type Map (Jake Leestma)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 71


present mecosta

parking

(Victor Urban)

It is important that there is sufficient parking for the downtown so that people can travel with more goods, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to walk far to get to their car, and most importantly there is accessibility for people with a disability. In Mecosta Village there is an opportunity for more parking. Mecosta Village can influence people to use parking through more spots in visible range to the driver. Refer to Figure 4.1 on page 178. These tables matter because they show the importance of parking requirements for banks, banquet facilities, office type buildings, and more. People are going to visit Mecosta and they are going to need a place to park their car. There are only 467 people in Mecosta Village so we need to provide the opportunity for others from farther communities to visit this community of great stores and people. It is good to know how many parking spots are needed for different commercial

types because it can give Mecosta the right number of spaces for businesses who want to make available space for their customers. This table is useful because if designer(s) are trying to figure out parking for woodies or sluggers then the Food and Beverage section of this table would directly correlate. This means that both woodies and sluggers would have to have one parking spot for every two seats and 1 space for every employee working during the busiest time of day. Since the Library has just been renovated we believe it already meets these codes and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need any more parking spots But revamping street parking to fit more customers is a possibility for the future. If a new office building is being developed in downtown Mecosta it states that for every 300 square feet there will need to be 1 parking spot. Parking is a very important force in designing downtowns. If there

72 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

is not enough parking people wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where to leave their car and instead figure it is too troubling to find a parking spot and keep driving instead of stopping. We see the opportunity for parking and providing travelers with the chance to make Mecosta Village a destination point.


Parking Angle Stall In Degrees Width 0 to 15 9 ft. 16 to 37 10 ft. 38 to 57 10 ft. 58 to 74 10 ft. 75 to 90 10 ft.

Aisle Parking Stall Curb To Width Length Curb 12 ft. 23 ft. 30 ft. 11 ft. 19 ft. 47 ft. 13 ft. 19 ft. 54 ft. 18 ft. 19 ft. 61 ft. 24 ft. 19 ft. 63 ft.

Figure 2.48: Parking Restrictions

LEGEND Right Of Way Street BoundParking Spaces

250 ft 50 m Figure 2.49: Parking Locations (Victor Urban)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 73


3

Future Mecosta urban design

park redesign

woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s renovation downtown eatery

multi-purpose facility


future mecosta

opportunities Main Street (M20)/ Bike Lanes The highway M-20 runs through the middle of Mecosta Village with no change to the speed limit. This causes people to feel unsafe and causes visitors to drive past the city without stopping. M-20 is a connector between Big Rapids and Mt. Pleasant, but does not have much other traffic from other nearby cities due to the location of Mecosta Village. There is also a bike lane located in Mecosta Village, although it only spans for about two blocks and is hardly used. The bike lane is located along M-20, next to high speed traffic; therefore people do not feel safe using the lanes. M-20 is a main road that runs through the Village which means that many people travel through the Village. The wide width offers the opportunity to add and change the road to make it more appealing. Publicity/Identity For multiple reasons, many people do not know about Mecosta Village. One issue is

(Geena Pickering, Joseph Nodge)

the villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publicity. The library tends to be the first thing that people think about when they hear â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mecosta Villageâ&#x20AC;?. The new library, which would be considered the greatest focal point in town tends to draw people from surrounding areas. Other businesses in Mecosta Village need to develop new strategies to be more publicly known. The town is currently without a central attraction so there is no reason for people to visit the village. Parks and rivers play a key role in small communities. They tend to be a space where people gather. Concerts, music, fishing, and other events could be expanded to help bring people into Mecosta Village. This is an opportunity for Mecosta Village because things like band-shells, and parks can be redesigned or added which would attract more people. Youth Mecosta Village has plenty of youth; these youth find very little to do in their spare time. The village has a youth center that

76 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

many youths do get involved in. It is run by volunteers who want to prevent the youths from causing problems and getting themselves in trouble. Having this great amount of youth in the Village presents an opportunity for a youth run business, or expanding the youth center. This would brighten up the town. Community Involvement This is a key factor in a strong core of a community. This also leads to potential conflict between ideas of how the town should evolve. Mecosta Village has many people that are willing to help out with the community. If involvement is organized in a beneficial way, it will bring forth many ideas for the village. On the other side there are so many people that want to be involved in the community that when change happens, it has the potential to happen quickly.


Jobs The unemployment rate in Mecosta Village for people over the age of 25 is 32.3%, significantly high in comparison to Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unemployment rate of 8.4%. Due to the lack of large businesses, there are not very many opportunities for people to work. This means that the Village has the potential to grow because there are many people willing to work. Plat Size In Mecosta Village the plat sizes are too small to fit a new building project on just one plat. With the new septic tanks, and depending on what type and size of building proposed, Mecosta Village would need to purchase multiple plats in order to build a new building. Since the plat sizes are small, developers have to buy at least two at a time, this means more money comes to the Village.

Location Mecosta Village is centrally located between many nearby cities. This provides an opportunity to bring people in from other communities to utilize what Mecosta has to offer. Mecosta Village is located just northeast of Canadian Lakes. The main issue with Canadian Lakes is the lack of connection between the two. Many people who live in Canadian Lakes feel there is no reason to go to Mecosta Village.

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 77


3.1

Urban design

daniel montgomery taylor heldt

brian maneke


Existing conditions

Buildings

The existing conditions for the downtown area consist of single story buildings and a few two story buildings. The color scheme of Mecosta Village is of neutral colors and earth tones consisting of mainly greys, beiges, whites, and browns. The buildings are spaced out creating unnecessary gaps in between the buildings. These gaps create opportunities for future green spaces, however, they elongate the downtown and without the buildings connecting, the town feels disconnected and less dense as other downtowns.

Road

The current span of the road from sidewalk to sidewalk is 75’ with medium traffic driving through at 55mph to 65mph. This is a safety hazard for pedestrians wanting to cross the street, and bicyclists who don’t feel safe riding on the road. The intersections in Mecosta Village do not have crosswalks which also make it difficult to cross the street because of the roads width.

The height of the buildings is smaller proportionately to the width of the road intensifying the width of the road.

Sidewalks

The sidewalks are made of concrete and are at a width of 11’-3”. There are no visual components to disrupt the space which also makes the road seem wider. Without visual components on the sidewalks, such as trees, the downtown feels hot and there isn’t any shade to create a relaxing cool environment for pedestrian activity.

Trees and Street Lights

The downtown district does not have any street trees or street lights on its sidewalks. Without street trees, the downtown looks empty. Street lights give night life to a town; however, without street lights lit up at night, the downtown district is dark and has little to no activity.

80 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Figure 3.1 : Library

Figure 3.2: Main Street Facing West

Figure 3.3: Main Street Facing East

Figure 3.4: Main Street Facing North East

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 81


Importance of Main Street

Main streets are typically the central hubs for a town’s community and should reflect the personality of the town. A thriving main street can give a town an identity. This identity can provide opportunities for more businesses to come in.

