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SMALL TOWN STUDIO

revitalizeMECOSTA: BROMLEY PARK CONCEPTUAL PLAN


1

BROMLEY PARK CONCEPTUAL PLAN

COLLECTIVE - 1.A COMMUNITY HEART - 1.B ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATIONAL PARK - 1.C FOCAL POINT OF MECOSTA - 1.D LOCAL INSPIRATION - 1.E VILLAGE INSIDE A VILLAGE - 1.F VISTAS OF MECOSTA- 1.G


1a

COLLECTIVE

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COLLECTIVE

BRINGING DIFFERENT INDIVIDUALS FROM DIVERSE COMMUNITIES, INTO A PLACE OF COLLABORATION

Collecting different communities from various parts of Mecosta County, by bringing them in one space to collaborate. The proposed plans for the new Bromley Park focus on different features within the park, including activities for older and younger generations, so that individuals from different communities are drawn to a focal point within Mecosta County. This will help the city, by bringing a new adventure and starting a new chapter of Mecostas history

1.A.2 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

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10

places thrive when users have a range of reasons (10+) to be adventure playground 1 art displaying 2 community garden (green house) 3 fishing 4 homework (wifi) 5 music entertainment 6 nature walk 7 picnic / bbq 8 rock climbing 9 zip line 10 Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.3


EXISTING PARK The existing Bromley Park is proposed to be demolished. Some parts within the park could be reused to construct some parts in the new park. The existing wood located in the current Band Shell, could be reused to construct the new Band Shell or other structures in the park. The Playground that is currently there now, could be reused, or relocated at Pine Tree Park. The skate park is also relocated to Pine Park, because moving the skate park helps making the new park safe for the kids to adventure in. The current road that exists now, would be relocated, it would be moved further south/ east to create more space for more parking, and future development.

LEGEND Playground Skate Park Band Shell 1.A.4 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Existing Site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.5


MECOSTA COUNTY The approach that was taken during the design process of the park was becoming familiar with the county. Bromley Park is located in the center of all the different towns in the county. The approach was to focus on how the different communities could come to one place, bringing them to a focal point in the county.

1.A.6 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


66 131 20

M 131 66

Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.7


PARTI DIAGRAM A Parti diagram is made to help ones thought and concept to drive the design forward. The Parti diagram gathers all the little circles to one to one big circle. In this case, the big middle circle is the Mecosta City, gathering all the different towns located in the County. Also, Because M20 is the major Hi-way that people usually take, one is forced to drive by the park, and having thoughts on how pleasant and interesting the park is.

1.A.8 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.9


PROPOSED PARK The proposed design for the new Bromley Park contains many different activates. As shown on the right side, there is a site plan that indicates how the new park will be laid out. Below, there will be a brief introduction to every color located in the LEGEND.

The “GREEN” indicates the new picnic shelters located in the new park design. Most families take advantage of spaces such as a picnic shelter, to invite their families and friends to hangout. Potentially this will bring people from diverse communities to use these spaces.

The “RED” is indicates the Band Shell that drew the concept of the park landscape layout. The Band shell is located towards the middle of the site, facing the back. This is placed like it is, because the background noise. This was a first priority in the design process. The way that it is place, reduces traffic sounds form the road, so it creates a quite calm location in the park. Also the river is beside the Band Shell, so that people can still get the view of the Muskegon River, and the sound of it, which most people enjoy.

The “CYAN” indicates the restrooms that will be located in the park. The restroom system that will be used is the pit toilet system. Because there is no plumbing connected to the site, this is the most efficient way to approach a nicer restroom.

The “ORANGE” indicates the playground. Many kids enjoy playgrounds, especially all the different activities they do in it. The playground acts as an adventure playground, containing recycled earth materials, so kids could use it as a learning tool, and adventure the nature. There are wings, a slide, monkey bars, etc.

The “PURPLE” indicates the new garden in the park. The new garden will contain planting to help raise money for the community. Also there will be a ‘Green House’ proposed later in the design. The “BLUE” indicates the new viewing dock, located inside of the nature walk. On it, one will view all parts of the park, and maybe some of the city. The viewing deck will contain Rock Climbing and Zip Line.

1.A.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

LEGEND Band Shell Playground Picnic Shelters Restrooms Garden Viewing Deck


Proposed Site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.11


PHASING PLAN PHASE 1 Construct New Band Shell Raised Hill Seating New Restrooms

PHASE 3 Viewing Deck Rock Climing, Zipline Picnic Shelters

PHASE 2 Adventure Playground Nature Walk With New Paths Moving The Road And Adding Paring

PHASE 4 New Garden Space Green House Raised Beds for Garden

1.A.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phasing Plan Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.13


ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND

The new proposed adventure playground contains many different activities especially for younger kids. Its good way to expose natural materials to construct the playground. This way it could be used as a learning material for the kids. Also some natural materials such as Heavy Timber, to represent Mecostas history, with the past. The park would contain a few swings, monkey bars, slides, etc. This would help Mecosta County by bringing other communities to the city, for an interesting adventure.

1.A.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Utlizing wood for stairs

Location on site

Wood climbing activities

Exposed natural materials

Collective

Swings made of wood Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.15


PICNIC AND BBQ Picnic and Barbequing are the most popular activities people like to do on Sundays. They go there with family and friends to enjoy their day off, under the nice weather. This brought to the Bromey Park, helps all the diverse communities to come together to one place and enjoy their time, eat BBQ, and their kids could have fun activities.

1.A.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Shelter side view

Shelter inside view

Location on site

Realistic approach Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.17


ART DISPLAY The new Picnic shelters located in the park contain art walls on both the inside and the outside. People could come and display their art so it can influence others in the county. This could be used as a study technique for the younger generations. In the Roundabout, there will be a monument, or a sculpture that would have a meaning with Mecosta and hits history.

1.A.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Art displaying on shelter

Art displaying inside shelter

Sculpture in the roundabout

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.19


COMMUNITY GARDEN The Community Garden was designed on the other side of the park closer to the road, so when people are walking or driving by, they could see the garden. It is placed there, so there could be future expansions. If they city bought the house located behind the garden, and the church, they could possibly get the garden to grow bigger. The garden helps the city by rising money, and it’s better for the people buy purchasing local produce. There are 4” x 8” raised beds to put the plants in. They could be possibly be tall, so that older people have easy access to them. They are spaced evenly, to create a space between for easy access. The garden contains a green house, made from recycled Plexi-Glass. There are many places that would donate recycled PlexiGlass, such as Lowes or Menards. This can be constructed from wood and Plexi-Glass. The community can come together and help built this environmental friendly house, to help the community garden.

1.A.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.21


COMMUNITY GARDEN On the right, there are photos of what possibly cold be at the community garden. These are constructed from 4’ x 8’ wood. So the 8’ would go horizontally, and then 8’ would be cut in half and placed sideways, so that it would be cheaper to build. These can also be constructed from the community developers, they would be cheap to build, and easy to construct.

1.A.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Raised Garden Details

Raised Beds Construction 1

Made From Recycled Plexi

Raised Beds Construction 2 Collective

Raised Beds Construction 3 Raised Beds Construction 4 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.23


VIEWING PLATFORM The viewing platform is located in the nature walk. It is placed in the back part of the park so that when climbed on the higher edge, kids can view the rest of the park. The deck contains Rock Climbing, and Zip Lining. This is a good way for kids to come out and enjoy their adventure at Bromley Park. This could help raise money for the community, and a good way to view the park from a different perspective

1.A.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Example: Viewing platform

Example: Viewing platform

Example: Viewing platform

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.25


ROCK CLIMBING Rock climbing is located in the back side on the park. It is located between the tree areas. Kids would love this idea because it gives them an activity to do during the day. Mecosta could raise money for the community to help out.

1.A.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Example: Rick climbing 1

Example: Rick climbing 2

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.27


ZIP LINE

The Zip Line is also located in the back of the site. It will be used by kids and adults from all over the county. Zip Lining is a fantastic activities that would make people come to the park to spend time, rock climbing, and zip lining and enjoying the view from the viewing deck.

1.A.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Example: Zipline over the river

Detailed Zipline Sketch

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.29


MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT The Band Shell was designed first, then everything else was placed around it, to fit in with the design. All the framing is dimensional lumber so that it could be bought at Lowes, or bought from a lumber yard. The foundation walls are Concrete Blocks because they can be hand-built, no need for special skills. The welding for the connections of the Band Shell could be asked to be done by the Ferris welding students, to weld all the structures together.

LEGEND

1.A.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Metal Plates With Bolt Connections

1

Dimentional lumber

2

Post Base Hanger

3


1 28’-8”

2

3

19’-8”

12’-5”

2’-8”

Detailed View

North elevation

East elevation

23’-4”

Stage

Floor plan Collective

29’-8”

Location on site Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.31


MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT On the right it shows more details of the connections for the Band Shell. On the bottom is a section to how the seating, and there’s a realistic rendering to show how the building will look like on site.

1.A.32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Realistic View

Site Section with acoustics diagram Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.33


NATURE WALK The nature walk created in this design is meant to bring people walking from Thomas Road, into the wetlands, then to cross over, going into the little woods area. There which the viewing deck is found, with the rock climbing and the zip lines. Experience walking through the wetlands and into the wood can be relaxing for many people, especially adults that like to walk and run around the area. The nature walk also progress around, so that it connects to a path that takes the walker to the school side.

1.A.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Example 1: Nature walk

Example 2: Nature walk

Example 3: Nature walk

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.35


RESTROOMS On the right is a small building constructed from brick to tie back with the old city brick. Something on the site will bring history to the park. The restrooms use Pit Toilets because the site doesn’t having the right plumbing systems A Pit toilet has to be maintained from time to time on the right it shows a section, showing how it is used, and what happens when its being used. A Pit Toilet is toilet that collects human feces in a hole in the ground. They use either no water or one to three liters per flush with pourflush pit latrines.

1.A.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Proposed Restroom and Storage

Realistic view

Pit Toilet Section

Location on site

Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.37


PARKING AND SIDEWALKS The sidewalls on the site are going to expand bigger. This helps because it draws people down a path which forces them to come into the site. The board walk is flattened so that people could fish comfortably on it. The Parking fits twelve cars, which can be used for the garden parking and the park. When this parking is full, people can use the library’s parking and walk down the path for the nature walk to bring them into the site.

1.A.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


4’ - 0”

Before

After

Fishing Deck

Location on site Collective

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.A.39


1b

Community Heart melanie lobsinger


community heart

A Public Green Space of Interlocking Social Circles An often overlooked aspect of a growing city is its social infrastructure. A strong social network invites in distant visitors and strengthens the inner city population to cooperate and accomplish what needs to be done to maintain thriving environment. The “Community Heart” vision for New Bromley Park looks at the park as the city’s center. It is an area where members of the community can come to grow together. The variety of uses within the space not only make it a very versatile and usable space but creates a feeling of welcoming. It is vital that each social space has open visibility to users and spectators to build the correct environment. There ought to be adequate light, visibility, and safety. Social infrastructure will start slow, undoubtedly but as local community members become more frequent users of the space and even obscure events and crowds utilize the space, it will become a part of the city’s name. It builds a city’s reputation and creates a sense of ownership in the inhabitants which leads to building and maintaining a great city.

This park will become Mecosta’s Beacon. Again, resonating the idea of “Community Heart”, the Park acts as core and the source and inspiration of revitalization throughout the town. I hope to create a community-building, public dwelling space. This centrally integrated, outdoor space will have versatile use and an emphasis on wetland restoration.

1.B.2 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

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10

places thrive when users have a range of reasons (10+) to be there

1 fishing ledge 2 benches/nooks 3 picnic area 4 bike trail 5 playground 6 dog park 7 community garden 8 merchant boulevard 9 wetland walk 10 band shell

Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.3


Connection to Town The successful implementation of a new park plan requires a high level of accessibility and connection to town. This will not only make it a readily used space but give it more value and reason to its further development.

be seen in the following pages elaborating on Merchant Boulevard: (1.B.40-1.B.41).

