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Läromedlet består av fyra komponenter som tillsammans förser eleven och läraren med allt som behövs för att klara kursen: • Elevbok med texter, övningar och ”Model Texts”-resursbank

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• Elevwebb med extra övningar och resurser, fler Model Texts, ljudfiler, ordlistor med uttal m.m.

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• Lärarwebb med ytterligare övningsmaterial, prov, facit, ljudfiler, handledning, länkar m.m.

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• Lärar-cd med ljudfiler till texter och hörövningar

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linda gustafsson uno wivast

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points 3

Viewpoints 3 är ett läromedel i engelska avsett för steg 7 på gymnasiet och komvux.

points 3

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linda gustafsson uno wivast

linda gustafsson uno wivast

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Eller för dig som vill arbeta helt digitalt: • Interaktiv elevbok (kombinerad elevbok/elevwebb) 40-68661-9 • Interaktiv lärarbok (kombinerad elevbok/elevwebb/ lärarwebb) 40-68662-6 Linda Gustafsson är lärare i engelska, svenska och italienska på Malmö Latinskola. Hon älskar engelska deckare och afternoon tea.

40685711_VP3_Omslag.indd Alla sidor

Uno Wivast är gymnasielärare i engelska och svenska på Malmö Borgarskola. Kulturen och myterna i den amerikanska filmen är ett stort intresse för honom.

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CONTENTS VISIONS 1. A President’s Address ................................................. 8 from First Inaugural Address by President Barack Obama Language: Words from the text, Collocation, Open cloze Produce and develop: Introduction to a speech Writing: Argumentative speech, Investigative essay

2. Digesting Mars ................................................................ 20 from Packing for Mars by Mary Roach Language: Words from the text, Three in one out, The passive voice Produce and develop: Video application Writing: Scientific article, Investigative essay

3. The Unpredictable Future ...................................... 34 from Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley Language: Words from the text, Word formation, Multiple-choice cloze Produce and develop: Podcast Writing: Review, Literary analysis

ALONG THE ROAD

3. A New Landscape ...........................................................74 from Journey to the Interior by Margaret Atwood Language: Words from the text, Adjectives used as nouns, Adjectives ending in -ic or -ical Produce and develop: Radio discussion Writing: Essay, Reportage

ILLUSIONS 1. Born in Fire...................................................................82 from The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni Language: Words from the text, Word formation, Multiple-choice cloze Produce and develop: Presentation Writing: Argumentative essay, Review

2. The Lying Truth ................................................................. 94 from The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty by Dan Ariely Language: Words from the text, Error spotting, Open cloze Produce and develop: Voice diary Writing: Argumentative speech, Argumentative article

1. An Inevitable Meeting................................................ 44 from Troll Bridge by Neil Gaiman Language: Words from the text, Phrasal verbs, Odd one out Produce and develop: Book trailer Writing: Literary analysis, Investigative essay

2. Who Made Your T-shirt? ........................................... 60

3. What Have You Done Since High School? ..................................... 106 from The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams Language: Words from the text, Collocation, Reconstruction Produce and develop: Drama scene Writing: Reportage, Application

from The Travels of a T-shirt in the Global Economy by Pietra Rivoli Language: Words from the text, Verbs from adjectives, Adjectives from verbs Produce and develop: Online news reportage Writing: Reportage, Speech

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CONFINEMENT 1. The African Girl ............................................................... 122

2. The Arrow of Time ........................................................ 178

from Little Bee by Chris Cleave

from A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking

Language: Words from the text, Formal and informal language, Reconstruction Produce and develop: TV interview Writing: Formal and informal letter, Argumentative article

Language: Words from the text, Antonyms with prefixes, Direct and indirect speech Produce and develop: Instructional video Writing: Scientific article, Outline summary

3. Hindsight ............................................................................ 188 2. Slaves to Chocolate .................................................. 136 from West African Cocoa Farmers Use Child Slave Labor by Victoria Lambert Language: Words from the text, Collocation, Formal and informal language Produce and develop: Video reportage Writing: Reportage, Essay