New Facade Fills Openings

Features of Main Street

main street

Main streets do well when there are plenty of services provided for the community. Main streets should be more than just a place to go shopping; they should be a space this is visually stimulating as well as encouraging pedestrians to explore and interact with the space. The following components will be addressed in the streetscape redesign. • • • • • •

New Facade Series of Bays

Building Facades Sidewalks Bicycles Parking Traffic Pedestrians

Building Facades

The buildings downtown mainly consist of two – story construction with businesses on the lower floor and residences on the upper floor. These buildings are designed to give the downtown a more modern look while making it fit into Mecosta.

Building Heights

The buildings on Main Street should be relatively constant by maintaining a height of one to two stories. Door heights and window heights (from ground to sill) should also be relatively constant.

Rhythm of Windows Rhythm of Storefronts Figure 3.5: Design Principles For Main Street Infill Development Source: Planning and Urban Design Standards 2007

82 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Setbacks

All buildings should be flush with the other buildings as well as the sidewalks with the exception of building entrances that may be inverted.

Sidewalks

The sidewalks are currently at a width of 11’-3”, the minimum is 5’-0”, and we designed 16’-6”. With a width of 16’ -6” the sidewalks will create an easy flow for pedestrian traffic both on the sidewalk and those who are entering and exiting business. Sidewalks will also be lined with a grey brick to highlight the edge of the sidewalk. Crosswalks and intersection corners will be made of grey brick to create a small hub for pedestrian interaction, and to make a connection with the businesses across the street.

Figure 3.7: Improved Sight Lines: Partial Extension Source: Planning and Urban Design Standards 2007

Sight lines obstructed by parked cars prevent drivers from seeing pedestrians starting to cross the street

Figure 3.6: Obstructed Sight Lines

Source: Planning and Urban Design Standards 2007

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Figure 3.8: Improved Sight Lines: Full Curb Extensions Source: Planning and Urban Design Standards 2007

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 83


Bicycles

Bicycle lanes will be lined with grey brick to alert vehicle traffic that there may be bikers and to slow down. The grey brick will also define the path and give bicyclist a designated area to bike safely. The bike lane will extend from its current location to the edge of the downtown.

Parking

main street

The parking will be parallel parking and will also be defined by grey brick to let drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists be alert that there are cars parked and to drive slowly. With on-street parking, it can help slow down traffic because they would be alert of cars as well as pedestrians going from business to car.

Pedestrians

With the parking area, bike lane, cross walks, and sidewalks being trimmed with grey brick, it defines all areas meant for pedestrians.

Terminating Vista

A terminating vista is located at the end of a path. “Vista” is your site when looking down a street or corridor. “Terminated” is any building, object or land mark acting as a focal point and limiting the individuals view from looking beyond. For the individual going in that direction, that location creates a focal point of greater importance.

84 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


terminating vista

Figure 3.9: Entrance to Mecosta Village from the South

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 85


mecosta villages

150 ft 25m

Figure 3.11: Mecosta Village Downtown Layout

50ft 10m

Figure 3.10: Typical Mecosta Village Intersection Layout

86 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Street Section

11’- 3” Sidewalk

13’- 9” Parking

6’- 6” 12’- 6” Bike Lane East Bound

12’- 0” Turn lane 100’- 0” Right of Way

12’- 6” 6’- 6” East Bound Bike Lane

13’- 9” Parking

11’- 3” Sidewalk

Figure 3.12: Mecosta Village Current Road Section

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 87


Street sections

10’- 6” 6’ - 0” Pedestrian lane Verge 8’- 6” 16’- 6” 6’- 6” 12’- 6” Parking Bike Lane East Bound Sidewalk

12’- 0” Turn lane 100’- 0” Right of Way

12’- 6” 6’- 6” 8’- 6” East Bound Bike Lane Parking

6’ - 0” 10’- 6” Verge Pedestrian lane 16’- 6” Sidewalk

Figure 3.13: Mecosta Village Future Road Section

88 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


19’- 0” Pedestrian lane 25’- 0” Sidewalk

4’ - 0” Ramp 6’- 6” 12’- 6” Bike Lane East Bound

12’- 0” Turn lane 100’- 0” Right of Way

12’- 6” 6’- 6” East Bound Bike Lane

4’ - 0” Ramp

19’- 0” Pedestrian lane 25’- 0” Sidewalk

Figure 3.14: Mecosta Village Future Crosswalk Section (Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 89


Phase One

Development

Phase one of the streetscape redesign of Mecosta Village could include items such as concrete blocks and painting of the bike lanes (Which are both not shown in Figure 3.15). Also it could include the redesign of current buildings with opportunities of new ones making them taller to give the feeling of a warmer downtown. Another item included in stage one would be the extending out of the sidewalks, making them wider and visually narrowing down the road to slow the flow of traffic.

Phase Two

Figure 3.15: Mecosta Village Phase 1 Perspective View

Phase two includes putting brick into the bike lanes, parking, crosswalks and the edges and corners of sidewalks. Also it includes the painting of the turn lanes and adding road symbols and signs. All of this aesthetic design helps to create a more appealing downtown and helps to create pedestrian zones by showing the difference of where they are. This slows down traffic by visually narrowing the road and also makes the pedestrians feel safe and have a barrier from traffic.

90 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.16: Mecosta Village Phase 2 Perspective View (Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Phase Three

Phase three includes the adding of trees, light poles, and banners into the downtown. Also adding benches, trash cans, and bike racks add to the aesthetics and personalization of a downtown. Again adding these items help to slow down the traffic going through town and help to get drivers to stop in and walk around.

Phase Four

Figure 3.17: Mecosta Village Phase 3 Perspective View

Phase four shows what future Mecosta Village could look like with density and more population moving around town.

Figure 3.18 : Mecosta Village Phase 4 Perspective View (Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 91


Final Proposal

Figure 3.19: Mecosta Village Perspective from the West

92 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Figure 3.20: Mecosta Village Perspective from the East (Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 93


Figure 3.22: Trash Receptacle Top View

specs

Figure 3.21: Trash Receptacle

Figure 3.23: Trash Receptacle Elevation

Trash Receptacle Trash cans/receptacles will be placed every 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from each other. Trash cans help keep the town clean and clear of garbage. Placing trash cans at reasonable distances will assure that there will be a trash can nearby when needed.

94 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Figure 3.24: Role Form Wire Bench

Figure 3.25: Wire Bench Section

Figure 3.27: Wire Bench Top View

Figure 3.26: Wire Bench Side Elevation Figure 3.28: Wire Bench Front Elevation

Benches All sidewalks will accommodate seating areas outside of businesses for eating/reading/relaxing etc. these benches should be place at a maximum separation of 75â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Street lights and street trees will also be placed on the sidewalks.