Bridge Path The existing pedestrian walk at the North end of the park is recognized and strengthened, becoming connected to a broader network of Toward Poplar St Poplar Street is the connecting street toward paths within the park. Individuals crossing the where the Youth Center is located. This bridge bridge from the elementary school or entering offers connection to another youth activity the area from downtown, are guided from street to green. The path connects to the local center. Merchant Boulevard and Wetland Walk deeper into the park. Toward Cherry St The bridge connecting to Cherry St leads to both the elementary school and Kirk Library. These would be ideal destinations for kids who may use the park for after school recreation. Thomas Street The park presently has parking available off Thomas Street, the existing drive through the park. “Community Heart” takes advantage of this automobile path, to integrating cars into the park circulation. The short distance the park is best used by foot, outside of the car. Improvements to Thomas’ Streetscape can 1.B.4 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

LEGEND Toward Poplar St Toward Cherry St Thomas Street Bridge Path


Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.5


Remodeled Parking A remodeling of Thomas Street and its through passage into Bromley Park has integrated car circulation into the park. It creates a more lively venue of parking and traveling. Parking has been made as seemless an addition as possible with parallel along Thomas as well as angular parking along the Merchant Boulevard.

Existing Parking 1.B.6 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Remodeled Parking Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.7


Phasing Schedule

Phase 1 CONSTRUCT Band Shell, Tiered Grass Seating, & New Fishing Dodge MOVE Park Benches PLANT New Trees

1.B.8 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 1 of 5 Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.9


1 Band Shell As a part of the first phase of construction, the band shell works as one of the most significant structures of New Bromley Park. It is to act as a beacon to passers by along M-20. The park as a whole will act as a social gathering place, however the band shell will be the largest draw for individuals unfamiliar with the town. This not only pulls attention toward the park but the massive timber features give it a real presence along M-20 as well. As the prime venue for Mecosta’s Music on the River, it was designed with the purpose of housing instrumental performances. It could, however, could be used for any performance or broadcast that the community demands. The 2 foot raised platform and tiered seating makes it a platform with abilities to reach broad audiences.

1.B.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


View of Park from Bridge

Site Section Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.11


1 Band Shell Cont’d The simplistic, yet highly crafted formation of this structure’s frame makes it a viable construction for local community members. If there was a desire, there is a potential to collaborate with the Amish community, a traditionally skilled group when it comes to heavy timber construction. Construction should begin with a survey of the land and formiddable choice of plot of land to build the structure on, in the general area specified. A cast should be made to pour a slab raised two feet above the ground as a platform. Sructural materials are mainly 6”x10” locally sourced heavy timber. These will be fastened to the concrete using knife plates embedded in the timber’s core. 6”x6” timbers run perpendicularly offering rigidity and support. These are then spanned at 3’ gaps by 2x6 dimensional lumber. This will offer an appropriate surface for the reclaimed sheet metal to be affixed to which will make up the roof and wind breaks on the sides.

LEGEND Reclaimed Sheet Metal Roofing A Bolt Plate Connectors B Dimensional Lumber Spanning C Heavy Timber Framing D Knife-Plate Connectors E 2’ Cast in Place Concrete Platform F

1.B.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Sketch

Concept

In-Site

15’- 0”

35’- 0”

E

30’- 0”

A

C

17’- 0”

D B F East Elevation with Materials Community Heart

In-Site Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.13


2 fishing Ledge It is important that this have improved measures of safety and become a more aesthetically pleasing point of interest. It is expected that the Fishing Ledge should become a reputable spot for children’s fishing. It also serves as a pleasant destination point for walkers in the park and community as a pleasant view of the river. Materials used include 6� x 6� heavy timber for columns with dimensional lumber making up the decking and rows on guard and connections back to the ground.

1.B.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Precedent photo from mvtimes.com 6”

60”

36”

6”

South Elevation Detail

In-Site Rendering Community Heart

Location On Site Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.15


3 Nooks/Benches Despite the fact that we are looking at the New Bromley Park as the heart of Mecosta, and as the social epicenter of the county, it is important that the visitors to the park be recognized as individuals. This is why the “nooks� or places where an individual can find their part of the park, are vital. Park benches have been dispersed throughout the park because of this. There are those with direct purpose such as those in front of the playzone for parents and then there are more hidden treasure benches such as those found along the Wetland Walk. In order for this space to grow in popularity and size, the present users must take ownership of it. Backless benches have replaced the old ones, inviting pedestrians to sit facing the park waiting for them. This offers a people watching opportunity which is often one of the most fun activities in a public space. Backless seats offer a more versatile seating opportunity.

1.B.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Proposed Bench Change

Existing Benches Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.17


Phasing Schedule

Phase 2 DEMO Playground CONSTRUCT Restrooms, Picnic Area, & Walk from Fishing Ledge to Edge of Park.

1.B.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 2 of 5 Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.19


restrooms/ Storage The present restroom situation is only adequate for minimal, small-scale usage of the park. Since there is a vision of something much more grand and exciting, it seems only right that this should be accounted for in restrooms in New Bromley Park. Since the town does not presently have an accessible sewage system, and it is undesirable to occupy precious green space with a drain field, it seemed only fitting to have the design of a vault toilet. This form of toilet is very common in park settings and requires maintenance only every decade or so if the volume of the pit is dug adequately. These restrooms will be centrally located for easy access for patrons of the Merchant Boulevard and the other park amenities nearby. This shelter includes two unisex restrooms and one storage unit for anything the community deems necessary to store on site. (ie. maintenance supplies, fishing poles, etc)

Vault Toilet Diagram from MIT.edu 1.B.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


East Elevation 10’ - 0”

BENCH COMMODE UNISEX RESTROOM

VENT 8’ - 0”

PIT ACCESS HAND SANITIZING STATION (IDENTICAL SET-UP MIRRORED BELOW)

STORAGE

8’ - 0”

UNISEX RESTROOM

8’ - 0”

BENCH

1’ - 6”

*EXTERIOR WALLS ARE BRICK CLAD, INTERIOR ARE SIMPLE STUD

Detailed Floor Plan Community Heart

In-Site Location Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.21


4 Picnic Area The present situation of a pavilion shelter for several picnic tables is adequate for very small groups and gatherings but accounts for little to no privacy. These proposed picnic shelters offer a sense of conglomerate community while still offering a level of privacy not seen in the present picnic area.

LEGEND 2x6 Dimensional Lumber A Knife-Plate Connectors B Reclaimed Metal C 1.B.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


In-Site Rendering

A B C

Detailed Elevation Community Heart

In-Site Location Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.23


Phasing Schedule

Phase 3 DEMO Skate Park CONSTRUCT New Playground, Raised Walk to First Bridge

1.B.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 3 of 5 Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.25


5 Bike Trail From case studies of Hemlock Park and Northland Park in Big Rapids, it is evident that one of the key reasons people will come to parks is simply as a transition space on a longer avenue. This is one of the main reasons a bike trail is incorporated into the new design for Bromley Park. This encourages a fit and wellness conscious community. Biking is a green method of transportation and should be encouraged whenever possible, especially in small shorttravel communities.

1.B.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Bike Rack Format

Precedent Photo from Google Search Community Heart

Bike Trail In-Site Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.27


6 Playground The present playground equipment in Bromley park can definitely be utilized in New Bromley Park. The old equipment, therefore, will be migrated to the new site for playground. The present site of the equipment will be needed for the parking built next to Merchant Boulevard. The new playground set-up is to be elongated rather than square-ish, giving heightened visibility to anoyone supervising the play area. It is vital that the parents remain connected to the play area, should they be needed for infants to play or for older kids who might need help. That is why the new design proposes only partial fencing (on the side facing the road) for the new site for the playground. Another important part is to guard a spot for the Memorial Rock. This was quite a generous gesture and should be recognized. This may encourage similar acts of generosity in the future as well.

1.B.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Existing Park Structure and Equipment

Precedent Photo from Google Images Community Heart

Existing Memorial Stone

In-Site Location Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.29


Phasing Schedule

Phase 4 DEMO Pavillion CONSTRUCT Dog Park Fence, New Community Garden, Merchant Blvd, & Widen James St

1.B.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 4 of 5 Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.31


7 Dog Park The dog park will bring a huge social boost to New Bromley Park. With relatively little initial cost and site development, a Dog Park’s biggest need is a population of canines to fill it. Research suggests that these can be hugely donation-driven developments as well. And little to no site design and development is needed except for fixtures such as fencing, benches, and a dog wash if that should be deemed an appropriate amenity. There are designated areas for small and large dogs and thought must be given to shading needed in the summer for both animals and humans. The most successful dog parks have been completed closely with the American Kennel Club and their suggested design standards.

1.B.32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Precedent Picture from Google Images

Precedent Picture from Google Images

Precedent Picture from Google Images Community Heart

In-Site Location Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.33


8 Community Garden The community garden is a place that should be not only used but seen by the entire community. Therefore, in New Bromley Park, it has been relocated to a more centrally located and therefore more visible and accessible location. It is proposed that raised garden boxes be integrated for usability by the elderly members of the community. It is also proposed to consider a protective low-rise fencing be built around the garden. Of course, as the “Community Heart� concept is driven by integration, it is only right that the harvest from the community garden be shared in activities such as farmers’ markets held at the Merchant Boulevard.

1.B.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Precedent Picture from Google Images

Existing Community Garden Community Heart

Precedent Picture from Google Images

In-Site Location

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.35


9 Merchant Boulevard Perhaps one of the most versatile spaces offered at the New Bromley Park, is the local Merchant Boulevard, now integrated into the passage from Thomas to Main Street. It offers visibility from both the road and pedestrian paths on either side. It also has a core walkway down which customers and interested witnesses can walk. It will be a place bustling with activity and continuously lively with craft fairs, farmers markets, and other various comunity activities. Parking is available to customers as parallel and supplemental parking while events are being held where vendors may require the closer angular spots. The merchant boulevard will undoubtedly bring some of the liveliest days to the park.

1.B.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


ANGLED PARKING 17‘-0“ PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY 6’-0”

GREEN BUFFER 3‘-0“ NORTH TRAFFIC 15‘-0“

GUEST WALKWAY 6‘-0“

MERCHANT STALL 8‘-0“

GREEN BUFFER 3‘-0“

MERCHANT STALL 8‘-0“

ANGLED PARKING 17‘-0“ SOUTH TRAFFIC 15‘-0“

PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY 6’-0”

Dimensioned Street Section

Realistic Rendering

In-Site Location Community Heart

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.37


Phasing Schedule

Phase 5 CONSTRUCT Raised Walk to Second Bridge, Finish Wetland System

1.B.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 5 of 5 Community Heart

Site Plan Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.39


10 Wetland Walk There is present a large greenfield just past Bromley park which is actually a registered area of Wetlands. This has potential of becoming a beautifully blooming biodiverse habitat. Such an example can be seen in PSOMAS’s Los Angelos park. Many Wetland restoration projects have been done and this is definitely a prime location for one. It has the potential to become a beautiful and educational area of raised flooring (preventing impact on wildlife) and a serene nature exploration. As a Stormwater Wetland Design, this shallow marsh system is also actually a design that is able to remove polltants at a moderate level. The forebay requires clean out only every 2-5 years. It has a high capability for native plant diversity and wildlife habitat potential.

1.B.40 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

LEGEND Maintenance Bench

A

25% of Pond Perimeter Open Grass

B

Gabion Wall

C

Forebay

D

Waterfowl Island

E

25’ Wetland Buffer

F

Micropool

G

Gate Valve

H


Precedent Picture from Google Images

Precedent Picture from Google Images

B

F

D C

A

E

G H Precedent Picture from Google Images (community heart)

In-Site Location Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.B.41


1

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PARK TRENT PRICE


ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PARK EDUCATING RESIDENTS OF MECOSTA THROUGH THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT. An Environmental Education Park would continue the city’s development and ideals as a book and education town. Bromley park would act as an opportunity to teach kids the importance of the environment and the world around us, while simultaneously keeping them out of trouble. Not only will it be a valuable educational asset to children, but it will also encourage all Mecosta residents to learn, and care for the environment. The development of this type of park will create a nice, natural place for residents, and outsiders, to enjoy. This park proposal is consistent with Mecosta’s Revitalization focus on activities. The proposed park will act as a homage to the Mecosta Youth Center by creating a place for youths to learn, exercise, and gain friends.