3. Trapped in the Past .................................................... 146 from After Long Absence by Janette Turner Hospital Language: Words from the text, Antonyms and synonyms, Multiple-choice cloze Produce and develop: Comment and analysis Writing: Literary analysis, Application

BACK TO THE FUTURE

from The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Language: Words from the text, Sentence transformation, Open cloze Produce and develop: Poem presentation Writing: Investigative essay, Argumentative essay

MODEL TEXTS * Argumentative speech........................................................ 196 Investigative essay ............................................................... 198 Literary analysis ..................................................................... 200 Review .......................................................................................... 202 Scientific article...................................................................... 204 Appendix 1: Literary terms and rhetorical devices......................................................................................... 206 Appendix 2: Working with sources ............................. 207 * Note: More model texts are available on the accompanying student/teacher websites

1. Reproduction .................................................................. 162 from Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Language: Words from the text, Three in one out, Effective sentences Produce and develop: Recorded discussion Writing: Argumentative essay, Investigative essay

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view

points VISIONS

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Before reading • Do you know of any great public speaker(s)? Why are they so great? What do you remember about their speeches? • What makes a good speech? Make a list of five key points! • If you were asked to give a speech to the Swedish parliament what issues would you bring up?

A President’s Address In November 2008 Barack Hussein Obama won the United States presidential election to become the country’s first African American president. The following text is Obama’s inaugural speech given on 21 January 2009 in Washington DC.

inaugural first, opening humbled made to feel less important bestow formal give sacrifice giving up something to benefit others

My fellow citizens: I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you’ve bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors.

bear (bore, borne) endure, tolerate

I thank President Bush for his service to our nation as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

transition process of change

ancestor family member who lived a long time ago

rising tides of increases in amidst literary in the middle of raging forceful, violent

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often, the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because we, the people, have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebears and true to our founding documents.

high office leading position, top job

So it has been; so it must be with this generation of Americans.

far-reaching having a great effect

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly, our schools fail too many – and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

hatred strong dislike

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ideals ideas about what is right forebears formal ancestors founding documents here historical papers relating to the creation of the US in the midst of formal in the middle of

greed wanting more than you need age here period of history, era shed (shed, shed) get rid of shutter AmE close (a business) adversary enemy, opponent

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subject to dependent on, informed by sap weaken nagging persistent and worrying decline fall, weakening inevitable impossible to avoid sights here ambitions, expectations span of time period of time unity here agreement discord formal disagreement proclaim say something publicly petty unimportant grievance complaint recriminations criticizing someone who has criticized you dogma belief, principle strangle here stop something developing Scripture the Bible reaffirm state something again enduring lasting precious valuable pursue try to achieve settle for accept faint-hearted not brave leisure free time doer an active person who achieves things rugged literary difficult worldly possessions everything you own toil literary work hard sweatshop factory with bad working conditions time and again often, repeatedly raw very sore, painful faction minority group prosperous rich and successful

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable, but no less profound, is a sapping of confidence across our land; a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, that the next generation must lower its sights. Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this America: They will be met. On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over confl ict and discord. On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas that for far too long have strangled our politics. We remain a young nation. But in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. In reaffirming the greatness of our nation we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted, for those that prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things – some celebrated, but more often men and women obscure in their labor – who have carried us up the long rugged path towards prosperity and freedom. For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life. For us, they toiled in sweatshops, and settled the West, endured the lash of the whip, and plowed the hard earth. For us, they fought and died in places like Concord and Gettysburg, Normandy and Khe Sanh. Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions, greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction. This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less

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inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week, or last month, or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions – that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America. For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of our economy calls for action, bold and swift. And we will act, not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We’ll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do. […]

inventive creative goods objects to be sold undiminished not reduced stand pat AmE remain unchanged remake make again, in a different way foundation here basis, structure electric grid network for distributing electricity restore bring back, re-establish wield use harness control and make use of soil part of the earth where plants grow common here general, shared Founding Fathers the people who made the US a country peril literary danger, risk draft write

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils that we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man – a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake.