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 95


Figure 3.31: Bike Rack Base Cap Figure 3.29: Bike Rack Figure 3.32: Cap Side Figure 3.33: Cap Iso Figure 3.34: Side

specs

Figure 3.30: Bike Rack Top View

Figure 3.35: Bike Rack Front Elevation

Bike Rack Bike racks create a space for cyclists to park their bikes rather than leaning them on a tree or a building. By installing bike racks, we will make the sidewalks safer for both cyclists, and pedestrians. The bike racks that are to be installed are called Wave Style Bike Racks and can be installed as a single unit supplying space for 2 bikes, or you can install multiple unit rack to supply space for multiple bikes. A single unit is 1’-7” long and a multi-unit rack (depending on the size you want, the length will vary) can go as long as 11’-10”.

96 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Figure 3.37: Street Light Lamp Topper

Figure 3.36: Street Light

Figure 3.38: Street Lamp Support

Figure 3.39: Street Light Base

Street Light The street lights will be positioned every 24’ starting at the 12’ mark in between each tree. These lights will encourage daytime activity to extend into the evening hours. With street lights being lit, they will give a sense of safety and comfort towards the downtown at night. The street lights will be at a height of 10’ to give verticality to the surrounding buildings.

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 97


specs

Figure 3.40: Banner Design

Figure 3.41: Children’s Art Banner Source: http://www.pammcconnell.ca/

Banners The banners can be mounted on every street light creating a more hometown feel. These banners are illustrated in red with a book as the town’s logo in the center (the color and the logo can be changed). The banner designed is 3’ wide by 6’ tall; however, the most common sizes of banners are 2’x6’, 3’x8’, and 4’x20’. The banner designed is measured at 3’x6’ which is also available.

98 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Figure 3.42: Parking Stop on Street

Figure 3.43: Parking Stop Temporary Plan

Figure 3.44: Parking stop op- Figure 3.45: Parking stop options three tions one and two. and four.

Concrete Barrier Concrete barriers are typically used for temporary fixes and traffic studies. A concrete barrier would be used in the 1st phase to slow traffic on M20. These barriers can be of any size, but for this situation a 10’ long barrier that is 2’-6” high will be used. These barriers will be used to demonstrate future construction planned for the downtown. By creating a choke point, these barriers will slow down future traffic through the village.

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 99


specs

Figure 3.46: Gingko Tree

Figure 3.47: Tree Planting Diagram

Tree Species All trees will be positioned every 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; starting and ending at each end of the sidewalk. These trees will be male Gingko trees and will act as visual components to define the main street as well as give the impression that the road is smaller in size. As these trees reach maturity, they will provide shade to pedestrians as well as provide aesthetic appeal.

100 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Daniel Montgomery, Taylor Heldt, Brian Maneke)


Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 101


3.2

park redesign

sheila kakavand

justin totty


park redesign

park opportunities Mecosta Village is filled with a large range of opportunities to accent the existing Village features. Recreational activities such as the bike trail, Skate Park, and playground currently rest in Brower Park of Mecosta Village.

The park, located on the Northwest portion of Main Street, provides amenities to the large percentage of the younger demographics as well as the older. Although Brower Park holds worthy amenities such as the Little Muskegon River, current park pathway with seating, and the existing pocket parks throughout the community there are also future implementations that could further improve Brower Park. Redesigning the current seating area into a functional band shell could provide the community with a range of outdoor activities such as: music in the park, community movie gatherings, farmers markets, community gardens, as well as stronger community

(Sheila Kakavand, Justin Totty)

involvement. The vast amount of park land available can make these amenities possible to thrive. Bleeding Brower Park into downtown Mecosta can add community ties within local businesses and increased foot traffic which could increase community revenue.

Figure 3.48: Little East Muskegon

Figure 3.49: Green Space Downtown

104 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.50: Current Sidewalk


Figure 3.51: Existing Park

Figure 3.52: Existing Skate Park

LEGEND xxxxxx xxxxxx Figure 3.53: Existing Playground

Figure 3.54: Porta Potty

xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx

Figure 3.55: Existing Parking Lot

xxxxxx

Figure 3.56: Reusable Materials

Figure 3.57: Red Barn Reusable Materials Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 105


Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y

23 miles

Mecosta

LEGEND

Stanwood Canadian Lakes 21 miles 7 miles

River Proposed Trail 82 miles Senior Center White Pine Trail

25 miles

Morley

Figure 3.58: Mecosta County

White Pine Trail Connection Cities

Y

Big Rapids

Y Y

106 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

18 miles

X

The proposed bike trail feathers out to different towns within Mecosta County such as: Canadian lakes, Stanwood, Morley, Barryton, and Big Rapids.

Barryton

X

These “hot spots” consist of Woody’s, Red Barn, Sluggers, Mecosta Elementary School, Morton Township Public Library, Kirk center, and The Family and Youth Center. Adding a bike trail that encompasses these hot spots as well as the green spaces in the community is a key step forward in uniting the community.

X

The park potential lies within the characteristics of the community. Showing ways the community could be tied together by the proposed revitalized park can lead to multiple opportunities. Extending the current bike trail as well as adding one not only connects downtown but circles the “hot spots” of the village.

X X X X X

park redesign

(Sheila Kakavand, Justin Totty) X X

maps


LEGEND Residential River Proposed trail Hot spots Brower Park Hubs

Figure 3.59: Mecosta Village

Hot spaces Spot Green

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 107


park redesign

green spaces / hubs (Sheila Kakavand, Justin Totty)

While the new trail following the river accommodates much of Mecosta Village there are additional “hubs” located in dense neighborhoods on the outskirts of downtown Mecosta. These “hubs” accommodate the community, especially the large percentage of youth that need to travel throughout Mecosta by a safe route. There are also pocket parks located throughout downtown on Main Street in order to address the issue of the lack of seating especially for eateries such as Sluggers and Woody’s. These pocket parks not only address seating but provide gathering spots in downtown that can be utilized which can in return reduce potential crime with these lookout spots.

Figure 3.60:Green Space

108 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Figure 3.61:Hub Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 109


park redesign

landscape

(Justin Totty)

Generating a bandshell and park design within the village of Mecosta is beneficial. There are many amenities in the area that can attract people to the park. Creating a walk path and different activities in the park that surround a featured bandshell can be a key aspect in the process of rebuilding the village of Mecosta.

A bandshell that is featured in the center of Brower Park can create an atmosphere that can accommodate the growing community of Mecosta Village. Developing the theme of an “inner and outer” park is essential when attracting people to a community park. In fact, the parks periphery, or “outer park,” is what successfully integrates the inner park into the city fabric. The attractions available on these adjacent streets are what draw people to the area, giving the park a steady flow of users. The lively character of these streets and sidewalks encourage people to stay and enjoy the space.