1.C.02 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

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10

(10+) WETLANDS WALK 1 FISHING 2 PLAZA IN THE PARK 3 FARMERS MARKET 4 PICNIC 5 GARDENING 6 MUSIC ON THE RIVER 7 ART (ACTIVE AND DISPLAY) 8 PLAYGROUND 9 BIKING 10 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.03


WHAT MAKES A GREAT PLACE? In order to design Bromley Park to its full potential, I researched into what makes a great public space. In order for a public space to thrive there are 4 key attributes that must be present; Sociability, Uses & Activities, Access & Linkages, and Comfort & Image. To design Bromley Park in the best way possible I needed all of the proposed activities to fit at least one of these key attributes. Figure 1 shows what intangibles I will be focusing on within the proposed activities. As you can see there are categories selected and used from each key attribute to make the best of this public space.

1.C.04 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 1 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.05


CURRENT PARK The current Bromley Park located in downtown Mecosta is set on the edge of the Little Muskegon River. It houses events throughout the summer such as “Music On the River” and is only a short walk to Mecosta’s famous used book store. The park is currently used by the younger demographic residents, but unfortunately does not contain a lot of activities for the teens of Mecosta. Located to the South of the park is a small plot of wetlands that is attainable and can greatly benefit the park. Figure 2 shows the current area of the park. It encompasses a small portion of land to the East of Thomas St. which holds very few parking spaces, and is split by the road.

1.C.06 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 2: Current Park Area Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.07


ATTAINABLE PARK AREA Mecosta and Bromley Park have the option to acquire the small wetlands plot to the South of the current park. Figure 3 shows the possible land area of the park if that plot of land were to be acquired. Attaining the wetlands could kickstart the development of an environmental education park.

1.C.08 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 3: Attainable Park Area Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.09


PROPOSED PARK PLAN Figure 4 shows the new proposed Bromley Park plan. My proposal consists of including a wetlands interaction walk, fishing dock, incorporating a park plaza, transforming Thomas St. to better accommodate the park and its pedestrians, community garden, a new bandshell, interactive art wall, natural playscape, covered picnic areas, and the introduction of a pedestrian path that will connect the park to important locations in Mecosta.

1.C.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 4: Proposed Park Plan Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.11


RIVERBANK CLEARING Figure 5 shows the area along the river that would benefit from clearing debris and excessive growth. Clearing this area will allow more visibility of the river for visitors, creating a major focal point for the park. Clearing the riverbank of excessive debris and invasive plants will also generate a more habitable environment for plant and animal species.

1.C.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 5: Riverbank Clearing Area Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.13


WETLANDS WALK With the acquisition of the wetlands it opens the possibility to develop a wetlands walk. This “walk� would consist of a boardwalk throughout the wetlands area with occasional signage that could be used as a teaching tool for children to learn about the environment and the animals that inhabit that area. It could also be used as a teaching tool for elementary school classes. Figure 6 shows the area that would hold the wetlands walk and house diverse levels of wetland growth.

1.C.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 6: Proposed “Wetlands Walk” Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.15


BOARDWALK LOCATION The boardwalk would be made up of simple dimensional lumber so it is easy to construct. Figure 7 shows the layout of the boardwalk, and how it is designed in a way to incorporate all different levels of wetland growth and continue along the riverbank. The wetlands walk allows visitors to enjoy nature while learning about animal and plant species, and the importance of keeping the environment clean and healthy.

LEGEND Wet Meadow Marsh Fen 1.C.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 7: Boardwalk Location Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.17


WETLANDS ENVIRONMENT A Diverse level of wetlands growth can be a huge benefit to Bromley Park. It provides ecological diversity and creates a multitude of learning environments for kids. It is also will provide vital food and habitat for many animal and insect species. Another environmental benefit of wetlands is that it helps shoreline stabilization and increases the rivers health, which teaches kids the importance of a healthy environment. Figures 8 - 10 show different levels of wetland growth native to Michigan. Figure 11 shows what the possible boardwalk will look like when installed. It is meant for users to be able to safely walk through the wetlands without getting wet and destroying the plants.

1.C.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 8: Fen

Figure 9: Marsh

Figure 10: Wet Meadow

Figure 11: Proposed Boardwalk Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.19


FISHING DOCK Incorporating a fishing clock is a great way to tie into the wetlands. Along the riverbank boardwalk would be a fishing pier (Figure 12). This is a safe place for kids and their parents to go fishing in the Little Muskegon River and even hold small events that teach kids how to fish. At the edge of the pier would be a small storage shack that could hold fishing supplies and could either be locked away or it could be accessible to the community as well.

1.C.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 12: Fishing Dock Area Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.21


FISHING DOCK CONT... The fishing dock, as seen in Figure 13, would be an extension of the boardwalk that hangs over part of the river. This allows easy access to the river and keeps the fishermen off of the main axis of the boardwalk, and away from any pedestrian traffic. The fishing dock would be constructed with simple dimensional lumber that would make it easy and financially achievable. Figures 14 and 15 show what the fishing dock could look like, a simple expansion of the boardwalk, with a railing around the sides for safety.

1.C.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure13: Fishing Dock Location

Figure 14 Environmental Education Park

Figure 15 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.23


PARK PLAZA The park plaza will be located at the corner of Thomas Street as shown in Figure 16. The plaza is a pedestrian only extension of the street. A park plaza is a place for the community to meet and gather with the plaza becoming the center-point of the park.

1.C.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 16 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.25


PARK PLAZA LOCATION The plaza will consist of many different activities that could be used by the community. A fountain as a decorative focal point, and used for public seating. A number of canopies would be installed that could act as shaded seating, or used for a farmers market, bake sales, events during Music on the River, or any other community event that is held in the park. Permanent planters would also be installed along the curve of Thomas St. for pedestrian safety and to slow traffic that passes through the park.

1.C.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 17: Park Plaza Location Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.27


PLAZA CANOPY The plaza canopies are small structures that create a sense of transparency and shelter. The designed structures resemble those in Figure 19, and would easily accommodate seating for up to 4 people. The canopies, as shown in Figure 20, are scattered around the edge of the plaza giving the plaza its own sense of space. The canopies can allow for seating areas, areas to set up a farmers market Figure 21), or any other event in the park. The canopied structures are also located near the river. This area can be used for family picnincs, or parents to watch their kids play in the park. These structures tie together the two different areas of the park, the plaza and the river.

1.C.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 20: Canopy Locations

Figure 19 Environmental Education Park

Figure 21 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.29


PLAZA CANOPY DETAILS The canopies were designed in order to have several throughout the park, so it was important to make them cost effective. They are made of standard dimensional lumber which makes them easy and fast to construct. Figures 22 and 23 show the roof plan and front elevation of the structure along with the dimensions. Figure 24 shows an in place rendering of what just the structures would look like in the park.

Material Size 4x4 4"x4"x10' 2x4 2"x4"x8' Hardware 61/4"

Amount CostperUnit CostforMaterial 2 $ 11.87 $ 23.74 13 $ 2.59 $ 33.67 2 $ 3.21 $ 6.41 SubTotal $ 63.82

1.C.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


0' - 6 3/4"

8' - 0"

5' - 9"

1' - 0"

5' - 7 1/2"

FRONT ELEVATION

ROOF PLAN

Figure F Fi g re gu re 22 22

Figure Fig gu ure re 23 23

Figure 24 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.31


RESTROOMS The restrooms for Bromley Park are an important detail. The current park only has one portable toilet. Installing a permanent men and women’s restroom will make the park much more welcoming. The most economical restroom for Bromley park are pit toilets, toilets in which have vaults underneath to hold waste and are periodically drained and cleaned out. Figure 25 shows that the restrooms are located near the parking area. This location provides easy accessibility to all, while keeping the restrooms away from the river and not distracting from the main focal points of the park. Figure 26 shows that the restrooms also have a storage room that will be very beneficial to the park. Figures 27 and 28 show the front and side of the restrooms and their dimensions.

1.C.32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 25 20' - 0"

ROOM LEGEND

11' - 0"

3' - 0"

10' - 6 1/2"

3

1' - 6"

2

3' - 6"

1

7' - 6 3/4"

1. WOMEN’S RESTROOM 2. STORAGE 3. MEN’S RESTROOM

8' - 0"

11' - 0"

FRONT ELEVATION

Figure 26 Environmental Education Park

Figure 27

SIDE ELEVATION

Figure 28 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.33


RESTROOM MATERIALS Figure 29 shows an in-site rendering of what the restrooms would look like in Bromley Park. Figures 30 and 31 show the front and side elevations with materials. These materials match the surrounding structures in the park and keep with the environmental theme using wood siding. Made of a common 2� x 4� stud structure and wood siding the restrooms are cost efficient and easy to build.

Material 2"x4" GypsumBoard OSB Shingles TarPaper WoodSiding Vault

Size 2"x4"x8' 3/8"x4'x8' 7/16"x4'x8' 33Sq.Ft./box 216Sq.Ft./roll 11/16"x8"x144" 1,500Gallon

1.C.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Amount 101 24 54 8 2 22 1

CostPerUnit $ 2.59 $ 9.99 $ 8.55 $ 22.45 $ 16.65 $ 59.86 $ 1,775.00 Subtotal:

CostforMaterial $261.59 $239.76 $461.70 $179.60 $ 33.30 $1,316.92 $1,775.00 $4,267.87


Figure 29

Figure 30: Front Elevations Showing Materials Environmental Education Park

Figure 31: Side Elevations SHowing Materials Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.35


FOUNTAIN In the middle of the plaza is a central fountain that helps form the plaza into the central square of the park. A fountain in the middle of the plaza has many benefits. It is aesthetically pleasing, establsihes a place for people to congregate and sit, and also generates a quiet, relaxing background noise for the park guests. The sound of the water from the fountain is similar to the sound of the water from the river and helps you feel more connected to nature, without being on the rivers edge. Figure 32 shows where in the park the fountain is located. Figures 33 and 34 show what the proposed fountain could look like, allowing for a place for guests to sit and for gentle water flow. Figure 35 shows a detailed section of the fountain.

1.C.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 32: Location of Fountain CONCRETE FOUNTAIN OVERFLOW #4 RE-BAR FLUID APPLIED WATERPROOFING DECORATIVE TILE FOUNTAIN DRAIN PUMP

CRUSHED GRAVEL

Figure 33 Environmental Education Park

Figure 34

Figure 35 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.37


PARKING The current parking in Bromley Park is very limited, with only 4 spots. This makes it so guests of the park have a far walk. I am proposing to use the current shoulder of M-20 to provide 6 parallel parking spots (Figure 37). This increases parking at the park, and with road side parking it will make drivers along M-20 slow down and be more cautious which creates a safer environment for pedestrians and park users. I am also proposing parking at the entrance of the park (Figure 38 and 39). This will create 3 barrier free parking spots, and 4 standard parking spots. Overflow parking is also available behind the Mecosta Library if need be for big events.

1.C.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 36: Parking Locations 18’ 18’

10’

10’

1 1

8’

3

2

2

2

10’

3

3

1 4

4 18’

5 6

Figure 37 Environmental Education Park

Figure 38

Figure 39 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.39


WOONERF A main aspect of the plaza, and the park, is transforming Thomas Street into a woonerf (VONE-erf), which is a road in which priority is equally given to automobiles and pedestrians. It is a multi-use path that is safe for both drivers and pedestrians. Developing a woonerf slows traffic through the park and creates a lively streetscape for everyone to enjoy.