charter official document describing laws and rights

And so, to all the other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born, know that America is a friend of each nation, and every man, woman and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity. And we are ready to lead once more.

sturdy strong

Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with the sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint. We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort, even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former

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expedience formal doing what is easy rather than morally right sake purpose, benefit peoples nations grand large, impressive face down confront, stand up to

alliance union, pact between countries conviction belief entitle someone to give someone the right to emanate from formal come from justness fairness cause here aim, principle temper formal make milder, less extreme humility behaving in a humble way legacy something that exists as a result of a past event/ action forge develop, create

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foe literary enemy roll back AmE reduce specter AmE sp. an unpleasant possibility waver hesitate, weaken advance here try to reach patchwork something made up of many different parts heritage inheritance, tradition swill liquid waste humanity sympathy towards other people mutual shared globe literary the world sow (sowed, sown) here create, introduce judge form an opinion about destroy ruin, tear down

foes, we’ll work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense. And for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken – you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you. For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace. To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow confl ict, or blame their society’s ills on the West, know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy.

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To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history, but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

deceit dishonesty, tricking people silence here make quiet dissent strong disagreement with general opinion

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to the suffering outside our borders, nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

extend formal offer

As we consider the role that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who at this very hour patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages.

plenty formal large quantities of food

We honor them not only because they are the guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service – a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet at this moment, a moment that will define a generation, it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all. For as much as government can do, and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child that finally decides our fate. Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends – honesty and hard work, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism – these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history.

willing agreeable, enthusiastic unclench here open pledge promise flourish develop and be successful flow run freely nourish feed

indifference lack of interest/ sympathy suffering pain consume use up without regard to without considering gratitude feeling thankful Arlington a military cemetery in the US guardian person who guards something embody be a symbol of service here duty inhabit literary live in determination pursuing a goal without giving up rely upon need levee a wall built to stop a river flooding selflessness the opposite of being selfish nurture take care of fair play honest behaviour, fairness grudgingly not willingly

What is demanded, then, is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility – a recognition on the part of every American that we have duties to ourselves, our nation and the world; duties that we do not grudgingly accept, but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so

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satisfying pleasing citizenship belonging to a country destiny fate creed formal a set of beliefs magnificent very impressive/ beautiful mall promenade, public walkway remembrance formal memory of an event huddle sit tight shores here edge outcome final result virtue good personal qualities hardship pain, suffering brave here endure, face up to grace love and kindness (of God)

satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character than giving our all to a difficult task. This is the price and the promise of citizenship. This is the source of our confidence – the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny. This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed, why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall; and why a man whose father less than 60 years ago might not have been served in a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath. So let us mark this day with remembrance of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At the moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words to be read to the people: “Let it be told to the future world ... that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive ... that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].”

America: In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fi xed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations. Thank you. God bless you. And God bless the United States of America. From President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Address, 21 January 2009, Washington, D.C.

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Analyse and interpret Examine the text with the help of the following questions. Make sure to use examples and quotes from the text to support your answers. See page 206 for explanations of literary terms and rhetorical devices. 1. How do you think this speech would be different if it were given by a Swedish politician? Come up with at least three points, and support your ideas with arguments. 2. Look at this quote from the third paragraph of the speech (page 9), which contains several examples of metaphorical language: “The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often, the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms.” Explain what the underlined expressions actually mean. Why do you think these kinds of metaphors are used? 3. In paragraph five (page 9) you can read “Our nation is at war ... Our economy is badly weakened ... Our health care is too costly ...”. Which rhetorical device is used in this passage: alliteration, anaphora or antithesis? What impact does the use of this device have on the speaker’s message? 4. Paragraph eight (page 10) contains the phrases “hope over fear” and “unity of purpose over conflict and discord”. Is alliteration, anaphora or antithesis used here? What does the use of this device add to the form and message? 5. In the eighth paragraph, Obama also uses the phrases “the time has come ... The time has come ...” and “all are equal, all are free, and all deserve ...”. Which rhetorical device – alliteration, anaphora or antithesis – is being used here, and why? 6. What historical events does Obama refer to in the tenth paragraph (page 10)? Why does he bring up these events in American history? 7. What does Obama say about America’s “patchwork heritage”? 8. Later on in his speech Obama says: “And yet at this moment, a moment that will define a generation, it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.” What “spirit” is Obama talking about? 9. At the end of the speech the following quote is given: “Let it be told to the future world ... that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive ... that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].” Search the Internet and find out who Obama is quoting. Why has he chosen this particular quote?