Figure 3.62: Porta Potty

Figure 3.63: Existing Seating

110 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.64: Existing Playground


Landscape Placement Map

LEGEND COMMMUNITY GARDENS

xxxxxx BANDSHELL

xxxxxx SKATE PARK

PLAYGROUND

xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx

Figure 3.65: Site Plan

xxxxxx Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 111


park redesign

landscape

(Justin Totty)

This featured bandshell will be made from recyclable materials. The big red barn is filled with useful material that are waiting to be put to good use, and how else then to create a bandshell.

This bandshell features for two restrooms and is located in the center of the park. The walking paths create a center hub to the bandshell. The bandshell is the key component to this park design. The playground, and skate park are centered by surrounding walking paths. Introducing community gardens to the park can be useful in growing the community. Creating community gardens in the front of the park can welcome pedestrians into Brower Park and the main street downtown of mecosta village.

COMMMUNITY GARDENS

BANDSHELL

SKATE PARK

PLAYGROUND

Figure 3.66: Landscape Figure Ground Map

112 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Landscape Design

Elevations & 3D Rendering

COMMMUNITY GARDENS

Figure 3.68: View 1

RESTROOOM

SKATE PARK

Figure 3.69: View 2

PLAYGROUND

Figure 3.67: Site Plan

Figure 3.70: View 3 Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 113


park redesign

landscape

(Sheila Kakavand)

The park redesign and bandshell proposal, will promote stronger community ties as well as well as promoting the connection between youth and the older community members. Composed of recycled materials and community pieces, the design ties together the community within the park. This multi-use bandshell can accommodate movies, concerts, and community events. This design incorporates a large portion of the original landscape while the amenities and trail surround this. The design includes three flexible phases that can be incorporated at different times. Phase 1: Bandshell proposal, part of skate park proposal, existing playground, and portion of community garden Phase 2: Skate park proposal addition and art wall Phase 3: The rest of the skate park, community garden addition, playground addition, and additional seating areas.

Figure 3.72: Community Pieces

Figure 3.71: Red Barn Reusable Materials

114 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.73: Existing Community Garden


Figure 3.75: Phase 1

Figure 3.76: Phase 2

Figure 3.74: Site Plan

Figure 3.77: Phase 3 Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 115


park redesign

landscape

(Sheila Kakavand)

Figure 3.78: Renovated Park Design

116 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Figure 3.79: Renovated Skate Park

xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx

Figure 3.80: Renovated Bandshell Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 117


3.3

Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reNOVATION


3.3.1

woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reNOVATION

dan horvath


Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Renovation: Proposal One By Dan Horvath

Figure 3.81:Floor Plan

122 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Focus Points: Deli Attraction Transformation Outdoor Seating Area


Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general store has so much to offer, and the people who are driving through Mecosta Village do not realize this. The transformation of this building can bring more wanted attention and business. The current state of the general store is concealing what it has to offer. The store already has a restaurant but in this design, the component of the store will be heavily emphasized. The emphasis on the restaurant will bring more business from people who do not live in Mecosta. With proper presentation the contents of the general store will become known more and will lead to an expanding business for Mecosta Village. There should be an inviting facade to greet your customers with an open arm.

Figure 3.82: Deli Interior Rendering

Figure 3.83: Outdoor Seating Rendering

Figure 3.84: Street View Rendering (Dan Horvath)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 123


3.3.2

woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rENOVATION

mike schauble


WOODY’S R E N O VAT I O N Proposal 2

Woody’s Grocery store in downtown Mecosta Village services the immediate local area and surrounding areas for a variety of consumables and non-perishables. After acquiring new ownership over three years ago to date this grocery store has been under renovation in small manageable pieces at any given time. The front face of the building however sells itself to being a corner store more than a grocery store, due to the signage that solicits beer, but not much else. Through the undertaking of this project I explored ideas using readily available and local reusable materials. The wood that is used on the front facade of the building can be found at any local lumberyard for affordability. The windows and the doors have operable screens that can be moved out of the way for natural lighting, and closed for privacy and security reasons.

Figure 3.85: Woody’s Floor Plan 126 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Figure 3.86: Northeast Corner

Figure 3.87: Northeast Street View (Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 127


WOODY’S R E N O VAT I O N Proposal 2

Stocked goods are not however the only things that Woody’s has to offer; Woody’s also has a restaurant located in the back of the store that has a full menu ranging from their very popular pizza and homemade bread to tacos and a variety of other things. The counter for getting food is located in the back of the grocery store which is behind the multiple racks of groceries and has nothing to help it stand on its own. By adding a variety of seating, natural wood floors, and a separation wall between the grocery store and the cafe keeps them separate from each other but inviting for anyone who wants to enjoy the fresh cooked food that Woody’s has to offer.

Figure 3.88: Enlarged First Floor Plan View 128 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

The kitchen that supplies the food is a little cramped with kitchen equipment in a tight space. After expanding the kitchen and adding appropriate shelving the kitchen is much more spacious and therefore more productive for proper work flow.


Figure 3.89: Kitchen View

Figure 3.90: Interior Cafe Rendering (Mike Schauble)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 129


3.4

downtown eatery


3.4.1

webber street cafe jake leestma


An alternative to traditional restaurants, the Webber Street Cafe would be among a number of growing businesses that have embraced the local, organic foods movement. With nearly 2200 sq. ft. of gardening space behind the building, an assortment of vegetables could be grown. Acting as a cafe in the morning, and in the evening a restaurant throughout the growing season, the Cafe would offer a unique food destination in Mecosta Village.

Webber Street Cafe Figure 3.91: Location Map 134 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.92: Floor Plan


145 days is the average growing season for Michigan Staggering planting dates provides vegetables to mature at different times Last average frost date in Mecosta is mid-May Square foot gardening minimizes wasted growing space and intensifies growth

Average yield per Beans Beets Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Celery Garlic Kale Kohlrabi Leek Onion Parsnip Pea Potato Pumpkin Radish Rutabaga Spinach Squash Tomato Turnip

3 lbs 10 lbs 2 lbs 8.5 heads 6 heads 13 lbs 35 heads 5 lbs 7.5 lbs 4 lbs 22 lbs 12 lbs 3 lbs 20 lbs 15 lbs 3 lbs 9 lbs 4 lbs 12 lbs 4 lbs

0

Figure 3.93:Annual Vegetable Growth Chart (Jake Leestma)

10 linear feet

30

60

45 lbs

90

120

days

150

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 135


The two design pieces are constructed out of reclaimed wood pallets and boards to offer an alternative to a complete overhaul of the restaurant. Supported by a metal system attached to the facade, and on the inside the walls. Both pieces work with light and shadows to provide a unique view.