1.C.40 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 40: Woonerf Location Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.41


WOONERF DETAILS In order to develop a woonerf you need to install traffic slowing devices and implement “walking� speed limits, about 5 mph. Installing planting strips (Figure 41) will be both aesthetically pleasing for the park, and will act as a component that slows down vehicles. The plaza canopies along the curve of Thomas street will also create drivers to be more cautious which, in turn, will slow them down. Figure 42 shows a section of what the Thomas Street woonerf would look like. With planting strips, plaza canopies, and active park guests, Bromley Park could be a fun, safe, and beautiful streetscape.

1.C.42 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 41: Raised Planter Environmental Education Park

Figure 42 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.43


COMMUNITY GARDEN A branch of the parks plaza, and a tool to turn Thomas Street into a woonerf, is the community garden. Figure 43 shows the community garden laid out near Thomas Street to be more accessible and viewable to residents. Also, because the soil quality closer to the road is better. It is beneficial to have the community garden near the plaza because the produce could be harvested and placed in the plaza for residents. This brings more residents into the park and creates a better sense of community while teaching kids the importance of fresh fruits and vegetables. Figure 45 shows an example of how community gardens can be educational and strengthen the sense of community in a town. The community garden is also tied back to the plaza with the climbing plants structure (Figure 46). This structure is constructed similarly to the plaza canopies and can be used for growing climbing plants such as tomatoes, beans, and peas.

1.C.44 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 43

Figure 44 Environmental Education Park

Figure 45

Figure 46 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.45


BANDSHELL The bandshell is a very important part in Bromley Park, it houses the events during the summer for Music on the River. When considering the design of the bandshell there are two clear cut-off limits, the wetlands, and M-20. The design location was made in order to avoid those two limits and take advantage of the river view, as shown in Figure 47.

LEGEND River View Limits

1.C.46 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


N

Figure 47 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.47


BANDSHELL LOCATION To take full advantage of the river view, the new bandshell will be constructed to the West of the plaza (Figure 48). This not only takes advantage of the great view of the river, but it also allows it to be easily visible and accessible from Thomas St. and the plaza.

1.C.48 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 48 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.49


BANDSHELL DESIGN The bandshell’s design was meant to tie back to Mecosta and their ideal of being a book and education town. The bandshell is designed with inspiration from the design of a book. In Figure 49, you see how the shape of an opened book creates the shape of the proposed bandshell.

1.C.50 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 49: Design Process Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.51


BANDSHELL DETAILS Figure 50 shows an in site rendering of the bandshell. The band shell is structurally made up of glue-laminated beams and columns, finished with wood planks on the side and a concrete foundation. Figures 51, 52, and 53 show the floor plan and elevation of the structure and its dimensions.

1.C.52 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 50 36' - 0" 1' - 0"

1' - 0"

14' - 2 1/2"

0' - 10"

0' - 4"

10' - 3 1/2"

20' - 0"

1' - 0"

2' - 2"

0' - 8"

0' - 6"

0' - 8 1/2"

15' - 0" 30' - 0"

FRONT ELEVATION

SIDE ELEVATION

FLOOR PLAN

Figure 51 Environmental Education Park

Figure 52

Figure 53 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.53


BANDSHELL DETAILS Figure 54 and 55 show simple acoustical diagrams of the bandshell. The curved back surface of the bandshell reflects sound waves in the opposite direction to move more of the sound from musicians out toward the crowd. The hard wood surfaces and concrete floor easily reflect sound waves out into the crowd. Some unwanted sound will be reflected away from the band shell from the side panels. Figure 56 and 57 show connection details of the bandshell. They show how the structure is attached to the ground and how the roof structure is attached.

LEGEND Reflected Sound Oppositely Directed Sound Direct Sound

1.C.54 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 54

Figure 55 CEDAR SHINGLES PLYWOOD 10” GLU LAM BEAMS

Figure xxx:

GUSSET PLATE 12” GLU LAM BEAM

Figure 56 Environmental Education Park

Figure 57 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.55


ART WALL I wanted to add something that could display the art talent that Mecosta has to offer. To do this I have designed a graffiti/art wall. This wall will be located near the road so it is easily visible to passing pedestrians. The graffiti/art wall can be used for residents to either actively paint or hang and display their work. Parents could take their children to the wall to paint, or schools could have art classes held there and use it for educational purposes. This wall shows kids that art is important and that creativity is encouraged in Mecosta. Figure 59 shows the graffiti/ art wall in place, and how it could be utilized.

1.C.56 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 58: GrafďŹ ti/Art Wall Location

Figure 59 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.57


NATURAL PLAYSCAPE Every park needs a playground, and creating a natural playscape is a way to tie the playground into the rest of the park. A natural playscape in Mecosta ties into their logging history while showing the importance of learning and caring for the environment. Natural playscapes are playgrounds that are composed of 100% natural materials and resemble the natural environment. They are a place for kids to enjoy the outdoors and let their imagination run wild. Figures 61 - 63 show current natural playscapes that could be inspiration for Bromley Park.

1.C.58 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 60

Figure 61 Environmental Education Park

Figure 62

Figure 63 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.59


“MECOSTA MILES” The “Mecosta Miles” is a proposed pedestrian path that connects several important places on Mecosta such as the Youth Center, Elementary School, Parks, Book Store, and Library. The “Mecosta Miles” trail would be composed of two trails that are just slightly over one mile long (Figure 64). This allows kids to travel safely and sustainably through Mecosta. It teaches them about healthy physical activity and the importance of keeping a healthy environment by not driving, when available.

LEGEND Important Facilities 1.13 Miles 1.09 Miles

1.C.60 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Figure 64 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.61


EXPANSION An important aspect of the “Mecosta Miles” is to give residents a safe, effective way of traveling to important educational areas throughout Mecosta. Right now the pathway along the bridge is very narrow and uncomfortable for a pedestrian to walk through. It is currently only four feet wide. With M-20 being so wide there is enough space available to expand the pathway to 10 ft wide which makes it much more safe and comfortable for pedestrians to walk across. This enhances the most crucial section of the “Mecosta Miles”, the path between the elementary school and Bromley Park.

1.C.62 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


BEFORE

4 ft.

Figure xxx:

AFTER Figure 65 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.63


CROSSWALKS Creating visible crosswalks for the “Mecosta Miles� is a very important feature. With a busy road, such as M-20, the main priority is to keep kids safe. Therefore, at the crossing points of M-20 there are crosswalks installed (Figure 66). These crosswalks are special to Mecosta. They are consistent with the ideal of Mecosta being a book and education town, so they are designed to look like books across a shelf. These crosswalks will stand out to passing drivers and make them more aware of their surroundings, making it safer for pedestrians. They will also mark the entrance, and exit, of downtown Mecosta.

1.C.64 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

LEGEND Crosswalk


Figure 66

Figure 67 Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.65


PHASING Rebuilding a whole park at once is expensive, Figure 68 shows how to progress the project in phases so it is easier to achieve the final result and less financially straining at once. The first phase gets the easiest and most focal aspect of the park done first to “get the ball rolling�. The next two phases are to slowly install some of the new aspects into the park, and the final phase is the most expensive facet of the project.

1.C.66 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Phase 1

Phase 2

Bandshell Crushed Gravel Woonerf Natural Playscape Community Garden

Restrooms Boardwalk Along River

Phase 4

Phase 3

Brick Road Bridge Walkway Expansion Fountain Roadside Parking

Wetland Interaction Walk Fishing Dock

Figure 68: Developmental Phases Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.67


GRANTS Developing a park can be expensive for a community, but an environmental education park has a lot of opportunity to receive grants and funding to help diminish these costs. An environmental education park in Mecosta would not only benefit the residents by becoming a fun learning tool that gets kids outdoors and stimulates their imagination, but it can benefit Mecosta by receiving funding and grants that lower the total cost of the project and make it easier to achieve.

1.C.68 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Possible Environmental and Educational Grants 1. Five Star Restoration Grant 2. The Awesome Foundation Grant 3. Great Lakes Protection Fund 4. MAEP Environmental Education Grant 5. LWCF Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership Program 6. Captain Planet Foundation Grant 7. Cyber-Sierra’s Conservation Grant

Environmental Education Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.C.69


1d

FOCAL POINT OF MECOSTA garrett szarenski


FOCAL POINT OF MECOSTA becoming a gathering place for the county and community The concept of “Focal Point of Mecosta” drove the design by focusing on the different connections whether broad or within the village of Mecosta. The park as a whole creates a focal point for the county of Mecosta. Within the village of Mecosta the park will re-invigerate the village, encouraging the community to come together and bring the village back to how it was during the logging years. The band shell in the park wil serve as a beacon and a reason to stop and explore the town. The park revolves around the band shell giving it the most space in the park for events like “Music on the River”

Special activities for kids that are included with in the park are combined skate park and pump track. There is also a naturalscape playground which uses heavy timber logs throughout the design to be more like nature tying back into Mecosta’s history. The band shell inspires the covered picnic ares and the farmers market. Which comes to the final aspect of the park which is a revamped community garden that can help supply the farmers market.The concept, parts of the park and more will be talked about throughout the book.

After conducting research on parks it was noted that places thirve when the users have at least ten reasons to be there. This park includes connecting to the White Pine Trail and creating a raised board walk around the park creating a biking destination. Along that raised path there are fishing docks and a view of the newly devloped wet land.

1.D.2 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

+

10

places thrive when users have a range of reasons (10+) to be connecting to the white pine trail 1 raised walking/biking path along river 2 fishing docks 3 skate park/ pump track 4 wetland development 5 path to community center 6 covered seating/ picnic areas 7 pavilion/ bandshell 8 playground 9 community garden 10 Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.3


MAP OF MECOSTA The map shows the village of Mecosta with the park highlighted in blue and the wetlands that run through the park are faintly expressed in a light green.

1.D.4 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


VILLAGE OF MECOSTA MAP Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.5


MECOSTA COUNTY PARTI The parti diagram shows the relative connection between the surrounding villages, towns and cities . The orange, large text signifies the towns within a five mile radius and the places that are closest connected to Mecosta. The blue, medium text shows the towns that are within a twenty mile radius. These towns are roughly twenty minutes away creating the perfect day trip. Finally, the green, small text sinifies the towns that are within a thirty mile radius. Because these towns are outlying it would be a proven sucsess if the park and town had visitors from those locations. That is the goal of this parti, to find the target cities for the park and village of Mecosta as a whole.

1.D.6 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


BARRYTON

CHIPPEWA LAKE

RODNEY

BIG RAPIDS

SHERMAN

STANWOOD WHITE CLOUD

VESTABURG

HOWARD CITY

MT. PLEASANT

MILLBROOK BLANCHARD EDMORE

MORELY

REMUS

CANADIAN LAKES

LAKEVIEW

MECOSTA BROOMFIELD

MECOSTA COUNTY PARTI DIAGRAM Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.7


CONNECTING TO WHITE PINE TRAIL This is a map of the existing White Pine Trail which shows a branch to Evart. The purpose of this map shows that though the process of making this trail useable, up to the standard of Rails to Trails, is expensve Mecosta would have a strong argument to get funding. There are many grants that fund various iterations of trails. One grant in particular had 1.8 million dollars in funding available this year. This grant wanted to focus on connecting communities which would boost the crediation that this proposal has.

1.D.8 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


WHITE PINE TRAIL MAP Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.9


CONNECTING TO WHITE PINE TRAIL The most logical step to take would be to do the restoration of this rail line in stages. The would be the trail from the White Pine Trail in Big Rapids to the Village of Mecosta. This would then encourage people to ride snowmobiles there in the winter and ride bikes ther in the summer. With a little help and compliance from land owners and the grants this first stage od the trail expansion could be a huge success with a small amount of finacial inout from the community.