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Working with language Words from the text a) Complete sentences 1–10 with a word from the box. You may need to change the form of some words in order to make them fit into the sentences. Note: Not all the words will be used.

grievance

decline

emanate

grudgingly

forge

peril

harness

mutual

nurture

recriminations

legacy

dissent

transition

precious

adversary

outcome

1. In the 2012 election, Obama went on to beat one of his toughest ever political 2. The post-war era was a major period of

in the western world.

3. Verbal abuse and

have alienated ethnic groups in this neighbourhood.

4. The public’s main

was the heavy cutbacks in health care.

5. When scientists succeeded in

nuclear power nobody considered the effects.

6. It is hard for us to imagine the many

faced by people in war-torn countries.

7. The current situation of riots and demonstrations unwillingness to lower university fees. 8. After the firm went bankrupt she had to

from the government’s

a new career in another industry.

9. A small group of political activists in the country has been charged with 10. Growing up, he was

.

.

not only by his parents but also by his siblings.

b) In each of the following ten sentences from the text there is a word in bold. Without looking at the word list, write an explanation of this word in English, including what type of word it is (noun, verb, adjective or adverb). Then write a new sentence with the same word. 1. Less measurable, but no less profound, is a sapping of confidence across our land. 2. Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. 3. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions, greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

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4. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history. 5. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils that we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man – a charter expanded by the blood of generations. 6. And so, to all the other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born, know that America is a friend of each nation, and every man, woman and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity. 7. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history. 8. We’ll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. 9. Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with the sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. 10. To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow.

Collocation A collocation is two or more words that are regularly used together. In the sentence She has a burning ambition to become president the adjective burning collocates with the noun ambition. On the other hand, it would not sound natural for a native speaker to say, for example, a strong ambition.

a) Complete sentences 1–10 below with one of the words in the box, making sure it collocates with the word in bold.

secret

formidable

rising

growing

profound

golden

sincere

worthy

smooth

considerable

1. In an interview he said that he was happy to be contributing to such a 2. Do most people make a 3. Aid organizations face the 4. Security was extremely tight for the 5. There is a

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cause.

transition from school to working life? challenge of getting food to very remote areas. talks.

fear that increased global warming will lead to a rise in natural disasters.

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6. Now that the dictator has been toppled people nurture a hope of the course of the next decade. 7. I see this as a 8. She has a

prosperity over

opportunity to invest in real estate. belief in her ability to shape her own future.

9. They expressed their 10. He has indicated that he has housing project.

gratitude to those who had helped them refurbish the house. doubts about the viability of the planned downtown

b) Now write ten new sentences using the collocations in part (a).

Open cloze Read the following text and fill in each gap with one appropriate word, in the correct form. The first one is done for you as an example. A (1) great many people in this world are working hard to pursue their ambitions. To some be leaving school with high grades or climbing Mount Everest, but to people this (2) Laura Andersen from Milwaukee, USA the word ‘ambition’ has become a lifelong struggle to mitigate poverty and suffering in (3) parts of the world. Even as a teenager Laura was appalled by the injustices which so clearly divided her own country starting up a local from developing countries, and in high school she succeeded (4) fundraising group called Pupils Against Poverty. In the space of just two years the group raised an astonishing $250,000 which, (5) other things, (6) used to build a hospital in Uganda. A few years later in the 1990s, when antiretroviral drugs appeared (7) the market, on the pharmaceutical industry to make these drugs she started a group that put (8) (9) in developing countries at a lower price. She claimed that this would “save the lives of millions of HIV-positive men, women and children”. Even if Laura Andersen didn’t quite manage to do what she set out to do, she and her cause earned a huge (10) of media attention, (11) proved to be crucial in her next fundraising campaign. In 1999 Laura Andersen founded the aid organization Access Literacy, the aim of (12) was to give poor girls in developing countries access to schooling. The organization managed to involve a number of large corporations and between 1999 and 2012 it raised $12 billion. This enormous contribution has (13) it possible for a large (14) of girls in several African countries to enhance (15) possibilities for a better life.