Figure 3.94: Interior Rendering

Figure 3.95: Exterior Rendering

136 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 137


3.4.2 Scoops victor urban


(Victor Urban)

Scoops Ice cream is a future option for renovating Sluggers. This newly renovated restaurant features a more diverse menu that will allow this facility to stay open year round. For the summer months there will be a featured ice cream menu and during the winter months I introduce coffee and warm beverages as the featured menu items. The idea that Scoops will be open year round introduces the concept of hot and cold served to go snacks. I further influenced the concept of hot and cold by creating an environment that would warm or cool the customer. For warm, I picked a material that is directly tied to heat; with Mecosta Villages history to the lumber industry, I chose to use

lumber. This brings a warmth to the space on a cold winters day. For cold I introduce slate in the flooring and counter surfaces to bring a refreshing feel during a hot summer day. While also adding corrugated steel siding as an architectural detail to make the business more industrial, Scoops will now grab the attention of the public. The entrance to Scoops is relocated to the west northern because I observed more people heading east on M-20 highway. Also this entrance it located on a public friendly corner at the intersection of M-20 and S. Webber Street, Mecosta Village, MI. This entrance is an important focal point for customers for indoor service, but there is an outdoor service now too!

140 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

First floor plan

Scoops

Figure 96: Floor Plan


1. ROOF COVERING / RAINWATER COLLECTIVE SYSTEM 2. ACCENTED FRONT AXIS POINT

4

3. GARDEN BEDS FOR COLORFUL EXTERIOR LANDSCAPING

1 5 6

Figure 97: exterior view

3

2

4. CORRUGATED METAL SIDING

3

5. PANORAMIC WINDOW FACADE TO VIEW DOWNTOWN FROM INSIDE-OUT 6. NATURAL WALL

LIMESTONE

BASE

Figure 98: M-20 and S. Weber St. (Victor Urban)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 141


Figure 99: Service/Bar Area

This view is able to give the owner of Scoops a vision of what their business could look like. The stone and wood is better represented here in figures (99 and 100). countertops where a customer will order is composed

of slate stone and places where the customer sits down to eat has a wood finished surface. I have a bar area for quick seating around an imitation fireplace.

142 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Figure 100: Seating Area

This view shows the cafe dining space where it is calm and relaxing. I bring in the element of wood in a mor craftier sense where it collides with metal to give the space a comfortable industrial feel like a train. I recalled

(Victor Urban)

on Mecosta Villages history with the railroad industry and introduce track lighting, metal rail seating and a window seating treatment like a coach would have. The fire illuminates and lights float like embers.

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 143


3.5

Multi-Purpose facility


3.5.1

multi-purpose facility brad edlund

joseph nodge geena pickering


Multi-Purpose Facility 1

Floor Plan Scale: 1/16”=1’-0” Figure 3.101: Floor Plan

In Mecosta Village, the red barn poses an opportunity for a multipurpose facility. The 116’x30’ space provides a large area, free of structural columns. One very practical approach would be simply designing the existing space as is, making sure the structure is stable, walls are impenetrable, roof is up to code, and ramps are placed to meet ADA standards.

148 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

To provide an inexpensive solution for the walls, vertical wood or vinyl siding would be a viable material choice. The roof needs to fully be redone to prevent any moisture penetration into the space. A concrete floor in the barn would be beneficial for both durability and would last a long time. New windows and doors are also needed throughout the barn.


Figure 3.102: Simplistic Barn Rendering (Brad Edlund, Joe Nodge, Geena Pickering)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 149


3.5.2

multi-purpose facility

geena pickering


Multi-Purpose Facility 2 Youth Business Space

Floor Plan Scale: 1/16”=1’-0” Figure 3.103: Floor Plan

152 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Major Uses Could Include: -Weddings -Banquet Hall -Farmers Market -Flea Market -Community Meeting Space


Figure 3.104: Side Rendering

Figure 3.106: Rendering of Outdoor Space (Geena Pickering)

Figure 3.105: Rendering from the Road

Figure 3.107: Youth Business Rendering Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 153


Multi-Purpose Facility 2

Site Plan Figure 3.108: Site Plan

The Multi-Purpose space will include a feature wall opposite the main entrance. This wall will be composed of various types of wood, all different in size, shape and texture.

154 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

The wall will create a rustic feel while reusing old materials. The wood for the wall will come from all of the wood that can be found behind the barn now.


Figure 3.109: View From Behind the Barn

Figure 3.111: Interior View from Front Door (Geena Pickering)

Figure 3.110: View from the Street

Figure 3.112: Stairs and Feature Wall Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 155


3.5.3

multipurpose facility

joseph nodge


Figure 3.114: Existing Barn

Figure 3.115:Existing Barn

Figure 3.113: Site Location 158 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.116:Existing Barn


Figure 3.117: Banquet/Meeting Hall Floor Plan

Figure 3.118: Farmers Market Floor Plan (Joseph Nodge)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 159


Figure 3.119: Flea Market Floor Plan

Figure 3.120: Site Plan 160 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Figure 3.121: Realistic Barn Redesign

Figure 3.122: Patio Redesign (Joseph Nodge)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 161


Figure 3.123: Exterior Rendering

Figure 3.124: Stage Rendering

162 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Figure 3.125: Interior Rendering


(Joseph Nodge)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 163


3.5.4

multiuse space brad edlund


multi-purpose facility 4 A community such as Mecosta is too small to have manys specialty buildings, but it could benefit from one large space that serves several different functions. Anything from dance classes to senior aerobics, money making opportunities like renting as a venue for events such as company picnics, weddings, or bringing the community together to schedule a flea market or a farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; market. It could also act as a temporary or permanent church building. Outside of the site it could also help the village financial aspects. Offices for the church could occupy an empty building downtown and when the space is rented for large gatherings, it is possible to team up with a local restaurant for catering opportunities. Music on the River could use the interior as a concert space to prevent cancellation due to rain.

The design concept for the building derives from the current state of the site. Many of the old buildings are falling apart and it is reverting back to nature creating a modern ruin. This idea is used in new building by pealing back the envelope of the building exposing its original structure. Many old barns are beautifully crafted and after the trussing is weatherproofed it can serve as a clear indication of the entrance into the building as well as a sculpture. The incorporation of the ramp into the flower beds (of which the concrete walls are varying heights and widths reference the ruins of the old foundations and walls) create a path like experience up to the front door. The flowerbeds will be left alone to be filled with local plants of different shapes and sizes just as the old buildings were creating an overgrown garden that again references the current state of the original site.

166 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Brad Edlund)

Exposing the structure also makes the building smaller and less oppressive. As it stands it is very long creating a hallway like space. By pulling in the wall it makes the space much more proportional. A silo is added to the design to combat the strong horizontality as well. It is not uncommon to purchase old silos from unused farms for other uses. This is an economical alternative to constructing a new vertical element and also adds a real age to building. In addition to aesthetics the silo will also house a space for a unique concession stand/bar space with HVAC equipment being held above it to not impose on the interior of the main multiuse space. All of the building materials were selected with cost and architectural appeal in mind. The wood siding as well as the corrugated steel will be from reclaimed sources. By being used there will be varying textures and colors making an interesting covering while still respecting that the building is historic to the village. An addition of restrooms in a design similar to what currently stands will be added adjacent to the existing building so plumbing would not create an issue with the existing foundation. A patio space will also be constructed to serve as both a public area and an opportunity for an indoor outdoor space when a large sliding glass wall is opened into the multiuse area (shown in renderings). Mecosta village can really benefit from a space similar to this. The activities to residents as well as economic ventures could really help the village financially as well as socially.