LEGEND White Pine Trail Proposed trail 1.D.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


WHITE PINE TRAIL ADDITION Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.11


CONNECTING TO WHITE PINE TRAIL After sucsseding with the first stage of the trail expansion and connection, the proposal entails expanding from Mecosta to Remus further connecting to other local communities. Funding for Stage 2 would be much easier after showing that the extra traffic through Mecosta boosted thier economy.

LEGEND White Pine Trail Stage 1 Trail Future Expansion 1.D.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


WHITE PINE TRAIL MAP FUTURE EXPANSION Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.13


CONNECTING TO WHITE PINE TRAIL This slightly zoomed in map shows where the existing railroad is and where the new trail would be. The branch off would be specified down S. James St. though any of the crossing roads could be used.

LEGEND White Pine Trail Branch 1.D.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


WHITE PINE TRAIL CONNECTION IN TOWN Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.15


EXISTING BROMLEY PARK The map and images show the existing site plan with the existing building and lanmarks. The pictures are the existing conditions of the different landmarks.

LEGEND Bromley Park Wetlands 1.D.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


EXISTING ENTRANCE

EXISTING BROMLEY PARK

EXISTING PLAYGROUND

EXISTING PAVILION Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.17


MECOSTA VILLAGE PARTI This parti diagram shows the relationships that impoatant buildings and institutions have with the park agian showing them based on thier proximity within a radius.

1.D.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


BRO

EL

ER T EN C

WOODY’S

BOOK GALLE R Y

RK PA

EY L M

E IC

KIRK LIB RA RY

OOL Y SCH R TA N E M E TOWNSHIP OF F

CO M M U N I TY VILLAGE OF MECOSTA PARTI DIAGRAM Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.19


PATH ALONG RIVER The path along the river is a raised boardwalk constructed with heavy timber wood supports and treated wood planks. The rendering shown is from when a person would have just started on the path near the northeast corner of the park looking towards the bandshell. The lower picture shows the what the boardwalk would look like going through the woods.

1.D.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


RENDERING FROM NORTHEAST

RAISED PATH

PICTURE THROUGH WOODS Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.21


FISHING DOCKS The addition of fishing docks will provide a greater opprotunity for multiple families and individuals to go fishing. This could now also be used a teaching tool for the near by elementary school.

1.D.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


RENDERING FROM NORTHEAST

FISHING DOCKS ALONG RIVER

PARENTS AND KIDS FISHING

STUDENTS FISHING Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.23


SKATE PARK/PUMP-TRACK The existing skate park needed some tending loving care and the new design combines the idea of a skate park and making it more bike friendly. A pump track is the perfect solution for a community that is not fully supportive of a skate park. This skate park can be used by people from little kid to grown adults. It adds a fun aspect of riding a bike that doesnt make it physically demanding. The great part is that it is not limited to just bikes and skateboards, people can use thier scooters and roller blades. This makes a pump track the most appealing to the most amount of people. The picture shows a pre-constructed option while the company does build custom to fit any area or needs.

1.D.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PRE-BUILT PUMP TRACK

SKATEPARK/ PUMP TRACK

Focal Point of Mecosta

KIDS BIKING ON PUMP TRACK

SKATEBOARDING ON PUMP TRACK Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.25


WETLAND DEVELOPMENT The wetland development would be an integral part of the raised boardwalk path. This will bring various spieces of animals to the park creating a more peaceful environment. This will also create a great learning expierience.

1.D.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


OPTION #1

WETLAND DEVELOPMENT

Focal Point of Mecosta

OPTION #2

OPTION #3 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.27


PATH TO THE COMMUNITY CENTER On of the biggest connections that needed to be made with in the village is with the local community center. The current path is along M-20 and is not the safest route . The proposal is to create a path down S. James St. through the woods and over the river provding a safe haven for kids traveling from the community center to the other end of town.

1.D.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATH TO COMMUNITY CENTER MAP Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.29


PICNIC AREAS There are three designated picnic areas in the park with the farmers market doubling as extra covered seating. There are recycled picnic tables and propane grills creating a comfortable place where families can enjoy a barbeque or children can do homework while enjoying the views of the developed wetlands.

1.D.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


RENDERING

PICINIC AREAS

Focal Point of Mecosta

RECYCLE PICINIC TABLE

NEW PROPANE GRILLS Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.31


PAVILION/ BANDSHELL The design for the band shell was focused on incorporating heavy timber construction. To keep the views of the river visible clear panels are placed in the back also creating interesting shadows throughout the day. On the north and south sides the lower half of the band shell is sheathed on the inside with solid accustical panels while there are clear glasss panels on the top half. The ceiling is mostly open but there are dropped planes of furniture grade plywood. These panels help direct sound to the crowd.

1.D.32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


BAND SHELL RENDERING

BAND SHELL LOCATION

Focal Point of Mecosta

BAND SHELL SECTION

BAND SHELL PLAN Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.33


PLAYGROUND The playground design is derived from the logging history. Using the logs and the rocks create whats called a natrualscape. This incorporates nature in the park to compliment the developed wetlands.

1.D.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


NATURAL SCAPE EXAMPLE

PLAYGROUND MAP

Focal Point of Mecosta

NATURAL SCAPE EXAMPLE

SLIDE EXAMPLE Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.35


COMMUNITY GARDEN The community garden has been relocated to higher grond and almost double in size. It was moved to higher ground because the current location is in the wetland and potentally flooding the garden and ruining the crops. The beds are construcuted from 2 by 12’s in a four foot by eight foot box. This will provide plenty of space for the community to come together and grow thier own food.

1.D.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


COMMUNITY GARDEN EXAMPLE

COMMUNITY GARDEN MAP

COMMUNITY GARDEN EXAMPLE

COMMUNITY GARDEN EXAMPLE Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.37


FARMER’S MARKET The farmers market structure provides a nice coverd area to hold sales of all type espeically ones selling produce. The structure is located directly across the path from part of the garden for easy transportation of vegtables.

1.D.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


FARMERS MARKET RENDERING

FARMERS MARKET MAP

Focal Point of Mecosta

FARMERS MARKET EXAMPLE

FARMERS MARKET EXAMPLE Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.39


NEW PARKING New parking spots are added on the opposite side if the road through the park. The new spots are angled for and easy pull in and pull out. The parking spots number was tripled to 12. If more parking is needed for when an event is held a new combined road and pedestrian walk way for easy travel from park to parking lot was added.

1.D.40 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


NEW PARKING MAP Focal Point of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.41


RESTROOM BUILDING The restroom building har two seperate bathrooms providing a mens and a womens. Pit toilets are used for means of sewage. After researching all otions this seemed the most cost effective and practical. The outside material is concieved of river rock, corrugated metal and heavy timber wood beams.

1.D.42 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


RESTROOM RENDERING

RESTROOM MAP

Focal Point of Mecosta

RESTROOM PLAN

RESTROOM SECTION Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.D.43


1E

LOCAL INSPIRATION

Mark Mirandola


LOCAL INSPIRATION

The local community will influence and inspire others Local Inspiration derives from the concept of community members inspiring others. With the Bromley park conceptual plan, there are many things that will be proposed in the park that can help people discover something new. Most of the new features are not located in the region, and that can have great benefits to the surrounding area. This concept really starts and ends with the community. The way the community responds to situations speaks upon its self. Local inspiration speaks to the saying, “follow my lead�. Residents that try something new can inspire others to better themselves by trying something new. The Power of 10+ is a concept that an organization called Project for Public Spaces, or PPS, developed. They use it to evaluate and facilitate place making for multiple cities. The power of 10+ is a

powerful tool for generating constructive conversations to identify targeted efforts. Revitalize Mecosta is currently targeting efforts to bring this beloved city back. The Power of 10+ shows how paying attention to the human experience and interaction when building a destination can have immediate impacts.

1.E.02 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

+

10

places thrive when users have a range of reasons (10+) to be there relaxation 1 playground 2 picnic area 3 art at the park 4 community garden 5 walk/ run/ bike 6 workout 7 music on the river 8 fishing 9 educaton 10 Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.03


CONCEPT PARTI This parti diagram is an integral part of the concept statement. Influence and inspiration are two separate entities. The deeper meaning behind the diagram is that community combines them together. Influence can branch off of inspiration and vice versa.

1.E.04 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Influence

Community

Inspiration

Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.05


SITE PLAN The site plan is layout so that in order to get full use of the park, you have to be willing to move around. The proximity from one focal point to another is connected through strategic walkway placement. The proposed park plan removed the street that separated the space into two distinct areas. With the removal of the road there is now more cohesion between each space. One focal point featured in the park is the art walk. The art walk can be seen in the site plan highlighted in red. The art walk ties the concept into action. Local artists can paint on concrete that was cast on site. The local schools can have art classes here to show children the basic principles of painting and composition. The art walk will inspire some students and local community members to try a new hobby.

Another key feature of the new proposed site is the bike path, which goes through the bandshell highlighted as white near the river. Track athletes will be able to practice by doing laps on a safe path. Young children will also have a safe place to bike by riding along the perimeter. The open grass in the middle can be used as seating for any music events that are held at the park. It also serves as a place where people can toss a football around or have extra room to run around.

LEGEND Grass Exisitng Buildings Community Garden Art Walk Playground River Bike Path

1.E.06 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.07


RELAXATION Benches are located spuraticaly throughout the park. They can serve as meeting spots for other people or as a spot to relax. Here are where people can find benches: - Built -in benches in the art walk - Picnic tables - Near the playground - Near the outdoor workout machines - Near the restroom - Along the river

LEGEND Bench Seating 1.E.08 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Bench Example 1

Figure xxx:

Bench Example 2

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Built In seating Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.09


PLAYGROUND A playground is focal point for most parks. It is not any different here. With grants available from KaBoom, getting a new park is something that can be done. The main features in the playground are a small scale rock wall with a ropes course. The playground also has a pair of see saws and we will reuse the same swing set that is currently in Bromley Park. The rock wall and ropes course follows along with local inspiration. Children that use this playground will explore new experiences that they may have not done before.

LEGEND Playground 1.E.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.11


Elevation

Playground Example

Ropes Playground Example 1.E.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Rockwall Playground Example


Playground Rendering Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.13


PICNIC AREA Following up to relaxation as the first use, the picnic benches near the river are designed for eating spaces. They are highlighted in the site plan to the right. To the north of the bandshell, are two large picnic tables that can hold up to 8 people per table. If both tables are available, someone can hold a small event there under the pergolas. The picnic areas do have good views due to its proximity along the river.

LEGEND Dining Seating 1.E.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Section of Seating Area North of Bandshell

Pergola Example

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Picnic Table Example Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.15


ART AT THE PARK Art is a very import part to the revimessage. That is up for the communtiy talization of Mecosta. Since this town to decide once it starts getting use. wants to become a ‘book town’ it was very import to bring that element into the park. At the art walk, there are concrete walls in which residents can paint over to create their own works of art. In addition to the varying sizes of the art walls, there will be two book statue at each end. People can also paint on the ‘pages’ of the book. If the art starts to become a success, it would be beneficial for Mecosta to extend this aspect of the park into the rest of town for a dedicated art walk. The art ties into the concept of local inspiration very well. Art can be a huge inspiration for the local community. The way that the walls are positioned, the walk can tell a story,or an inspirational

LEGEND Art Walk

1.E.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Section

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Book Statue Example Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.17


Art Example

Art Example

Material: Brick Paver

Material: Concrete Paver 1.E.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Art Example

Material: Concrete


Figure xxx:

Art Walk Rendering Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.19


COMMUNITY GARDEN The community garden will be placed in a more convenient location in the proposed park. There will be plots that residents can use throughout the year. It will be up to the city if those garden plots will have small fee or not. The garden is intended for personal use for any flowers or food harvesting. The garden will be closed off around most of its sides to prevent access from pedestrian traffic or any animals in the area. This garden can serve as a local inspiration for younger kids that find it interesting to garden. Schools in the area can have a classes at the garden or, for various exercises. The garden is highlighted in the site plan to the right.