Translation Translate the following text (continuing on the opposite page) into English. You will find some of the translations in the word list, but you might also need a dictionary. USA:s förste president hette George Washington. Han föddes den 22 februari 1732 i Virginia i en välbärgad familj som ägde tobaksplantager och slavar. Under det amerikanska frihetskriget, som pågick mellan 1774 och 1783, blev Washington utnämnd till överbefälhavare över armén.

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Segern över engelsmännen var dock inte självklar eftersom de engelska styrkorna var större, vilket medförde att Washington tvingades till ett utdraget gerillakrig. Emellertid besegrades engelsmännen till slut. Washington tillträdde som USA:s förste president 1789 och satt i två mandatperioder. Den 14 december 1799 avled Washington i sviterna av en halsinfektion.

Produce and develop ”I stand before you today ...” Imagine you are the newly elected president or prime minister of a country and you are expected to hold an inaugural speech. Write a short introduction (approximately 100 words) to your speech. Then follow these five steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Record your introduction using a smartphone or other electronic device. Listen to the recording. Get into pairs and listen to each other’s recordings. Work together and discuss possible improvements to your introductions. Record your improved introduction and share your results.

For an example of a speech see pages 196–197.

Writing Choose one of the following writing tasks. 1. Imagine you have been asked to give a speech to the Swedish parliament about the challenges young people face in contemporary society. Argue for one key measure that you think the government should take in order to improve young people’s prospects on the job market. Make sure to include a thesis, two or three arguments and at least one counter-argument. You should also use one or two rhetorical devices (see page 206 for some examples). Write a maximum of 500 words. Target audience: Politicians / Register: Formal For an example of an argumentative speech see pages 196–197.

2. In your school there has been a debate on post-World War II American presidents and their impact on American society and the world as a whole. Now, in your English class, you have been asked to write an investigative essay on the topic. Choose two post-World War II American presidents and, focusing on one or two specific fields, compare the impact they have had on American society and the world as a whole. Use appropriate sources – printed, digital or both – and make sure you include correct and appropriate source information (see page 207 for more on working with sources). Your essay should be no longer than 800 words. Target readers: Students – young adults and adults / Register: Formal For an example of an investigative essay see pages 198–199.

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Läromedlet består av fyra komponenter som tillsammans förser eleven och läraren med allt som behövs för att klara kursen: • Elevbok med texter, övningar och ”Model Texts”-resursbank

40-68571-1

• Elevwebb med extra övningar och resurser, fler Model Texts, ljudfiler, ordlistor med uttal m.m.

40-68717-3

• Lärarwebb med ytterligare övningsmaterial, prov, facit, ljudfiler, handledning, länkar m.m.

40-68719-7

• Lärar-cd med ljudfiler till texter och hörövningar

40-68716-6

linda gustafsson uno wivast

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points 3

Viewpoints 3 är ett läromedel i engelska avsett för steg 7 på gymnasiet och komvux.

points 3

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linda gustafsson uno wivast

linda gustafsson uno wivast

points 3

Eller för dig som vill arbeta helt digitalt: • Interaktiv elevbok (kombinerad elevbok/elevwebb) 40-68661-9 • Interaktiv lärarbok (kombinerad elevbok/elevwebb/ lärarwebb) 40-68662-6 Linda Gustafsson är lärare i engelska, svenska och italienska på Malmö Latinskola. Hon älskar engelska deckare och afternoon tea.

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Uno Wivast är gymnasielärare i engelska och svenska på Malmö Borgarskola. Kulturen och myterna i den amerikanska filmen är ett stort intresse för honom.

2014-06-24 08:56

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