Figure 3.126: Inspiration 1

Figure 3.127: Inspiration 2 (Brad Edlund)

Figure 3.128: Inspiration 3 Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 167


looking east from hayes - Peeled back building evelope to create a sculptural, defined entrance - Reduced the amount of floor space making the interior to a more pleasing and useable scale - Added reclaimed silo to add a vertical element and make more visible from street - Concealed ramp within varying of varying heights and widths concrete walls to reference ruins and hold over growth plants as well as act as seating - Clad building in reclaimed wood and corru gated steel to give it a modern rustic feel - Covered roof in standing seam metal roofing

Figure 3.129: Edlund Barn 168 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Brad Edlund)


- Blocking used to create reveals as you walk from parking to main entrance: corner of building blocks silo, then as you pass the silo it reveals ruins and entrance, and finally as you make your way up the ramp you see the wall of glass and interior.

- Three entrances: Path along Hayes St for building use, trail entrance is more casual for a rest, and back parking lot entrance for exclusive patio use

Figure 3.130: Edlund Barn Site Plan (Brad Edlund)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 169


patio/back of building - Large glass wall slides over plank wall to create outdoor/indoor space - Plank wall is meant to give a hint of the atmosphere as you enter the main entrance (can hear and see movement but not really any detail), while on the patio you can tell when people arrive or leave. - every main entrance is created with a ramp so every person gets the same experience regardless of physical condition.

Figure 3.131: Edlund Barn 170 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

(Brad Edlund)


- Mixed use space: reception hall, flea market, graduation parties, com pany picnics, temporary church space, music venue, theatre produc tions (team up with local businesses for catering opportunities) - Silo opens into grand space through window can be used to sell tickets, concession, or bar for reception

- Opening into barn from restrooms can be closed so it can be accessed from outdoors without disturbing space - Restroom separate from main structure for easier addition - Extra room used for storage or could be converted into small kitchen

Figure 3.132: Edlund Barn Floor Plan (Brad Edlund)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 171


- Left open for ultimate adaptability - HVAC housed in silo and above addition to keep ceiling free - All of the curtain wallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mullion systems are modeled after how the barn walls were framed - Walls covered in corrugated metal and reclaimed wood. The aged condition compliments with the finished wood floor and the more industrial feel of the large glass walls. -Lighting for the space comes from the front and back curtain wall as

Figure 3.133: Edlund Barn 172 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

well as a skylight running with the peak of the roof - Modern style of lighting to add a contemporary feel.


(Brad Edlund)

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 173


4

Appendix survey results

opportunities


survey results

(Brad Edlund, Sheila Kakavand, Daniel Montgomery, Joe Nodge, Geena Pickering,Mike Schauble, Victor Urban)

appendix

In the gathering of information for this plan we conducted various surveys collecting data from a first plan perspective. Mecosta Village Survey The survey of Mecosta Village revealed many opinions of the locals as well as those who work there. Many were concerned about M20 running through the downtown. Motorists do not slow down as they enter downtown and the absence of crosswalks make it stressful to cross the very wide road. Another subject that was continually brought up was the relationship between the village and its youth. Many of the older members of the community feel that the young are a detriment to the downtown and are responsible for the crime. More heavily enforced curfews and loitering were brought up by more than one person as a problem. One example took place in a Mecosta business were two youth entered asking if there was anything they could do to earn

some money around the shop. The owner apologized and they went on their way, but after they left a patron ran to the door and claimed that they were scoping out the shop so they could commit a crime later. We approached those teenagers earlier and asked what would improve the community and as a group the two responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;more police.â&#x20AC;? There are troublemakers in every age group, but the main issue with the children and teenagers of Mecosta is boredom which the survey results reflected. Many adults reported this as a problem and suggested actions such as boy scouts. The common theme found in Mecosta Village was most people felt the town was dying and is in dire need resuscitation, but do not know how to help. Big Rapids Survey In the survey that was given in Big Rapids one of the first questions asked if they had heard of or been to Mecosta Village. More

176 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

than half of the participants said they had never heard of Mecosta Village. Another quarter of people said that they knew of it but do not go there unless they are driving through. We find this to be one of the major problems with Mecosta Village. For the participants who knew of Mecosta Village, we asked what the first thing that came to mind was. An astounding amount of people stated that it was a very small town that needed a lot of help. We also asked if they had heard of Mecosta Days, or Music on the River. This time three quarters of the people interviewed said that they had never heard of anything like that. Most of them also said that if there was a music event with music that interested them they would drive to Mecosta Village to attend it. The common theme that we found in Big Rapids was that practically no one knew what Mecosta Village was. They also said that there was no reason to go there because


Big Rapids has everything they need. We aim to change their thinking and get people to go to Mecosta Village by the end of this project. Canadian Lakes Survey In the survey that was given to Canadian Lakes people were asked to state what they thought of Mecosta Village. Some people said that it was small and going downhill, but others said good things like that they used the library, the hardware store, and Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Some people said that they would travel to Mecosta Village for the library, Sluggers, the 24 hour gas station, and the post office; however, most people said that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to travel to Mecosta Village for anything. There were a few participants that said they would travel to Mecosta Village for a car wash, or a dollar store. When asked what Canadian Lakes was missing, the major results were apparel, restaurants, a pharmacy, and fast food.

When asked about Mecosta Days and Music on the River, almost all of the participants had heard of them. However, almost all of them also said that they would not go because they do not like music events; they are too loud and not fun. Some people said that they would go if there was more variety in the music being played.

not go to one. A more common reason was that where they were already had a farmers market. In Big Raids there is on twice a week, every week, and in Canadian Lakes there is an Amish one every week. Overall most people do not see a need to go to Mecosta Village, our goal during this project is to change that.