LEGEND Community Garden

1.E.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Garden Example

Garden Example

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Garden Example Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.21


WALK/ RUN / BIKE The new path provides great views to the river. Also, with new vegetation natural to the area, it will provide an escape from the city. The path is a safe place for everyone to use. With the exception a woonerf, explained under ‘proposed parking’,the path is positioned away from vehicular traffic. It is located along the perimeter so that you can get a glimpse of everything that the park has to offer during laps. The path also runs through the bandshell (look for the rendering on the next page).

LEGEND Proposed Path Vegetation 1.E.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.23


Child Enjoying His Bike

Vegetation on the Path

Vegetation on the Path 1.E.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Path Example


Rendering Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.25


OUTDOOR WORKOUT According to Acefitness.org, exercise helps to aid in the development of important interpersonal skills, as well as promotes improved school attendance and enhances academic performance. That is fact and it is important for people of all ages to regularly get exercise in. There will be 4 permanent, built in machines to help bring awareness, and inspiration for the community. The four machines are 4 push up bars, 4 pull up bars, 1 leg press and 2 ab crunch benches. At the beginning of each station there will be information pertaining to what muscle is being worked, and how to properly execute the exercise.

LEGEND Workout Area 1.E.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Elevation

Rendering

Workout Example

Floor Plan Local Inspiration

Workout Example Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.27


MUSIC ON THE RIVER The bandshell has been design for music on the river. It has also been designed to be easy to build. It is simple in nature, but provides certain aspects to make it stand out. The stepping down of the roof from North West to the South East provides character and is beneficial for proper rainwater runoff in the river. (Look at South Elevation on the next page for reference) The materials used for the bandshell are kept simple for the ease of constructibility. Concrete Masonry Units, dimensional lumber and shingles on the roof are the 3 main materials used. These three materials will be used again in the restroom facilities to provide cohesion. The bands that play here will be easily noticeable during performances. Concrete Masonry Units. CMU, helps to bounce back any sound to the audience

due to its hard surface. The bandshell is in prime location along the river, as well as it opens up right to the middle portion of the park; which just happens to be one of the largest spots that connects the whole park together.

1.E.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

LEGEND Bandshell


South Elevation

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.29


Section

Materials: Dimensional Lumber

Materials: Concrete Masonry Unit

Floor Plan 1.E.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Materials: Asphalt Shingles


Figure xxx:

Concert Rendering Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.31


FISHING

Off of the path is a new fishing dock for all ages. A picture of what the dock will look like is to the right. The dock has great sight-lines from the street and other parts of the park due to the open cetner of the proposed park.

LEGEND Fishing Dock 1.E.32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Fishing Dock Example

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Child Enjoying Fishing Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.33


E DUCATION Education is a very critical part of childhood development. With the demographics of Mecosta being mostly young children, education is something that needs to be looked at. At the North East end of the site lays a giant chess set that can be used. It is placed near the public sidewalk so that it can draw interest and inspire people that pass by it on a daily basis. Chess helps to develop concentration and improve thinking ability. Those traits are very important in the education process.

LEGEND Giant Chess 1.E.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Section View

Chess Example

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Chess Example Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.35


RESTROOMS The toilet system that will be beneficial for Bromley Park is vaulted toilets. This system allows waste to be built up in the ground and then is ventilated through vertical stack. The restrooms are located conveniently near the open space. People there for music on the river do not have to travel far. The placement of the restrooms is near the public sidewalk too. This will help draw people into the park that are just walking by if they need a restroom. The materials that were used in the bandshell will also be used here. Using CMU, dimensional lumber and shingles. As stated previously, using the same materials will help cohesion between the park as well as easier constructibility.

LEGEND Restrooms 1.E.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.37


Material Option: Smooth Concrete Masonry

Vault Toilet Diagram

North Elevation 1.E.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability

Unit

Material Option: Rough Concrete Masonry Unit


Floor Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.39


PROPOSED PARKING Parking has been re adjusted for the new site. Since the old road is no longer existing, the new layout needed to make sense otherwise the demolition would be a failure. All traffic coming in will turn on James St from M-20. From there, vehicle traffic will turn onto Thomas St which will end at your destination. A new feature that is being proposed is a round about circle for parents/ friends to drop off and pick up people. If residents were looking to park, they can turn right off Thomas St to a one way woonerf. A woonerf is a road that is used to help reduce the flow of traffic. Woonerf ’s are typically designed for pedestrians that cars can drive slowly on.

LEGEND Parking Walking Path

1.E.40 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Woonerf Example

Site Plan Local Inspiration

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.E.41


1

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

CHAD ELLY


VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE T . This park concept will strenghten the Village of Mecosta by providing a structured central beacon. By using the 5 elements of city design as described by Kevin Lynch, this city will serve as an organized “Village Within a Village� to promote sustainable growth starting within the park and working out to the village and the county. Serving as a central beacon for the city, this park will help produce an identity for the city by capturing the values and life of the city. This park will strengthen the city, by offering a public venue that will promote public and social involvment. The identity formed with this park will not only attract residents, but neighboring residents to visit the site, and enjoy the experience this park has to offer.

1F.02 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


+

10

POWER OF (10+)

/ “

” /

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1F.03


THE IMAGE OF THE CITY Kevin Lynch, the author of “The Image of The City� describes successful city design as having 5 key elements; Path, Node, District, Landmark, and Edge. These 5 elements come together to create an organized structured city. Each element plays a distinctive role in a cities design, and all stand alone as parts of a city, but simultaneously come together as a larger picture in a city. Paths serve as channels along which an observer customarily, occassionally, or pontentially moves. They are often streets or paths. Nodes are strategically located points into which an individual enters. They are often crossings or junctions. Edges provide boundaries that seperate one region from another. They are often buildings or walls. Districts are two dimensional sections often held together by some commonality, often acting as neighborhoods. Landmarks are physical structures that help individuals to better understand and navigate an environment. Using these 5 elements, a city can flourish and promote sustainable growth and development for the future.

04 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


5 ELEMENTS OF CITY DESIGN PATH NODE DISTRICT LANDMARK EDGE VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 05


PARTI This parti diagram shows the concept behind the proposed park design. The park (represented by the inner green circle) acts as a central beacon for the village of Mecosta (represented by the larger blue circle). With the park acting as a center for the Village of Mecosta, the 5 elements of city design (represented by black arrows) used in the park are influencing the Village of Mecosta, and other surrounding towns. The park is also being influenced by, and influencing key points within the village of Mecosta, These three key points (The School, Library, and Youth Center) are represented by small purple circles.

06 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


MECOSTA

ES

EDG

SURROUNDING TOWNS

SCHOOL

S ICT

R IST

D PATHS

PARK LIBRARY

MA R LA

ND

S

DE

NO

KS

YOUTH CENTER

Parti Diagram VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 07


PARK CONCEPT DIAGRAM This Park concept diagram shows how the 5 elements of city design will be implemented into the park. Each serving an identical function as city design, but at a smaller scale within the park. Although these 5 elements are inteded for cities, by implementing them at a smaller scale within the park, they will provide a structured park to serve many purposes.

08 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Park Concept Diagram VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 09


PATH Paths are the most distinctive of the 5 elements. Often serving as roads, bike paths, sidewalks, clearings, or any other path. Very recognizable, paths are the easiest way to help with navigation.

10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Example of Road

Example of Walking/Bike Path VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Sidewalk

Example Gravel Road Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 11


VILLAGE PATHS Identified in the map to the right, are the recognizable paths within the village of Mecosta. All of the most distinctive paths within the village consists of roadways, and sidewalks.

12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Village Paths VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 13


BIKE/HIKING PATHS This park proposal uses four Bike/Hiking paths to connect the park to important buildings in the village of Mecosta, and other neighboring Cities. The bike path represented by the red line connects the park to the youth center, and the elementary school. The bike path represented by the yellow line, is a shorter bike/Hiking path to the elementary school. The path represented by the pink line connects the park to the downtown area of Mecosta. The path represented by the orange line, connects the park to the old rail trails, which serves as a larger scale network of paths that would connect the village of Mecosta to neighboring cities and villages.

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TO OLD RAIL TRAIL

PATHS

YOUTH CENTER

SCHOOL

OLD RAIL TRAIL

DOWNTOWN

Example Roadside Bike Path VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Bike/Hiking Paths

Example Bike Racks

Example Gravel Bike Path Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 15


PARK PATHS This Park proposal includes paths in the form of roads, walking paths, bike paths, and a boardwalk. All of the paths can be seen to the right highlighted in red.

16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Parkk P P Paths th VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 17


BIKE/HIKING PATHS The map to the right shows a close up of the bike /hiking paths and how they connect and move through the park. The first path travels along M-20, while the second path comes in through Thomas Street and connects to the boardwalk with a gravel trail. The gravel path at the south end of the site allows bikers to connect with other bike trails without traveling through the walking paths within the center of the park.

18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Bike/Hiking Paths VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 19


STREETSCAPE M-20 (highlighted in red) is an important path within the site beacause it serves as the main access point for residents and visitors to enter and exit the village. With the site of the park resting just beyond an entrance/exit point for the village, it is important that the park portrays an unforgettable identity for the village. To strenghten M-20 at the park front, there will be a bike/hiking path previously mentioned along with parallel parking. The width of M-20 is much wider than code, allowing 10 feet to be used for parallel parking. The parallel parking would also serve as protection for bikers and walkers from the traffic on M-20. A section of this organization can be seen to the right.

20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

M-20 Park Front

Roadway R d VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

P Parking ki

Bike Path

Park

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 21


WALKING PATHS Walking paths are needed in the park to connect different areas of the park. The organization of the walking paths can be seen highlighted in red. The reason for the organization is the idea of the band shell, which will be later discussed, acting as a central element for the park, and the walking paths radiate out from the center. The walking paths can be constructed in phases. Phase 1 can include clearing paths in the grass that would provide dirt paths. Phase 2 would include laying gravel to help distinguish paths from grass. Phase 3 would be paving the paths with concrete.

Phases Dirt 1 Gravel 2 Concrete 3 22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Park Walking Paths

Example Dirt Path VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Concrete Path

Example Stone Path Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 23


THOMAS STREET AXIS The Thomas Street Axis is important to connect the park to the park to the village. In order to strengthen this axis, the walking path along this axis is constructed twice as wide as all the other walking paths. This allows maintenance vehicles to travel down this path for access to the band shell (discussed later in the book), and the restrooms (discussed later in the book). Along with these two structures, this wide path creates an opportunity for other structures to rest along the path which would also strenghten the axis. The bike/hiking paths traveling down the side of Thomas street also strenghten the axis by promoting activity down Thomas Street. By altering Thomas Street to incorporate a drop off path at the corner, the area shared between the park and the residential neighborhood is strengthened.

24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Rendering

Thomas Street Axis

Bike Path

Thomas Street Th St t

Roadside Bike Path VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 25


BOARDWALK Highlighted in red, the map shows a boardwalk along the river. The boardwalk would encourage fishing for kids in the river. Towards the center of the path, the boardwalk opens up to be wider to allow for greater activity including fishing and benches. This would allow for fishing along the river while allowing enough of the boardwalk to remain open for pedestrians traveling along the boardwalk. The boardwalk could be contructed in phases. Phase 1 would be clearing a path to provide a dirt walkway. Phase two would be contructing a wooden boardwalk.

Phases Dirt 1 Wood 2 26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


PATHS

Rendering

Boardwalk

Fishing

Example Boardwalk

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Walk/Jogging Path Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 27


NODES Nodes are intersections of paths that act as checkpoints. Most common nodes are road intersections, path crossings and overlapping of paths. Pictures of common paths can be seen to the right.

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NODES

ExampleRoad Intersection

Example 4-Way Stop VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Path Intersection

Example Path Crossing Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 29


VILLAGE NODES Nodes within the village of Mecosta are identified in orange circles. Most of these nodes consist of road intersections.