The common theme that we found in Canadian Lakes was that if people did not need to go to Mecosta Village, they were not going to. We did find a few things that Canadian Lakes didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that they would go to Mecosta Village for. However, we are not sure if those things are feasible in Mecosta Village. There was a common theme throughout all of the surveys, almost everyone said that they would not go to a farmers market in Mecosta village. There were many reasons for this, some people said that they did not like farmers markets and therefore would Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 177


parking USE

SPACES REQUIRED

APPENDIX

Commercial Services Automobile Repair

2.0 per service bay l.0; each tow/service vehicle; l.0 per employee

Gas Stations

1.0 per pump and 2.0 per 500 square feet of retail sales space, 1.0 per employee

Automobile wash

2.0 stacking spaces per semi- or fully automatic car wash bays. 2.0 stacking spaces per bay for a self-service bay; 1.0 per employee

Barber Shops and Beauty Parlors

1 ½ per station; l.0 per employee

Dry Cleaners

3.0 per customer service area.; 1.0 per employee

Funeral Parlors

1.0 per employee; l.0 per funeral vehicle; or l.0 space per every two persons of capacity authorized by the Uniform Building Code. etc.. whichever is greater

Hotels, Motels, and Bed & Breakfast

1.2 per room in addition to spaces required for restaurant facilities

Laundromats/coin operated dry cleaners

1.0 per 2 machines; 1.0 per employee on duty

Food and Beverage Bars. lounges. tavern. nightclubs (majority of sales consist of alcoholic beverages)

1.0 per two seals; 1.0 per employee based on peak

Carry-out restaurant

1.0 per two seals; l.0 per employee based on peak shift

Coffee house

1.0 per two seats; l.0 per sewing station; I.0 per employee based on peak shift

Figure 4.1: Parking Regulations

178 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Fast Food take-out establishments and drive-in restaurants, restaurants and clubs

l.0 per two seats; 1.0 per employee based on peak

Institutional Auditoriums, assembly halls, and outdoor arena/stadiums

1.0 per 3 seats; or l.0 space per every two persons of capacity authorized by the Uniform Building Code, etc., whichever is greater

Churches and similar places of worship

0.5 times permitted occupancy of the largest room

Community/Senior Centers

l.0 per employee; 0.5 per building occupancy

Convalescent/nursing home

1.0 per three beds or two rooms, whichever is less; l.0 per each employee during peak shift

Elderly Housing Congregate Care

1.0 per two units; 1.0 per employee based on greatest number of employees in any one shift

Elderly Housing Independent Living

1.0 per unit; 1.0 per employee based on greatest number of employees in any one shift

Elementary and junior high schools

1.0 per employee; l per each 30 students; in addition to requirements for auditorium or stadium

Library

1.0 per 300 sq. ft. of floor space

Municipal office buildings

.25 times permitted occupancy; 1.0 per employee; 1.0 per 2 units of business, l.0 per 3 seats of maximum allowed occupancy

Museums & galleries

0.5 per 100 sq ft of floor space

Private clubs. lodge halls, union halls, fraternal orders, civic clubs, and similar

1/3 spaces of maximum occupancy

Rooming houses, convalescent homes, group homes and group family homes

0.5 times maximum lawful number of occupants

Senior “interim care” and “intermediate care” units

1.0 per each room or two beds, whichever is less; 1.0 space per employee (peak shift)

Senior high schools, colleges and commercial schools

l.0 per employee; 1.0 per each 1.0 students, in addition to the requirements of the auditorium or stadium, whichever is more.

Senior Independent Housing

1.5 per unit

Office Banks/ Savings and Loans/Credit Unions

2.0 per teller station; 2.0 per ATM station; 2.0 stacking spaces of each drive up window/ATM; 1.0 per employee

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 179


parking Business (Insurance, Real Estate, Financial Planning, etc.)

2.0 per potential customer based upon number of servicing employees; 1.0 per employee

Doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Dentistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Offices

1.0 per exam/treatment! procedure room; 1.0 per employee; 2.0 per treatment specialist

Offices

1 per 300 sq. ft. of floor space

appendix

Recreational Banquet facilities

2.0 per table; 1.0 per employee; or 1.0 space per every two persons of capacity authorized by the Uniform Building Code, etc.. whichever is greater

Bowling Alleys

5 per lane in addition to spaces required for restaurant facilities

Golf Courses

4.0 per hole; 1.0 per employee

Golf Courses with clubhouse

4.0 per hole; 1.0 per employee; restaurants - per above

Health fitness centers; athletic clubs/ etc. Physical therapy

1.0 space per every two persons of capacity authorized by the Uniform Building Code; etc.

Theatres, facilities for spectator sports, auditoriums, concert halls Residential

0.5 times the maximum occupancy

Residential Apartments and Townhouses

2 per dwelling unit

Manufactured/Mobile Housing Park

2.0 for each mobile home unit or site and 1.0 for each employee of the facility

Multiple-Family Residential

1.5 per each or 1 bedroom dwelling unit, 2.0 spaces per each unit with 2 or more bedrooms

180 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment


Single-Family and Two-Family Residential

2 per dwelling unit

Retail Automobile and Motor cycle sales

l.0 per employee; 2.0 per service/sales station/area

Furniture. appliance. household equipment carpet and hardware stores. repair shops, including shoe repair. contractor`s showrooms and others

0.5 per 100 sq. ft. of floor space

Home improvement /remodeling/etc

l.0 per employee; 2.0 per service station

Retail stores and service establishments

l per 150 sq. ft. of floor space and outdoor sales space

Shopping Centers

l.0 per 200 sq. ft. of floor space

For uses not specifically listed above the requirements below are applicable: Other commercial and industrial uses, warehouses

.75 times the maximum number of employees on premises at any one time

Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 181


APPENDIX

index

Figure 1.1 Mecosta Depot Figure 1.2 Main Street Looking West, 1912 Figure 1.3 Mecosta High School, 1936 Figure 1.4 View of Downtown Mecosta Figure 1.5 Far Left Building Destroyed by Fire in 1961 Figure 1.6 Mecosta Late 1880â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Figure 1.7 Rubble After Fire Figure 1.8 Historic Railroad System Figure 1.9 Winter Trail Figure 1.10 Average Temperature (F) Figure 1.11 Average Snowfall and Rainfall (in) Figure 1.12 Average Wind

Figure 2.1 Population Growth Figure 2.2 Population Figure 2.3 Age Distribution Figure 2.4 Average People per Household Figure 2.5 Family Homes vs. Non-Family Homes Figure 2.6 State Income Levels Figure 2.7 County Income Levels Figure 2.8 Regional Transportation Map Figure 2.9 Travel Routes

182 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Page 2 Page 3 Page 3 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 5 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 9 Page 9 Page 14 Page 15 Page 17 Page 19 Page 21 Page 23 Page 25 Page 29 Page 31


Figure 2.10 Morton Township Road Map Figure 2.11 Work Travel Times Figure 2.12 Mecosta County Amenities Map Figure 2.13 Morton Township Amenities Map Figure 2.14 Mecosta County Recreation Figure 2.15 Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market Schedule Figure 2.16 Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market Location Map Figure 2.17 Brook Trout Figure 2.18 Yellow Perch Figure 2.19 Canadian Geese Figure 2.20 White Tail Buck Figure 2.21 Outdoor Hunting and Fishing Map Figure 2.22 Rails to Trail s Map Figure 2.23 Right of Way and Lot Separation Figure 2.24 Land Distribution Graphic Figure 2.25 Vacant Land Figure 2.26 Single Family Residential Figure 2.27 Government Figure 2.28 Commercial Figure 2.29 Church Figure 2.30 Schools Figure 2.31 Mobile Home Park Figure 2.32 Park Figure 2.33 Current Land Use Figure 2.34 Mecosta Village Core Figure Ground Figure 2.35 Mecosta Village Figure Ground Figure 2.36 Mecosta Library Figure 2.37 Abandoned Building Figure 2.38 Village Church Figure 2.39 Big Red Barn Figure 2.40 Mecosta Village Core Figure 2.41 Existing Building Conditions Map Figure 2.42 Plot Setbacks Figure 2.43 Septic Setbacks Figure 2.44 Septic and Well Spacing Figure 2.45 Typical Michigan Pond

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index APPENDIX

Figure 2.46 Figure 2.47 Figure 2.48 Figure 2.49

Typical Michigan Forest Soil Type Map Parking Restrictions Parking Locations

Figure 3.1 Library Figure 3.2 Main Street Facing West Figure 3.3 Main Street Facing East Figure 3.4 Main Street Facing North East Figure 3.5 Design Principles for Main Street Infill Development Figure 3.6 Obstructed Sight Lines Figure 3.7 Improved Sight Lines: Partial Extension Figure 3.8 Improved Sight Lines: Full Curb Extensions Figure 3.9 Entrance to Mecosta Village from the South Figure 3.10 Typical Mecosta Village Intersection Layout Figure 3.11 Mecosta Village Downtown Layout Figure 3.12 Mecosta Village Current Road Section Figure 3.13 Mecosta Village Future Road Section Figure 3.14 Mecosta Village Future Crosswalk

184 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

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Section Figure 3.15 Mecosta Village Phase 1 Perspective View Figure 3.16 Mecosta Village Phase 2 Perspective View Figure 3.17 Mecosta Village Phase 3 Perspective View Figure 3.18 Mecosta Village Phase 4 Perspective View Figure 3.19 Mecosta Village Perspective from the West Figure 3.20 Mecosta Village Perspective from the East Figure 3.21 Trash Receptacle Figure 3.22 Trash Receptacle Top View Figure 3.23 Trash Receptacle Elevation Figure 3.24 Role Form Wire Bench Figure 3.25 Wire Bench Section Figure 3.26 Wire Bench Side Elevation Figure 3.27 Wire Bench Top View Figure 3.28 Wire Bench Front Elevation Figure 3.29 Bike Rack Figure 3.30 Bike Rack Top View Figure 3.31 Bike Rack Base Cap Figure 3.32 Cap Side Figure 3.33 Cap Iso Figure 3.34 Side Figure 3.35 Bike Rack Front Elevation Figure 3.36 Street Light Figure 3.37 Street Light Lamp Topper Figure 3.38 Street Lamp Support Figure 3.39 Street Light Base Figure 3.40 Banner Design Figure 3.41 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art banner Figure 3.42 Parking Stop on Street Figure 3.43 Parking Stop Temporary Plan

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APPENDIX

index

Figure 3.44 Parking stop option one and two Figure 3.45 Parking stop option three and four Figure 3.46 Gingko Tree Figure 3.47 Tree Planting Diagram Figure 3.48 Little East Muskegon Figure 3.49 Green Space Downtown Figure 3.50 Current Sidewalk Figure 3.51 Existing Park Figure 3.52 Existing Skate Park Figure 3.53 Existing Playground Figure 3.54 Porta Potty Figure 3.55 Existing Parking Lot Figure 3.56 Reusable Materials Figure 3.57 Red Barn Reusable Materials Figure 3.58 Mecosta County Figure 3.59 Mecosta Village Figure 3.60 Green Space Figure 3.61 Hub Figure 3.62 Porta Potty Figure 3.63 Existing Seating Figure 3.64 Existing Playground Figure 3.65 Site Plan Figure 3.66 Landscape Figure Ground Map

186 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

Page 99 Page 99 Page 100 Page 100 Page 104 Page 104 Page 104 Page 105 Page 105 Page 105 Page 105 Page 105 Page 105 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 110 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112


Figure 3.67 Site Plan Figure 3.68 View 1 Figure 3.69 View 2 Figure 3.70 View 3 Figure 3.71 Red Barn Reusable Materials Figure 3.72 Community Items Figure 3.73 Existing Community Garden Figure 3.74 Site Plan Figure 3.75 Phase 1 Figure 3.76 Phase 2 Figure 3.77 Phase 3 Figure 3.78 Renovated Park Design Figure 3.79 Renovated Skate Park Figure 3.80 Renovated Bandshell Figure 3.81 Floor Plan Figure 3.82 Deli Interior Rendering Figure 3.83 Outdoor Seating Rendering Figure 3.84 Street View Rendering Figure 3.85 Woody’s Floor Plan Figure 3.86 Northeast Corner Figure 3.87 Northeast Street View Figure 3.88 Enlarged First Floor Plan View Figure 3.89 Kitchen View Figure 3.90 Interior Café Rendering Figure 3.91 Location Map Figure 3.92 Floor Plan Figure 3.93 Annual Vegetable Growth Chart Figure 3.94 Interior Rendering Figure 3.95 Exterior Rendering Figure 3.96 Floor Plan Figure 3.97 Exterior View Figure 3.98 M – 20 and S. Weber St. Figure 3.99 Service/Bar Area Figure 3.100 Seating Area Figure 3.101 Floor Plan Figure 3.102 Simplistic Barn Rendering

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Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 187


APPENDIX

index

Figure 3.103 Floor Plan Figure 3.104 Side Rendering Figure 3.105 Rendering from the Road Figure 3.106 Rendering of Outdoor Space Figure 3.107 Youth Business Rendering Figure 3.108 Site Plan Figure 3.109 View from Behind the Barn Figure 3.110 View from the Street Figure 3.111 Interior View From Front Door Figure 3.112 Stairs and Feature Wall Figure 3.113 Site Location Figure 3.114 Existing Barn Figure 3.115 Existing Barn Figure 3.116 Existing Barn Figure 3.117 Banquet/Meeting Hall Floor Plan Figure 3.118 Farmers Market Floor Plan Figure 3.119 Flea Market Floor Plan Figure 3.120 Site Plan Figure 3.121 Realistic Barn Redesign Figure 3.122 Patio Redesign Figure 3.123 Exterior Rendering Figure 3.124 Stage Rendering Figure 3.125 Interior Rendering

188 Ferris State University: School of the Built Environment

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Figure 3.126 Inspiration 1 Figure 3.127 Inspiration 2 Figure 3.128 Inspiration 3 Figure 3.129 Edlund Barn Figure 3.130 Edlund Barn Site Plan Figure 3.131 Edlund Barn Figure 3.132 Edlund Barn Floor Plan Figure 3.133 Edlund Barn Figure 4.1 Parking Regulations

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Ferris State University: Conceptual Mecosta Plan 189

Revitalizing Mecosta Community Plan  
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