30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


NODES

Village Nodes Village Within A Village

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 31


PARK NODES Nodes will be used in the park to signify the areas where multiple paths meet. These nodes consist of a monument sign, park signage, and sculpture, which are shown in the map on the next page.

32 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


NODES

Park Nodes VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 33


SCULPTURE/WAYFINDING The first type of nodes used in the park are signage. This can be placed at popular intersections to help users navigate the park. Signage could consist of maps of the park, and titles of key points within the park to direct traffic. The second type of nodes used in the park are sculptures. Sculptures similar to the metal sculpture located outside the library can be used to connect the park to the village. These sculptures can be an intersting and successful way to tell visitors the story of the history of Mecosta.

34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


NODES SIGN

SCULPTURE

Signs/Sculptures Park Locations

Sculpture Outside Library Village Within A Village

Example Sign

Example Trail Sign Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 35


MONUMENT SIGN A monument sign will be located on Thomas street to identify the meeting of the street and the park. This monument sign will also act as a sign to identify the entrance of the park. By pushing the entrance to the park to the back, users are encouraged to travel to the back of the park and experience all that the park has to offer. This monument sign will be constructed of wood paneling and ashlar stone. Placed behind the monument sign is the existing American flag that would be moved to this new location. Lighting would be used behind the monument sign to light the flag as well as help illumintate the monument sign . This would create interesting aesthetic effects for the sign. The design of this monument sign also allows the names of donors for the park to be displayed. This not only helps to recognize the generosity of others, but also encourages donations for the park.

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NODES

Monument Sign Location

Monument Sign Dimensions Village Within A Village

 

 

 

Monument Sign Rendering Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 37


DISTRICT Districts are areas of a city that come together to create a whole. They are also identified as neighborhoods, zoning classes, or other large public areas that can be viewed as standing alone, and part of a greater organized structure.

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DISTRICTS

Example Neighborhoods

Example Public Park VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Quad Districts

Example City Zones Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 39


VILLAGE DISTRICTS These are the districtrs identified in the village of Mecosta. Two residential districts, one commercial districts, and one rural disctrict highlighted in green. The rural district is highlighted in green because the site for the park sits in this district. This map shows the importance of the park to connect to other areas in this district as well as other districts within the village.

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DISTRICTS

Village Districts Village Within A Village

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 41


PARK DISTRICTS This map shows the three seperate disctricts in the park; Playground district, Gathering district, and Art in the Park district. Each having some commonality within the extents of the district, they all serve as individual spaces, and also come together to create an organized park design.

Districts Playground Gathering Art in the Park 42 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


DISTRICTS

Park Districts VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 43


PLAYGROUND The playground districts will contain the playground, and nearby picnic tables. The playground will consist of natural playground equipment such as wood stumps and pvc tunnels. Other playground equipment can be re-used from the existing playground. The idea of using a natural playground strenghtens the connections to the history of the lumbering industry in the village. A split wood fence will wrap around the north end of the park to provide safety for kids, discouraging curious kids from wandering to the road. The fence will only wrap around the north end of the playground and leave the south end open to allow for quick access to the playground from picnic tables for parents. Picnic tables will also be placed on the north side of the park to allow for parents to stay between the road and their children if need be. The playground can be constructed in phases. Phases one would allow for playground organization on grass. Phase two would allow for cedar mulch to be layed down to help signify the area of the playground. Phase 3 would consist of contructing the playground fence.

Phases Natural Playscape 1 Mulch 2 Fence 3

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DISTRICTS

Example Picnic Tables

Example Natural Playground

Example Playground VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Playground Location

Example Fence Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 45


PICNIC/GATHERING The picnic/gathering area will consist of picnic tables and bbq grills. This will provide any needs for bbq gatherings and other social events. The band shell (discussed later) will also sit in this space. The majority of the rest of this discrict will remain open space to allow for seating in the grass, and any other acitivity that would require a large open space (such as frisbee).

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DISTRICTS

Picnic/Gathering Components

Example BBQ Setup VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Charcoal Grill Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 47


ART IN THE PARK The third district called “Art in the Park� consists of large rocks to be painted by the public, as well as a public art display. The painted rocks will be placed along the path and open for interpretation by the public. The public will be encourage to paint, draw or display art on the rocks. The public art display will rest on the West side of the district and act as a Terminating Vista that would pull users of the space from Thomas street down the path, and into the heart of the park. The public art display will be discussed in further detail later in the book. This district can be constructed in two phases. The first stage consists of bringing in the rocks. The second phase consists of constructing the public art display.

Phases Rocks 1 Public Art Display 2 48 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


DISTRICTS

Art In The Park Components

Public Art Display Rendering VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Painted Rocks Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 49


PARKING Parking for this site consists of three areas. The first area similar in location to the existing parking, will include a larger area on the East side of Thomas Street. This area will act as the main parking for the park, and consist of ten parking spaces, two of them being accessible parking spaces. This proposed plan also includes parallel parking along M-20. The third parking area for this site consists of using the library parking. With a strengthened axis along Thomas Street, parking in the library lot can be achieved, and tied into the park for overflow parking.

Phases Parking Lot 1 Library Parking 2 Parallel Parking 3 50 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


DISTRICTS

On-Site Parking

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Library Parking Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 51


LANDMARK Landmarks are physical structures that help give an area an identity, and help individuals better navigate an area. Common landmarks are monuments and famous architecture. To the right are famous landmarks from around the world.

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LANDMARKS

Taj Mahal, India

St. Louis Arch, Missouri VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Big Ben, England

Eiffel Tower, France Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 53


VILLAGE LANDMARKS Landmarks within the village of Mecosta are identified. The most important landmarks within the village consist of the Elementary school, the Youth Center, and the Library. These three landmarks help give the village an identity of an educational village.

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LANDMARKS

Village Landmarks VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 55


PARK LANDMARKS Landmarks used within the park consist of easily identifiable structures. These landmarks include the band shell, two pavilions, restrooms, the public art display, and farmers stand/ community garden.

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LANDMARKS

Park Landmarks VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 57


EXISTING SITE The existing site features a pavilion, a playground, and a skate park. The exisitng pavilion will be kept. The existing playground and skatepark will be demolished, but parts and equipment will be recycled and re-used for the new proposed playground site.

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LANDMARKS

Existing Site

Existing Skate Park VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Existing Playground

Existing Pavilion Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 59


PAVILION Along with the existing pavilion, a new pavilion will be placed towards the north end of the site between the playground and picnic/bbq areas to allow for adequate shelter for either use.

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LANDMARKS

Pavilion Location VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 61


PAVILION This new pavilion utilizes heavy timber construction and ashlar stone. The total dimensions of the pavilion are 15’ X 25’. This size is comparable to the existing pavilion and it big enough to allow for at least two picnic tables. The pavilions main purpose is to serve as shelter for the playground and picnic areas. The head height of the pavilion starts at 6’-8” at the north elevation. Columns are constructed of heavy timber, with the base finished up to 3’ with ashlar stone. The pavilion faces south to accomodate an inviting entrance to both the playground area and the picnic area. To deal with sunlight shining from the south into the pavilion, trees are to be planted on the south end near the path, to provide shade for the pavilion.

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LANDMARKS

Floor Plan

Pavilion Rendering

South Elevation VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

North Elevation

East Elevation Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 63


FARMERS STAND The farmers stand will be located beside the community garden close to the existing space of the current community garden. This space gives visitors a pleasant entry into the park, promoting the idea of community involvment. The farmers stand and community garden paired with a row of crabapple trees across the path creates a strong path between, acting as a aesthetically pleasing entrance into the park. The community garden is left close to the same spot because of the sunlight it receives being on the south end of the site. This gives the plants adequate sunlight to grow.

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LANDMARKS

Farmers Stand Location

Example Farmers Stand VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Farmers Stand Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 65


FARMERS STAND This farmers stand is a two bay structure that would allow local visitors to display produce. This farmers stand will promote social gathering and community involvment within the park. placed on the Thomas street axis, this stand will strengthen the axis by promoting activity along the path. The farmers stand is constructed of heavy timeber and ashlar stone to strengthen the connection to the history of the village. Walls are constructed of wood planks that would be attached at each column. This gives a sense of transparency, yet is solid enough to keep the properties of a wall. The wood planks are off center and variate in depth giving the wall a three dimensional and aesthetically pleasing sense. The stand is 9 feet deep and 21 feet wide, allowing adequate room for its function as a farmers market stand. The head heights of the ceiling are 7’-8” towards the back, and 8’-8” at the front of the stand.

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LANDMARKS

Floor Plan

Rendering

North Elevation

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Wall Detail

South Elevation

East Elevation

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 67


BAND SHELL The band shell is located in the center of the site. It is located here because the band shell acts as the cener of the park with the greatest detail. The band shell is the largest structure in the park, and provides a strong central point for the park. This location also allows vehicles to approach the back of the structure through the wide paths. The place for the band shell also allows for the grass seating to the north east of the band shell to be used as a larger open seating area for visitors to set up lawn chairs or blankets in the grass.

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LANDMARKS

Band Shell Location

Band Shell Precedent VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Band Shell Precedent

Band Shell Precedent Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 69


BAND SHELL The band shell is 26’ X 36’. Constructed of heavy timber frame construction, wood panels, and ashlar stone, It is designed to bounce acoustics out towards the grass seating in front. Acoustical panels have been placed along the ceiling of the shell to add additional sound control. The design also provides two access points through the back of the band shell without disrupting the scenery or acousitcs of the space.

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LANDMARKS

Floor Plan

Band Shell Rendering

West Elevation

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

East Elevation

North Elevation Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 71


PUBLIC ART DISPLAY The public art display is constructed of concrete and metal rods. The concrete wall at the front of the display is 12’ tall to attract people from Thomas Street into the park. The wall slopes down in the back to where the metal rods meet the wall. This gives visitors the effect as they walk around the display, the concrete wall dissapears, revealing the metal rods. The metal rods serve the function of displaying art, with clips that can be used to hang art. The poles are organized into a variety of shapes to adjust to different sized pieces. This allows for a variety of art including drawings, paintings, three-dimensional models, quilts and many more. For a more rigid structure, panels can be placed inbetween rods. This design also allows for quick display and take down of art to adhere to pertaining weather. There is a small patch of grass behind the display to host small gatherings, such as classrooms, to teach art to children.

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LANDMARKS

Public Art Display Location

 

 

 

Public Art Display Dimensions VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Public Art Display Rendering Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 73


RESTROOMS The restrooms are located towards the south end of the site off the Thomas Street path. The location allows maintenance trucks to travel to the location for disposal of the waste from the vaults. Since these restrooms utilize vault toilets, this structure does not need sewage plumbing, and a drain field.

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LANDMARKS

Restrooms Location VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 75


RESTROOMS These restrooms provide one mens and one womens toilet, and utilize vault toilets which require enclosed vaults below each toilet. The restroom shelter is constructed of wood framing, wood siding, and field stone. The structure also features wood plank screen walls to add an extra level of privacy. These wood plank walls are similar to the walls used in the farmers stand. This design also features a full storage closet for additional materials such as fishing materials to be stored. The restrooms also feature high windows on the north and south sides to allow natural daylighting to enter the space, reducing the energy needed to light the structure during the day. Overall the restroom structure has a footprint of 25’ X 15’.

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LANDMARKS

FLOOR PLAN

Restrooms Rendering

East Elevation VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

North Elevation

South Elevation Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 77


EDGE Edges provide boundaries that seperate one region from another. They are often buildings, walls or any other objects that can be used to show a distinction of spaces.

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EDGE

Example Building Edge

Example Rocks VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Bench

Example Foliage Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 79


VILLAGE EDGES These are the edges identified within the village. The edges identified are mostly comprised of structures and foliage.

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EDGES

Village Edges VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 81


PARK EDGES Edges within the park help to seperate districts and identify paths. The edges within the park consist of foliage, benches, signage, and the art rocks.

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EDGES

Park Edges VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 83


FOLIAGE Foliage is a great way to provide edges for a site. They provide a great way to promote sustainability within a public space. The park should consist of a variety of foliage to teach kids of landscaping. Some example trees include red maple trees, american ash trees, and crab apple trees. Crab apple trees have been previously mentioned as being implemented into the village. The park would be a great way to introduce crab apple trees into the village. They should be placed by the farmers market to strengthen the idea of vegetaion, as well as other corners of the park. To eliminate maintenance, fruitless crab apple trees can be substituted for prevent clean-up of apples.

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EDGES

Park Foliage

Example Red Maple VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example American Ash Tree

Example Crab Apple Trees Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 85


WAYFINDING/ROCKS Signs can be a great way to act as edges. With the need for signs to be placed along paths, they immediately qualify as edges. Rocks are another great way to provide edges. The art rocks used in the “art in the park� district can have the dual function of providing art, as well as acting as edges within the park.

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EDGES

Sign/Rock Locations

Example Park Sign VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Painted Rocks Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 87


BENCHES Benches are another type of edge used within the park. The benches would be scattered throughout the park to provide comfortable seating for visitors. Bench design could be as simple as an ordinary park bench, or can take on a more abstract design to encourage creative thinking, and public art. Benches within a park also help to keep visitors in the site longer, and also give visitors a sense of the public park acting as a “home away from home�. With the park taking on this role in society, this space could act as a village within a village.

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EDGES

Bench Locations

Example Bench VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Bench

Example Abstract Bench Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 89


PROPOSED SITE This site plan shows the proposed site as all of the elements of city design come together. All aspects come together to create a strong public space where visitors and residents can feel a sense of identity and community involvement within the city.

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Proposed Site VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 91


NATURE WALK For future proposals, the site across the river can act as a nature walk, teaching kids about the environment. The nature walk would be a minimalistic way to teach kids of foliage, and the environment within north-west Michigan. The path would consist of simple dirt and gravel so that if the area floods, it would not be detrimental to the site, and minimal cleanup , if any, would be required. The nature walk could also include signs for tree identification. Paths for the nature walk could directly continue from the paths on the site allowing for a greater connection between the two functions.

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Nature Walk Location

Example Nature Walk VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Nature Walk

Example Nature Walk Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 93


DISC GOLF The field to the south of the site can provide space for a disc golf course. Although not full size, this space can fit a 9 hole course. This function would work well in this space, because it would require little to no upkeep, and would not be detrimental to the function of the space if flooded. A disc golf course would not be expensive, and little tree clearing would be needed along the river.

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Start Finish

Disc Golf Course Location

Example Disc Golf Course VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Disc Golf Course

Example Disc Golf Course Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 95


PUBLIC SPACE A future proposal for the park would be acquiring the adjacent lot to the east of the park. This space will provide a great public space that can be used for farmers markets, or any other public gathering space. By renovating this space into a public space, the connection between the downtown area of the village, and the park would have a stronger connection.

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Public Space Location

Example Public Space VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

Example Public Space

Example Public Space Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 97


PHASES Parks can be expensive, and aside from the smaller phases within the elements, the entire project can be phased. The first phase would consist of laying out paths, which in turn would create the districts for the site. This phase could also include construction of the bandshell and the playground. The next phase could include developing the districts as well as nodes within the park. The second phase could also include construction of the restrooms, public art display, and the boardwalk. The third phase would consist of implementing edges into the park as well as construction of the farmers stand and the additional pavilion. The final phase consists of the future proposals of the nature walk, the disc golf course and the public space adjacent to the site. By constructing the park in phases, this would lighten the cost for specific times, and allow the park to be constructed to the full potential of the site. The park would therfore create a strong public space that would provide an identity for the village as well as promote sustainable growth throughout the city.

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PHASE 1 Paths Districts Landmarks -Band Shell Playground

VILLAGE WITHIN A VILLAGE

PHASE 2 Nodes Landmarks -Restrooms -Public Art Display Boardwalk

PHASE 3 Edges Landmarks -Farmers Stand -Pavilion

PHASE 4 Future Proposals -Nature Walk -Disc Golf -Public Space

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 99


1G

VISTAS OF MECOSTA

Kristen Albert


VISTAS OF MECOSTA vis¡ta: a pleasing view, especially one seen through a long, narrow opening.

to create a park with maximum visability with hopes of bringing pleasant views and optimal levels of safety. visibility of park will also offer an invitation to the community to come together for activities and entertainment.

1.G.2 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


POWER OF

+

10

places thrive when users have a range of reasons (10+) to be art in the park 1 community garden 2 cookout/picnic 3 farmers market 4 fishing 5 homework (wifi) 6 music/entertainment 7 playground 8 river walk/sight seeing 9 sit & relax 10

Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.3


CONCEPT When entering or leaving the city of Mecosta, there are two main vantage points when approaching Bromley Park. Seen in the image on the right, the eyes represent the main views, or vistas, looking onto the park. The use of this focal point made a grid to form the main paths creating a space for visitors to walk and many other spaces to enjoy a nice day at the park. As seen throughout ‘Vistas of Mecosta’, the grid also places important features such as the band shell, picnic spaces and gardens between the paths creating many different views for visitors to explore.

1.G.4 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.5


SITE PLAN

LEGEND Important Surrounding Buildings Wetlands Bromley Park 1.G.6 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.7


PARKING Added parking to Bromley Park is a key feature that will help maintain a safe area for people to park their cars and enjoy their day at the park. There will be no worry about having to park on the street or in other parking lots throughout the city during events. This creates many more parking spaces for all visitors and community members in Mecosta.

1.G.8 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.9


BAND SHELL The band shells primary design is for music and entertainment. It can hold many events and is the primary focal point of the park. Constructed of heavy timber, it represents Mecosta’s history of logging. The large timber columns act as a strong form but given the columns instead of thick walls it has a range of visability to all areas of the park. In this area, the site has been bermed up to allow for raised seating and a larger view of the stage. Vistors can sit and enjoy ‘Music on the River’ or simply sit and relax enjoying a beautiful day in the park.

1.G.10 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.11


BAND SHELL

1.G.12 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


29'

'

39

Floor Plan

Site Section Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.13


BAND SHELL

1.G.14 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Side Elevation

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Contextual Rendering Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.15


BAND SHELL To the right is an exploded view of how the band shell is constructed. A legend is provided showing the different materials throughout the band shell and other buildings on the site. The stage is a poured concrete slab. Columns and trusses supporting the roof of the band shell are set in the ground placed in each corner are a heavy timber connecting todays Mecosta back to the past. Columns between the supports are acting aesthetically to again bring out Mecosta’s past in the logging industry. Walls around these columns constructed with stone, act as an accoustical barrier which will bounce sound out of the band shell out into the audience. The raised seating also acts as a trap for sound coming out.

LEGEND Asphalt Shingles Heavy Timber Stone Concrete Slab

1.G.16 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Exploded View Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.17


RIVER WALK The river walk was defined with the views earlier discussed when looking at the park. The proposed idea is to extend the parks property across the river allowing for an easy accessed path continuing to the youth center. The many paths throughout this space act as a nature trail for kids to explore and learn about their surrounding environment while giving them the option to stay outside and enjoy the fresh air. The paths across the river will simply be defined by using woodchips to maintain a natural feeling throughout the space. Railings aligning the river, bridges and overlooks are constructed with heavy timber to carry the same materials throughout the park. Dimensional lumber is used to construct the paths of the bridges.

LEGEND Dimensional Lumber Heavy Timber Woodchips 1.G.18 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


4' Railing Detail

Path to Youth

VIstas of Mecosta

Center

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.19


RESTORED WETLANDS Most of Bromley Park is considered to be a wetland area. A proposed idea is to restore the wetlands to a more natural scene where construction is not allowed. There are many grants available to restore this area and there is very little work for this process. The ‘5 Star Restoration’ grant is a partnership between multiple national associations providing $10,000 to $40,000 grants to support community-based wetland restoration projects through education, outreach and training activities. Key project elements include, on-the-ground restoration restoring ecological habitats and environmental education with participating community members and a great way for kids to interact and learn during school.

1.G.20 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.21


RESTORED WETLAND GRANTS 5 Star Restoration A partnership between multiple national associations providing $10,000 to $40,000 grants to support community-based wetland restoration projects through education, outreach and training activities. Key Projects Elements: -On-the-Ground Restoration (ecological habitat restoration) -Environmental Education (community participation, school cirriculum interaction)

Ferris State University Muskegon River Watershed Assembly -Biology professor and students dedicated time to planting trees in Big Rapids protecting future biological integrity and water quality by increasing forest cover. -The MWRA is dedicated to the preservation, protection, restoration and sustainable use of the Muskegon River through educational, scientific and conservation initiatives.

1.G.22 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.23


FISHING

Fishing docks are added at both ends of the park to accomodate multiple areas for kids to fish together or with their parents. They offer two differents views to the river keeping kids entertained for hours.

1.G.24 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.25


RESTROOMS Restrooms have been added to the park. Since there is no area for a septic system, pit toilets have been found to be an easy alternative. They use little to no water acting as a cleaner outhouse.

1.G.26 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.27


RESTROOMS Materials on this shelter follow the same materials throughout the park, heavy timber and stone, seen in the elevations on the right. The pipes in the back act as a vent to keep the smell out. The gap between the roof and walls also act as a vent to allow for the smell to easily exit the shelter. Vaults are below the restrooms to collect waste. Between the two restrooms is a storage space for anything that needs to be stored at the park, such as fishing poles, decorations, etc. It is also easily lockable to keep unwanted people out.

LEGEND Asphalt Shingles Heavy Timber Stone Concrete Slab 1.G.28 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Side Elevation

Back Elevation

Side Elevation

6' - 8" 5' - 8"

15' - 10"

3' - 6"

Front Elevation

5' - 0" 7' - 8"

Floor Plan Vistas of Mecosta

6' - 6"

7' - 8"

22' - 0"

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.29


PLAYGROUND The existing playground is proposed to be moved to its new site. All equipment will be kept the same with the idea of eventually gaining new equipment for the future.

1.G.30 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.31


CARTERS KIDS An idea for a new playground for Bromley Park would be to contact the Carter’s Kids Foundation. They are a non-profit organization dedicated to creating and promoting awareness of fitness and self-esteem for America’s youth seeking to build better playgrounds, building a better community. The community raises funds for the park inviting Carter Oosterhouse and his crew to the area in which they provide all services and work with the community to design the playground.

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Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.33


COMMUNITY GARDEN The idea of the community garden is to bring community members together to grow anything from vegetables to flowers. This garden has many different paths through it connecting the outside paths into the park. Visitors entering from the east side will have to walk through the gardens to gain access into the park. Planter boxes and trellises will be provided to grow any type of plant or food in this space. There will also be benches located along these paths for anyone to sit and relax in the garden area.

1.G.34 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.35


PICNIC

The picnic area serves as more than just a place to eat. There are many places in this area for kids to relax or do homework if they do not want to go home. Students can also come to the area to do their homework. Two areas have been established for such uses. One view overlooking the river and another on the grass with a covered area near blocking visitors from inclimate weather or the sun.

1.G.36 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.37


PICNIC

The covered picnic area serves as another shelter in the park giving the space multiple uses. Materials on this shelter are the same used throughout the park. A concrete slab to ground the building, structured by heavy timber to maintain the same theme throughout.

LEGEND Asphalt Shingles Heavy Timber Concrete Slab 1.G.38 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Front Elevation

Side Elevation

Contextual Rendering Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.39


FREE SPACE The extra space in the park is left for many different uses or for future development to a new idea. There is room to set up tents allowing for a farmers market within the community or a space for art in the park events. It can also serve as an area for kids and dogs to run around and play. This space allows for a vast amount of flexability for anyone in the community to use.

1.G.40 | Ferris State University: Architecture and Sustainability


Vistas of Mecosta

Small Town Studio: Bromley Park Conceptual Plan | 1.G.41



Bromley Park Concptual Plan